Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Warplanes of the Second World War preserved in the United Kingdom

Warplanes of the Second World War preserved in the United Kingdom

The aim of this website is to locate, identify and document Warplanes from the Second World War preserved in the United Kingdom.  Many contributors have assisted in the hunt for these aircraft to provide and update the data on this website.  Photos are by the author unless otherwise credited.  Any errors found here are by the author, and any additions, corrections or amendments to this list of Warplane Survivors of the Second World War in the United Kingdom would be most welcome and may be e-mailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com. 

(Note: Hawker Hurricanes and Supermarine Spitfires are listed on a separate web page to keep the site from crashing)

Data current to 13 Aug 2018.

Warplanes of the Second World War preserved in the United Kingdom by aircraft type, serial number, registration number and location:

 (RuthAS Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (David Merritt Photo)

  (Tony Hisgett Photo)

Airspeed AS.10 Oxford (Serial No. V3388), Reg. No. G-AITB.   Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (RAF Photo)

Airspeed AS.51 Horsa troop carrying Glider (Serial No. DP726) in flight, ca 1944.  The type was named after Horsa, a legendary 5th-century conqueror of southern Britain.  The type was used to perform an unsuccessful attack on the German Heavy Water Plant at Rjukan in Norway, known as Operation Freshman, and during the invasion of Sicily, known as Operation Husky.  Large numbers of Horsa were subsequently used during the opening stages of the Battle of Normandy, being used in the British Operation Tonga and American operations.  It was also deployed in quantity during Operation Dragoon, Operation Market Garden and Operation Varsity.

 (Happy Days Photos)

Airspeed Horsa Mk. II glider (Serial No. KJ351), Museum of Army Flying, Middle Wallop, Hampshire.

 (IWM Photo CH 10228)

Airspeed Horsa Mk. I (Serial No. HS103), Heavy Glider Conversion Unit, night operations at Brize Norton.

Airspeed Horsa glider, Imperial War Museum, Duxford.

 (RAF Photos)

Armstrong Whitworth A.W.38 Whitley Mk. V, ca 1943.

Armstrong Whitworth A.W.38 Whitley.  No complete aircraft of the 1,814 Whitleys produced remains but the Whitley Project is rebuilding an example from salvaged remains and a fuselage section is displayed at the Midland Air Museum (MAM), whose site is adjacent to the airfield from where the Whitley's maiden flight took place.

 (IWM Photo)

 (David Merrett Photo)

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

Avro Anson Mk. XI (Serial No. N4877), Reg. No. G-AMDA, Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (ozz13x Photo)

 (Tim Felce Photo)

 (John5199 Photo)

Avro Anson XIX, painted to represent Anson C.19 (Serial No. TX176), a 1946-built aircraft that flew from RAF Coningsby from 1957 to 1964, Reg. No. G-AHKX, The Shuttleworth Collection, Old Warden, Bedfordshire.

 (Tony Hisgett Photo)

 (Rob Mitchell Photos)

 (Classic Air Force Photo)

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

Avro Anson Mk. T.21 (Serial No. WD413), Reg. No. G-VROE, Classic Air Force, St. Mawgan, Newquay. Airworthy.

 (Panhard Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Avro Anson Mk. I (Serial No. W2068), Reg. No. VH-ASM,.  Built 1941 and delivered to 4 Service Flying Training School at Geraldton, shown here mounted on a Queen Mary trailer, Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (Rept0n1x Photo)

Avro Anson Mk. C.19 (Serial No. TX214), Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire.

 (Ken Fielding Photo)

Avro Anson Mk. C.19 (Serial No. TX219), Reg. No. G-AWRS, North East Aircraft Museum, Sunderland, Tyne and Wear.

 (Ronnie Macdonald Photo)

Avro Anson Mk. C.19 (Serial No. VL348), Reg. G-AVV, Newark Air Museum, Winthorpe Airfield, Nottinghamshire.

 (Ashley Dace Photo)

Avro Anson Mk. C.19 (Serial No. VL349), Reg. No. N5054, Norfolk and Suffolk Aviation Museum, Flixton, Suffolk.

 (Ad Meskens Photo)

Avro Anson Mk. C.19 (Serial No. VM360), Reg. No. G-APHV, National Museum of Flight, East Fortune, Scotland.

  (Richard Goring Photo)

 (Ken Fielding Photo)

 (calflier001 Photo)

Avro Anson Mk. 19, c/n 1212, Reg. No. G-AGPG, (EKCO), cockpit section being restored, slated for display in the Avro Heritage Centre, Woodford.  At least 8,138 aircraft were built in Britain, with a further 2,882 in Canada.

 (Craig Sunter Photo)

Avro Anson Mk. T.21 (Serial No. VV901), Yorkshire Air Museum, Elvington, Yorkshire.

Avro Anson C.19 (Serial No. TX226), built in 1946 and currently undergoing a major restoration.  Montrose Air Station Heritage Centre, Scotland.  Anson TX226 was among a batch ordered by the RAF in Jan 1945.  The type operated from  Montrose with RAF Coastal Command's 269 Squadron, usually on anti-submarine patrols over the North Sea during the Second World War.

 (Ronnie Macdonald Photo)

 (Kogo Photos)

Avro Lancaster B Mk. I (Serial No. PA474), 617 Squadron, “City of Lincoln”, WS-J, painted as (Serial No. DV385), “Thumper Mk. III”, Battle of Britain Memorial Flight, Coningsby, Lincolnshire.  Airworthy.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Avro Lancaster B Mk. I (Serial No. R5868), “S-Sugar”, 467 Squadron, Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Jim IWM Duxford Photo)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X (Serial No. DV372), “Old Fred”, forward fuselage, PO-F, 467 (RAAF) Squadron, Imperial War Museum, Lambeth.

 (David Merrett Photos)

Avro Lancaster B Mk. X, RCAF (Serial No. KB889), Reg. No. G-LANC, Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (Eastkirkby Photo)

 (IdreamofJeanie Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Avro Lancaster B Mk. VII (Serial No. NX611), “Just Jane”, Reg. No. G-ASXX, Lincolnshire Aviation Heritage Centre, East Kirby, Lincolnshire. Taxi runs.

 (AlfvanBeem Photo)

Avro Lancster B. Mk. X (Serial No. KB976/KB994), Reg. No. G-BCOH, composite forward fuselage, damaged, Brooklands Museum, Weybridge, Surrey.

 (Allen Watkin Photo)

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

 (Rept0n1x Photo)

Avro Lincoln (Serial No. RF398), Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire.

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

 (Alan D R  Brown Photo)

Avro York (Serial No. MW100), ex Skyways & BOAC G-AGNV, and ex RAF TS798, Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire. Avro York (Serial No.), G-ANTK.  IWM Duxford.

 (IWM Photo CH 5324)

Cierva C.30 Autogyro used for Army co-operation work, being examined by Coastal Command aircrew officers at Wick, Caithness.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Roland Turner Photo)

Avro 671 Rota Mk. I (Cierva C.30 Autogyro), (Serial No. HM580), KX-K, Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Avro 671 Tota Mk. I (Serial No. AP507), KX-P, Reg. No. G-ACWP, Science Museum, South Kensington, London.

 (John5199 Photo)

Beechcraft Staggerwing, Reg. No. G-BRVE, The Fighter Collection, Duxford.  Built in 1945, flown during the Second World War by the Royal Navy as Traveller Mk. I (Serial No. FT475).  This aircraft was allocated to the United States Navy post-war before being sold into civilian ownership.  It was acquired by the Fighter Collection in 2005.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

  (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

Beechcraft C-45 Expeditor 3NM (Serial No. HB275), ex-RCAF (Serial No. 2324), ex-N5063N, Reg. No. G-BKGM, Skyblue Aero Services Ltd, Woodleys Drive, Newton Poppleford, Sidmouth.  In Royal Navy markings of Flag Officer Naval Air Command, painted as (Serial No. KP110).

 (James Photo)

Beechcraft 18 (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-BKGM, Bristol Airways Ltd.

 (Kogo Photos)

Bell P-39Q Airacobra (Serial No. 42-19993), c/n 26E-397, Reg. No. G-CEJU, “Brooklyn Bum 2nd”, The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire. Airworthy.

 (SDA&SM Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Blackburn Skua Mk. II (Serial No. L2940), wreckage, consisting of fuselage from the firewall forwards, both wings and rear fuselage with tail. Recovered from Norway in 1974. This 800 Squadron Skua was shot down in 1940 by a Heinkel He111.   Displayed in "as found" condition at the Fleet Air Arm Museum, Yeovilton, Somerset.

Boeing Stearman PT-13D Kaydet (Serial No. 42-17786), IWM Duxford.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Boeing Stearman PT-17 Kaydet (BuNo. 3486), c/n 75-1263,  44, Reg. No. G-RJAH, Golden Apple Operations Ltd, IWM Duxford.

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photos)

  (Steve Fitzgerald Photo)

 (Kogo Photo)

 

 (Tony Hisgett Photos)

 (Tim Felce Photos)

 

 

 (John5199 Photos)

 (Paul from United Kingdom Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Boeing B-17G Flying Fortress (Serial No. 44-85784), “Sally B”, Reg. No. G-BEDF, B-17 Preservation Ltd, Imperial War Museum Duxford, Cambridgeshire.  Painted as (Serial No. 41-24485), 124485.  Airworthy.

 (Clemens Vasters Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Paul from United Kingdom Photo)

 (en:Mark.murphy Photo)

Boeing B-17G Flying Fortress (Serial No. 44-83735), Reg. No. F-BDRS, “Mary Alice”, American Air Museum Duxford, Imperial War Museum. Painted as (Serial No. 238133), Y-G.

Boeing B-17G-50-VE Flying Fortress (Serial No. 44-8167), of the 15th Air Force, 2nd Bomb Group, 96th Bomb Squadron, dropping its bombs in 1944/45.  (NMUSAF Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Oren Rozen Photos)

 (Roland Turner Photo)

Boeing B-17G Flying Fortress (Serial No. 44-83868), Reg. No. N5237V, ex-USN (BuNo. 77233) ex-N6466D).  This aircraft was flown as a fire fighting tanker for a number of years before being converted back to full B-17G configuration at Sequoia, California.  Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

Boeing B-29 Superfortress (Serial No. 42-24612).  (USAAF Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Boeing B-29A Superfortress (Serial No. 44-61748),  "It's Hawg Wild", Reg. No. G-BHDK, American Air Museum, Imperial War Museum, Duxford.

 (IWM Photo CH 3448)

Boulton Paul Defiant Mk. I night fighter (Serial No. N3313), PS-P, of No. 264 Squadron, RAF based at West Malling, Kent, ca 1940.

 (RAF Photo)

Boulton Paul Defiant Mk. I night fighter (Serial No. ), OZ-V, ca 1940.

 (IWM Photo CH 4810)

Boulton Paul Defiant Mk. I night fighter (Serial No. N1801), PS-B, "Coimbatore II", of No. 264 Squadron RAF, undergoing a routine service in a dispersal, probably at Colerne, Wiltshire.  This aircraft was flown by the effective night-fighting team of Flying Officer F D Hughes (pilot) and Sergeant F Gash (gunner), and displays a victory tally of 5 enemy aircraft shot down.  In 1942 Hughes converted to the Bristol Beaufighter and, flying with Nos. 125 and 600 Squadrons RAF, further increased his score.  By the end of the war, he commanded No 604 Squadron RAF and had destroyed 18.5 enemy aircraft.

 (IWM Photo CH 2526)

Flight Sergeant E R Thorn (pilot, left) and Sergeant F J Barker (air gunner) pose with their Boulton Paul Defiant turret fighter at RAF Biggin Hill, Kent after destroying their 13th Axis aircraft.  Note the teddy-bear mascot.

 (IWM Photo CH 879)

Boulton Paul Defiant Mark I of No. 264 Squadron RAF, with an air gunner in the turret training his four .303 Browning machine-guns skywards at Kirton-in-Lindsey, Lincolnshire, ca 1940.

 (SDA&SM Photo)

Boulton Paul Defiant Mk. I night fighter (Serial No. V1110), RA-H, ca 1940.

 (Oxyman Photo)

 (Hugh Llewelyn Photo)

 (Oren Rozen Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Tony Hisgett Photos)

Boulton Paul Defiant Mk. I (Serial No. N1671), on display as a night fighter at the Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.  It was one of four Defiants delivered to 307 (Polish) Night Fighter Squadron at RAF Kirby in Lindsey, Lincolnshire on 17 September 1940.  It was passed to No. 153 Squadron at the end of October 41 and 285 Sqn in 1942.  In 1954, it was identified for storage as a historical aircraft and passed to the RAF Museum in 1971.  The aircraft was moved on 20 May 2009 to Rochester Airport, where it was restored by the Medway Aircraft Preservation Society (MAPS). It was returned to Hendon on 6 December 2012.

