Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Warplanes of the Second World War preserved in the USA, Fighters, Bombers and Patrol Aircraft

Warplanes of the Second World War preserved in the United States of America,

Fighters, Bombers and Patrol Aircraft

The aim of this website is to locate, identify and document Warplanes from the Second World War preserved in the USA.  Many contributors have assisted in the hunt for these aircraft to provide and update the data on this website.  Photos are as credited.  Any errors found here are by the author, and any additions, corrections or amendments to this list of Warplane Survivors of the Second World War in the United States of America would be most welcome and may be e-mailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com.

Data current to 18 Nov 2018.

Fighters, Bombers and Patrol Aircraft of the Second World War preserved in the USA by aircraft type, serial number, registration number and location:

 (National Museum of Naval Aviation Photo)

Aichi B7A2 Ryusei (Grace), (Serial No. 2 Sho-816), No. 47, captured and test flown post-war by the Allied Technical Air Intelligence Unit, South-East Asia (ATAIU-SEA).  It was assigned the foreign equipment number FE-1204, later T2-1204.  This aircraft is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

 (Eric Salard Photo)

Aichi M6A1 Seiran (Clear Sky Storm), Gokoku c/n1600228, Reg. No. 47.  This aircraft is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

 (Luftwaffe Photo)

Arado Ar 196A-5 (Wk. Nr. 623 167), coded PO+HG, later coded T3+BH of Bordfl Gr 196, which served aboard the German cruiser Prinz Eugen, which became a War Pirze in 1945, Philadelphia Navy Yard.  This aircraft is in storage with the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

Arado Ar 196 A-5 (Wk. Nr. 623 183).  Also from the German cruiser Prinz Eugen, currently with the National Museum of Naval Aviation (NMNA), at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.   The upper fuselage and canopy were damaged during transit, and it remained in storage awaiting restoration. In December 2012, it was packed into containers and shipped to Nordholz, Germany. Restoration began in August 2013, in time for that city's celebration for 100 years of German naval aviation. The plane, on long term loan from the National Naval Aviation Museum, will eventually be displayed at the Naval Air Wing 3 (Marinefliegergeschwader 3) headquarters at Nordholz Naval Airbase.

 (Kogo Photo)

Arado Ar 234B-2 Blitz (Lightning), (Wk. Nr. 140312), coded F1+GS, USA 50, 505, Reg. No. 27, restored coded as F1+GS.  This aircraft was one of nine Ar 234s surrendered to British forces at Sola Airfield near Stavanger, Norway.  The aircraft had been operating with 9. Staffel III./Kampfgeschwader 76 (later reorganised as Einsatzstaffel) during the final weeks of the war, having operated previously with the 8th squadron, carrying the full-four-character Geschwaderkennungmilitary code of "F1+GS" on the fuselage sides, with the wing code of "F1" painted on in a much reduced size for "low-visibility" requirements.  This aircraft and three others were collected by the "Watson's Whizzers" of the USAAF to be shipped back to the United States for flight testing.  The aircraft was flown from Sola to Cherbourg on 24 June 1945 where it joined 34 other advanced German aircraft shipped back to the U.S. aboard the British aircraft carrier HMS Reaper, arriving at Newark, New Jersey on 28 July.  Upon arrival two of the Ar 234s were reassembled (including 140312) and flown by USAAF pilots to Freeman Field, Indiana for testing and evaluation.  This aircraft was assigned the foreign equipment number FE-1010, later T2-1010.  After receiving new engines, radio and oxygen equipment, 140312 was transferred to Wright Field near Dayton, Ohio and delivered to the Accelerated Service Test Maintenance Squadron (ASTMS) of the Flight Test Division in July 1946.  Flight testing was completed on 16 October 1946 though the aircraft remained at Wright Field until 1947.  It was then stored until transferred to the Smithsonian Institution.  Restoration was completed in 1989.  This aircraft is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

 (Creanium Photo)

Bachem Ba 349B-1 Natter (Snake), (Wk. Nr. unknown).  This is the only surviving original Ba 349, likely captured by US forces at St. Leonhard im Pitztal, Austria in May 1945.  This aircraft was assigned the foreign equipment number FE-1, later T2-1. The Natter is of the experimental type as launched from the steel tower and is painted to look like an M17.  It is currently in storage awaiting restoration.  This aircraft is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

Bell P-39 Airacobras and Bell P-63 Kingcobras are listed on a separate page on this web site.

 (Greg Goebel Photo)

Bell XP-59A Airacomet (Serial No. 42-108784), National Air & Space Museum, Washington, D.C.

 (USAF Photo)

Bell YP-59A Airacomet (Serial No. 42-108777), being restored to flying condition with General Electric J31 engines by Planes of Fame Museum, Chino, California.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Bell P-59A Airacomet (Serial No. 44-22614), c/n 27-22, March Field Air Museum, Riverside, California.

 (NMUSAF Photo)

Bell P-59B Airacomet (Serial No. 44-74936), painted as (Serial No. 44-22650), C/N 27-58.  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

Bell P-59B Airacomet (Serial No. 44-22633), Edwards AFB, California.

Bell P-59B Airacomet (Serial No. 44-22656), Pioneer Village, Minden, Nebraska.

 (Luftwaffe Photo)

Blohm & Voss Bv 155B, ca April 1945.

Blohm & Voss Bv 155B-V3 (Wk. Nr. unknown), captured by the RAF in May 1945 and forwarded to the USAAF.  This aircraft was assigned the foreign equipment number FE-505, later T2-505.  This aircraft is in storage in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

Boeing B-17 Flying Fortresses are listed on a separate page on this website.

Boeing B-29 Super Fortress are listed on a separate page on this website.

  (NMNA Photo)

Brewster SB2A-4 Buccaneer (Serial No. 462-860).  National Museum of Naval Aviation, Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

(Brewster SB2A-4 Buccaneer (Serial No. unknown), in storage with the Pima Air & Space Museum, Tucson, Arizona.

 (Dsdugan photo)

Bristol 156 Beaufighter Mk. 1C (Serial No. A19-43), with parts from (Serial No. KV912).  A19-43 has been on public display at the National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio since October 2006.  Although flown in combat in the south-west Pacific by 31 Squadron, Royal Australian Air Force, A19-43 is painted as (Serial No. T5049), "Night Mare", a USAAF Beaufighter flown by Capt. Harold Augspurger, commander of the 415th Night Fighter Squadron, who shot down a Heinkel He 111 carrying German staff officers in September 1944.  The Beaufighter was recovered from a dump at Nhill, Australia, in 1971, where it had been abandoned in 1947.  It was acquired by the USAF Museum in 1988.  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

Consolidated PBY Catalinas are listed on a separate page on this web site.

 (NMNA Photo)

Consolidated PB2Y-5R Coronado (BuNo. 7099), c/n 57, (Reg. No. N69003 in Howard Hughes Photo).  National Museum of Naval Aviation, Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

 (NMNA Photo)

Consolidated PB4Y-2 Privateer (BuNo. 66304), 202, F.  National Museum of Naval Aviation, Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

Consolidated B-24 Liberators are listed on a separate page on this website.

 (NMUSAF Photo)

Curtiss P-36A Hawk (Serial No. 38-001), 69, c/n 12415.  This was the first P-36A to be delivered to the US Army Air Corps (USAAC), and is displayed in the markings of the P-36A flown by Lt Phil Rasmussen during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 Dec 1941.  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

Curtiss O-52 Owl (Serial No. 40-2746), Pima Air & Space Museum, Tucson, Arizona.

