Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) 1939–1945, Corvettes (Flower and Castle Class)

Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) 1939–1945,

Corvettes (Flower and Castle Class)

Data currrent to 17 July 2019.

Flower Class Corvettes

The Flower-class corvette was a British class of 294 corvettes used during the Second World War, specifically with the Allied navies as anti-submarine convoy escorts during the Battle of the Atlantic.  RN ships of this class were named after such as the lead ship  HMS Gladiolus, hence the name of the class.

The original Flower class were fitted with a 4-inch (102-mm) gun on the bow, depth charge racks carrying 40 charges on the stern, a minesweeping winch, and a 2-pounder (40-mm) pom-pom anti-aircraft gun mounted on a "bandstand" over the engine room.  The long-range endurance of the vessels, coupled with early war-time shortages of larger escort warships, saw Flowers assigned to trans-Atlantic convoy escort where Luftwaffe fighter-bombers were rarely encountered.  Vessels assigned to the Mediterranean Sea usually had their anti-aircraft capability significantly upgraded.

Underwater detection capability was provided by a fixed ASDIC dome; this was later modified to be retractable.  Subsequent inventions such as the High Frequency Radio Detection Finder (Huff-Duff) were later added, along with various radar systems (such as the Type 271), which proved particularly effective in low-visibility conditions in the North Atlantic.

The majority served during the Second World War with the RN and RCN.  Many of the corvettes were built in Canada, and a number were transferred from the RN to the USN under the lend-lease program, seeing service in both navies.  Post war, many surplus Flower-class vessels saw worldwide use in other navies, as well as civilian use.  HMCS Sackville (K181) is the only member of the class to be preserved as a museum ship at Halifax, Nova Scotia.