 (RAF Photo)

   (Roland Turner Photo)

 (Ian Dunster Photo)

 (Les Chatfield Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Bristol Bulldog (Serial No. K2227), Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

The Bulldog never saw combat with the RAF, although during the Abyssinia Crisis of 1935–36, Bristol Bulldogs were sent to the Sudan to reinforce Middle East Command.  Douglas Bader, better known for his Second World War actions, lost both of his legs when his Bristol Bulldog crashed while he was performing unauthorised aerobatics at Woodley airfield near Reading.  The type continued to serve for a few years with Service Flying Training Schools.

 (Library of Congress Photo  fsa.8d29959)

Bristol Beaufort Mk. V, Royal Australian Air Force.  This was the first Beaufort delivered to the RAAF on 3 September 1941, RAF (Serial No. T9450).  Subsequently it received the RAAF (Serial  A9-1).  Originally this aircraft was intended for use in Singapore, but it was retained in Australia.  It is known that it served in 1942 with No. 1 OTU and with No. 100 Squadron in 1944.  On 29 September it overshot a flare path and crashed through a boundary fence upon landing at Bairnsdale, Victoria, but it was repaired.  It was finally placed in storage on 23 October 1945 and written off on 13 May 1946.

 (RAF Photo)

 (The Land Photos)

 (Roland Turner Photos)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

 (tataquax Photo)

Bristol Beaufort Mk.VIII (Serial A9-559), a composite of several RAAF aircraft, displayed as Mk.IIA (Serial DD931/L), Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

 (Chad Kainz Photos)

 (Mark Harkin Photo)

Bristol Beaufighter Mk. XIc, (Serial No. JM135), ex-RAAF (Serial No. A19-144), a composite airframe which also includes parts of another Mk. XIC (Serial NBo. JL946) and an Australian built Mk. XXI.  The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (Raymond Godfrey Photo, ca 1967)

Bristol Beaufighter Mk. I (Serial No. X7688), Reg. No. G-DINT, Skysport Engineering, Hatch, Beds.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

 (The Land Photo)

Bristol Beaufighter TF.X (Serial No. RD253), Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.  Ex-Portuguese Air Force BF-13.

 (RAF Photo, ca 1944)

Bristol Beaufighter TF.X (Serial No. RD220), National Museum of Flight, East Fortune Airfield, Scotland. Being restored.

Bristol Beaufighter IIF (Serial No. unknown), sectioned forward fuselage, on loan from the RAF Museum, last surviving example of a IIF, in night fighting colours, Aerospace Bristol, Hayes, Way, Patchway, Bristol.

 (Tim Felce Photo)

Bristol Bolingbroke Mk. IVT (Blenheim Mk. IF), (Serial No. L6739), 82 Squadron, Reg. No. G-BPIV, Aircraft Restoration Co, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.  Airworthy.

Bristol Boningbroke, RCAF (Serial No. 9893).  IWM Duxford.

Bristol Blenheim Mk. IVT (Serial No. R3821), nose.  IWM Duxford

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Hugh Llewelyn Photo)

Bristol Blenheim Mk. IVT (Serial No. L8756), 254 Squadron, Coastal Command, Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (Ad Meskens Photo)

Bristol Blenheim/Bolingbroke Mk. IVT (Serial No. 9940), National Museum of Flight Scotland, East Fortune.

 (ozz13X Photo)

 (Graham Bould Photo)

Bücker Bü 181E Bestmann, Reg, No. G-GLSU, built in 1940, The Shuttleworth Collection, Old Warden, Bedfordshire.

Colditz Cock, a replica of a glider built by British prisoners of war for an escape attempt from Oflag IV-C (Colditz Castle) in Germany during the Second World War.  (IWM Photo)

Photo of the original "Cock" glider taken on 15 April 1945 by Lee Carson, one of two American newspaper correspondents assigned to the task force which captured the castle.

 (Tony Hisgett Photo)

 (Tim Felce Photo)

Consolidated PBY-5A Catalina (Serial No. 44-33915), Reg. No. G-PBYA, Plane Sailing, Duxford, Cambridgeshire. Airworthy.

 (Neal Stebbing Photo)

Consolidated PBY-5A Catalina (Serial No. 44-8423, (Serial No. JV928), Reg. No. N423RS, previously located in the North Weald Airfield Museum, Essex, this aircraft is now in St Lucie County Airport, Fort Pierce, Florida, where it is being restored.

 (Allen Watkin Photo)

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

 (Lancasterspotting Photo)

 (ozz13x Photo)

Consolidated PBY-6A Catalina (Serial No. L-866), Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire.

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

 (Les Chatfield Photo)

 (tataquax Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Consolidated B-24L Liberator B Mk. VI (Serial No. 44-50206), RAF (Serial No. KN751), Indian Air Force (Serial No. HE807), Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Clemens Vasters Photo)

Consolidated B-24M Liberator (Serial No. 44-51228), “Dugan”, Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (Kogo Photos)

Curtis Model 75A-1 Hawk (Serial No. 82/X881), Reg. No. G-CCVH.  Issued to the French Air Force in 1939.  It was later flown in combat against the British and Americans by the Vichy France Air Force.  Post-war it served as a trainer until the 1950s; it was acquired by the Fighter Collection in 1995.  It carries the markings of 1ére Escadrille, Groupe de Combat 11/5 Lafayette, the unit that operated it in 1939.  The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.  Airworthy.

 

 (Charlie Jackson Photos)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Curtiss P-36C Hawk (Serial No. 38-210), Reg. No. G-CIXJ, The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire. Airworthy.  Built in 1939, this P-36 is the only flying example of its type.  It saw some service in the Second World War in the USA before being allocated to a technical school.  Post-war, it passed through several private owners before being acquired by The Fighter Collection and restored.

 (John5199 Photo)

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Curtiss P-40B Warhawk (Serial No. 284), Reg. No. G-CDWH, The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire. Airworthy.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Curtiss P-40C Warhawk (Serial No. 41-13357), c/n 16161, Reg. No. G-CIIO, The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.  Airworthy.  After a period of US Army Air Force service, this aircraft was sent to the Soviet Union in 1941.  Little is known of its history there until the 1990s, when it was one of two Warhawks recovered from the former Soviet Union by The Fighter Collection.  It was restored in the United States, taking its first post-restoration flight in 2011.

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

 (John5199 Photos)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Curtiss P-40F Warhawk (Serial No. 41-19841), Reg. No. G-CGZP, The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.  Airworthy.  Operated by the 347th Fighter Group in the Solomon Islands in 1942, it was recovered from a dump on the island of Espiritu Santo in the 1970s.  Restored to airworthy condition, it has been flying since 2011.  As the aircraft's exact wartime history is unknown, it is painted to represent "Lee's Hope", a Warhawk based in Italy in 1944.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Curtiss P-40M Warhawk (Serial No. 43-5802), ex-RCAF (Serial No. 840), Reg. No. G-KITT, painted as P-40N (Serial No. 44-2104590) named "Lulu Belle", which was flown by 2nd Lieutenant Philip R. Adair as part of the 89th Fighter Squadron, 80th Fighter Group, 10th Air Force, based in the China-Burma-India Theater.  Peter Teichman, North Weald, Essex. Airworthy.

Curtiss P-40N Warhawk (Serial No. 44-7983), Reg. No. N9950, in storage, David Arnold, Flying A Services, North Weald.

 (Aldo Bidini Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Curtiss P-40 Kittyhawk Mk. IV (Serial No. FX760), Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

de Havilland DH.82 Queen Bee (Serial No.), composite being constructed, de Havilland Aircraft Museum at London Colney, Herfordshire.

 (Adrian Pingstone Photo)

de Havilland DH.82 Queen Bee (Serial No. LF858), Reg. No. G-BLUZ, Airworthy, Bee Keepers Flying Group, Old Warden, Bedfordshire.

 (Aldo Bidini Photo)

  (Alan Wilson Photo)

de Havilland DH.82A Tiger Moth (Serial No. T6296), Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

  (Roland Turner Photo)

 (David Merrett Photo)

de Havilland DH.82A Tiger Moth (Serial No. DE998), Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgshire.

 (Tim Felce Photos)

de Havilland DH.82A Tiger Moth (Serial No. K2585), Reg. No. TBC, The Shuttleworth Collection, Old Warden, Bedfordshire.

de Havilland DH.82A Tiger Moth (Serial No. T7793), Reg. No. TBC, Croydon Airport Visitor Centre, London.

 (Les Rickman Photo)

 (Ian Kirk Photos)

de Havilland DH.87B Hornet Moth (Serial No. 8033), Reg. No. G-ADKK, Compton Abbas airfield, Dorset.

 (Ken Fielding Photos)

de Havilland DH.87B Hornet Moth (Serial No. W9385), Reg. No. G-ADND, David and Sylvia Weston, Kemble, Glos. Airworthy.

 (Alec Wilson Photo)

de Havilland DH.89A Dragon Rapide (Serial No. TBC), Reg. No. G-ADAH, in the livery of Allied Airways, is on display at the Museum of Science and Industry, Manchester.

 (Alec Wilson Photo)

 (ozz13X Photo)

 (Allen Watkin Photo)

 (Roland Turner Photo)

de Havilland DH.89A Dragon Rapide (Serial No.), British European Airways colours, Reg. No. G-AGSH), The Shuttleworth Collection, Old Warden, Bedfordshire.

 (Tony Hisgett Photo)

 (Alec Wilson Photo)

(Adrian Pingstone Photo)

de Havilland DH.89A Dragon Rapide (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-AGTM, airworthy, operated by the Classic Air Force before it closed in 2016.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Oren Rozen Photo)

de Havilland DH.89A Dragon Rapide (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-AHAG, in the livery of Scillonia Airways, airworthy, based at Membury airfield, Berkshire.

 (IWM Photo CH 2731)

 (IWM Photo CH 2729)

de Havilland DH.89 Rapide and DH.89A Rapide ambulance aircraft, (Serial No. Z7258), ?Women of the Empire? and (Serial No. Z7261), ?Women of Britain?, at Hendon, Middlesex, the day before they were presented to No. 24 Squadron RAF by the ?Silver Thimble Fund?.  Originally civilian aircraft, Reg. No. Z7258 (G-AFMH) and Reg. No. Z7261 (G-AFMJ), these aircraft were impressed for the RAF in July 1940.

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

de Havilland DH.89A Dragon Rapide (Serial No. NR786), Reg. No. G-AHGD, painted as Z-7258, "Women of the Empire", Mildenhall.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

 (Rod Hodgkins Photo)

de Havilland DH.89A Dominie Mk. 6 (Serial No. TX310), Reg. No. G-AIDL, airworthy and flown from the Tangmere Military Aviation Museum in Tangmere, West Sussex.

 (Tony Hisgett Photos)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

de Havilland DH.89A Dragon Rapide (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-AKIF airworthy, based at Duxford, England airfield for tourist flights.

 (Tim

Felce Photo)

 (Trevor Marron Photo)

 (wallycacsabre Photo)

 (Tony Hissgett Photos)

de Havilland DH.89A Dragon Rapide (Serial No. HG691), Reg. No. G-AIYR, Classic Wings, Duxford, Cambridgeshire. Airworthy.

 (Rob Mitchell Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

de Havilland DH.89A Dragon Rapide (Serial No. X7344), Reg. No. G-AGJG, Mark and David Miller, Duxford, Cambridgeshire. Airworthy.  Ex-RAF Dominie G-AIDL was flown by Allied Airways in the late 1940s, Fox's Confectionery 1950–59, the Army Parachute Association 1967–77 and Air Atlantique Classic Flight 1995–2009.  Since 2009 it has flown from Tangmere Military Aviation Museum.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito (Serial No. EO234), c/n 98001, prototype, de Havilland Aircraft Museum at London Colney.

 (Sam Wise Photos)

de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito prototype (Serial No. W4050), de Havilland Aircraft Museum at London Colney close to the location it was built. It is painted as W4050 on the port side but has the test serial registration (Serial No. E-0234) on the starboard side.  This aircraft received the Engineering Heritage Award from the Institution of Mechanical Enginers in 2017.