Curtiss P-40 Warhawks, Tomahawks and Kittyhawks preserved in the USA are listed on a separate page on this web site.

 (NMUSAF Photo)

Curtiss O-52 Owl (Serial No. 40-2763).  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

Curtiss O-52 Owl (Serial No. 40-2769), Yanks Air Museum, Chino, California.

 (Kogo Photo)

Curtiss SB2C-5 Helldiver (BuNo. 83589), Reg. No. NX92879, Commemorative Air Force (West Texas Wing), Graham, Texas.  Airworthy.

 (Mys 721tx Photo)

Curtiss SB2C-5 Helldiver (BuNo. 83479), 212.  Built at Columbus, Ohio, this aircraft rolled off the assembly line in May 1945.  BuNo. 83479 flew with VB92 on the USS Lexington in the western pacific.  This aircraft is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

Curtiss A-25A Shrike/SB2C-1A Helldiver (BuNo. 75552), being restored for a private owner, Cameron Park, California.
Curtiss A-25A Shrike/SB2C-1A Helldiver (BuNo. 76805), being restored for the National Museum of the USAF, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, Ohio.

Curtiss SB2C-3 Helldiver (BuNo. 19075), being restored for the Yanks Air Museum, Chino, California.

Curtiss SB2C-4 Helldiver (BuNo. 19866), being restored for the National Museum of Naval Aviation, NAS Pensacola, Florida.

    Curtiss SB2C-5 Helldiver (BuNo. 83393), begin restored for Fagen Fighters and Warhawks, Granite Falls, Minnsota.

     (Jnc Photo)

    de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito FB Mk. 26 (Serial No. KA114), built by de Havilland Canada, brought on strength 22 Feb 1944. Struck off strength 13 April 1948.  Airworthy.

    de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito PR Mk. VI (Serial No. PZ474), Lewis Air Legends, San Antonio, Texas.  Being restored to airworhty status.

      (NMUSAF Photo)

    de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito B Mk. 35 (Serial No. RS709, ex-G-MOSI, ex-G-ASKA, painted as USAAF F-8 (Serial No. NS519), Reg. No. N9797.  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

     (Bzuk Photo)

    de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito B Mk. 35 (Serial No. RS712), Kermit Weeks, on loan to the EAA Aviation Museum, Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

    de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito Mk. 35 (Serial No. TH998),  3 CAACU.  This aircraft is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

     (Election1960)

    de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito T Mk. TIII (Serial No. TV959), painted as (Serial No. NS838), Flying Heritage and Combat Armor Museum, Everett, Washington.  Airworthy.

     (Nick-D Photo)

    Dornier Do-335A-02 Pfeil (Arrow) (Werknummer 240102), coded VG+PH.  FE-1012.  This aircraft was assigned factory radio code registration, or Stammkennzeichen, of VG+PH.  The aircraft was assembled at the Dornier plant in Oberpfaffenhofen, Bavaria on 16 April 1945.  It was captured by Allied forces at the plant on 22 April 1945.  VG+PH was one of two Do 335s to be shipped to the United States aboard the Royal Navy escort carrier HMS Reaper, along with other captured German aircraft, to be used for testing and evaluation under a USAAF program called "Operation Sea Horse".  VG+PH went to the Navy for evaluation and was sent to the Test and Evaluation Center, Patuxent River Naval Air Station, Maryland.  Following testing from 1945 to 1948, the aircraft was placed in storage at Norfolk, until donated to the Smithsonian in 1961.   In October 1974, VG+PH was returned to the Dornier plant in Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany for a complete restoration.  In 1975, the aircraft was restored by Dornier employees, many of whom had worked on the airplane originally.  They were amazed that the explosive charges built into the aircraft to blow off the dorsal fin and rear propeller prior to pilot ejection were still installed and active 30 years later.  The aircraft was on display in the Deutsches Museum in Munich until 1986 when it was returned to the Smithsonian.  This aircraft is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

     (NMUSAF Photo)

    Douglas O-38F, biplane (Serial No. 33-0324), C/N 1117.  Suspended from the ceiling.  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

     (NMUSAF Photo)

    Douglas O-46A (Serial No. 35-179), C/N 1441.  Suspended from the ceiling.  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

    Douglas B-18 Bolo (Serial No. 36-446), 81, 50R, currently on the Kohala Mountains, Hawaii.  This aircraft crash-landed due to engine failure on 25 Feb 1941.  The crew was rescued and the aircraft was abandoned; it remains in a gulch on private land.  The Air Force later recovered the nose turret for (Serial No. 37-029) and the dorsal turret for (Serial No. 37-469).  There have been plans to recover the aircraft for the Pacific Air Museum in Honolulu, Hawaii.

     (Alexander Migl Photo)

    Douglas B-18 Bolo (Serial No. 37-029), Castle Air Museum, Atwater, California.

     (NMUSAF Photo)

    Douglas B-18A Bolo (Serial No. 37-0469), R33, c/n 2469, National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

     (Author Photo)

    Douglas B-18A Bolo (Serial No. 39-025), painted as (Serial No. 39-52), Wing Over the Rockies Air and Space Museum, Denver, Colorado.

     (Articseahorse Photo)

    Douglas B-18B Bolo (Serial No. 37-505), McChord Air Museum, McChord AFB, Washington.

     (aeroprints.com Photo)

    Douglas B-18B Bolo (Serial No. 38-593), Pima Air and Space Museum, Tucson, Arizona.

    Douglas A-20G Havoc (Serial No. 43-21709), Lewis Air Legends, San Antonio, Texas.  Airworthy.

     (NMUSAF Photo)

    Douglas A-20G Havoc (Serial No. 43-22200), c/n 21847, painted as (Serial No. 43-21475), "Little Joe", Reg. No. NL63004, National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

    Douglas A-20G Havoc (Serial No. 43-9436), "Big Nig", being retored for the Pima Air and Space Museum, Tucson, Arizona.

    Douglas A-20G Havoc (Serial No. 43-21627), being retored for the Pima Air and Space Museum, Tucson, Arizona.

    Douglas A-20G Havoc (Serial No. 43-22197), being restored for Fantasy of Flight, Polk City, Florida.

    Douglas A-20H Havoc (Serial No. 44-0020), being restored to airworthy status by the National Warplane Museum, Geneseo, New York.

    Douglas F-3A Havoc (Serial No. 39-741), being restored to airworthy status by GossHawk Inc., Casa Grande, Arizona.

    Douglas SBD Dauntless diver bombers preserved in the USA are listed on a separate page on this web site.

    Douglas B-23 Dragon (Serial No. 39-0033), being restored to airworth status, Reg. No. N747M, Bellevue, Washington.

     (Articseahorse Photo)

    Douglas B-23 Dragon (Serial No. 39-0036), McChord Air Museum, McChord AFB, Washington.

     (NMUSAF Photo)

    Douglas B-23 Dragon (Serial No. 39-0037), 17B-9, in storage at the National Museum of the United States Air Force at Wright-Patterson AFB in Dayton, Ohio.

    Douglas B-23 Dragon (Serial No. 39-0038), being restored for display at the 1941 Historical Aircraft Group Museum in Geneseo, New York.

     (aeroprints.com Photo)

    Douglas B-23 Dragon (Serial No. 39-0051), Pima Air & Space Museum, Tucson, Arizona.

     (Spartan7W Photo)

    Douglas UC-67 Dragon (Serial No. 39-0047), Castle Air Museum, Atwater, California.

    Douglas UC-67 Dragon (Serial No. 39-0057), in storage at Fantasy of Flight, Polk City, Florida.