HMCS Agassiz (K129) (Flower-class); HMCS Alberni (K103) (Flower-class); HMCS Algoma (K127) (Flower-class); HMCS Amherst (K148) (Flower-class); HMCS Arrowhead (K145) (Flower-class); HMCS Arvida (K113) (Flower-class); HMCS Asbestos (K358) (Flower-class); HMCS Atholl (K15) (Flower-class); HMCS Baddeck (K147) (Flower-class); HMCS Barrie (K138) (Flower-class); HMCS Battleford (K165) (Flower-class); HMCS Beauharnois (K540) (Flower-class); HMCS Belleville (K332) (Flower-class); HMCS Bittersweet (K182) (Flower-class); HMCS Brandon (K149) (Flower-class); HMCS Brantford (K218) (Flower-class); HMCS Buctouche (K179) (Flower-class); HMCS Calgary (K231) (Flower-class); HMCS Camrose (K154) (Flower-class); HMCS Chambly (K116) (Flower-class); HMCS Charlottetown (K244) (Flower-class); HMCS Chicoutimi (K156) (Flower-class); HMCS Chilliwack (K131) (Flower-class); HMCS Cobalt (K124) (Flower-class); HMCS Cobourg (K333) (Flower-class); HMCS Collingwood (K180) (Flower-class); HMCS Dauphin (K157) (Flower-class); HMCS Dawson (K104) (Flower-class); HMCS Drumheller (K167) (Flower-class); HMCS Dundas (K229) (Flower-class); HMCS Dunvegan (K177) (Flower-class); HMCS Edmundston (K106) (Flower-class); HMCS Eyebright (K150) (Flower-class); HMCS Fennel (K194) (Flower-class); HMCS Fergus (K686) (Flower-class); HMCS Forest Hill (K486) (Flower-class); HMCS Fredericton (K245) (Flower-class); HMCS Frontenac (K335) (Flower-class); HMCS Galt (K163) (Flower-class); HMCS Giffard (K402) (Flower-class); HMCS Guelph (K687) (Flower-class); HMCS Halifax (K237) (Flower-class); HMCS Hawkesbury (K415) (Flower-class); HMCS Hepatica (K159) (Flower-class); HMCS Kamloops (K176) (Flower-class); HMCS Kamsack (K171) (Flower-class); HMCS Kenogami (K125) (Flower-class); HMCS Kitchener (K225) (Flower-class); HMCS La Malbaie (K273) (Flower-class); HMCS Lachute (K440) (Flower-class); HMCS Lethbridge (K160) (Flower-class); HMCS Levis (K115) (Flower-class); HMCS Lindsay (K338) (Flower-class); HMCS Long Branch (K487) (Flower-class); HMCS Louisburg (K143) (Flower-class); HMCS Louisburg (K401) (Flower-class); HMCS Lunenburg (K151) (Flower-class); HMCS Matapedia (K112) (Flower-class); HMCS Mayflower (K191) (Flower-class); HMCS Merrittonia (K688) (Flower-class); HMCS Midland (K220) (Flower-class); HMCS Mimico (K485) (Flower-class); HMCS Moncton (K139) (Flower-class); HMCS Moose Jaw (K164) (Flower-class); HMCS Morden (K170) (Flower-class); HMCS Nanaimo (K101) (Flower-class); HMCS Napanee (K118) (Flower-class); HMCS New Westminster (K228)  (Flower-class); HMCS Norsyd (K520) (Flower-class); HMCS North Bay (K339) (Flower-class); HMCS Oakville (K178) (Flower-class); HMCS Orillia (K119) (Flower-class); HMCS Owen Sound (K340) (Flower-class); HMCS Parry Sound (K341) (Flower-class); HMCS Peterborough (K342) (Flower-class); HMCS Pictou (K146) (Flower-class); HMCS Port Arthur (K233) (Flower-class); HMCS Prescott (K161) (Flower-class); HMCS Quesnel (K133) (Flower-class); HMCS Regina (K234) (Flower-class); HMCS Rimouski (K121) (Flower-class); HMCS Rivière du Loup (K357) (Flower-class); HMCS Rosthern (K169) (Flower-class); HMCS St. Lambert (K343) (Flower-class); HMCS Sackville (K181) (Flower-class); HMCS Saskatoon (K158) (Flower-class); HMCS Shawinigan (K136) (Flower-class); HMCS Shediac (K110) (Flower-class); HMCS Sherbrooke (K152) (Flower-class); HMCS Smiths Falls (K345) (Flower-class); HMCS Snowberry (K166) (Flower-class); HMCS Sorel (K153) (Flower-class); HMCS Spikenard (K198) (Flower-class); HMCS Stellarton (K457) (Flower-class); HMCS Strathroy (K455) (Flower-class); HMCS Sudbury (K162) (Flower-class); HMCS Summerside (K141) (Flower-class); HMCS The Pas (K168) (Flower-class); HMCS Thorlock (K394) (Flower-class); HMCS Timmins (K223) (Flower-class); HMCS Trail (K174) (Flower-class); HMCS Trentonian (K368) (Flower-class); HMCS Trillium (K172) (Flower-class); HMCS Vancouver (K240) (Flower-class); HMCS Ville de Québec (K242) (Flower-class); HMCS Wetaskiwin (K175) (Flower-class); HMCS Weyburn (K173) (Flower-class); HMCS West York (K369) (Flower-class); HMCS Whitby (K346) (Flower-class); HMCS Windflower (K155) (Flower-class); HMCS Woodstock (K238) (Flower-class)

Castle Class Corvettes

HMCS Arnprior (K494) Castle-class; HMCS Bowmanville (K493) (Castle-class); HMCS Copper Cliff (K495) (Castle-class); HMCS Hespeler (K489) (Castle-class); HMCS Humberstone (K497) (Castle-class); HMCS Huntsville (K499) (Castle-class); HMCS Kincardine (K490) (Castle-class); HMCS Leaside (K492) (Castle-class); HMCS Orangeville (K491) (Castle-class); HMCS Petrolia (K498) (Castle-class); HMCS St. Thomas (K488) (Castle-class); HMCS Tillsonburg (K496) (Castle-class)

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3554046)

Canadian Vickers Ltd., RCN Corvette just completed, Montréal, Quebec.