 (Nilfanion Photo)

 (Yorkshire Air Museum Photo)

de Havilland Mosquito NF.II (Serial No. HJ711). This aircraft is a composite airframe and was on display during restoration at the Yorkshire Air Museum, Elvington.  HJ711 is moving to the Lincolnshire Aviation Heritage Centre at East Kirby.  There are plans to bring the aircraft's engines to running order.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

de Havilland Mosquito FB.6 (Serial No. TA122), de Havilland Aircraft Museum at London Colney in 605 Squadron markings.  It is being rebuilt with wings from another Mosquito.

  (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Martin Addison Photo)

de Havilland Mosquito TT.35 (Serial No. TA634), de Havilland Aircraft Museum at London Colney in 571 Squadron markings.

  (Tony Hisgett Photo)

 (Goshimini Photo)

de Havilland Mosquito TT.35 (Serial No. TA639), Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire.

  (Tony Hisgett Photo)

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

de Havilland Mosquito TT.35 (Serial No. TA719), Imperial War Museum, Duxford, it was registered G-ASKC in 1963 for use in the film 633 Squadron.

 (Les Chatfield Photo)

 (Hugh Llewelyn Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

de Havilland Mosquito B.35 (Serial No. TJ138), in 98 Squadron markings, Milestones of Flight exhibition at the Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

de Havilland Mosquito FB Mk. VI (Serial No. RL249), under construction in Ardmore, New Zealand and parts in the UK, for a UK-based charity, The People's Mosquito.

de Havilland Mosquito B Mk. IV (Serial No. DZ542), under construction for the British Charity, the Mosquito Pathfinder Trust.

Dornier Do 17Z.  (Bundesarchiv Bild 101I-341-0489-10A)

 (Dapi89 Photo)

 (Flightsoffancy Photo)

Dornier Do 17 (Wk. Nr. 1160), wreckage recently recovered.

 (Happy Days Photo)

Dornier Do 24T-3, (Wk. Nr. No. 5342), X-24, formerly EC-DAF, is on loan to the Militaire Luchtvaart Museum in the Netherlands from the Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (Bill Larkins Photo)

Douglas B-26C Invader (Serial No. 44-35282), California Air National Guard markings, ca 1950s.

Douglas B-26C Invader (Serial No. 44-34172), Reg. No. N4806E, Kent.

 (Carlos Menendez San Juan Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Cpl Phil Major (RAF)/MOD Photo)

 (Aldo Bidini Photos)

Douglas Dakota (Serial No. ZA947), built at Long Beach, California in March 1942, was issued to the US Army Air Forces and later transferred to the RCAF where she served until 1971.  The aircraft was purchased by the Royal Aircraft Establishment before being issued to the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight, Coningsby, in March 1993.  She is equipped with authentic period 'para seats' and is used in commemorative parachute drops.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Douglas C-47 Skytrain (Serial No. 43-15509), ex-Spanish Air Force Serial No. T.3-29, Imperial War Museum, Duxford.

 (Tim Felce Photos)

Douglas AD-4NA Skyraider (BuNo. 126922), c/n 7722, Reg. No. G-RADR, ex-French Air Force (Armée de l'Air), 42, ex-Gabon Air Force, (Armée de l'Air Gabonaise), (Serial No. TR-KMM), ex-F-AZED, Kennet Aviation, North Weald, Essex. Airworthy.  G-RADR is painted as an A-1H (BuNo 126922), code AK-204 of VA-176 "Thunderbolts", flying from the USS Intrepid.  The unit flew the A-1 Skyraider from 1955 until 1966 and saw combat during the Vietnam War.  On 9 Oct 1966, Lieutenant William T. Patton of VA-176 shot down a North Vietnamese MiG-17 Fresco.  It was the first (and only) shoot down of an enemy jet by a propeller-powered aircraft during the Vietnam Conflict. 

Douglas Skyraider AEW.1s from 778 Naval Air Squadron based at Royal Naval Air Station Culdrose in flight in the 1950s.  (USN Photo)

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

 (MACOS8 Photo)

 

Douglas Skyraider AEW.1 (Serial No. WT121), in storage, Fleet Air Arm Museum, Yeovilton, Somerset.  C/n 7427, built in January 1951 and stationed at the US Navy base at NAS Norfolk before allocation to the Royal Navy.  Shipped to Great Britain in March 1954 and served at RNAS Hal Far, Malta in 1955, returning to Culdrose later that year to serve with 849 Squadron.  In 1972 airlifted to RFA Engadine off the Cornish coast by Sea King helicopter, then airlifted by another Sea King to Cobham Hall.

Douglas Skyraider AEW.1 (Serial No. WV106), in storage, Fleet Air Arm Museum, Yeovilton, Somerset.

Fairchild Argus Mk. III (Serial No. HB652), on the ground at Hooton Park, Cheshire, ca 1940s.  (IWM Photo, ATP 10978C)

Fairchild Argus Mk. III, Reg. No. G-RGUS, painted as (Serial No. KK527), c/n 1145, previously flown as USAAF (Serial No. 44-83184), to be painted in an RAF scheme, Spanhoe, Northants.

Fairchild Argus (Serial No. HB612), Reg. No. G-AJSN, being restored by the Ulster Aviation Society (UAS) at Lisburn, Northern Ireland.

Fairchild Argus Mk. I, RAF (Serial No. HM181), on the ground at Heston Airport, Middlesex.  (IWM Photo, ATP 10978C)

 (Nilfanion Photos)

Fairchild Argus II (Serial No. FK338), Yorkshire Air Museum, Elvington.  The Argus II at Elvington arrived in England in August 1942 and served for most of the Second World War with the ATA at No.2 Ferry Pool, Whitchurch.  After the War, it was acquired by the United States Flying Club and registered as G-AJOZ. It was finally withdrawn from use in 1963.  After many years in various collections, the Argus was acquired by the Yorkshire Air Museum in June 2000.

  

Fairey Albacore being bombed up, HMS Formidable, Nov 1942.  (IWM Photo TR 287)

 Fairey Albacore, Royal Navy, ca 1942.  (Royal Navy Photo)

 (Ian Kirk Photo)

 (Rodw Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Fairey Albacore (Serial No. N4389), 4M, Fleet Air Arm Museum, Yeovilton, Somerset.

 (TSRL Photo)

Fairey Fulmar (Serial No. N1854).  This was the first Fulmar to be flown (on 4 January 1940) was later modified to Mk. II standard and then civilianised as Fairey's hack, G-AIBE.  In June 1959 it reverted to Service markings and is pictured here at Farnborough at the SBAC show on 8 September 1962.  Its last flight was three month later on 18 December 1962.  It is now in the FAA museum at Yeovilton and is the only surviving airframe.

 (Alan Wilson Photos) 

 (Rodw Photo)

 (Roland Turner Photos)

Fairey Barracuda Mk II carrying an 18-inch (46 cm) aerial torpedo.  The ASV radar "Yagi" antennae are visible above the wings. 

Fairey Barracuda Mk. II (Serial No. DP872), in storage, Cobham Hall, Fleet Air Arm Museum, Yeovilton, Somerset.

Fairey Barracuda Mk. II (Serial No. LS931), in storage, Cobham Hall, Fleet Air Arm Museum, Yeovilton, Somerset.

 

Fairey Battle (Serial No. K7650), 63-M, 63 Sqn, RAF Benson, Nov 1939.  (RAF Photo)

 

Fairey Battle, No. 218 Squadron over France, ca 1940.  (IWM Photo C447)

Fairey Battle (Serial No. L5343 is displayed at the Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.  In July 1940, it was with No. 98 RAF Squadron, based at Kaldadarnes, Iceland for anti-invasion operations supporting British forces. L5343 was the first RAF aircraft to land on Icelandic soil, and crashed during subsequent operations. In 1972, the RAF recovered the wreck for restoration, which was completed at the Michael Beetham Conservation Centre of the Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire.

Fairey Firefly FR.1 (Serial No. Z2030), of the Fleet Air Arm at Manchester (Ringway) Airport, 1 Apr 1946.  (RuthAS Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Fairey Firefly TT.1 (Serial No. DT989), Reg. No. SE-BRG, ex-Swedish Target tug, hence the colour scheme and registration. Aircraft Restoration Co, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

Fairey Firefly of 1770 Squadron, Fleet Air Arm, armed with rockets, awaiting the signal to take off from the flight deck of HMS Indefatigable during a carrier-borne air strike on a Japanese oil refinery at Pangkalan Brandan, Sumatra, ca 1945.  (IWM Photo A 27170)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Fairey Firefly TT.1 (Serial No. Z2033), "Evelyn Tensions", Reg. No. G-ASTL, Fleet Air Arm Museum, Yeovilton, Somerset.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Fairey Firefly TT.4 (Serial No. VH127), Fleet Air Arm Museum, Yeovilton, Somerset.

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photos)

 (Steve Fitzgerald Photo)

Fairey Firefly AS5 (Serial No. WB271), Royal Navy Historic Flight, lost in a crash at Duxford in 2003.

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

 (Oren Rozen Photo)

Fairey Swordfish Mk. II (Serial No. W5856), Reg. No. G-BMGC, Royal Navy Historic Flight, Yeovilton, Somerset. Airworthy.

 (Keith Morgan Photo)

 (Abbie Herron Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Fairey Swordfish Mk. II (Serial No. LS326), Reg. No. G-AJVH, Royal Navy Historic Flight, Yeovilton, Somerset. Airworthy.

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

Fairey Swordfish Mk. III (Serial No. NF389), Royal Navy Historic Flight, Brough, Yorkshire.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Fairey Swordfish Mk. II (Serial No. P4139), Reg. No. HS618, Fleet Air Arm Museum, Yeovilton, Somerset.

 (Petebutt Photo)

 (David Merrett Photo)

 (Clemens Vasters Photo)

Fairey Swordfish Mk. III (Serial No. NF370), Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (Roland Turner Photo)

Fiat CR.42 Falco (Serial No. Fv.2542), Reg. No. G-CBLS, The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.  This Swedish Air Force J 11 is one of only four survivors of its type.  It was lost in 1942 in a crash that killed its pilot on Tärnatjåkko, a mountain in the north of Sweden.  It was recovered from the crash site in 1983 and was acquired by the Fighter Collection in 1995.  It has since been undergoing restoration to flying condition.

 (RAF Photos)

Fiat CR.42 Falco captured during the Battle of Britain.  The aircraft was salvaged following a forced landing due to an overheated engine, on the shingle beach at Orfordness, Suffolk, on 11 November 1940.

 (RAF Photos)

Fiat CR.42 Falco, still wearing its Italian camouflage scheme, was given RAF roundels and RAF Serial No. BT474.  It was later flown by the RAF's No. 1426 Flight.  This aircraft is preserved and displayed at the Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London, as MM5701, 13-95.  

 (Oren Rozen Photo)

 (Mike1979 Russia Photo)

Fiat CR.42 Falco (Serial No. MM5701), 13-95, on display in the Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (Alec Wilson Photo)

Fieseler Fi 156A-1 Storch (Wk. Nr. 2088), GM+AI, Reg. No. G-STCH, built in 1943, Peter Holloway, The Shuttleworth Collection, Old Warden, Bedfordshire.

 (Rept0n1x Photos)

 (Tony Hisgett Photo)

 (Desmoh Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Fieseler Fi 156C-7 Storch (Wk. Nr. 475081), CF+HF, Re. No. EI-AUY, Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire.

 (ECM Photo)

Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, Eden Camp Museum, Malton.

Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, (Wk. Nr. 442795), Science Museum, London.  It was presented to the museum in 1945 by the War Office.

 (Florestan Photo)

Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in the Imperial War Museum, London.

 (Martin Richards Photo)

Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, mounted on a partial ramp section, at the Imperial War Museum Duxford.  The museum also has a partially recreated launch ramp with a mock–up V-1 displayed outside.

 (Rept0n1x Photo)

Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in front of a V2 rocket in the Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire.

Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display at the Aeropark at East Midlands Airport.

Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg IV piloted flying bomb, Lashenden Air Warfare Museum.This R.IV is reported to have been captured  at the Dannenburg V-1 factory buy the US Army and transported to the UK in 1945.  It was on display at the German aircraft exhibitioin at RAE Farnborough and later passed to the Joint Services Bomb Disposal School at Horsham, West Sussex, and then to the Territorial Bomb Disposal Unit at Fort Clarence in Rochester, Kent.

 (Luftwaffe Photo)

Flettner Fi 282B Kolibri (Hummingbird), coded CJ+SN 20th prototype, Midland Air Museum.  This  German helicopter was used for trials, including shipboard development flying at Kiel's Holtenau airfield in northern Germany.  It was captured at Travemunde in mid-1945 and moved to Britain by July, where it was issued to the College of Aeronautics at Cranfield on 1 Aug 1946.  In cut-down form it was transferred to the Midland Air Museum in May 1975.