    Douglas UC-67 Dragon (Serial No. 39-0063), being restored to airworthy status in Anchorage, Alaska.

    Douglas A-26 Invaders preserved in the USA are listed on a separate page on this web site.

     (NMUSAF Photo)

    Fieseler Fi-156C-1 Storch (Wk. Nr. TBC), coded 5F+YK.  This aircraft is painted as the Storch used by Field Marshal Erwin Rommel in North Africa.  Built in 1940, it was exported to Sweden where it remained until 1948. The last German to fly it before its acquisition by the donors in 1973 was German Second World War ace Erich Hartmann.  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

     (NMUSAF Photo)

    Fisher P-75A Eagle (Serial No. 44-44553).  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

     (Chairboy Photo)

    Focke-Achgelis Fa 330A-1 Bachstelze (Sandpiper), rotor kite towed behind U-Boats (Wk. Nr. 100463 ), National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

    Focke-Achgelis Fa 330A-1 Bachstelze (Sandpiper), rotor kite towed behind U-Boats (Wk. Nr. 60133).  This aircraft was assigned the foreign equipment number FE-4618, later T2-4618.  It is currently on loan to the Pima Air & Space Museum, Tucson, Arizona from the National Air and Space Museum.

    Focke-Wulf Fw 190 fighters preserved in the USA are listed on a separate page on this web site.

     (USAAF Photo)

    Focke-Wulf Ta 152H-0/R-11 (Wk. Nr. 1500010), coded CW+CJ, "Green 4", JG301, USA 11, Reg. No. 32.  This Ta 152 is the only existing example of this fighter in the world today.  The British recovered Wk. Nr. 1500010 in Aalborg, Denmark, at the end of hostilities.  They turned the airplane over to “Watson’s Whizzers", an American unit charged with collecting Luftwaffe aircraft for further study.  Lt Harold McIntosh flew ‘020 to Melun, France, where it was loaded aboard the British aircraft carrier HMS Reaper and shipped Newark Army Airfield, New Jersey.  From Newark, McIntosh flew this Ta 152 to Freeman Field, Indiana.  The airplane was later transferred to Wright Field, Ohio, to undergo extensive flight testing.  This aircraft was assigned the foreign equipment number FE-112, later T2-112.  After testing, the Army stored the aircraft and then turned it over to the National Air Museum in 1960. 

    Research conducted late in 1998 may have revealed the airplane’s true identity as Werk-Nummer 150010, not 150003 or ‘020 as has been widely reported.  This places the airframe toward the end of the range of pre-production H-0 models, a variant marking the transition from the Ta 152 prototypes to full production Ta 152H-1 airplanes.  It was probably built at Focke-Wulf’s production facility at Cottbus, Germany, in December 1944, and delivered to Erprobungskommando Ta 152 at Rechlin, Germany, for service testing.  As with most Ta 152s produced, ‘020’ was apparently transferred to Jagdgeswader (fighter squadron) JG 301 in early 1945.  A Green ‘4’ was painted on the fuselage and this may have been the squadron identification and radio call sign “Green 4”.  The aircraft has a wooden tail and only (Wk. Nr. 150003) and (Wk. Nr. 150010) were fitted with this and on historical photos the overpainted remains of the code CW+CJ is visible which belongs to (Wk. Nr. 150010).  (Wk. Nr. 150020) was coded CW+CT.  Data courtesy of Peter W. Cohausz.  This aircraft is stored in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

    Grumman J2F-4 Duck (Serial No. V-1640), downed in a storm on a Greenland glacier on 29 November 1942.  The United States Coast Guard worked with North South Polar, Inc. plans to recover this J2F-4 Duck.  Two Coast Guard airmen were lost along with a rescued U.S. Army Air Forces passenger from a downed B-17 searching for a downed C-53 with five on board.  The three men of the Duck are presumed to still be entombed at the site.  North South Polar, under the auspices of the Coast Guard team, located the aircraft in August 2012 resting 38 feet beneath the surface of the icesheet.  As per the mandate of Title 10 of the U.S. Code, North South Polar, the Coast Guard and the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command plan to recover the men's remains for proper interment.  The Coast Guard and North South Polar are also developing plans to recover the aircraft and restore it to flying condition as a memorial to the aircrew.

    Grumman J2F-6 (A-12A) Duck (Serial No.), Erickson Aircraft Collection, Madras, Oregon.  Airworthy.

     (Valder137 Photo)

    Grumman J2F-6 (A-12A) Duck (Serial No.), "Candy Clipper", Kermit Weeks, Fantasy of Flight, Polk City, Florida.

     (airforcefe Photo)

    Grumman J2F-6 (A-12A) Duck (Serial No.), Erickson Group Ltd, Tillamook Air Museum, Tillamook, Oregon.

    Grumman J2F-6 Duck (BuNo. 33594), USMC colours, Valle, Arizona.

     (NMUSAF Photo)

    Grumman OA-12/J2F-6 Duck, Reg. No. N67790,  (Serial No. 33587), painted as 48-0563.  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

     (Greg Goebel Photo)

    Grumman J2F-6 Duck (BuNo. 33581), biplane floatplane.  National Museum of Naval Aviation, Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

     (Greg Goebel Photo)

    Grumman FF-1 (Canadian Car & Foundry) G23 Goblin Mk. I (Serial No. 9351), c/n 101, 5-F-1.  National Museum of Naval Aviation, Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

    Grumman F4F-3 Wildcat (BuNo. 12260), Lewis Air Legends in San Antonio, Texas. Airworthy.

    Grumman F4F-3 Wildcat (BuNo. 3872), National Naval Aviation Museum at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

    Grumman F4F-3 Wildcat (BuNo. 4039), displayed unrestored in a simulated underwater diorama at the National Naval Aviation Museum at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

     (Lepeu1999 Photo)

    Grumman F4F-3 Wildcat (BuNo. 12296), Pacific Aviation Museum at Ford Island, Hawaii.

    Grumman F4F-3 Wildcat (BuNo. 12297), Cradle of Aviation Museum in Garden City, New York. It is on loan from the National Naval Aviation Museum at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

     (Author Photo)

    Grumman F4F-3 Wildcat (BuNo. 12320), Chicago O'Hare International Airport in Chicago, Illinois as a memorial to Navy Cross and Medal of Honor recipient and airport namesake, LCDR Edward O'Hare. It is on loan from the National Naval Aviation Museum at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

    Grumman F4F-3 Wildcat (BuNo. 12290), being restored for static display at the USS Midway Museum in San Diego, California.

    Grumman F4F-3A Wildcat (BuNo. 3956), Patriots Point Naval Museum in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina.

    Grumman F4F-3A Wildcat (BuNo. 3969), National Naval Aviation Museum at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

    Grumman F4F-4 Wildcat (BuNo. 11828), San Diego Aerospace Museum in San Diego, California. It is on loan from the National Naval Aviation Museum at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

    Grumman F4F-4 Wildcat (BuNo. 12114), National Museum of the Marine Corps in Triangle, Virginia.

    Grumman's Wildcat production ceased in early 1943 to make way for the newer F6F Hellcat, but General Motors continued producing Wildcats for both the U.S. Navy and Fleet Air Arm.

