Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Warplanes of the Second World War preserved in South Africa

Warplanes of the Second World War preserved in South Africa

The aim of this website is to locate, identify and document Warplanes from the Second World War preserved in South Africa.  Many contributors have assisted in the hunt for these aircraft to provide and update the data on this website.  Photos are by the author unless otherwise credited.  Any errors found here are by the author, and any additions, corrections or amendments to this list of Warplane Survivors of the Second World War in South Africa would be most welcome and may be e-mailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com.

Data current to 27 March 2017.

   (Alan Wilson Photos)

Avro Anson, composite airframe from RAF (Serial No. EG559), SAAF (Serial No. 4437), and  RAF (serial MG802), SAAF (Serial No. 4588).  South African Air Force Museum. Swartkop Airfield, Pretoria.

 (RAF Photo)

Bristol Beaufighter in service with aircrew of 16 Squadron SAAF and No. 227 Squadron RAF at Biferno, Italy, prior to taking off to attack a German headquarters building in Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia, 14 August 1944.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

de Havilland DH.87B Hornet Moth (Serial No. 2007), c/n 8121, Reg. No. ZS-ALA "African Queen".  South African Air Force Museum. Swartkop Airfield, Pretoria.

de Havilland DH.89 Dragon Rapide (Serial No. NR743) Reg. No. ZS-JGV, airworthy, flown out of East London in the Eastern Province, owned by Mark Sahd.  This aircraft was originally built as a Dominie for the RAF in 1944.

 (Nolween Photo)

Douglas C-47 Dakota (Serial No. TBC), South African Air Force, South African National Museum of Military History, Johannesburg.

Douglas C-47 Dakota (Serial No. TBC), AFB Ysterplaat.

 (IWM Photo CM2079)

Douglas Boston Mk. III (Serial No. W8376), 'C', of No. 24 Squadron, South African Air Force, walking away from their aircraft on an airfield in Libya after a sortie, ca 1942.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Douglas AD-4N Skyraider (BuNo. 127894), c/n 7909, ex-French Air Force service as '68', then finally to Gabon as 'TR-KFQ'.  It was later civil registered as 'N92072' but never left France and eventually made it's way to South Africa.  Stored at the South African Air Force Museum at Swartkop Airfield, Pretoria.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Fairchild UC-61K Argus Mk. III, RAF (Serial No. KK476), c/n 1094.  Originally allocated USAAF (Serial No. 44-83133) as a UC-61K.  South African Air Force Museum Swartkop Airfield, Pretoria.

  (Alan Wilson Photo, left, Nolween Photo, right)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-6/R6, (Wk. Nr. 550214), PN+LU, possibly flown by III./NJG 11 as it was fitted with a FuG 217 Neptun radar system.  This aircraft was built by the Ago factory in mid-1943.  This Fw190 was captured complete at Leck-Holstein at the end of the war.  It was given the RAF Air Ministry Number AM10 and was delivered from Schleswig to Farnborough on 16 June 1945.  Initially displayed in the UK, this aircraft was shipped from Birkenhead, England to Capetown, South Africa on the SS Perthshire on 20 Oct 1946, arriving on 6 Nov.  It is now on display at the South African National Museum of Military History, Saxonwold, Johannesburg

 (RAF Photo)

Fieseler Fi 156C-7 Storch, (Wk. Nr. 475099), VD+TD, STOL reconnaissance aircraft captured at Flensburg.  Designated RAF AM99, this aircraft was shipped from Birkenhead, England to Capetown, South Africa on the SS Perthshire on 20 Oct 1946, arriving on 6 Nov.  It is now on display in the South African Air Force Museum, Swartkop Airfield, Pretoria.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Fieseler Fi 156C Storch (Wk. Nr. 475099), VD+TD, built by Mraz in Czechoslovakia and assigned to an unknown unit.  This aircraft is believed to have been surrendered in Flensburg at the end of the war.  Recorded as being in service with the RAE at Farnborough in September 1945 as Air Min 99, 475099 was shipped from Birkenhead, England to Capetown, South Africa on the SS Perthshire on 20 Oct 1946, arriving on 6 Nov.  South African Air Force Museum. Swartkop Airfield, Pretoria.