Focke-Achgelis Fa 330, Lashenden Air Warfare Museum.

Focke-Achgelis Fa 330, Fleet Air Arm Museum, RNAS Yeovilton, Somerset.

 (MilborneOne Photo)

 (Yachtman Photos)

Focke-Achgelis Fa 330, Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire.

 (Mark Harkin Photo)

 (Clemens Vasters Photo)

Focke-Achgelis Fa 330, Imperial War Museum, Duxford.

Focke-Achgelis Fa 330, (Wk. Nr. 100502), RAF Millom Museum.  This museum has closed, the Fa 330 has been moved to a location TBC.

 (ozz13x Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 44 (Serial No. D-2692), The Shuttleworth Collection, Old Warden, Bedfordshire.

 (ozz13x Photos)

Focke Wulf Fw 190A (newbuild), Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire.

Morane-Saulnier MS.505 Criquet (Storch), TA+RC, Reg. No. G-BPHZ, Historic Aircraft Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire. Airworthy.

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

Morane-Saulnier MS.505 Criquet (Storch), FI+S, Reg. No. G-BIRW, National Museum of Flight, East Fortune, Scotland.

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8 (new-build), Reg. No. G-FWAB, Spitfire Ltd, Duxford, Cambridgeshire. Airworthy.

Focke-Wulf Fw 190D-9, (Wk. Nr. 211028), coded Black 8, 14/JG26 was preserved in England after being recovered from Germany in 1996.  This aircraft was registered on 21 May 2003, by Glenn R. Lacey of Epsom, Surrey, as G-DORA.  (Wk. Nr. 211028) is currently with the Fighter Factory at Virginia Beach, USA, as the Lacey collection no longer exists.

 

 (RAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190F-8/U1 (Fw 190S8) two-seat training and high speed transport (Wk. Nr. 584219), Black 38, RAF AM29.  This aircraft was built by Arado at the Warnemünde factory, and was an FW 190 F-8 converted to two-seat standard.  Captured in Grove, Denmark, North of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany by British forces in May 1945.  It is shown here shortly after it was flown to Farnborough in the UK on 2 Sep 1945 and repainted with RAF markings.  In Luftwaffe service, it operated with training units, and carried the letters HRZ.  It was exhibited at various locations, and now resides in the Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (RuthAS Photo)

 (Les Chatfield Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190F-8/U1 (Wk. Nr. 584219), two-seat training version, Black 38, designated RAF AM29, on display in the Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (RAF Photo)

Mistel S2, Focke-Wulf Fw 190A mounted on a Junkers Ju 88H1 (Wk. Nr. 714633), RAF, Schleswig, 1945.

 (RAF Photo)

Mistel S3A, Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8/R6, (Wk. Nr. 733759), designated RAF AM77 combined with Junkers Ju 88A, (Wk. Nr. 2492).  Both are believed to have been scrapped at Farnborough.

 (Zzztriple 2000 Photo)

 (Tony Hisgett Photo)

 (Gustav Gullberg Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8/R6, (Wk. Nr. 733682), RAF AM75.  This aircraft was captured at Tirstrup, Denmark where it was found mounted on top of a Junkers Ju 88A-6 bomber, (Wk. Nr. 2492), RAF AM77, as part of a Mistel S3B combination.  This aircraft has faired-over gun ports and a belly-mounted ETC-501 bomb rack.  This aircraft is on display in the Imperial War Museum.  The Ju 88 was scrapped at Farnborough.

  (Kogo Photo)

 (Oxyman Photo)

Fritz X, German Second World War Air-to-Ship Wireless Guided Gliding Bomb, Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.  The Fritz X was the world's first precision guided weapon ever deployed in combat, and the first to sink a ship in combat.  Fritz X was a nickname used both by Allied and Luftwaffe personnel. Alternative names include Ruhrstahl SD 1400 X, Kramer X-1, PC 1400X or FX 1400 (the latter, along with the unguided PC 1400 ordnance's Fritz nickname, is the origin for the name "Fritz X").

 (IWM Photo BU216 Photo)

General Aircraft Limited GAL. 49 Hamilcar with a Universal carrier unloaded fduring the Rhine crossing, 24-25 March 1945.  Hamilcars were only used on three occasions, and only in support of British airborne forces.  They first saw action in June 1944, when approximately thirty were used to carry 17-pounder anti-tank guns, transport vehicles and Tetrarch light tanks into Normandy in support of British airborne forces during Operation Tonga.  In September 1944 a similar number of Hamilcars were used to transport anti-tank guns, transport vehicles and supplies for airborne troops as part of Operation Market Garden.  They were used a third and final time in March 1945 during Operation Varsity, when they transported M22 Locust light tanks and other supplies.  The gliders proved to be successful in all three operations, although their slow speed and large size made them easy targets for anti-aircraft fire, which resulted in a number of gliders being damaged or destroyed. 

General Aircraft Limited GAL. 49 Hamilcar  unloading an M22 Locust light tank.  (RAF Photo)

 (Happy Days Photos)

General Aircraft Limited GAL. 49 Hamilcar glider (Serial No. TK777), fuselage and replica, Museum of Army Flying, Middle Wallop, Hampshire.

 (Simon Q Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

General Aircraft Limited GAL. 49 Hamilcar glider (Serial No. TK718), rear fuselage frame with an M22 Locust light tank, in the Tank Museum, Bovington, Dorset.

  (IWM Photo CH6030)

General Aviation GAL.48 Hotspur Mk. IIs (Serial No. BT551), "L" nearest, of No. 2 Glider Training Unit based at Weston-on-the-Green, in free flight over the Oxfordshire countryside, 1 Jan 1943.   The Hotspur was conceived as an "assault" glider which necessitated a compact design carrying no more than eight troops.  Tactical philosophy soon favoured larger numbers of troops being sent into battle aboard gliders.  Due to this, the Hotspur was mainly relegated to training where it did excel and it became the basic trainer for the glider schools that were formed.  The Hotspur was named after Sir Henry Percy, a significant captain during the Anglo-Scottish who was also known as "Hotspur".

Paratroopers serving with theAirborne Division beside a General Aircraft Hotspur Mk. II glider, 12 Nov 1942.  (IWM Photo TR276)

 

Paratroopers serving with theAirborne Division beside a General Aircraft Hotspur Mk. II glider, 12 Nov 1942.  (IWM Photo TR279)

 (Happy Days Photos)

 (Geni Photo)

General Aircraft Hotspur Mk. II (Serial No. HH368), replica, Museum of Army Flying, Middle Wallop, Hamsphire.

 

Gloster Gladiator (Serial No. K6131), ca 1938.  (RAF Photo)

 (Kogo Photo)

 (Tim Felce Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Gloster Gladiator Mk. I (Serial No. L8032), 423/427, built in 1937, Reg. No. G-AMRK. painted as (Serial No. K7985), 73 Squadron, The Shuttleworth Collection, Old Warden, Bedfordshire.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Gloster Gladiator Mk. I (Serial No. N5903), Reg. No. G-GLAD, The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire. Airworthy.  Built in 1939 as a Sea Gladiator but converted during restoration into a straight Gladiator, still wearing it’s genuine serial.  This Gladiator was flown briefly by 141 Squadron, but spent much of the Second World War in storage.  After a period of private ownership, and a some years as a static exhibit at the Fleet Air Arm Museum it was bought by the Fighter Collection from The Shuttleworth Collection in 1994 and restored to flying condition, taking its first post-restoration flight in 2007.  It is painted in the pre-Second World War markings of No. 72 Squadron RAF.

 (Hugh Llwelyn Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Gloster Gladiator Mk. I (Serial No. K8042), 87 Sqn, built in 1937, RAF Museum, Hendon.

Gloster Sea Gladiator Mk. (Serial No. N5520), on an airfield in Malta, possibly flown by No. 261 Squadron RAF at RAF Ta' Qali, ca 1940.  The aircraft has been refitted with a Bristol Mercury engine and three-bladed Hamilton propeller salvaged from a Bristol Blenheim.  N5520 is the only surviving Gladiator of the Hal Far Fighter Flight, and was presented to the people of Malta as Faith in 1943.  (RAF Photo)

Gloster Sea Gladiator (Serial No. N5518), Fleet Air Arm Museum, Yeovilton, Somerset.

 (Nick-D Photo)

 (Hugh Llewelyn Photos)

 (The Land Photos)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Gloster Meteor (Serial No. DG202/G), prototype, Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (Air Historical Branch-RAF/MOD Photo)

Ground crew manhandle a Gloster Meteor F.3 of the 616 Squadron Detachment at B58/Melsbroek, Belgium, on 6 February 1945.  The aircraft had deployed to the Continent to counter the threat of the German Me262 jet fighter which had started to enter service with the Luftwaffe.  The Meteor was the first British jet fighter and the Allies' only jet aircraft to achieve combat operations during the Second World War.  The Meteor first flew in 1943 and commenced operations on 27 July 1944 with No. 616 Squadron RAF.

 (Charlie Jackson Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Grumman FM-2 Wildcat, ex-USN (BuNo. 5765), Reg. No. G-RMMW, The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire. Airworthy.  This aircraft was accepted by the US Navy in 1945 but was immediately put in storage until its disposal in 1946.  It had several private owners and spent nearly two decades as a static museum exhibit before being restored to flying condition in the early 1990s.  It is painted to represent (Serial No. JV579), a Wildcat Mk. V of 846 Squadron, Fleet Air Arm, with full D-Day invasion stripes.

  (SDA&SM Photo)

Grumman F4F-4 Grumman Martlet Mk. I (Serial No. AL246), Fleet Air Air Museum, Yeovilton.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Grumman Martlet Mk. I (Serial No. AL246), Fleet Air Arm Museum, Yeovilton, Somerset.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Grumman FM-2 Wildcat (BuNo. 86690), c/n 5744, Reg. No. G-CHPN, previously Reg. No. N49JC, The Shuttleworth Collection, Old Warden, Bedfordshire.

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

Grumman F6F-5K Hellcat (Serial No. 80141) painted as (BuNo. 40467), Reg. No. G-BTCC, The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire. Airworthy.

Grumman Hellcats of No.1840 Naval Air Squadron based at RNAS Eglinton in Northern Ireland, 23 June 1944.  (IWM Photo A24533)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Nimbus227 Photo)

Grumman Hellcat Mk. II (Serial No. KE209), Fleet Air Arm Museum, Yeovilton, Somerset.

 

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Grumman F8F-2P Bearcat, ex-USN (BuNo. 21714), Reg. No. G-RUMM, The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.  Built in 1948, it served with the US Navy until 1957.  It then passed through the hands of several owners, including a period of being in the collection of the Planes of Fame Air Museum.  It was bought by the Fighter Collection in 1981.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Grumman ECM.68 Avenger (Serial No. XB446), Fleet Air Arm Museum, Yeovilton, Somerset.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Grumman TBM-3E Avenger (BuNo. 69327), painted as (Serial No. 46214), Reg. No. CF-KCG, Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

(Happy Days Photo)

Hafner Rotachute III (Serial No. P-5), Museum of Army Flying, Middle Wallop, Hampshire.

The rotorcraft team of the Airborne Forces Experimental Establishment (AFEE), handed by Raoul Hafner, had enjoyed some success in developing the so-called Rotachute (the idea of using a rotor rather than a parachute as a means of pinpoint landing troops in enemy territory), and this led to the suggestion that the principle could be applied to larger loads. This prompted Hafner to propose the Rotabuggy, a rotor-equipped Jeep, and the Rotatank, a similarly-equipped Valentine tank. A contract to develop the former was placed with the ML Aviation Company at White Waltham in 1942, this being covered by specification 10/42.

 (Happy Days Photos)

Hafner Rotabuggy (Serial No. B415), Museum of Army Flying, Middle Wallop, Hampshire.

Designed by Austrian Raoul Hafner of the British Airborne Forces Experimental Establishment (AFEE), the Rotabuggy was essentially a jeep converted into an autogiro as a way of giving airborne forces some ground ttansport. Initial flight trials, with the Rotabuggy towed behind a Whitley bomber, proved exhausting to the pilot who had to hang on to the control column which thrashed continuously around the cockpit. On flights where the tow cable remained attached there were some scary moments as the Rotabuggy, on the edge of a stall, touched down after the tow plane left and the driver took over. Development of vehicle-carrying gliders provided a safer and more efficient way of getting jeeps with more equipment (such as towed light guns) to the battlefield and the Rotabuggy never saw service. Another of Hafner's ideas was the Rotatank, a modified Valentine tank, which fortunately never left the drawing board.