    Grumman FM-1 Wildcat (BuNo. 14994), (F4F-4), Valiant Air Command Warbird Museum at Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville, Florida. It is on loan from the National Naval Aviation Museum at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

    Grumman FM-1 Wildcat (BuNo. 15392), National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

    General Motors production of the Wildcat later switched to the improved FM-2 (based on Grumman's XF4F-8 prototype, informally known as the "Wilder Wildcat") optimized for small-carrier operations, with a more powerful engine, and a taller tail to cope with the increased torque.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 16089), National Naval Aviation Museum at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 16161), being restored to airworthy status, by the Pima Air & Space Museum, Tucson, Arizona.  It crashed in Lake Michigan on 12 April 1945, and is on loan from Military Aircraft Restoration Corporation in Anaheim, California.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 16203), Michael Gillian in Downers Grove, Illinois. Airworthy.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 16278), Flying Leatherneck Aviation Museum at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, San Diego, California.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 47030), Military Aviation Museum in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Airworthy.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 47160), FM-2 LCC in Lewes, Delaware. Airworthy.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 55052), being restored for static display at the USS Hornet (CV-12) in Alameda, California.

    Gruman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 55627), Palm Springs Air Museum in Palm Springs, California. Airworthy.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 57039), being restored for static display at the Glenview Hangar One Museum at the former Naval Air Station Glenview, Glenview, Cook County, Illinois. While conducting training on 28 December 1944, the FM2 Wildcat malfunctioned and rolled off the deck of the training aircraft carrier USS Sable. The pilot, ENS William Forbes, escaped from the aircraft before it sank into Lake Michigan. In early December 2012, the aircraft was moved 45 miles under the water to a safe harbor in Waukegan, Ilinois.  The Wildcat fighter was lifted from the water on Friday 7 Dec 2012.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 74120), New England Air Museum, Windsor Locks, Connecticut.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 74161), National Museum of the Pacific War in Fredricksburg, Texas. It is on loan from the National Naval Aviation Museum at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

     (Articseahorse Photo)

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 74512), Museum of Flight in Seattle, Washington.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 74560), Comanche Warbirds Inc. in Houston, Texas. Airworthy.

     (Alan Wilson Photo)

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 86564), Yanks Air Museum in Chino, California. Airworthy.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 86572), Thomas Camp in Sausalito, California. Airworthy.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 86581), Air Zoo in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 86680), Collings Foundation in Stow, Massachusetts. This Wildcat is unique in having a passenger cabin able to carry 4 passengers. Airworthy.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 86741), Fantasy of Flight in Polk City, Florida. Airworthy.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 86746), Frasca Air Museum in Champaign, Illinois. Airworthy.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 86747), National Naval Aviation Museum at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 86754), Erickson Aircraft Collection in Madras, Oregon. Airworthy.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 86773), being restored to airworthy status by Bruce Roberts in New London, Pennsylvania.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 86774), N774FM LLC in Granite Falls, Minnesota. Airworthy.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 86777), Texas Flying Legends Museum in Houston, Texas. Airworthy.

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 86819), Commemorative Air Force (Colonel Carter Teeters) in San Diego, California. Airworthy.

     (Balon Greyjoy Photo)

    Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 86956), Reg. No. N18P, Cavanaugh Flight Museum in Addison, Texas. Airworthy.

     (CJ Machado Photo)

    Grumman F6F-3 Hellcat (BuNo. 25910), National Naval Aviation Museum at NAS Pensacola in Pensacola, Florida.

    Grumman F6F-3 Hellcat (BuNo. 40467), being restored to airworthy status by the Yanks Air Museum in Chino, California.

     (Clemens Vasters Photo)

    Grumman F6F-3N Hellcat (BuNo. 41476), being restored to airworthy status by the Collings Foundation in Stow, Massachusetts.

     (Ad Meskens Photo)

    Grumman F6F-3K Hellcat (BuNo. 41834), last used as a drone during "Operation Crossroads", July 1946.  This aircraft is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

    Grumman F6F-3 Hellcat (BuNo. 419300), Comanche Warbirds Inc. in Houston, Texas. Airworthy.

     (PH2 L. D. Brown Photo)

    Grumman F6F-3 Hellcat (BuNo. 42874), operated by the NACA from 1945 until 1960 (Serial No. NACA 158).  San Diego Aerospace Museum in San Diego, California.

     (Valder137 Photo)

    Grumman F6F-3 Hellcat (BuNo. 43041), in storage at the Fantasy of Flight in Polk City, Florida.

     (Tomás Del Coro Photo)

    Grumman F6F-3 Hellcat (BuNo. 66237), c/n A-1257, 21, National Naval Aviation Museum at NAS Pensacola in Pensacola, Florida.

     (Airwolfhound Photo)

    Grumman F6F-5 Hellcat (BuNo. 70222),  c/n A-5634, "Minsi III", Reg. No. N1078Z, Commemorative Air Force (Southern California Wing) at Camarillo Airport (former Oxnard AFB) in Camarillo, California. Airworthy.

     (Alan Wilson Photo)

    Grumman F6F-5 Hellcat (BuNo. 78645), c/n A-9790, Yanks Air Museum in Chino, California. Airworthy.

     (Ken Fielding Photo)

    Grumman F6F-5 Hellcat (BuNo. 79863), Flying Heritage Collection in Everett, Washington. Airworthy.

     (Alan Wilson Photo)

    Grumman F6F-5N Hellcat (BuNo. 94204), c/n A-11956, 17, painted as Reg. No. N17VF, actual Reg. No. N4998F, F6F Hellcat LLC in Beaverton, Oregon.  Airworthy.

     (Edward O'Connor Photo)

    Grumman F6F-5 Hellcat (BuNo. 94473), Palm Springs Air Museum in Palm Springs, California. Airworthy.

    Grumman F6F-5 Hellcat (BuNo. 70185), previously on display at the Quonset Air Museum at Quonset State Airport (former NAS Quonset Point) in Quonset Point, Rhode Island. The Quonset Air Museum closed in December 2016 and the current location of this aircraft is unknown.

    Grumman F6F-5 Hellcat (BuNo. 77722), Naval Air Facility Washington at Joint Base Andrews (former Andrews AFB) in Maryland.

    Grumman F6F-5 Hellcat (BuNo. 79192), New England Air Museum in Windsor Locks, Connecticut.

    Grumman F6F-5 Hellcat (BuNo. 79593), USS Yorktown, Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina.

    Grumman F6F-5 Hellcat (BuNo. 79683), Air Zoo in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

    Grumman F6F-5 Hellcat (BuNo. 80141), being restored to airworthy status by Spitfire Aircraft LLC in San Antonio, Texas.

    Grumman F6F-5 Hellcat (BuNo. 94203), National Naval Aviation Museum at NAS Pensacola in Pensacola, Florida.

     (Ad Meskens Photos)

    Grumman F6F-5 Hellcat (BuNo. 94263), Cradle of Aviation Museum in New York.  It is on loan from the USMC Museum in Quantico, Virginia.

    Grumman F6F-5 Hellcat (BuNo. 94385), being restored to airworthy status American Aircraft Sales LLC in Hayward, California.

     (Tomás Del Coro Photo)

    Grumman F7F-3 Tigercat (BuNo. 80373), National Naval Aviation Museum in Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

    Grumman F7F-3 Tigercat (BuNo. 80374), Tigercat N7629C LCC in Wilmington, Delaware. Airworthy.

     (Valder137 Photo)

    Grumman F7F-3 Tigercat (BuNo. 80375), Tigercat N379AK LLC in Bellevue, Washington. Airworthy.

     (Andre Wadman Photo)

    Grumman F7F-3 Tigercat (BuNo. 80382), Planes of Fame Air Museum in Chino, California.

     (Valder137 Photo)

    Grumman F7F-3 Tigercat (BuNo. 80390), "Here Kitty Kitty", Lewis Air Legends in San Antonio, Texas. Airworthy.