HMCS Agassiz (K129)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Agassiz (K129) (Flower-class).  Built by Burrard Dry Dock Co. Ltd., Vancouver, BC, HMCS Agassiz was commissioned at Vancouver on 23 Jan 1941.  On 17 Mar 1941, HMCS Alberni, HMCS Agassiz and HMCS Wetaskiwin departed Esquimalt for Halifax.  Enroute they stopped at San Pedro, California for fuel, where a party for the crew, hosted by actress Mary Pickford and her husband Douglas Fairbanks, was held for them . They arrived at Halifax on 13 Apr 1941.  On 23 May 1941, HMCS Alberni, HMCS Agassiz and HMCS Wetaskiwin left Halifax for St. John's, Newfoundland, to join the recently formed NEF.  She sailed early in Jun 1941 with a convoy for Iceland and was thereafter in continuous service as an ocean escort until the end of 1943.  On 18 Jun 1942, HMCS Agassiz picked up 51 survivors from the American merchant Seattle Spirit that was torpedoed and sunk by U-124 in the North Atlantic.  In Sep 1941, she took part in a major battle around convoy SC.44, rescuing survivors of her torpedoed sister, HMCS Lévis.  She was also part of the escort of the hard-pressed convoy ON.115 in July 1942.  On 5 Jan 1943, she commenced a major refit at Liverpool, NS, completing in mid-Mar 1943, and in Apr 1943 was assigned to newly designated EG-C-1.  She arrived at New York on 16 Dec1943 for another major refit, including extension of her fo'c's'le, completing 4 Mar 1944.  After working up in St. Margaret's Bay in Apr 1944, she joined EG W-2 of WEF, transferring in Aug 1944 to W-7.  She spent the remainder of the war with W-7, being paid off on 14 Jun 1945, at Sydney, and was broken up in 1946.

 (Dave Chamberlain Photo)

HMCS Agassiz (K129) (Flower-class).

 (Ron Bell Photo)

HMCS Agassiz (K129) (Flower-class).

HMCS Alberni (K103) 

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Alberni (K103) (Flower-class).  Built at Esquimalt, British Columbia, she was commissioned there on 4 Feb 1941.  On 17 Mar 1941, HMCS Alberni, HMCS Agassiz and HMCS Wetaskiwin departed Esquimalt for Halifax.  Enroute they stopped at San Pedro, California for fuel, where a party for the crew, hosted by actress Mary Pickford and her husband Douglas Fairbanks, was held for them.  They arrived at Halifax on 13 Apr 1941.  On 23 May 1941, Alberni, Agassiz and Wetaskiwin left Halifax for St. John's to join the recently formed NEF.  Alberni left the following month with a convoy for Iceland, serving as mid-ocean escort until May 1942, when she was taken out of service to have a new boiler installed.  In Sep 1941, she had taken part in the defence of convoy SC.42, which lost 18 ships to as many U-boats.  Assigned to duties in connection with the invasion of North Africa, she sailed for the UK in Oct 1942 with convoy HX.212, and until Feb 1943, escorted convoys between the UK and the Mediterranean.  HMCS Alberni took part in Operation Torch duties in March 1943 and then briefly served with the Western Local Escort Force (WLEF), before an assignment with Quebec Force in May 1943.  For the next five months she escorted Quebec-Labrador convoys, leaving Gaspé on 6 Nov1943 to undergo repairs at Liverpool, Nova Scotia.  With repairs completed early in Feb 1944, she proceeded to Bermuda to work up, and on her return to Halifax joined EG W-4.  On 24 Apr 1944 she was reassigned to Western Approaches Command (WAC) for a part in Operation Neptune, the naval participation in the D-Day landings.  While taking part in her duties connected with the invasion on 21 Aug 1944, she was torpedoed and sunk by U 480, southeast of the Isle of Wight.  Fifty-nine of her ship's company lost their lives after the torpedo struck the warship on her port side immediately aft of the engine room, causing her to sink in less than a minute.  (Acting) Lt. Frank. Williams was awarded the Royal Humane Society's bronze medal for his work in saving members of the crew.  31 crew members were rescued by Royal Navy motor toerpedo boats (MTB).

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Alberni (K103) (Flower-class). 

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3304841)

HMCS Alberni (K103) (Flower-class), RCN crew preparing to launch a minesweeping float, off the BC coast, March 1941.

HMCS Algoma (K127) 