 (SDA&SM Photo)

Handley Page Hampden Mk. I (Serial No. P1344).  This Hampden was recovered from a crash-site in Russia in 1991 and is being reconstructed at the Michael Beetham Conservation Centre at the Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire.  During the Second World War, it served with No. 144 Squadron RAF, part of Coastal Command.  In September 1942, the squadron was transferred to the Kola Peninsula in northern Russia to help protect the Arctic convoys.  While in transit over Finland, P1344 accidentally flew close by a German airfield and was shot down by two scrambled Messerschmitt Bf 109s.  It crashed in a wooded area of the Kola Peninsula, three crew members were killed and two taken prisoner.  After its recovery by another party, the RAF Museum gained ownership of the aircraft in 1992.  It was reported in 2016 that, with the help of volunteers, work on the fuselage could be completed by 2018.

 (Alan Zomerfeld Photo)

 (Rachel Semlyen Photo)

 (Craig Sunter Photos)

Handley Page Halifax B Mk. II (Serial No. HR792).  The Yorkshire Air Museum, on the site of the Second World War airfield, RAF Elvington, has a fully restored aircraft re-constructed from a fuselage section of HR792 and parts from other aircraft including the wings from an RAF Hastings.  It is painted to represent Halifax (Serial No. LV907), "Friday the 13th" from No. 158 Squadron RAF on the port side and "N - Novembre" of 347 "Guyenne" Squadron, Free French Air Force, on the starboard side (RAF Elvington was the home of the only two French heavy bomber squadrons in Bomber Command).

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Handley Page Halifax B Mk. II (Serial No. W1048), "S for Sugar" of No. 35 Squadron RAF.  On the night of the 27/28 April 1942, W1048 was taking part in a raid on the German battleship Tirpitz - its first operational flight.  It was hit by anti-aircraft fire after releasing the four 1,000-pound (450 kg) mines it carried and the pilot made a successful belly landing on the frozen surface of Lake Hoklingen.  The crew escaped to Sweden with the help of the Norwegian resistance, except for the Flight Engineer who remained behind because of a broken ankle and was taken prisoner. Within hours, the aircraft sank through the ice into 27 metres (89 ft) of water.  In the summer of 1973, it was recovered from the lake by a team of divers from the RAF and a Norwegian diving club, and was transported to the UK on a British Army Landing craft tank.  It is displayed in its "as recovered" condition in the Bomber Command display at the Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London, apart from the nose turret which had already been restored.

 (Tim Felce Photo)

 (Tony Hisgett Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Hawker Demon (Serial No. K8203), 64 Squadron, Reg. No. G-BTVE, The Shuttleworth Collection, Old Warden, Bedfordshire.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

 (Tony Hisgett Photo

Hawker Fury Mk. I (Serial No. K5674), Reg. No. G-BBZP), Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

Hawker Fury (Serial No. K1926), Cambridge Fighter and Bomber Society (CFBS), Little Gransden.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Aldo Bidini Photo)

Hawker Hart Mk. II (Serial No. J9941), 57, Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

 (Aldo Bidini Photo)

Hawker Hart trainer (Serial No. K4972), 57, Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (Tony Hisgett Photos)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Hawker Hind (Serial No. K5414), XV, 15 Squadron, Reg. No. G-AENP, recovered from Afghanistan, The Shuttleworth Collection, Old Warden, Bedfordshire.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Hawker Hind (Serial No. L7181), Reg. No. G-CBLK, restoration project recovered from Afghanistan, Imperial War Museum, Duxford.

 

 

 (Tony Hisgett Photos)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Hawker Nimrod (Serial No. S1581), 562, Reg. No. G-BWWK.  Flown from the aircraft carrier HMS Glorious by 408 (Fleet Fighter) Flight RAF until being written off in 1938.  It was discovered in a scrapyard in the 1970s and restored to airworthiness in the 1990s, taking its first post-restoration flight in 2000.  It joined the Fighter Collection in 2004.  It is currently painted in the markings it carried when serving operationally in the 1930s.  The Fighter Collection, Duxford.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Allen Watkin Photo)

 (ozz13x Photo)

 (TSRL Photos)

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo) 

Hawker Tomtit (Serial No. K1786), Reg. No. G-AFTA, The Shuttleworth Collection.

Hawker Hurricanes are listed on a separate page on this web site.

 (Author Photos)

 (Hohum Photo)

Hawker Typhoon Mk. Ib (Serial No. MN235), Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.  MN235 is currently on loan to the Canada Aviation and Space Museum in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Hawker Typhoon Mk. Ib, RAF No. 486 (NZ) Squadron, wearing 12-inch black and 24-inch white bands over Tangmere, UK, 27 Oct 1943.  (IWM Photo CH 11578)

Hawker Typhoon Mk. Ib (Serial No. RB396), Hawker Typhoon Preservation Group (HTPG), Cranfield.  Test flown on 9 Nov 1944 this aircraft served with No. 51 Maintenance Unit at Lichfield, Staffordshire in Nov 1944.  It flew with No, 174 Sqn in Jan 1945.  Mostly flown by Canadian Pilot Officer Frank Johnson, who named it "Sheila" after his wife.  While being flown by Flight Lieutenant Chris House, RB396 was damaged by flak and force landed Denekamp in the Netherlands.  The aircraft's remains are being restored to fly, possibly ca 2024.

 (SDA&SM Photo)

Hawker Tempest prototype in flight, ca 1944.

Hawker Tempest Mk. II (Serial No. MW401), Reg. No. G-PEST, stored, Blackbushe.

Hawker Tempest Mk. II (Serial No. MW758), stored, Blackbushe.

 (SDA&SM Photo)

Hawker Tempest Mk. II (Serial No. MW742) in flight, ca 1944.

Hawker Tempest Mk. II (Serial No. MW763), Reg. No. G-TEMT, Weald Aviation, North Weald. Being restored to fly.

 (Aldo Bidini Photo)

 (Paulmaz Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Hawker Tempest Mk. II (Serial No. PR536), Reg. No. HA457, Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (RAF Photo)

Hawker Tempest Mk. V (Serial No. NV696), during a test flight, November 1944.

 (IWM Photo ATP 14599C)

Hawker Tempest Mk. V (Serial No. NX201), 1 Nov 1944.

Hawker Tempest Mk. V (Serial No. JN768), Reg. No. G-TMPV, owned by Richard Grace, Halsead.

 (Panhard Photo)

 (Hugh Llewelyn Photo)

 (Roland Turner Photo)

 (Aldo Bidini Photos)

Hawker Tempest TT.5 (Serial No. NV778), Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Hawker Fury Mk. II ISS (Serial No. SR661), painted in the markings of the Sea Fury prototype, Reg. No. G-CBEL, John Bradshaw, Bournemouth, Dorset.  Airworthy.

 (Tim Felce Photo)

 (Adrian Pingstone Photo)

 (Peter Bakema Photo)

Hawker Sea Fury FB.11 (Serial No. VR930), Royal Navy Historic Flight, Yeovilton, Somerset. Airworthy.

 (Mark Harkin Photo)

Hawker Sea Fury FB.11 (Serial No. VX653), Reg. No. G-BUCM, currently being restored, The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

  (Tony Hisgett Photos)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Tim Felce Photo)

 (AKS.9955 Photo)

Hawker Sea Fury T.20(Serial No. WG655), Reg. No. NX20MD, The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (Tony Hisgett Photos)

 (Andrew Thomas Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Hawker Sea Fury T.20S (Serial No. VX281), Reg. No. G-RNHF, Royal Navy Historic Flight, North Weald, Essex.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Hawker Sea Fury FB.11 (Serial No. WJ231), Fleet Air Arm Museum, Yeovilton, Somerset.

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

 (Anthony Noble Photo)

Hawker Sea Fury FB.11 (Serial No. TF956).  This aircraft was lost when it crashed into sea off Prestwick, Scotland, 10 June 1989.

 (USAAF Photos)

Heinkel He 111H-20, (Wk. Nr. 701152), NT+SL in USAAF markings.

Heinkel He 111H-20, (Wk. Nr. 701152), NT+SL captured in the Munich area of Germany, shown here in USAAF markings.  This aircraft was flown by Watsons Whizzers and then by the 56th FG, 8th USAAF before being handed over to the RAF.  It was painted black and had an RAF roundel painted over the USAAF star and bar markings.  The peculiar logo on the fuselage is the letter W inside a C inside an O from the initials of Major J. Carter of the 61st Fighter Squadron, Major Williamson of the 62nd FS and Captain Ordway, Engineer Officer of the 61stFS.  This aircraft is preserved in the Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (Roland Turner Photo)

 (Hugh Llewlyn Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Heinkel He 111H-20, (Wk. Nr. 701152), coded NT+SL.  This aircraft was built in 1944 and modified to drop Fallschirmjäger (paratroops).  It is on display in the Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

CASA C-2111B (Serial No. B21-103), Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (tataquax Photo)

 (Panhard Photo)

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120227) of JG 1, captured at Leck in northern Germany.  Designated RAF AM65, later VN629 this aircraft was brought to Farnborough by surface transport on 31 July 1945.  It was not flown by the RAF.  It is currently on display in the Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (Tony Hisgett Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Heinkel He 162A-1, (Wk. Nr. 120235), originally coded Red 6, now painted coded Yellow 6, JG1, was captured at Leck. This aircraft was not allocated an Air Ministry number, likely because it was intended for use as a ballistics target.  Initially on display at RAF Cranwell it was transferred to Imperial War Museum, Lambeth in London, but is now on display at Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (Alan Watkin Photo)

 (Andrew Thomas Photo)

Junkers Ju 52 (Wk. Nr.), Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (Allen D R  Brown Photo)

 (Rept0n1x Photo)

Junkers Ju 52, painted as G-AFAP to represent a British Airways Ju52/3m, but is a CAS- built ex T.2B-272 of the Spanish Air Force, Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire.

 (RuthAS Photo)

Junkers Ju 87G-2 Stuka, (Wk. Nr. 494083), in 1970 wearing code W8-A.

 (Kogo Photo)

 (Roland Turner Photo)

 (Hugh Llewelyn Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Junkers Ju 87G-2 Stuka, (Wk. Nr. 494083).  This aircraft was captured at Eggebek in Schleswig-Hostein, Germany in May 1945.  No Air Ministry number was allocated.  Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire.

The Junkers Ju 87 Stuka, dive-bomber displayed at the Royal Air Force Museum was captured by British troops in Germany in 1945  It is thought to have been built in 1943–1944 as a D-5 before being rebuilt as a G-2 variant, possibly by fitting G-2 outer wings to a D-5 airframe.  After the war, it was one of 12 captured German aircraft selected by the British for museum preservation.  In 1967, permission was given to use the aircraft in the film Battle of Britain and it was repainted and modified to resemble a 1940 variant of the Ju 87.  The engine was found to be in excellent condition and there was little difficulty in starting it, but returning the aircraft to airworthiness was considered too costly for the filmmakers, and ultimately, models were used in the film to represent Stukas.  In 1998, the film modifications were removed, and the aircraft returned to the original G-2 configuration.  This aircraft has also been reported as being Junkers Ju 87B, (Wk. Nr. 5763), RAF HK827.

 (IWM Photo HU 108219)

Junkers Ju 88R-1 D5+EV of IV/NJG 3 fitted with FuG 202 AI radar.  The crew of this aircraft defected from Norway to Britain in May 1943, landing at Dyce in Scotland, and delivering their aircraft and its hitherto secret radar into the hands of the RAF. The photo shows the aircraft post-war, after a period of restoration.

 (Roland Turner Photo)

 (Hugh Llewlyn Photos)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Junkers Ju 88R-1, (Wk. Nr. 360043), D5+EV from IV./NJG3.  Originally built as a Ju 88A-1 bomber in 1942, it was converted to R-1 standard early in 1943 for the night fighter role.  In May 1943, a three-man crew was ordered to intercept an unarmed BOAC Mosquito courier flight from Leuchars, Scotland flying to Stockholm, Sweden.  Two hours after their take-off, the aircrew of this aircraft defected to England, sending a fake message to their home base that they had a fire in the starboard engine.  The bomber descended to sea level and dropped three life rafts to make the search parties think the aircraft had ditched at sea.  The crew then few on to Scotland.  The aircraft was a significant acquisition for the RAF as this aircraft was fitted with the most up to date FuG 202 Lichtenstein B/C radar installation.  This aircraft was designated RAF PJ876 and underwent trials with the RAF Wireless and Electrical Flight section of No. 1426 (Enemy Aircraft) Flight.  It was acquired by the RAF Museum in 1978.  The antenna of the on this aircraft are replicas, as the entire radar system was removed from the aircraft for evaluation during the war.  It had been preserved in the Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London, but is currently located at Cosford while the Hendon location is being upgraded.