    Grumman F7F-3 Tigercat (BuNo. 80404), in storage at the Fantasy of Flight in Polk City, Florida.

     (aeroprints.com Photo)

    Grumman F7F-3 Tigercat (BuNo. 80410), Pima Air & Space Museum, Tucson, Arizona.

    Grumman F7F-3 Tigercat (BuNo. 80411), Palm Springs Air Museum in Palm Springs, California. Airworthy.

     (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

    Grumman F7F-3 Tigercat (BuNo. 80425), Avstar Inc. in Seattle, Washington. Airworthy.

    Grumman F7F-3 Tigercat (BuNo. 80483), Historic Flight Foundation in Mukilteo, Washington. Airworthy.

     (Valder137 Photo)

    Grumman F7F-3 Tigercat (BuNo. 80503), Lewis Air Legends in San Antonio, Texas. Airworthy.

    Grumman F7F-3 Tigercat (BuNo. 80532), Lawrence Classics LLC in Bentonville, Arkansas. Airworthy.

    Grumman F8F-1 Bearcat (BuNo. 90446), being restored to airworthy status, by Texas Bearcats LLC in Dover, Delaware.

    Grumman F8F-1 Bearcat (BuNo. 90454), Jens Meyerhoff in Fountain Hills, Arizona. Airworthy.

    Grumman F8F-1 Bearcat (BuNo. 95255), Lewis Air Legends in San Antonio, Texas. Airworthy.

    Grumman F8F-1 Bearcat (BuNo. 95356), being restored to airworthy status, by Texas Bearcats LLC in Dover, Delaware.

    Grumman F8F-2 Bearcat (BuNo. 121646), “Buff”,  D.1020, “Conquest 1”, Racer No. 1, Reg. No. N7699C, N1111L.  This aircraft is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

    Grumman F8F-2 Bearcat (BuNo. 121679), being restored to airworthy status by American Aircraft Sales LLC in Alameda, California.

     (Tomás Del Coro Photo)

    Grumman F8F-2P Bearcat (BuNo. 121710), c/n D.1084, B-100, National Museum of Naval Aviation,  NAS Pensacola, Florida.

    Grumman F8F-2 Bearcat (BuNo. 121748), Comanche Warbirds Inc. in Houston, Texas. Airworthy.

     (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

    Grumman F8F-2 Bearcat (BuNo. 121752), Historic Flight Foundation in Mukilteo, Washington. Airworthy.

    Grumman F8F-2 Bearcat (BuNo. 121776), BA1945 LLC in Wilmington, Delaware. Airworthy.

    Grumman F8F-1B Bearcat (BuNo. 122095), Quality Leasing Company in Indianapolis, Indiana. Airworthy.

    Grumman F8F-2 Bearcat (BuNo. 122614), Lewis Air Legends in San Antonio, Texas. Airworthy.

    Grumman F8F-2 Bearcat (BuNo. 122619), Lewis Air Legends in San Antonio, Texas. Airworthy.

    Grumman F8F-2 Bearcat (BuNo. 122629), Lewis Air Legends in San Antonio, Texas. Airworthy.

    Grumman F8F-2 Bearcat (BuNo. 122637), Comanche Warbirds Inc. in Houston, Texas. Airworthy.

     (Tomás Del Coro Photo)

    Grumman F8F-2 Bearcat (BuNo. 122674), 201S, Reg. No, N7825C, Commemorative Air Force (Southern California Wing) in Camarillo, California. Airworthy.

    Grumman G-58A Gulfhawk (civilian built Bearcat), Steven Hinton in Chino, California. Airworthy.

    Grumman G-58B Gulfhawk (civilian built Bearcat), Palm Springs Air Museum in Palm Springs, California. Airworthy.

    Grumman TBF and TBM Avengers are listed on a separate page on this web site.

     (Author Photo)

    Hurricane Mk. II (Serial No. V6864), on display at the Pima Air & Space Museum, Tucson, Arizona.  This aircraft is a composite of five Hurricanes and carries the markings of Robert Stanford Tuck while he was flying with No. 257 Squadron RAF in Summer, 1940.

     (NMUSAF Photo)

    Hawker Hurricane Mk. IIa (Serial No. Z3174), XR-B.  This aircraft was built in Canada.  It is painted to represent an aircraft of RAF No. 71 (Eagle) Sqn, which was composed of American pilots that had volunteered to join the RCAF or the RAF beginning in September 1940 prior to US entry into the Second World War in Dec 1941.  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

      (Ad Meskens Photo)

    Hawker Hurricane Mk. IIb, RAF (Serial No. 56022), painted as (Serial No. LF686).  This aircraft is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

     (Goshimini Photo)

    Hurricane Mk XIIA, RCAF (Serial No. 5429),  operated by the Flying Heritage & Combat Armor Museum at Paine Field in Everett, Washington.  Airworthy.

     (Tomás Del Coro Photo)

    Hurricane Mk XII, RCAF (Serial N. 5667), Reg. No. N2549 operated by the Military Aviation Museum near Virginia Beach in Pungo, Virginia.  Airworthy.

    Hurricane Mk. XII RCAF (Serial No. 5708), built by Canadian Car and Foundry (CCF 96), Reg. No. N96RW.  Lone Star Flight Museum, Galveston, Texas, currently in storage following ground collision with Spitfire and subsequent damage by Hurricane Ike in 2008.

     (USAAF Photo)

    Heinkel He 162A-2 Spatz (Sparrow),Volksjager (Wk. Nr. 120230), coded White 23, 1/JG1, painted (Wk. Nr. 120222).  This He 162A was captured by the British at Leck and sent to the US on board the escort carrier HMS Reaper.  It is currently fitted with the tail unit from (Wk. Nr. 120222).  This aircraft was one of thirty-one JG 1 aircraft manufactured by Heinkel at Rostock-Marienehe and captured by the British at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany on 8 May 1945.  It was painted with the number White 23, and its red-white-black nose bands were in reverse order from the usual paint scheme, which may indicate that the wing commander and high-scoring ace, Col Herbert Ihlefeld, flew this particular aircraft.  After transfer to Britain, the US Army Air Forces accepted the airplane and shipped it to Wright Field, Ohio, for evaluation. It received the foreign equipment number FE-504, later T2-504, and was later moved to Freeman Field, Indiana.  For unknown reasons, mechanics replaced the tail unit at Wright Field with the tail unit of aircraft Wk. Nr. 120222.  FE-504/T2-504 was apparently never flown.  Its flying days ended permanently when someone at Freeman Field neatly sawed through the outer wing panels sometime before September 1946.  The wings were reattached with door hinges and the jet was shipped to air shows and military displays around the country.  The USAF transferred the aircraft to the Smithsonian Institution in 1949 but it remained in storage at Park Ridge, Illinois, until transfer to the Garber Facility in January 1955.  This aircraft is stored in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

    Heinkel He 162 A-2 (Wk. Nr. 120222).  This aircraft was assigned the foreign equipment number FE-504, later T2-504The remains of this aircraft may be stored in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

     (Alan Wilson Photo)

    Heinkel He 162 A-2 (Wk. Nr 120077) is displayed at the Planes of Fame Museum, Chino, California. This aircraft was captured by the British at Leck and sent to the United States in 1945 where it was given the designation FE-489 (Foreign Equipment 489) and later T-2-489.