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Algoma (K127) (Flower-class).  Built by Port Arthur Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., she was commissioned at Montreal on 11 Jul 1941.  HMCS Algoma arrived at Halifax 18 Jul 1941.  She escorted her first convoy to Iceland in Sep 1941, and was thereafter employed as an ocean escort until the end of May 1942.  During this period she was involved in two major convoy actions: ONS.67 (Feb 1942) and ONS.92 (May 1942).  In Jul 1942, after six weeks' repairs at Liverpool, Nova Scotia, she joined WLEF.  In Oct 1942, allocated to duties connected with the invasion of North Africa, she left for Britain with convoy SC.107, which lost fifteen ships to U-boat attacks.  Algoma served under RN orders the next few months, escorting convoys between Britain and the Mediterranean.  In Feb 1943 she was based at Bone, Algeria, but returned to St. John's via the U.K in on 30 Apr 1943 in company with HMCS Calgary K231 as escort for convoy ON.179.   She served briefly with Western Support Force which, based at St. John's, existed only during May 1943, and with WLEF, before joining Quebec Force in Jun 1943.  HMCS Algoma escorted Quebec-Labrador convoys until mid-November, when she was lent to EG C-4 for one round trip to the UK.  She arrived at Liverpool, NS, late in Dec 1943 for a major refit, which included extending her fo'c's'le and was not completed until mid-Apr 1944.  In May she joined EG C-5 and arrived in Bermuda on 1 June 1944 to work up.  Returning to St. John's on 27 Jun 1944, she made three round trips to the UK before joining EG 41 (RN), Plymouth Command, in Sep 1944.  She was employed on patrol and escort duties in the Channel until the end of May 1945, when she returned to Canada and was paid off 6 Jul 1945 for disposal at Sydney.  In 1946 she was sold to the Venezuelan Navy, being renamed Constitucion, and was not discarded until 1962.

HMCS Amherst (K148)

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Amherst (K148) (Flower-class).  Built by Saint John Dry Dock & Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., HMCS Amherst was commissioned on 5 Aug 1941 at Saint John, New Brunswick.  She arrived at Halifax on 22 Aug 1941 and after working up, joined Newfoundland command in Oct 1941.  She was steadily employed as an ocean escort for the succeeding three years, during which time she was involved in two particularly hard-fought convoy battles: ON.127 (Aug 1942) and SC.107 (Oct 1942).  She had joined EG C-4 in Aug 1942.  Her only real respite was between May and Nov 1943, when she under went a major refit at Charlottetown, PEI, including the extension of her fo'c's'le.  After workups at Pictou, NS, she returned to the North Atlantic grind until Sep 1944, when she began another long refit, this time at Liverpool, NS.  Following workups in Bermuda in Jan 1945, she joined Halifax Force, but in Mar 1945 was lent to EG C-7 for one round trip to the UK.  She was paid off 11 Jul 1945 at Sydney, and placed in reserve at Sorel.  Sold in 1946, she served in the Venezuelan Navy as Federacion until broken up in 1956.

HMCS Arrowhead (K145)

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4821042)

HMCS Arrowhead (K145).  Built for the RN, she was commissioned at Sorel on 22 Nov 1940 as HMS Arrowhead K145.  After arriving  at Halifax on 3 Dec 1940 she carried out workups and sailed on 21 Jan 1941, with convoy HX.104 for Sunderland.  There she was in dockyard hands for the two months' work required to complete her fully.  After working up at Tobermory HMS Arrowhead joined EG 4, Iceland Command (RN).  On 15 May 1941, she was transferred to the RCN and commissioned as HMCS Arrowhead K145.  In Jun 1941 she transferred to the newly formed NEF.  For the rest of 1941 she escorted convoys between St. John's and Iceland, proceeding early in Dec 1941 to Charleston, SC, for refit.  Returning to Halifax in Feb 1942, she made one round trip to Londonderry before joining WLEF.  In Jul 1942 she transferred to Gulf Escort Force, escorting Quebec/Gaspé-Sydney convoys, and in Oct 1942 joined Halifax Force and for two months escorted Quebec-Labrador convoys.  On 30 Nov 1942 she rejoined WLEF at Halifax, to remain with it until Aug 1944.  When this escort force was divided into escort groups in Jun 1943, HMCS Arrowhead became a member of EG W-7, transferring to W-1 in Dec 1943.  During this period she underwent two major refits: at Charleston, SC, in the spring of 1943, and at Baltimore, Maryland, a year later.  During the latter refit her fo'c's'le was extended.  In Sep 1944, she joined Quebec Force and was again employed escorting Quebec-Labrador convoys.  In De 1944 she transferred to EG W-8, WEF, and served on the "triangle run" (Halifax, St. John's, New York/Boston) for the balance of the war.  On 27 May 1945, HMCS Arrowhead left St. John's to join convoy HX.358 for passage to Britain, where she was paid off and returned to the RN on 27 Jun 1945, at Milford Haven.  Sold in 1947 for conversion to a whale-catcher and renamed Southern Larkspur, she was finally broken up at Odense, Denmark, in 1959.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Arrowhead (K145).