 (SDA&SM Photo)

 (ozz13X Photo)

 (Max Smith Photo)

 (Fairlight Photo)

 (Aldo Bidini Photos)

 Kawasaki Ki-100-1b (Army Type 5 Fighter Model 1A) (Serial No. 8476M)Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire.

At the end of the Second World War 64 Japanese aircraft were selected for shipment to the UK, but due to limited shipping space only 4 made it to the UK.  These four aircraft included a Mitsubishi A6M5 Model 52 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter) codename “Zeke”, (the cockpit is now in the IWM), a Mitsubishi Ki-46-III (Army Type 100 Command Reconnaissance Plane Model 1), codename “Dinah”, 5439, a Kawasaki Ki-100-1a (Army Type 5 Fighter Model 1A), and a Kyushu K9W1 (Navy Type 2 Primary Trainer Momiji), codename “Cypress” (scrapped after accidental fire damage).  The Ki-46 and Ki-100 are today on display at the AMC.  The aircraft were sent via ship to No 47 MU, Sealand, for crating and storage, in February 1947.  In November 1985 they were transferred to RAF museum reserve collection RAF St Athan, before being moved to the Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire.in June 1989.  These aircraft were: Kawasaki Ki-100-1b (Army Type 5 Fighter Model 1A) (Serial No. 8476M); Yokosuka MXY7 Ohka Model 11 (Tail Number I-13); Mitsubishi Ki-46-III (Army Type 100 Command Reconnaissance Plane Model 1), codename “Dinah”  (Serial No. 5439); a Mitsubishi A6M5 Model 52 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, and a Mitsubishi A6M3 Model 52 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke” (Manufacture Number 3685), Tail Number Y2-176).  (Steve Dodd)

 (TSRL Photo)

Klemm Kl.35D, Reg. No. G-KLEM, The Shuttleworth Collection, Old Warden, Bedfordshire.

Lavochkin La-11 (Serial No. 20), The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (IWM Photo TR 27)

Lockheed Hudson Mk. VI (Serial No. AE626), of the Middle East Communications Flight flying over the Pyramids at Cairo, Egypt, in 1942.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Lockheed Hudson Mk. IIIA (Serial No. A16-199), RAAF colours, Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (Peripitas Photo)

 (Bob Jarrett Photo)

Lockheed P-38H-LO Lightning (Serial No. 42-66841), c/n 1352, 153, "Scarlet Scourge", 432 SQN, 475th FG, 5th AF, flown by Lt. Edward Dickey on numerous missions over Papua New Guinea and it’s adjacent national islands.  The Lightning scored a probable victory against an Oscar Fighter over the enemy fortified Rabaul Harbour, New Britain on 23rd October 1943.  The large fighter was salvaged by the Classic Jets Fighter Museum, Australia in 1999 and subsequently under went a seven year restoration program by the Museum’s restoration team.  This aircraft is now in the UK at Bentwaters.

Messerschmitt Bf 109F-4 (Wk. Nr. 7485), Black 1, ex-9./JG5, Charleston Aviation Services, Colchester, Essex.

Messerschmitt Bf 109F-4 (Wk. Nr. 8347), Yellow 10, ex-6./JG54, Charleston Aviation Services, Colchester, Essex.

Messerschmitt Bf 109G-6 (Wk. Nr. 15458), Black 10, ex-III/JG 1, CW Tomkins Ltd, UK.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Roland Turner Photo)

Messerschmitt Bf 109E-3 (Wk. Nr. 1190), Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (RAF Photos)

Messerschmitt Bf 109E-3, (Wk. Nr. 4101), "Black 12" from I./JG51, RAF DG200, in flight while serving with No. 1426 (Enemy Aircraft) Flight.  This aircraft force-landed at Manston, Kent, on 27 November 1940, after being attacked by Supermarine Spitfires of No. 66 Squadron RAF over the Thames estuary.  After repair at the Royal Aircraft Establishment it was delivered to Rolls-Royce Ltd at Hucknall in February 1941 for engine performance tests.  On 8 February 1942 it was passed to the Controller of Research and Development at Hatfield for propeller tests before going on to the Aircraft and Armament Experimental Establishment at Boscombe Down, and, in March 1942, to No. 1426 Flight at Duxford and later Collyweston.  In 1943, DG200 was put into storage, eventually moving to St Athan in 1969 for refurbishment.  Once restored to its wartime paint scheme, it moved to the Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London, in 1976, where it is presently on display in the Battle of Britain Hall.  DG200 is seen here being flown without its cockpit canopy, which was removed (and never replaced) while the aircraft was at Hucknall to enable Wing Commander J.H. Heyworth, a Rolls Royce test pilot who was very tall, to fit into the cockpit.  This aircraft is now on display in the Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

Messerschmitt Bf 109E-3 (Wk. Nr. 4101), Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.  Ex-GH + DX, ex-6./JG 52, Yellow 8, ex-2/JG51, Black 12, ex-RAF DG200, ex-No. 1426 Flight RAF (the "Rafwaffe"), used in Battle of Britain film, Black 12 , Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photos)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Roland Turner Photo)

 (Les Chatfield Photo)

 (Oren Rozen Photos)

Messerschmitt Bf 109G-2 (Wk. Nr. 10639), Reg. No. G-USTV, Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Hispano Aviación HA-1112-M1L Buchón, "Black 1", Reg. No. G-AWHE, top Spitfire Ltd, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (AlanWilson Photos)

 (Mark Harkin Photo)

Hispano Aviación HA-1112-M1L Buchón, previously Red 1, painted as - Yellow 10, Reg. No. G-BWUE,  c/n 172. Spanish Air Force serial ‘C.4K-102’, built post-war in Spain.  Restored in original condition and still fitted with a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine, which is how they were built.  Painted in the colours it wore when involved in the production of 'The Battle of Britain' film, at Duxford in 1968, when it was registered as G-AWHK.  It is operated by ARCo.  Spitfire Ltd, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Hispano Aviación HA-1112-M1L Buchón previously Yellow 10, Reg. No. G-AWHK, painted Black 2 for the film "Dunkirk".

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Hispano Aviación HA-1112-M1L Buchón, previously Yellow 10, Reg. No. G-AWHK, recently repainted in a weathered desert paint scheme, to represent Messerschmitt Bf109 E-7 “Black 8″ flown by Leutnant Werner Schroer of Jagdgeschwader JG-27 in April 1941.  Historic Flying Ltd, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.  

Hispano Aviación HA-1112-M1L Buchón, Reg. No. N109ME, Privately owned, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

Hispano Aviación HA-1112-M1L Buchón, Reg. No. G-BOML, at Duxford, Cambridgeshire, on 10 July 1999.  This aircraft was lost in a crash at Barcelona, Spain on 25 Sep 1999.

 (Anthony Noble Photo)

Hispano Aviación HA-1112-M1L Buchón, c/n 235, "Red 14", ex-G-HUNN, now in the USA as Reg. No. N109GU.

Hispano Aviación HA-1112-M4L Buchón, c/n C4K-112, two-seater variant, painted as "Red 11" as flown during the film "Battle of Britain" in 1968, Reg. No. G-AWHC, airworthy.  The Spitfire Blister, Sywell Aerodrome, Northampton.

 (Dapi89 Photo)

 (Clemens Vasters Photos)

 (Rept0n1x Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 163B-1a Komet, (Wk. Nr. 191614), captured at Husum.  Designated RAF AM207.  This aircraft last flew on 22 April 1945, when it shot down an RAF Lancaster.  It is currently painted as (Wk. Nr. 191461).  Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire.

 (Ronnie Macdonald Photo)

 (Ad Meskens Photo)

 (Guinog Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 163B-1a Komet, (Wk. Nr. 191659), "Yellow 15".  Designated RAF AM215.  Captured at Husum, Schleswig Holstein at the end of the war, this Komet went to the College of Aeronautics at Cranfield in 1947.  In 1976 it was refurbished and loaned to the Royal Scottish Museum.  In 2007 it was donated to the museum by Cranfield University.  National Museum of Flight in East Fortune, East Lothian, Scotland.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 163B-1a Komet, (Wk. Nr. 191316), "Yellow 6", Science Museum, South Kensington, London.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

 (Aldo Bidini Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a Schwalbe, (Wk. Nr. 112372), "Red 2", captured at Schleswig.  Designated RAF AM51, later VK893.  AM51 was test flown by the Royal Aircraft Establishment Aerodynamics Flight.  It was painted "Yellow 7", and is now painted as "Yellow 4".  It was on display in the Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London for many years, before being moved to RAF Cosford.

 (RAF Photos)

 (IWM Photo CH 15616)

Messerschmitt Me 410A-3 (Wk. Nr. 10259) being examined by RAF mechanics at No. 1426 (Enemy Aircraft) Flight at Collyweston, Northamptonshire (UK). This aircraft was formerly F6+OK of 2(F)./122.  The crew, Fw. Hans Beyer and Uffz. Helmut Hein, got lost on the return leg to Perugia and landed by mistake at Monte Corvino, Italy, on 27 November 1943. Designated RAF (Serial TF209), it arrived for testing at the Royal Aircraft Establishment, Farnborough, on 14 April 1944, and was also evaluated by the Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establishment, Boscombe Down.  TF209 flew with the Fighter Interception Unit at Wittering from August 1944 until March 1946 when it was transferred to No. 6 Maintenance Unit at Brize Norton.

 (RAF Photo)

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

 (Clemens Vasters Photos)

 (Tony Hisgett Photo)

 (Dapi99 Photo)

 (ozz13x Photo)

 (Allen Watkin Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 410A-1/U2 Hornisse, (Wk. Nr. 420430), captured at Vaerlose.  Designated RAF AM72.  Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire.

 (Kevin Dickin Photo)

Miles M.2H Hawk Major (Serial No. DG590), Montrose Air Station Heritage Centre, Scotland.  This aircraft was in storage with the RAF Museum and is one of only two in existance.

 (IWM Photo CH 1250)

Miles M.14A Magister, No. 28, No. 8 Elementary Flying Training School at Woodley, Berkshire, September 1940, prior to a training flight.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

 (Mike Burdett Photo)

Miles M.14A Magister (Serial No. P6382), c/n 1750, Reg. No. G-AJRS, The Shuttleworth Collection, Old Warden, Bedfordshire.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Miles Magister (Serial No. N3788), Reg. No. G-AKPF, The Shuttleworth Collection, Old Warden, Bedfordshire.

 (IWM Photo CH 140)

Miles M.14 Magister (Serial No. N3780), flown by Miles Aircraft?s test-pilot, Bill Skinner, from Woodley airfield, Berkshire. The aircraft later served as ?49? with No. 15 Elementary Flying Training School at Carlisle.

 (Gaius Cornelius Photo)

 (Roland Turner Photo)

Miles M.14 Magister Mk. III (Serial No. BB661), FDT-A, Reg. No. G-AFBS, Imperial War Museum, Duxford.

 (Happy Days Photo)

Miles Magister (Serial No. T9707), Museum of Army Flying, Middle Wallop, Hamsphire.

 (MBA Photo)

Miles Magister Mk. I (Serial No. T9841), reconstructed as (Serial No. L6906), Reg. No. G-AKKY, Museum of Berkshire Aviation (MBA), Woodley, Berkshire.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Miles Magister M.14A (Serial No. T9738), Reg. No. G-AKAT, Real Aeroplane Company, Breighton Airfield, North Yorkshire.

Miles Magister Mk. I (Serial No. 35), National Museum of Ireland, Collins Barracks, Dublin.

 (Miles Aircraft Ltd Photos)

Miles Martinet TT Mk. I (Serial No. HN862), being flown by Miles Aircraft?s chief test-pilot Tommy Rose shortly after completion. Following service with The RAE and the Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establishment, HN862 joined No. 1634 (Anti-Aircraft Cooperation) Flight at Hutton Cranswick, Yorkshire, where it was lost as a result of a forced landing on 7 July 1943.

 (Allen Watkin Photo)

Miles Martinet TT.1 (Serial No. MS902), Reg. No. TF-SHC, ca. 1942, Museum of Berkshire Aviation, Woodley, Berkshire.  MS902 was built in 1943, and spent its operational life in Iceland at RAF Reykjavik.  In 1949, it was sold to the Akureyri Flying Club and given the Icelandic civil registration TF-SHC.  The club flew it until it crashed in 1951 near Kopasker in north-east Iceland.  The wreckage remained at the crash site until 1977, when it was recovered and placed in storage by the Icelandic Aviation Historical Society.  The aircraft was returned to the United Kingdom in 1996 by the Museum of Berkshire Aviation and has since been the subject of a lengthy restoration project.