     (Kogo Photo)

    Heinkel He 219A-2 Uhu (Eagle Owl) (Werknummer 290202), coded GI+KQ.  This aircraft was one of three He 219s found at Grove airfield in Denmark, which had been operated by the 1st Night Fighter Wing (Nachtjagdgeschwader 1) in Jutland.  It was captured by the RAF and assigned the designation USA 10.  It was transferred to the USAAF and was made flight worthy by Watson's Whizzers (US Army Intelligence Service) and flown to Cherbourg, France, 16 June 1945.  It was shipped to the USA along with 21 other captured German aircraft onboard the British escort carrier HMS Reaper and reassembled at Ford Field, Newark, New Jersey.  Assigned foreign equipment number FE-614 and later TE-614, it was flown to Freeman Field, Indiana for testing.  It was then stored until transferred to the Smithsonian's National Air Museum on 3 Jan 1949.  Restoration is continuing.  This aircraft is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

    Horten H IIL, Reg. No. D-10-125 (Serial No. 6). It was flown by Reimar Horten, who tested the intake design for Ho IX/229.  After being collected, this aircraft was assigned the foreign equipment number FE-7, later T2-7.  On loan to the Deutsches Technikalmuseum, Berlin, Germany, from the National Air and Space Museum.

    Horten H IIIf (Wk. Nr. 32), this is the only one of its kind still intact, originally flown by a pilot in the prone position.  On arrival in the USA it was assigned the foreign equipment number FE-5042, later T2-5042.  It is currently on loan to the Deutsches Technikalmuseum, Berlin, Germany from the National Air and Space Museum.

     (Mike Peel Photo)

    Horten H IIIh, LA-AI (Wk. Nr. 31), the only version still intact, it is a modified H IIIg.  This aircraft was assigned the foreign equipment number FE-5039, later T2-5039.  it is currenly on loan to the Deutsches Technikalmuseum, Berlin, Germany, from the National Air and Space Museum.

    Horten H VI-V2 (Serial No. 34).  This aircraft was assigned the foreign equipment number FE-5040, later T2-5040.  It was never flown.  It is currently on loan to the Deutsches Technikalmuseum, Berlin, Germany, on loan from the National Air and Space Museum.

     (Michael Katzman Photo)

    Horten IX/229-V3 (Wk. Nr. unknown).  It was never flown.  This Horten was assigned the foreign equipment number FE-490, later T2-490.  It is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

     (Soviet Air Force Photo)

    Ilyushin IL-2 Shturmovik.  Shot down spring 1944, Kryakovsky Lake.  This aircraft is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

     (NMUSAF Photo)

    Junkers Ju-52/3m (CASA 352L) Trimotor (Serial No. T2B-244), 901-20, C/N 135.  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

     (Eric Salard Photo)

    Junkers Ju 52/3m (CASA 353L) (Serial No. 146), Reg. No. G-BFHD.  T.2B-255 (Spain), D-ADLH.  This aircraft is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

     (Tomás Del Coro Photo)

    Junkers Ju 52/3m (CASA 352L) (N352JU), coded 1Z+AR, at the Military Aviation Museum, Virginia Beach, Virginia.

     (NMUSAF Photo)

    Junkers Ju 88 D-1/Trop (Serial No. 0880430650), F6-Al, 105, C/N 430650.  Ex-RAF (Serial No. HK959).  Romanian Air Force colours.  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

     (USAAF Photo)

    Junkers Ju 388L-1 Störtebeker, (Wk. Nr. 560049).  This aircraft was brought to Freeman Field, Indiana, after the war, and was assigned the foreign equipment number FE-4010, later T2-4010.  The Störtebeker is currently stored in the Paul E. Garber Facility, Suitland, Maryland.  (USAAF Photos)

     (NMUSAF Photo)

    Kawanishi N1K2-Ja Shiden Kai (Serial No. 5312).  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

    During restoration, four different aircraft serial numbers were found on parts throughout the airframe, indicating reassembly from three different wrecks brought back to the USA for examination, or wartime assembly or repair from parts obtained from three different aircraft.  (Serial No. 5312) was found in the most locations, and is the number now cited.  The N1K2-Ja is painted as an aircraft in the Yokosuka Kokutai, a Japanesetest and evaluation unit.

     (Tomás Del Coro Photo)

    Kawanishi N1K2-J Shiden Kai (Violet Lightning) George (Serial No. 343-A-19).  National Museum of Naval Aviation, Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

    Kawanishi N1K2-Ja Shiden Kai (Serial No. unknown).  This aircraft is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

     (Author Photo)

    Kawanishi N1K Kyofu (strong wind), Allied reporting name “Rex”, on display in immaculate condition at the National Museum of the Pacific War in Fredericksburg, Texas.  The Rex was an Imperial Japanese Navy floatplane fighter.  National Museum of the Pacific War, Ffredericksburg, Texas.  On loan from the National Air and Space Museum.

     (IJN Photo)

    Kawanishi N1K1 Kyofu (Rex) (Serial No. 514).  903 Kokutai (TBC).  This Rex was assigned the foreign equipment number FE-324, later T2-324 (TBC).  It is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

    Kawanishi N1K2-Ja Shiden Kai (George) (Serial No. 5341), C/N 343-35. Yokosuka Kokutai, No. 32 (TBC).  This George was assigned the foreign equipment number FE-305, later T2-305.  It is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

     (Stephen Duhig Photo)

    Kawasaki Ki-45 Toryu (Nick) (Serial No. 4268).  This Toryu was assigned the foreign equipment number FE-701, later T2-701.  It is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

     (USAAF Photo)

    Kyushu J7W1 Shinden (Magnificent Lightning).  This Shindin was assigned the foreign equipment number FE-326, later T2-326.  It is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

    Lockheed P-38 Lightnings preserved in the USA are listed on a separate page on this web site.

    Lockheed Model 18 Lodestar (Serial No. 18-2035), XC-60B on static display at the Castle Air Museum at the former Castle Air Force Base in Atwater, California.

    Lockheed Model 18 Lodestar (Serial No. 18-2302), C-60 on display at the 1940 Air Terminal Museum in Houston, Texas. It has been converted for use as an executive aircraft.

    Lockheed Model 18 Lodestar (Serial No. 18-2347), C-60 in storage in Corinth, Mississippi.

    Lockheed Model 18 Lodestar (Serial No. 18-6124), L18-56 airworthy with Chris Galloway of Knights Landing, California.

    Lockheed Model 18 Lodestar (Serial No. 41-19729), C-56 on static display at the Travis Air Force Base Heritage Center at Travis Air Force Base near Fairfield, California.

    Lockheed Model 18 Lodestar (Serial No. 42-32181), C-60 on static display at the Planes of Fame Air Museum in Chino, California.

    Lockheed Model 18 Lodestar (Serial No. 42-55884), C-60A airworthy with Gary Hilton of Kingsville, Missouri.

    Lockheed Model 18 Lodestar (Serial No. 42-56005), C-60A airworthy with the Houston Wing of the Commemorative Air Force in Houston, Texas.

    Lockheed Model 18 Lodestar (Serial No. 42-56036), C-60A airworthy with the Mid America Flight Museum in Mount Pleasant, Texas.

     (Greg Hume Photo)

    Lockheed Model 18 Lodestar (Serial No. 43-16445), c/n 18-2605, C-60A on static display at the National Museum of the United States Air Force at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio.

    Lockheed Model 18 Lodestar (Serial No. 43-16462), C-60A on static display at the Planes of Fame Museum in Chino, California.

    Lockheed Model 18 Lodestar (Serial No. 12473), R5O-5 on static display at the March Field Air Museum at March Air Reserve Base (former March Air Force Base) in Riverside, California.