 (RAF Photo)

Hawker Hartebeast, Reg. No. G-ABMR dressed as the first production Hart (Serial No. J9953), as she was between 1959 and 1970.  Many served with the SAAF.  A derivative of the Audax, the Hawker Hartebeest, a light bomber, was built for the South African Air Force with modifications made from the Audax. Sixty-five of these aircraft were built, the majority in South Africa. The aircraft saw action in East Africa during clashes against Italy who occupied Abyssinia.  None have been preserved in South Africa.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Hawker Hurricane Mk. IIc (Serial No. 5285).  Originally built at Hawkers Langley factory in 1943, (Serial No. LD619), this Hurricane initially went to North Africa, hence the tropical filter.  It didn't see RAF service, however, and was instead transferred to the South African Air Force as (Serial No. 5285) in April 1944.  In May 1950 it joined the South African National Museum of Military History where it remains on display at Saxonwold, Johannesburg.

 (Bundesarchiv, Bild 141-2402)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Junkers Ju 86Z-I (Wk. Nr. 647), Reg. No. ZS-AGJ.  One of 31 Ju 86 transports operated by South African Airways at the outbreak of the Second World War. Joined the SAAF as No. 647.  Crashed 8 July 1942 while on a flight from Swartkop AB to Brooklyn AB, Cape Town.  It flew into a mountain in bad weather with the loss of all three crew.  The remains of the airframe were recovered in 1978 and are now on display at the South African Air Force Museum. Swartkop Airfield, Pretoria.

At the outbreak of war, South Africa had no naval vessels and the UDF's first priority was to ensure the safety of the South African coastal waters as well as the strategically important Cape sea-route.  For maritime patrol operations, the SAAF took over all 29 passenger aircraft of South African Airways: 18 Junkers Ju 86Z-ls for maritime patrols and eleven Junkers Ju 52s for transport purposes.  SAAF maritime patrols commenced on 21 September 1939 with 16 Squadron flying three JU-86Z's from Walvis Bay.  By 1940, the Ju 86s were replaced by Ansons and Coastal Command SAAF had been established, eventually consisting of 6, 10, 22, 23, 25, 27 and 29 Squadrons.  By the end of the Second World War in August 1945, SAAF aircraft (in conjunction with British and Dutch aircraft stationed in South Africa) had intercepted 17 enemy ships, assisted in the rescue of 437 survivors of sunken ships, attacked 26 of the 36 enemy submarines that operated around the South African coast, and flown 15,000 coastal patrol sorties.  (Wikipedia)

(Alan Wilson Photos) (NJR Photo)

Lockheed 18-08 Lodestar (Serial No.), c/n 18-2058, Reg. No. ZS-ATL.  Despite the camouflage, this Lodestar has no military history.  Built in 1941 it originally flew for South African Airways, later flying with Comair between 1954 and 1958.  South African Air Force Museum, Swartkop Airfield, Pretoria.

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

Lockheed Ventura GR.V (Serial No. 6487), c/n 237-6219.  Originally allocated USN (BuNo. 49403) and RAF (Serial No. JT861), but saw no British service before joining the SAAF as (Serial No. 6487).   It is now in a polished metal scheme.  South African Air Force Museum, Swartkop Airfield, Pretoria.

  (Alan Wilson Photo, left, NJR ZA Photo, right)

Lockheed Ventura GR.V (Serial No. 6498), c/n 237-6290.  Originally allocated USN (BuNo. 49474), and RAF (Serial No. JT867), but saw no British service before joining the SAAF as (Serial No. 6498), where it served with 29 Sqn.  It was later converted into a transport flew with 17 Sqn before ending up at the South African Airways apprentice training school.  It was eventually passed back for preservation and is now restored in a maritime colour scheme and on display at the South African Air Force Museum, Swartkop Airfield, Pretoria.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Lockheed Ventura Mk. II, RAF (Serial No. AJ508), c/n 137-4646.  This aircraft sat derelict on a farm between 1951 and 1978 but is now in storage with the South African Air Force Museum at Swartkop Airfield, Pretoria.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Lockheed Ventura Mk. II (Serial No. 6112), c/n 137-4642, ex-RAF (Serial No. AJ504).  The SAAF received 135 Ventura Mk. IIs from RAF stocks. This unrestored example is stored with the South African Air Force Museum, Swartkop Airfield, Pretoria.