 (IWM Photo B 7065)

Miles M.38 Messenger Mk. I (Serial No. RD333), the personal aircraft of Field Marshal B.L. Montgomery, at a landing ground in Normandy.  His pilot, Flying Officer Martin, stands next to him.

 (Alan D R  Brown Photo)

 (Les Chatfield Photo)

 (L-Bit Photo)

Miles Messenger (Serial No. RG333), Reg. No. G-AIEK, Jim Buckingham, Bristol, Somerset. Airworthy.

 

Mitsubishi A6M5 “Zeke” Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter, Model 52, coded BI-I2, in flight with ATAIU-SEA markings.  (RAF Photo)

 (Mark Harkin Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M3 “Zeke” Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter cockpit, still carrying its ATAIU-SEA markings, Imperial War Museum, Duxford.

 (Roland Turner Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M3 “Zeke” Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter, Imperial War Museum, Duxford.

 (Tony Hisgett Photo)

 (Dapi89 Photo)

 (Roland Turner Photo)

 (RuthAS Photo)

Mitsubishi Ki-46-III Army Type 100 Command Reconnaissance Plane (C/N 5439), 8484M, of the 81st Sentai, 3rd Chutai IJAAF, codenamed "Dinah".  In 1944-45, during the last days of the war, it was modified as a high altitude interceptor, with two 20-mm cannons in the nose and one 37-mm cannon in an "upwards-and-forwards" firing position.   It was stationed in British Malaya before its shipment to England in 1946, and is now on display at the Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire.

 (SDA&SM Photo)

Nakajima Ki-43 Hayabusa, The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Noordyn Harvard Mk. II (Serial No. FE695), Reg. No. G-BTXI.  The Fighter Collection, Duxford.  A version of the North American T-6 Texan that was built by Noorduyn Aviation in Montreal, Quebec in 1942.  It served as a trainer with the RCAF, and then the Swedish Air Force until 1972.  It joined The Fighter Collection in 1990.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Noordyn Harvard Mk. IIB (Serial No. FE511), ex-RCAF, ex-Swedish Air Force, Shuttleworth Collection, Old Warden.  This aircraft has been restored and flew on 14 March 2017.

  (Ian Kirk Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

North American Harvard Mk. III, (Serial No. 41-33949), (Serial No. EX976), Fleet Air Arm Museum, Yeovilton.

  (Alan Wilson Photos)

 (Kral Michal Photo) 

 (Memorino Photo)

North American Harvard Mk. IIB (Serial No. KF488), Bournemouth Aviation Museum, Dorset.

North American Harvard Mk. IV (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-TVIJ, Robert W. Davies, Woodchurch Airfield.

North American AT-6C Texan (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-TSIX, Anthony Cundall, Linton-on-Ouse.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

North American AT-6D Texan (Serial No. 42-4415), Reg. No. G-TOMC, Adrian Marshall, being restored.

 (James Photo)

 (Alec Wilson Photo)

North American AT-6D Texan (Serial No. 313048), Reg. No. G-TDJN, David Nock.

North American Harvard Mk. IV (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-RAIX, Malcolm Paul. Lee-on-Solent.

North American Harvard Mk. IV (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-HRVD, Phil Earthy, (Ex-CCF4-541, 53-4622, BF+055).

 North American Harvard AT-6D (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-ELMH, Maurice Hammond, Hardwick Warbirds.

North American Harvard Mk. II (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-CCPM, Steven Wilch.  Ex-RCAF (Serial No. 3019), being restored.

North American SNJ-7 Texan (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-BRBG, David Jon Gilmour, North Weald.

North American Harvard Mk. IIB (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-CTKL, Michael Rowland Simpson, Biggin Hill.

 (wallycacsabre Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

North American Harvard Mk. IV (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-BUKY, Neil Oakman and Mike Cumming, Duxford.

 (Tony Hisgett Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (wallycacsabre Photos)

North American Harvard Mk. IV ex-(Serial No. KF729), Reg. No. G-BJST, now painted as (Serial No. AJ841), A. Goodall, G. Fricker, B. Jones and M. Cumming, Duxford.

North American AT-16 Texan (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-CGYM, Reflight Airworks Ltd.

North American AT-16 Texan (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-CCOY, Classic Flying Machine Collection.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

North American Harvard Mk. IIB (Serial No. 42-12392), c/n 14-639.  Built in Canada in 1943 by Noorduyn.  RCAF (Serial No. FE905).  In 1946 it was stored until joining the Royal Danish Air Force in September 1950 as (Serial No. 31-329).  Sold in 1960, it became 'LN-BNM'.  It's last flight was in 1968, and in 1972 it joined the Historic Aircraft Museum at Southend.  When the museum was auctioned off in 1983, the Harvard was bought by Paul Raymond for his Whitehall Theatre of War.  In 1985 it was purchased by the RAF Museum and was later restored at RAF Cardington.  It was initially display on loan at the Newark Air Museum, but in 1994 it moved to Hendon.  it is currently on display in the Historic Main Hangars, RAF Museum, Hendon, London.

North American Harvard Mk. IIB (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-BZHL, Ronald Henry Cooper.

 (Alec Wilson Photo)

North American Harvard Mk. IV (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-BSBG, Anthony Paul St John.

North American Harvard Mk. IV (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-CHYN, Robert F. Warner.

North American AT-6C Texan (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-BICE, Colin Malcom, Lewis Edwards.

 (Carlos Menendez San Juan Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

North American Harvard Mk. IV (Serial No. 1747), Reg. No. G-BGPB, Aircraft Spares and Materials, Duxford.

 (Alan D R  Brown Photo)

North American AT-6D Texan (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-BGOR, Patrick Meyrick, Goodwood.

North American AT-16 Texan (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-AZSC, Goodwood Road Racing Co.

 (Alec Wilson Photo)

North American AT-16 Texan (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-AZBN, Swaygate Ltd, Duxford. 

North American T-6G Texan (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-BGHU, Christopher Edward Bellhouse.

North American T-6G Texan (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-BKRA, First Air Ltd.

North American T-6G Texan (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-BRBC, Anthony Patrick Murphy.

North American T-6G Texan (Serial No.), Reg. No. G-DDMV, Colin Dabin.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

North American B-25J Mitchell (Serial No. 44-31171), Reg. No. N7614C, Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.  It is painted in the markings of the 488 Bomb Squadron, USAAF, based in Corsica in 1944.  This is a most appropriate scheme for a B-25, as it was in this unit that Joseph Heller flew as a bombardier. He was later to write famed novel ‘Catch 22’ based on his experiences in the unit. ‘34064’ was named 'LI'l Critter From The Moon' (which is on the port side) and was one of the aircraft in which it is known Heller flew.  It was lost in January 1945 in a mid-air collision with sister aircraft 43-27657, while returning from a raid on San Michelle.  The film of the movie involved some 17 airworthy Mitchells, most of which are still flying.

 (Clemens Vasters Photo)

 (Roland Turner Photo)

North American B-25J, ex-TB-25N Mitchell (Serial No. 44-29366), Reg. No. N9115Z, Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

North American P-51D Mustang (Serial No. 44-13521), “Marinell”, Reg. No. G-MRLL, Maurice Hammond, Hardwick, Norfolk.  Airworthy.

North American P-51D Mustang (Serial No. 44-13954), “Da Quake”.  This aircraft crashed on a beach near Bordeaux on 26 Aug 1944.  Reg. No. G-UAKE, Philip S. Warner, Coventry, Warwickshire.  Being restored.

North American P-51D Mustang (Serial No. 44-14291), Phil G. Earthey.  Being restored.

North American P-51D Mustang (Serial No. 44-14574), “Little Zippie”.  This aircraft ditched off Clacton Pier on 13 1945.
It was recovered on 16 Aug 1987.  The fuselage is displayed in crash state.  East Essex Aviation Museum, Point Clear, Essex.

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

 (Julian Herzog Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Oren Rozen Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

North American P-51D Mustang (Serial No. 44-72035), Reg. No. G-SIJJ, “Tall in The Saddle”, Painted with a red tail and spinner in the colours of the 99th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group, USAAF.  Previously “Jumpin Jacques”.  Peter Teichman, Hangar 11 Collection, North Weald, Essex. Airworthy.

North American P-51D Mustang (Serial No. 44-72181), Reg. No. G-CEBW, Dental Insurance Solutions, Norwich, Norfolk.

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photos)

North American P-51D Mustang (Serial No. 44-72216), 487th Fighter Squadron, 352nd Fighter Group, 8th Air Force.  Operated by Robert Lamplough, it is painted as "Miss L" for the film "Memphis Belle".  It was operated later by the Swedish Air Force (Serial No. 26116) and the Israeli Defence Force (Serial No. 2343). 

  (Adrian Pingstone Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

North American P-51D Mustang (Serial No. 44-72216), “Miss Helen”, Reg. No. G-BIXL, Robert Tyrrell, Abingdon. Airworthy.

North American P-51D Mustang (Serial No. 44-73098), Reg. No. G-BMBA, Aces High Ltd, Duxford, Cambridgeshire. Being restored.

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

North American P-51D Mustang (Serial No. 44-73149), ex-RCAF (Serial No. 9568) “Moose”, (now repainted as “Ferocious Frankie”), Reg. No. G-BTCD, Old Flying Machine Co, Duxford, Cambridgeshire. Airworthy.

 (Aldo Bidini Photos)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Peter Bakema Photos)

North American P-51D Mustang (Serial No. 44-73149), “Ferocious Frankie”, Reg. No. G-BTCD.  This Mustang is painted to represent the aircraft flown by Wallace E. Hopkins, 374th Fighter Squadron, 361st Fighter Group.  Previously with the Old Flying Machine Co, Duxford, Cambridgeshire. Airworthy.  This aircraft has been sold to a private collector in Turkey

 (ozz13x Photo)

 (Allen Watkin Photo)

North American P-51D Mustang (Serial No. 44-73415p), “Isabel III”, EGWC, Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

 (Gerard van der Schaaf Photo)

 (bckthd Photo)

North American P-51D Mustang (Serial No. 44-73877), (Serial No. KH774), Reg. No. G-SHWN, Shaun Patrick, Sharkmouth Ltd, Goodwood. Airworthy.

 (Gustav Gullberg Photo)

 (Florestan Photo)

 (Trabalninja Photo)

 (calflier001 Photo)

 (Tony Hisgett Photo)

North American P-51D Mustang (Serial No. 44-73979), ex-RCAF (Serial No. 9246), "Big Beautiful Doll", before being repainted as "Etta Jeanne II".

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

North American P-51D Mustang (Serial No. 44-73979), ex-RCAF (Serial No. 9246), “Etta Jeanne II”, Imperial War Museum, Lambeth, London.

 (Roland Turner Photo)

  (Hugh Llewelyn Photo)

 (Aldo Bidini)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

North American P-51D Mustang (Serial No. 44-74409), “Donald”, Reg. No. N51RT, painted as (Serial No. 44-13317), Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (Tim Felce Photo)

 (Tony Hisgett Photo)

 (Alex Patrel Photo)

North American TF-51D Mustang (Serial No. 44-84847), Reg. No. N251RJ, Reg. No. G-TFSI, Stephen Grey, The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.  Airworthy.  Built too late for the Second World War, this aircraft flew with the 45th Reconnaissance Squadron during the Korean War.  It was acquired by the fighter collection in 1999.  It is painted to represent Miss Velma, flown by Captain Frank E Birtciel of the 55th Fighter Group.

 (Omono Photos)

North American P-51D-25NT Mustang (Serial No. 44-84952), "Sarah Jean", FF-330, Reg. No. N9857P, David Nock, Halfpenny Green, Wolverhampton.

 (Alan D R Brown Photo)

North American P-51D Mustang (Serial No. 45-11518), (414419), LH-F, “Janie”, Reg. No. G-MSTG, Maurice Hammond, Hardwick, Norfolk. Airworthy.

 (Peter Bakema Photo)

 (Andre Wadman Photo)

North American Mustang Mk. 22, RAAF (Serial No. A68-192), “Big Beautiful Doll”, Reg. No. G-HAEC, EZ-Z, Rob Davies, Woodchurch, Kent. Airworthy. To Germany as D-FBBD, crashed at Duxford 10 July 2011.

