Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Warplanes of the Second World War preserved in Sweden

Warplanes of the Second World War preserved in Sweden

The aim of this website is to locate, identify and document Warplanes from the Second World War preserved in Sweden.  Many contributors have assisted in the hunt for these aircraft to provide and update the data on this website.  Photos are by Alan Wilson, unless otherwise credited.  Any errors found here are by the author, and any additions, corrections or amendments to this list of Warplane Survivors of the Second World War in Sweden would be most welcome and may be e-mailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com.

Data current to 17 Nov 2018.

Sweden

The official policy of Sweden before, during, and after the Second World War was neutrality.  It had held this policy for over a century, since the end of the Napoleonic Wars.  In contrast to many other neutral countries, Sweden was not directly attacked during the war, although it was subject to British and Nazi German naval blockades, which led to problems with the supply of food and fuels. 

From the spring of 1940 to the summer of 1941 Sweden and Finland were surrounded by Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union.  This led to difficulties in maintaining the rights and duties of neutral states in the Hague Convention.  Sweden violated this, as German troops were allowed to travel through Swedish territory between July 1940 and August 1943.  In spite of the fact that it was allowed by the Hague Convention, Sweden has been criticized for exporting iron ore to Nazi Germany via the Baltic and the Norwegian port of Narvik.  German dependence on Swedish iron ore shipments was the primary reason for Great Britain to launch Operation Wilfred and, together with France, the Norwegian Campaign in early April 1940.  By early June 1940 the Norwegian Campaign stood as a failure for the allies.  Nazi Germany could obtain the Swedish iron ore supply it needed for war production despite the British naval blockade by securing access to Norwegian ports by force.

The Swedish Air Force was created on 1 July 1926 when the aircraft units of the Army and Navy were merged.  Because of the escalating international tension during the 1930s the Air Force was reorganized and expanded from four to seven squadrons.  When the Second World War  broke out in 1939 further expansion was initiated and this substantial expansion was not finished until the end of the war.  Although Sweden never entered the war, a large air force was considered necessary to ward off the threat of invasion and to resist pressure through military threats from the great powers.  The Flygvapnet bought aircraft from a number of other nations.  These included the J-7 Bristol Bulldog and the J-8A/B Gloster Gladiator Mk I & II from the UK; 60 J-9 Seversky EP-106 (P-35) from the USA (60 others were impounded by the USAAC); 72 J-11 Fiat CR.42 and 60 Reggiane Re.2000 from Italy; 50 North American P-51D Mustangs (purchased in April 1945); 56 B-3/A/B/C Junkers Ju 86K built under licence;  15 B-4 Hawker Hart light biplane bombers; 91 B-5B/C Northrop A-17A; and 31 B-16 Caproni Bergmaschi Ca.312s.  As the war progressed, Sweden developed its own aircraft designs, including the SAAB J-21A pusher fighter in 1945 which was later modified to the J-21R jet fighter; and the FFVS J-22 monoplane fighter in 1945.  The Swedish designated their bombers as the B-17A/B/C single-engine light level, reconnaissance and dive bomber from 1941; and the B-18 twin-engine medium bomber.

When the Soviet Union attacked Finland in November 1939, Sweden came to its neighbour’s assistance in most ways short of joining the war outright.  A Swedish volunteer infantry brigade and a volunteer air squadron fought in northern Finland in January till March 1940.  The squadron was designated F 19 and consisted of 12 Gloster Gladiator fighters and four Hawker Hart dive-bombers.

By 1945 the Swedish Air Force had over 800 combat-ready aircraft, including 15 fighter divisions.  The Swedish Air Force underwent a rapid modernization from 1945.  It was no longer politically acceptable to equip it with second-rate models.  Instead, the air staff purchased the best it could find from abroad, including North American. P-51D Mustangs, De Havilland Mosquito NF.19 night fighters and de Havilland Vampires, and supported the development of top performance domestic models, including the Saab 29 Tunnan jet fighter was introduced around 195.

Aviation Museums in Sweden

Ängelholms Flyg Museum, F 10 Kamratforening, Valhall Park, 262 74 Ängelholm.

Robotmuseum/Arboga Missile Museum, Glasbruksgatan 1, 732 31 Arboga.

Försvarsmuseum Boden, Granatvägen 2, 961 43 Boden.

Eskilstuna Flygmuseum, Eskilstuna Flygplats, 63506 Eskilstuna.

Allebergs Segelflyg Museet, Alleberg, Falkoping.

Aeroseum, Holmvägen 100, S-417 46 Göteborg-Säve.

Flygvapenmuseum, Carl Cederstroms gata, Malmslatt, Flygvapenmuseum 581 98 Linkoping.

F11 Museet, Nykoping – Skavsta Flygplats, Nykoping Aviation Association, Skavsta Flygplats, 611 92 Nykoping.

Teknikland, Optands flygfält, 83192 Östersund.