    Lockheed Model 18 Lodestar (Serial No. 12481), R5O-5 on static display at the Pima Air & Space Museum, Tucson, Arizona.

     (Author Photo)

    Lockheed Ventura Mk. IIA, RAF (Serial No. AJ311), c/n 137-4449, B-34A Lexington.  Previously on display with the Pueblo-Wiesbrod Aviation Museum, Colorado.  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

    The Ventura was very similar to its predecessor, the Lockheed.  The primary difference was not in layout; rather, the Ventura was larger, heavier, and used more powerful engines than the Hudson.  The RAF ordered 188 Venturas in February 1940, which were delivered from mid-1942.  Venturas were initially used for daylight raids on occupied Europe but like some other RAF bombers, they proved too vulnerable without fighter escort, which was difficult to provide for long-range missions. 

    Lockheed PV-1 Ventura (Serial No. 34670), TP Universal Exports International LLC in Eagan, Minnesota. Airworthy.

    Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon (BuNo. 37107), Bruce Graham in Orange, California. Airworthy.

    Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon (BuNo. 37202), in storage at the Fantasy of Flight in Polk City, Florida.

    Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon (BuNo. 37211), Palm Springs Air Museum in Palm Springs, California. Airworthy.

     (NMNA Photo)

    Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon (BuNo. 37230), National Museum of Naval Aviation in Pensacola, Florida.

    Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon (BuNo. 37254), Southwest Aviation Inc. of Fairacres, New Mexico. Airworthy.

    Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon (BuNo. 37257), Pima Air & Space Museum in Tucson, Arizona.

    Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon (BuNo. 37270), being restored to airworthy status by the Wingspan Air Heritage Foundation in Mesa, Arizona.

    Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon (BuNo. 37396), American Military Heritage Foundation in Indianapolis, Indiana. Airworthy.

    Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon (BuNo. 37466), Heritage Aircraft Preservation Group in Orange, California. Airworthy.

    Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon (BuNo. 37472), Warbird Warriors Foundation in Heber City, Utah. Airworthy.

    Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon (BuNo. 37492), painted yellow and marked "Air Tropic Island Charters" at Mayday Golf in North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.

    Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon (BuNo. 37535), Erickson Aircraft Collection in Madras, Oregon. Airworthy.

    Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon (BuNo. 37633), Wingspan Air Heritage Foundation in Mesa, Arizona. Airworthy.

    Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon (BuNo. 37634), Lone Star Flight Museum in Galveston, Texas, TBC. Airworthy.

    Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon (BuNo. 84060), in storage at the Cavanaugh Flight Museum in Addison, Texas.

    Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon (BuNo. 84062), Stockton Field Aviation Museum in Stockton, California. Airworthy.

    Lockheed B-34 Lexington (Serial No. 41-38032), being restored for static display by NAS Sanford Memorial Committee at the Orlando Sanford International Airport's NAS Sanford Memorial Park, Sanford, Florida. This aircraft is on loan from the National Naval Aviation Museum.

     (Valder137 Photo Photo)

    Macchi MC-200 Saetta (Serial No. MM8146), 372-5.  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

    Martin B-26 Marauder (Serial No. 40-1370), being restored for display by Hill Aerospace Museum, Hill Air Force Base, Utah.

     (Author Photo)

    Martin B-26 Marauder (Serial No. 40-1464), Fantasy of Flight collection in Polk City, Florida. Airworthy.

     (Jdmessner Photo)

    Martin B-26B Marauder (Serial No. 40-1459), "Charley's Jewel", MAPS Air Museum in Akron, Ohio.

    Martin B-26 Marauder (Serial No. 40-1501), being restored for display at the Pima Air & Space Museum, Tucson, Arizona.

     (John MacKay Photo)
    Martin B-26B Marauder (Serial No. 41-31773), "Flak Bait".  This aircraft survived 207 operational missions over Europe, more than any other American aircraft during the Second World War.  It is being restored in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

     (NMUSAF Photo)

    Martin B-26G Marauder (Serial No. 43-34581), c/n 8701, "Shootin In", painted as (Serial No. 42-95857) a 9th Air Force B-26B assigned to the 387th Bombardment Group in 1945.  This aircraft was flown in combat by the Free French Air Force during the final months of the Second World War.  It was obtained from the mechanics' training school of French airline Air France near Paris in June 1965.   It is on display at the National Museum of the United States Air Force at Wright-Patterson AFB in Dayton, Ohio.

     (Author Photo)

    Martin PBM-5A Mariner (BuNo. 122071).  Reg. No. N3190G.  Operated by the USN between 1948 and 1956, it is painted in the markings of Transport Squadron 21 (VR-21) and coded RZ 051 of the early 1950s.  On loan from the NASM to the Pima Air & Space Museum, Tucson, Arizona.

    Martin AM-1 Mauler (BuNo. 22260). In storage at the Glenn L. Martin Maryland Aviation Museum in Middle River, Maryland.

     (Valder137 Photo)

    Martin AM-1 Mauler (BuNo. 22275), Tillamook Air Museum, Tillamook, Oregon. Previously with the Erikson Aircraft Collection in Madras, Oregon.

     (NMNA Photo)

    Martin AM-1 Mauler (BuNo. 122397), 139, B.  National Museum of Naval Aviation, Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

    Martin AM-1 Mauler (BuNo. 122401).  Partial air frame in storage at the Glenn L. Martin Maryland Aviation Museum in Middle River, Maryland.

    Martin AM-1 Mauler (BuNo. 122403).  In storage at the Planes of Fame in Chino, California.

    Messerschmitt Bf 109s preserved in the USA are listed on a separate page on this web site.

     (NMUSAF Photo)

    Messerschmitt Me 163B-1A Komet (Serial No. 191095), C/N 191095.  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.  Five Me 163s were originally brought to the United States in 1945, receiving the Foreign Equipment numbers FE-495 and FE-500 to 503.

     (Aaron Headley Photo)

    Messerschmitt Me 163 B-1a Komet (Wk. Nr. 191301), arrived at Freeman Field, Indiana, during mid-1945, and received the foreign equipment number FE-500.  On 12 April 1946, it was flown aboard a cargo aircraft to the U.S. Army Air Forces facility at Muroc dry lake in California for flight testing.  Testing began on 3 May 1946 and involved towing the unfueled Komet behind a Boeing B-29 Superfortress to an altitude of 9,000–10,500 m (29,500–34,400 ft) before it was released for a glide back to earth under the control of test pilot Major Gus Lundquist.  Powered tests were planned, but not carried out after delamination of the aircraft's wooden wings was discovered.  It is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

    Messerschmitt Me 163B B-1a Komet (Wk. Nr. 191660), "Yellow 3", Flying Heritage Collection, Everett, Washington.

     (Clemens Vasters Photo)

    Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a Schwalbe (Wk. Nr. 501232), 5, c/n 501232, " Yellow 5", 3./KG(J)6, and its Junkers Jumo 004 turbojet engine.  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

    Messerschmitt Me 262 A-1a/U3 Schwalbe (Wk. Nr. 500453), "White 9". Flying Heritage Collection, Everett, Washington.