 (IWM Photo CH 775A)

Percival Q.6 (Serial No. P5634),  RAF Northolt Station Flight, parked alongside Bristol Blenheims at Wyton, Huntingdonshire, ca 1940.

Percival Q.6, Reg. No. G-AFFD, built in 1938.  Seething, Norfolk.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Liper L-4H Grasshopper (Serial No. 44-329854), c/n 11145, in the markings of the 381st Bomb Group, based at Ridgewell, Essex in 1944.  This L-4 was taken on charge from the Piper Aircraft Corporation at Lock Haven in January 1944 and first issued to the Eighth Air Force.  She served the U.S Ground Forces in Europe possibly with Pattons 3rd Army.  In 1947 she was struck of charge and sold as surplus and acquired by a French aero club.  She was acquired by a British owner and arrived in the U.K.  In 2011 she moved to The Biggin Hill Heritage Hangar Ltd, Biggin Hill, Kent.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Piper L-4J Cub (Serial No. 43-0681), c/n 12544, Reg. No. G-AXGP), painted as 3681. Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (Tim Felce Photo)

 (Roland Turner Photo)

 

 (Allan Wilson Photos)

 (Alec Wilson Photo)

Polikarpov Po-2 Mule (Serial No. 9), Reg. No. ZK-POZ, The Shuttleworth Collection, Old Warden, Bedfordshire.

 (RAF Photo)

Republic P-47D Thunderbolt Mk. I, RAF (Serial No. FL844), ca 1944.

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

 (Roland Turner Photos)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Republic P-47D Thunderbolt Mk. I (Serial No. 42-25068), WZ-D, "Snafu", the mount of Lt Severino B. Calderon, 84th Fighter Squadron, USAAF in late 1944.  Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photos, 2004)

 (Peter Bakema Photos, 2006)

Republic P-47D Thunderbolt (Serial No. 42-26671), Reg. No. N47DD, Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (David Merrett Photo)

 (Mike Harkin Photo)

Republic P-47D Thunderbolt (Serial No. 42-26671), painted as (Serial No. 42-26413), "Oregon's Britannia", Reg. No. N47DD, Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (SDA&SM Photo)

Republic P-47D-27-RE Thunderbolt II (Serial No. 42-26911), acquired by the RAF and designated (Serial No. HD298).  This Thunderbolt II is equipped with long-range tanks slung under the main plane, and is just getting airborne from a forward RAF airstrip on the Burma front.  It was part of the 135th Squadron, Chittagong, in Nov 1944.

 (Les Chatfield Photo)

  (Roland Turner Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Republic P-47D Thunderbolt Mk. II (Serial No. 45-49295), (RAF Serial No. KL216), Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (Kogo Photo)

Republic P-47D-40-RA Thunderbolt (Serial No. 45-49192), C/N 399-55991, painted to represent F4-J, "Nellie", which flew with the 492nd Fighter Squadron, 48th Fighter Group of the Ninth Air Force.  Reg. No. G-THUN, Fighter Aviation Engineering, Dunmow, Essex, UK.  This aircraft was previously based in the USA, painted in the colours of LCol Ben Mayo, CO of the 82nd Fighter Squadron, 78th Fighter Group, MX-X, "No Guts No Glory", Reg. No. N147PF. 

 (Alec Wilson Photo)

 (ozz13x Photo)

Ryan ST-3KR Recruit (Serial No. 001), Reg. No. G-BYPY, The Shuttleworth Collection, Old Warden, Bedfordshire.

 (RuthAS Photo, 1977)

 (Hugh Llewelyn Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

 (The Land Photos)

 (Nick-D Photo)

 (Les Chatfield Photo)

Short Sunderland (Serial No.), Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (Happy Days Photos)

Slingsby Kirby Kite glider (Serial No. G285), Museum of Army Flying, Middle Wallop, Hampshire.

 (San Diego Air & Space Museum Photo)

Stinson L-5A Sentinel (Serial No. 42-98177), c/n 76-428, R-8, Reg. No. N6438C, Paul Bennet and Mike Nice, Norfolk.

Supermarine Spitfires are listed on a separate page on this web site.

 (Roland Turner Photos)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Supermarine Stranraer (Serial No. 920), Reg. No. CF-BXO, Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.  This aircraft was built in 1940, one of 40 built by Canadian Vickers.  In service with the Royal Canadian Air Force, it flew with several squadrons on anti-submarine patrols, as a training aircraft and carrying passengers.  In 1944, it was disposed of and went into civil service where it was flown by Canadian Pacific Airlines until 1947, then Queen Charlotte Airlines, who replaced its original British engines with American Wright 1820s.  Queen Charlotte Airlines flew it on passenger flights until 1952, flying from Vancouver along the Pacific coast of British Columbia.  It flew with several other private owners until damaged by a ship in 1966.  In 1970, it was bought by the RAF Museum and transported to the UK.

 (IWM Photo CH 18540)

Supermarine Walrus Mk. I of Nos. 276 or 277 Squadron, RAF, on the ground at Warmwell, Dorset, ca 1943, 

Supermarine Walrus Mk. I (Serial No. W2718), Reg. No. G-RNLI, being restored, Solent Sky, Hampshire.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Supermarine Walrus Mk. I (Serial No. L2301), Reg. No. G-AIZG, Fleet Air Arm Museum, Yeovilton, Somerset.

 (The Land Photo)

 (Oxyman Photo)

 (Hugh llewelyn Photos)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Supermarine Seagull Mk. V (Serial No. A2-4), Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (Happy Days Photos)

Taylorcraft Auster AOP.5 (Serial No. TJ569), Museum of Army Flying, Middle Wallop, Hampshire.

 (Adrian Pingstone Photo)

Taylorcraft Auster AOP.5 (Serial No. TW511), Reg. No. G-APAF, Air Observation Post aircraft built in 1957, Keevil Airfield, Wiltshire.

 (Happy Days Photo)

Taylorcraft Auster AOP.6 (Serial No. WJ358), Museum of Army Flying, Middle Wallop, Hampshire.

Taylorcraft Auster AOP.9 (Serial No. WZ706), ex-AAC, Reg. No. G-BURR, "Romeo-Romeo", three-seat version with passenger facing the rear, hydraulic undercarriage,  struts and ailerons that droop when the flaps are lowered.  (Built in 1957, the last of this particular Auster family).  Peter Gill, Spanhoe, Northamptonshire.

 (Happy Days Photos)

Taylorcraft Auster AOP.9 (Serial No. WZ721), Museum of Army Flying, Middle Wallop, Hampshire.

 (IWM Photo CH 6114)

Taylorcraft Auster AOP, Taylorcraft Plus C/2, (Serial No. HH982), of No. 651 (AOP) Squadron RAF, about to depart on a training flight from Old Sarum, Hampshire.  Formerly a civilian machine (registration G-AFVA), impressed in August 1941, HH982, went on to serve with Nos. 653 and 654 (AOP) Squadrons RAF, and with No. 2 Group Communications Flight, before being restored to the civilian register as G-AHAE in December 1945.

Taylorcraft Auster AOP.9 (Serial No. XR271), Firepower, Royal Artillery Museum, Royal Arsenal, Woolwich.

Taylorcraft Auster AOP.9 (Serial No. XP280), Snibston Discovery Park, Coalville, Leicestershire.

Taylorcraft Auster AOP.9 (Serial No. XP281), Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

Taylorcraft AusterAOP.9 (Serial No. XK418), Second World War Aircraft Preservation Society, Crowthorne, Berkshire.

 (RuthAS Photo)

 (ozz13x Photo)

 (Carlos Menendez San Juan Photo)

Taylorcraft Auster T.7 (Serial No. WE600), flown by the British Antarctic Survey, Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

 (Peter Bakema Photo)

Goodyear FG-1D Corsair (BuNo. 88297), (Serial No. KD345), Reg. No. G-FGID, The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.  This Corsair served in the US Navy between 1945 and 1959; this included wartime service in Guam and the Philippines.  It was then sold to a smelting company, however instead of scrapping it, the company sold it to the movie stunt pilot Frank Tallman.  It joined the Fighter Collection in 1985 and is currently painted in the December 1945 markings of an aircraft of 1850 Naval Air Squadron, serving on HMS Vengeance of the British Pacific Fleet.

 (IWM Photo A 19777)

Chance-Vought Corsair of the Royal Navy taxis in at Roosevelt Field, Long Island, New York, ca 1944.  

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Ian Kirk Photo)

Vought Corsair Mk. IV (BuNo. 14862), (Serial No. KD431), Fleet Air Arm Museum, Yeovilton, Somerset.

 (Goshimini Photo)

 (Rept0n1x Photo)

 (Allen Watkin Photo)

V-2 Rocket, Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire.

 (NMUSAF Photo)

 (RAF Photo)

Waco CG-4A-WO glider, USAAF (Serial No. 42-79211, 31 Dec 1942.  The CG-4A could carry 13 troops and their equipment. Cargo loads could be a 14ton truck (i.e. a Jeep), a 75-mm pack howitzer, or a 14ton trailer, loaded through the upward-hinged nose section.  Douglas C-47 Skytrains were usually used as tow aircraft.

 (Roland Turner Photo)

 (Paul Hermans Photo)

 (Nilfanion Photos)

WACO CG-4A Hadrian glider (Serial No. 319764), Yorkshire Air Museum, Elvington.

 (IWM Photo HU 107810)

Vickers Wellington Mk. I (Serial No. P9249), overhead view, ca 1940.

 (IWM Photo HU 107812)

Vickers Wellington Mk. IC bombers of No. 149 Squadron in flight, circa August 1940.

 (IWM Photo HU 107786)

Vickers Wellington Mk. IC, with aircrew from No. 75 (New Zealand) Squadron at Feltwell, UK, October 1941.

 (Neiltipton Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Vickers Wellington Mk. IA (Serial No. N2980), "R-for-Robert", built in 1939.  This aircraft flew with 149 Squadron and later 37 Squadron, Brooklands Museum, Weybridge, Surrey.

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

Westland Lysander Mk. III (Serial No. V9367), ex-RCAF (Serial No. 1582), Reg. No. G-AZWT, painted in the markings of a Polish Aqn (Serial No. V9441), ca 1999,  The Shuttleworth Collection, Old Warden, Bedfordshire. Airworthy.

 

 (Tim Felce Photos)

 (Paul Maritz Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Westland Lysander Mk. III (Serial No. V9367), Reg. No. G-AZWT, The Shuttleworth Collection, Old Warden, Bedfordshire. Airworthy.  V9367 is painted in the all black colour scheme of the clandestine SOE aircraft of 1942 and is marked MA-B (of No. 161 Squadron RAF) the aircraft flown by Pilot Officer Peter Vaughan-Fowler, DSO, DFC and bar, AFC.

Westland Lysander Mk. IIIA (Serial No. V9312), Reg. No. G-CCOM, project, Aircraft Restoration Co, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (Roland Turner Photos)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Westland Lysander Mk. III (Serial No. R1925),  LX-L, 225 Squadron, Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London.

 (Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation Photo)

 (Paul Photo)

 (Jim, IWM Duxford Photo)

Westland Lysander Mk. III (Serial No. V9300) painted as (Serial No. V9673), Reg. No. G-LIZY, 141 Squadron, Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (Yak-1 recovery team Photo, 1999)

Yakovlev Yak-1 (Serial No. 1342), Reg. No. G-BTZD, recovered from a lake in ca 1989, Historic Aircraft Collection, Sussex.

 (SDA&SM Photo)

 (Soviet Air Force Photo)

Yakovlev Yak-3UA (Serial No. 5), Reg. No. D-FYGJ, Privately owned, Sleap, Shropshire.

 (Soviet Air Force Photos)

Yak-9D formation flight, USSR, ca 1945. 

Yakovlev Yak-9UA (Serial No. 21), Reg. No. RA3364K, Privately owned, Headcorn, Kent.

Yakovlev Yak-9 (Serial No. TBC), Reg. No. G-YAKP, Privately owned, London.

 (Error Photo)

Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka, Japanese manned flying bomb, Museum of Science and Industry, Manchester.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka, Japanese manned flying bomb, Imperial War Museum, Duxford.

 (Steve Bowen Photo)

 (Shioiri Photos)

 (Steve Bowen Photo)

 (Rept0n1X Photo)

 (ozz13x Photo)

 (Roland Turner Photo)

Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka, Japanese manned flying bomb, Royal Air Force Museum Cosford, Shropshire.

Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka 11, Japanese manned flying bomb, (Serial No. 15-1585), Fleet Air Arm Museum, Yeovilton, Somerset.