Osterlens Flygmuseum, Ostra Vemmerlov, Ostbo, 272 97 Garsnas.

Soderhamn F15 Flygmuseum, Byggnad 81 Flygstaden, 826 70 Soderhamn.

Tekniska Museet, National Museum of Science and Technology, Box 27842, Museivagen, S-115 93 Stockholm.

Svedinos Bil- och Flygmuseum, Ugglarp, SE-310 50 Sloinge.

Hangar 91, Garnisonsvägen, 752 19 Uppsala. 

Västerås Flygmuseum, Hasslogatan 16, 721 31 Västerås.

RFN Vidsel Museum, Vidsel.

Warplanes of the Second World War preserved in Sweden

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Stahlkocher Photos)

Bucker Bu 181B-1 Bestmann (Sk25), (Serial No. 181), 25000, 76, (D-EXWB).  This aircraft is on display in the main hall of the Flyvapenmuseum, Malmen.

 (Kapten Kaos Photo)

 (Sgt. Oddball Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Consolidated PBY-5A Canso (Tp47), (Serial No. 47001), 79, (Serial No. CV-244).  This is a Canadian built PBY which makes it a Canso instead of a Catalina.  It saw RCAF service as RCAF (Serial No. 9810), before passing to the  Swedish Air Force between 1948 and 1966 where it was flown on Search and Rescue (SAR) operations.  It is on display in the Cold War Hall at the Flygvapenmuseum (Swedish Air Force Museum), Malmslätt, Linköping, Sweden.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Douglas C-47 Skytrain (Serial No. 42-93706), (Serial No. 13647).  This aircraft was flown with SAS as Reg. No. SE-CFR, before entering Swedish Air Force service.  Flyvapenmuseum, Malmen.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

FFVS J-22-2 (Serial No. 22280), Red L.  Built specifically to cover the lack of fighter types in the Swedish Air Force during the Second World War, it was found in trials that the J-22 could hold its own against a P-51.  This example was built in 1945.  It is displayed in F3 unit markings.  Flyvapenmuseum, Malmen.

 (Towpilot Photo)

 (Stahlkocher Photo)

 (Bene Riobo Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Fiat CR.42 Falco (J-11), (Serial No. 921), 2543.  Built in 1941, this Falco carries F9 unit markings.  Flyvapenmuseum, Malmen.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Fieseler Fi 156 Storch (S-14), (Serial No. 3812), 67.  This is a composite airframe and has no true identity, although (Serial No. 3815) has also been quoted for it.  It carries F3 unit markings.  Flyvapenmuseum, Malmen.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 44J Stieglitz (Sk12), F5 unit markings, (Serial No. 52), 670, 60 (SE-EGB).  Flyvapenmuseum, Malmen.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Fokker CV E (S-6B), 386, 86.  Built by CVM in Sweden in 1934.  Displayed on skis with F3 unit markings, (Serial No. 207). Flyvapenmuseum, Malmen.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

FSM Caproni Ca.313 (B-16).  This is a full-size mockup using a few original parts that was built for a mini-television series.

 (Ilmavoimat, Finnish Airforce Photo)

Gloster Gladiator of the Swedish volunteer detachment F19 serving with the Finnish Air Force.  It is shown here at Kauhava, Finland, on 30 March 1940, on its way back to Sweden after the Winter War in Finland.

 (Ilmavoimat, Finnish Airforce Photo)

Swedish Voluntary Air Force Gladiator fighter from the air squadron F 19 Image taken before 1944.

 (Towpilot Photo)

 (Lore & Guille Photo)

 (Bene Riobo Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Gloster Gladiator (Serial No. G5/59066), built in 1938.  Flyvapenmuseum, Malmen.

 (Bene Riobo Photo)

 (Tonyingesson Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Hawker Hart (Serial No. 52).  Displayed in non-genuine Finnish markings as this actual aircraft did not serve with F19 in Finland.  Swedish Air Force (Serial No. 714).  This aircraft was built under license by ASJA in 1937.  Flyvapenmuseum, Malmen.

 (SAF Photo)

 (Towpilot Photo)

 (Stahlkocher Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Junkers Ju 86K (B-3C-2), (Serial No. 0860412), 0155, Blue A.  Built in 1938, this last remaining Ju 86 served until 1958.  It now carries F21 unit markings.  It is a German built aircraft (some were built in Sweden) and is actually a Ju 86K-13, which had the Swedish designation B-3C-2. . Flyvapenmuseum, Malmen.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

North American NA-16 (Sk-14), 610, 110.  Displayed with F5 unit markings, this NA-16 is a composite rebuild using parts from North American Yale (Serial No. 3359), and CAC Wirraway (Serial No. A20-223).  It has been given the representative (Serial No. Fv610).  Flyvapenmuseum, Malmen.