     (Tomás Del Coro Photo)

    Messerschmitt Me 262B-1a Schwalbe (Wk. Nr. 110639), "White 35", two seat trainer, USN (BuNo. 110639), previously "Red 13".  Test flown by the USN post-war and then put on display at NAS Willow Grove for many years, recently restored to static display.  National Museum of Naval Aviation, Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

     (Tony Hisgett Photo)

    MesserschmittMe 262 A-1a/R7 Schwalbe (Wk. Nr. 500491), Yellow 7, II./JG 7, equipped with twin original underwing racks for 24 R4M unguided rockets.in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

     (USAAF Photo)

    Messerschmitt Me 410A-3/U1 Hornisse (Hornet), (Wk. Nr. 10018), coded F6+WK, 2(F)/122.  It was found intact at an airfield in Trapani, Sicily, in August 1943 bearing the markings of the Luftwaffe's 2.Staffel/Fernaufklärungsgruppe 122 and was shipped to the United States in 1944.  Initially designated EB-103, this Hornisse was assigned the foreign equipment number FE-499, later T2-499.  It is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

    Mitsubishi A6M Zeros preserved in the USA are listed on a separate page on this web site.

     (Sturmvogel 66 Photo)

    Nakajima J1N1-S Gekko (Irving) (Serial No. Nakajima-7334).  This Gekko was assigned the foreign equipment number FE-700, later T2-700.  It is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

     (FlugKerl2 Photo)

    Nakajima Kikka, (Orange Blossum).  A-103, probably assembled from parts.   This Kikka is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

    North American O-47A (Serial No. 37-279), in storage at the Paul E. Garber Preservation, Restoration, and Storage Facility of the National Air and Space Museum in Suitland, Maryland.

     (Alan Wilson Photo)

    North American O-47A composite (Serial Nos. 38-284 and 38-295), being restored at the Planes of Fame Air Museum in Chino, California.

    North American O-47B (Serial No. 39-098), owned by James P. Harker of Blaine, Minnesota.

     (NMUSAF Photo)

    North American O-47B (Serial No. 39-112), on static display at the National Museum of the United States Air Force in Dayton, Ohio.  It is displayed in the markings of an O-47A belonging to the 112th Observation Squadron of the Ohio National Guard.

    North American B-25 Mitchells preserved in the USA are listed on a separate page on this web site.

     (Goshimini Photo)

    North American A-36A Apache (Serial No. 42-83665), c/n 97-15883, "Margie H", National Museum of the United States Air Force at Wright-Patterson AFB in Dayton, Ohio.

    North American A-36A Apache (Serial No. 42-83731), Comanche Warbirds Inc. in Houston, Texas. Airworthy.

    North American A-36A Apache (Serial No. 42-83738), "Baby Carmen", Collings Foundation in Stow, Massachusetts. Airworthy.

    North American P-51 Mustangs preserved in the USA are listed on a separate page on this website.

     (Author Photo)

    Northrop P-61B-1NO Black Widow (Serial No. 42-39445), c/n 964.  The aircraft crashed on 10 January 1945 on Mount Cyclops, papua New Guinea.  It was recovered in 1989 and is being restored to airworthy status by the Mid-Atlantic Air Museum in Reading Pennsylvania.  

     (NMUSAF Photo)

    Northrop P-61C-1NO Black Widow (Serial No. 43-8353), c/n 1399, Reg. No. N1399.  It is painted as P-61B-1NO (Serial No. 42-39468), "Moonlight Serenade" of the 550th Night Fighter Squadron.  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

     (USAF/DoD Photo)

    Northrop P-61C-1NO Black Widow (Serial No. 43-8330), c/n 1376, FK-330, C/N 1376.  Donated to the National Air Museum (now the National Air and Space Museum) in 1950, recalled for flight test work, it came back to the museum in 1954.

     (NMUSAF Photo)

    Northrop A-17A (Serial No. 36-0207), c/n 234, ex-3rd Attack Group (Barksdale Field).  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

    Republic P-47 Thunderbolts preserved in the USA are listed on a separate page on this web site.

     (Valder137 Photo)

    Seversky P-35A (Serial No. 36-0404), PA70.  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

    Supermarine Spitfires preserved in the USA are listed on a separate page on this web site.

     (NMNA Photo)

    Vought SB2U-2 Vindicator (BuNo. 1383).  This is the only known survivor.  National Museum of Naval Aviation, Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

    Vought OS2U-3 Kingfisher (BuNo. 1368 ), painted as (BuNo. 0951), 60.  Obtained years ago from Mexico, this aircraft was previously displayed aboard the battleship Alabama and is now displayed inside the aircraft pavilion adjacent to the battleship in Mobile, Alabama.

     (USMC Photo)

    Vought OS2U-3 Kingfisher (BuNo. 3073), 8, based on an assigned air group, on board the battleship USS North Carolina in Wilmington, North Carolina.  With the assistance of a Royal Canadian Air Force Piasecki helicopter, Lynn Garrison salvaged this Kingfisher from Calvert Island, British Columbia, during the winter of 1963.  It crashed there on a ferry flight to Alaska during the Second World War.

     (Ryan Somma Photo)

    Vought-Sikorsky OS2U-3 Kingfisher (BuNo. 5909), served on the USS Indiana, May 1942 to Dec 1944.  This aircraft is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.

     (Greg Goebel Photo)

    Vought OS2U-3 Kingfisher (BuNo. 5926).  National Museum of Naval Aviation, Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

    Vought OS2U-3 Kingfisher (BuNo. unknown), in storage with the Yanks Air Museum, Chino, California.

    Vought F3A-1 Corsair (BuNo. 04634), privately owned in San Diego, California.  Airworthy.

    Vultee SNV-1 Valiant (Serial No. FAA 60828).  National Museum of Naval Aviation, Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

    Vought F4u Corsairsand Goodyear FG-1D Corsairs are listed on a separate page on this web site.

     (Clemens Vasters Photo)

    V-2 Rocket, Mittelwerk A-4 V-2 with Meillerwagen.  National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

     (NMUSAF Photo)

    Waco CG-4A-GN Hadrian Glider (Serial No. 45-27548).

     (Ad Meskens Photo)

    Westland Lysander Mk. IIIa, RCAF (Serial No. 2346), C/N 1185, AC-B, 138 Sqn. RAF, Reg. No. N7791.  Donated to the NASM in 1979.

     (Author Photo)

    Westland Lysander Mk. IIIA (Serial No. Y1363), painted as (Serial No. V9545), Reg. No. N3093K.

    Yokusuka Model 11, Suicide attacker powered by 3x 2.616 kN (588 lbf) Navy Type 4 Mark 1 Model 20 solid-fueled rocket motors, firing for 8–10 seconds;755 built. Marine Corps Air-Ground Museum, Quantico, Virginia.

    Yokusuka Model 11, Ohka Number I-10.  Yanks Air Museum, Chino, California.

     (Alan Wilson Photo)

    Yokusuka Model 11, Ohka Number I-18 captured at Yontan, Planes of Fame Air Museum, Chino, California.

     (Sanjay Acharya Photo)

    Yokusuka Model 22 (Serial No. Kugisho-61).  Suicide attacker, powered by a Ishikawajima Tsu-11 thermo-jet engine with reduced span wings and 600 kg (1,300 lb) warhead, to be carried by Yokosuka P1Y1 Ginga bombers.  50 built by the First Naval Air Technical Arsenal. Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, Washington, D.C.

    Yokusuka Ohka Model 43 K-1 Kai Wakazakura (Young Cherry). Two-seat suicide attack glider trainer with flaps and retractable skid undercarriage, fitted with a single Type 4 Mark 1 Model 20 rocket motor, for limited powered flight.  Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, Washington, D.C.

     (NMUSAF Photo)

    Yokusuka Ohka K-1, Suicide attack training glider, (rebuilt to represent a Model 11, but retaining the landing skid), National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, Ohio.

    Yokusuka Ohka K-1, Suicide attack training glider, U.S. Navy Museum, Washington, D.C.

    Yokusuka Model 11, replica, National Warplane Museum, Geneseo, New York.