Lockheed Ventura Mk. II (Serial No. TBC), AFB Ysterplaat.

 (NJR ZA Photo)

Messerschmitt Bf 109E-3, (Wk. Nr. 1289), ex-SH + FA, ex-2/JG 26 (Schlageter) "Red 2", was delivered to JG 26 in 1939, coded as SH + EA, "Black 2".  The aircraft crash-landed at Udimor, England and the unrestored remains are preserved in the South African Museum of Military History, Johannesburg.

 (SAAF Photo)

Messerschmitt Bf 109F, (Wk. Nr. unknown) captured in North Africa.  This aircraft was given South African Air Force markings and serial "KJ-?", on the airfield at Martuba No. 4 Landing Ground in North Africa, January 1943.  It was operated by No. 4 Squadron, SAAF.

 (NR ZA Photo)

Messerschmitt Bf 109F-2/Trop, (Wk. Nr. 31010), coded "White 6", JG27, South African National Museum of Military History, Johannesburg.

  (PaulMaz Photo, left, NJR ZA Photo, right)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

North American Harvard (T6 Texan) (Serial No. 7028).  South African Air Force Museum. Swartkop Airfield, Pretoria.

North American Harvard (T6 Texan) (Serial No. 7072).  South African Air Force Museum. Swartkop Airfield, Pretoria.

 (NJR ZA Photo)

North American Harvard (T6 Texan) (Serial No. 7111).  South African Air Force Museum. Swartkop Airfield, Pretoria.

North American Harvard (T6 Texan) (Serial No. 7306).  South African Air Force Museum. Swartkop Airfield, Pretoria.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

North American Harvard Mk. III, SAAF (Serial No. 7573), c/n 88-15336, ex-USAAF (Serial No. 41-34019), ex-RAF (Serial No. EZ146), before entering SAAF service.  SAAF Museum painted in in false American markings. South African Air Force Museum. Swartkop Airfield, Pretoria.

 (NJR ZA Photo)

North American Harvard (T6 Texan) (Serial No. 7643), Reg. No. ZU-AOX.  South African Air Force Museum. Swartkop Airfield, Pretoria.

North American Harvard (Serial No. TBC), AFB Ysterplaat.

 (Gerhard Roux Photo)

North American Harvard (Serial No. TBC), being restored, Port Elizabeth.

 (USAF Photo)

North American F-51D Mustang fighters of No. 2 Squadron of the South African Air Force in Korea, on 1 May 1951.

 (DanieB52 Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photos)

 (Bob Adams Photos)

North American P-51D Mustang, USAAF (Serial No. 44-72202), c/n 122-38661, ex-Swedish Air Force (Serial No. Fv26112) between 1948 and 1952, then joined the Dominican Air Force as (Serial No. FAD-1917).  Acquired from the USA in 1987, it was slowly restored and flew again in 1998, painted as ‘325’, "Patsy Dawn".  As part of the SAAF Museum and therefore under SAAF control, no civil registration was required and ‘325’ actually became it’s identity.  This is the third P-51D to carry the serial ‘325’ in SAAF service.  Sadly in 2001 it suffered a wheels-up landing and although the minor structural damage was quickly repaired, the cost of returning the engine and prop to flying status was prohibitive and the aircraft was placed on static display. South African Air Force Museum. Swartkop Airfield, Pretoria.

 (RAF Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire pilots of 40 Squadron, South African Air Force, at Gabes in Tunisia, April 1943.

 (NJR ZA Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VIII (Serial No. JF294), painted as (Serial No. 5501), South African National Museum of Military History, Johannesburg.