 (Herranderssvensson Photo)

North American Harvard Mk. IIb, Swedish Air Force (Serial No. 16073), buitl by Norduyn, Swedish Air Force designation Sk 16A, Reg. No. SE-FVU.  This aircraft is operated by the Swedish Air Force Historic Flight.  The Swedish Air Force bought 257 surplus Texan/Harvard trainers after the Second World War.  They were kept in service between 1947 and 1972. 

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

North American P-51D-20NA Mustang (Serial No. 43-63992), 16, built in 1944 with USAAC service in the Second World War.  Postwar it passed to the Royal Swedish Air Force, where it was designated as a J-26 (Serial No. 26020).  From 1952 it saw Israeli Air Force service as (Serial No. 2353).  In 1965 it was returned for display in the Flyvapenmuseum. It is preserved in F16 markings and painted as (Serial No. 122-31718), in the Flyvapenmuseum, Malmen.

North American P-51D Mustang (Serial No. 44-72112), Swedish Air Force (Serial No. 26084).  The wreckage of this aircraft was salvaged from a moor near Vidsel in 1998.  It has been restored and is now on display at Flygmuseet F21, Lulea.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Cavalier F-51D-T Mustang Mk. II (Serial No. 44-10753a), 405, Reg. No. SE-BIL).  This aircraft served with the Fuerza Aérea Salvadoreña (ElSalvador Air Force), (Serial No. FAS405), Angelholm, Sweden.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Raab-Katzenstein RK 26 (Serial No. 20).  This is the only remaining example of this German trainer.  The service aircraft ended up 200kg heavier than the original design, and of the 25 which saw Swedish service, 18 were written off.  Flyvapenmuseum, Malmen.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Reggiane Re.2000 (J20), (Serial No. 2340), 40, (Serial No. 405).  Sweden bought 60 Re.2000 Serie I fighters in 1941, mainly because no other country was prepared to sell fighters to a neutral country. The type was unreliable and required a lot of maintenance time, but was liked by it's pilots.  It was flown by F10, the only unit to use this type in Swedish service, where it was designated the J-20.  This sole survivor carries their markings.  These fighters were used to intercept Axis and Allied bombers straying into Swedish airspace between 1941 & 1945.  Flyvapenmuseum, Malmen.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Saab A-21A-3 (J21), (Serial No. 21364), built in 1948, in the Flyvapenmuseum, Malmen.

 (Brorsson Photo)

SAAB A21A-3, F15 Aviation Museum, Söderhamn.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

SAAB J21R (Serial No. Fv21286).  The J21R was developed from the J21A, making one of only two jet types to be successfully converted from piston powered aircraft, the other being the Yak-15 which was a conveted Yak-9.  This aircraft is a J21A which was converted into a J21R for display in the museum.  As well as the fuselage, the tailplane and fins are heavily modified.  Flyvapenmuseum, Malmen.

 (Swedish Air Force Photo)

Saab S-17B, 11, 1939.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Saab S-17BL (B17), (Serial No. 17005), 5.  Designed as a dive-bomber, the museums B-17 is an S-17 reconnaissance version.  Note the huge undercarriage covers, which doubled up as dive brakes.  Flyvapenmuseum, Malmen.

 (Kogo Photos)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

 (Tonyingesson Photo)

 (Peter Bakema Photo)

Saab B17A (Serial No. Fv7239), airworthy, Flyvapenmuseum, Malmen.

 (Towpilot Photos)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Saab B18B (Serial No. 18172), Red D.  The B model was a dive bomber variant.  This aircraft was one of a group of eight aircraft which were lost in a snowstorm in 1946.  It was finally recovered and restored in 1979 and is the only existing B18. This aircraft is undergoing restoration.  It is the only remaining example in existence.  Flyvapenmuseum, Malmen.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

 (Masugen Photo)

Seversky (P-35) EP-1-106 (J-9), (Serial No. 282-19), 2134, 53.  Built in 1940 and one of 60 to see Swedish AF service. The type remained in service as a fighter until 1946.  Displayed with F3 unit markings.  Flyvapenmuseum, Malmen.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Supermarine Spitfire PR Mk. XIX (Serial No. PM627), 51.  This aircraft did not serve with the Swedish Air Force.  After RAF service it went to India where it flew as (Serial No. HS964).  It was later purchased by the Flyvapenmuseum and returned to Sweden to represent one of the types that flew in Swedish service.  It was given the "next-in-line" (Serial No. 31051), as the last actual Spitfire in service with the Swedish Air Force was (Serial No. 31050).   It is painted as a fighter serving with unit F11 , 6S/683524, and is on display in the Cold War Hall at the Flyvapenmuseum, Malmen.

 (Per Sylvan och Torsten Friis Photo, 1940)

Lieutnant general Torsten Friis, Commander-in-Chief of the Swedish Air Force 1934-42, and lieutnant general Per Sylvan, Commander-in-Chief of the Swedish Army 1937-40.