HMCS Arvida (K113) 

  (Ron Bell Photo)

HMCS Arvida (K113) (Flower-class).  Built at Quebec City, she was commissioned there on 22 May 1941 and arrived at Halifax on 06 Jun 1941.  She joined Sydney Force in Jul 1941 acting as escort to local sections of transatlantic convoys until Sep 1941, when she joined Newfoundland Command.  She left Sydney on 05 Sep 1941 to join her maiden ocean convoy, SC.43, and was thereafter in almost continuous service as an ocean escort until the end of 1943 . In Jun 1942, she became a member of EG C-4 and, in May 1943, of C-5.  While escorting convoy ON.188 in mid-Jun, 1943, she was damaged by her own depth charges and arrived at Iceland on 16 Jun 1943 for repairs that took a week to complete.  Three of HMCS Arvida's convoys received particularly rough handling by U-boats: ONS.92 (May 1942), ON.127 (Sep 1942), and SC.107 (Nov 1942).  While with ON.127 she rescued survivors of the torpedoed HMCS Ottawa on 13 Sep 1942.  She had major refits at Saint John (Jan - Apr 1942); Lunenburg/Saint John (Dec 1942 - Mar 1943); and Baltimore, MD. (Jan - Apr 1944).  While at Baltimore she was given her extended fo'c's'le, afterward joining EG W-7 of WLEF.  In mid-May, 1944, she was sent to Bermuda to work up, returned to Halifax on 09 Jun 1944, and in Aug 1944 joined EG W-2.  In Dec 1944 she transferred to W-8, remaining with that group until the end of the war.  HMCS Arvida was paid off on 14 Jun 1945, at Sorel and later sold for commercial use, entering service in 1950 as the Spanish-flag La Ceiba.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Arvida (K113) (Flower-class).

HMCS Asbestos (K358) 

  (RCN Photo)

HMCS Asbestos (K358) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Quebec City on 16 Jun 1944, she arrived at Halifax on 09 Jul 1944 and later that month proceeded to Bermuda to work up.  HMCS Asbestos left Bermuda on 21 Aug 1944 for St. John's, where she joined EG C-2, and left on 10 Sep 1944 for HFX.307, her maiden convoy to Britain.  For the rest of the war she was steadily employed as a North Atlantic escort and left Londonderry for the last time at the beginning of Jun 1945.  Paid off on 08 Jul 1945, she was laid up at Sorel for disposal.  In 1947 she was sold to the Dominican Republic but was wrecked on the Cuban coast en route there.  She was later salvaged and taken to New Orleans for scrapping.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Asbestos (K358) (Flower-class).  

HMCS Atholl (K15) 

  (RCN Photo)

HMCS Atholl (K15) (Flower-class).  Commissioned on 14 Oct 1943, at Quebec City, HMCS Atholl arrived at Halifax in Nov 1943 and returned there in mid-Dec 1943 for two months' repairs after working up at Pictou, Nova Scotia.  In Feb1944, she was assigned to EG 9, Londonderry, and made her passage there in March as escort to convoy HX.281.  She had scarcely arrived when it was decided that the group should consist only of frigates, and she returned to Canada in Apr 1944 with ONM.231, joining EG C-4 at St. John's.  She served the rest of the war as a mid-ocean escort except for time out under refit at Sydney and Halifax (Dec 1944 - Apr 1945).  Early in Jun 1945, she left Londonderry for the last time, and was paid off on 17 Jul 1945 at Sydney and laid up at Sorel.  She was broken up at Hamilton, Ontario, in 1952.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Atholl (K15) (Flower-class). 

HMCS Baddeck (K147)

  (RCN Photo)

HMCS Baddeck (K147) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Quebec City on 18 May 1941, HMCS Baddeck arrived at Halifax on 29 May 1941.  She again left Quebec City late in Jun 1941 for Halifax, escorting SS Lady Rodney, but had to return to her builder's at Lauzon owing to an engine breakdown.  In Sep 1941 the two set out from Halifax for Jamaica, but again HMCS Baddeck's engine failed, and she reached her destination only with difficulty.  When further repairs had been completed, she was assigned to Newfoundland Command, leaving Sydney on 5 Oct 1941 for Iceland as ocean escort to convoy SC.48, which lost nine ships to U-boats.  Engine repairs kept her at Hvalfjord, Iceland, until mid-Dec 1941 but failed to cure the problem and she was in dock at Halifax for the first six months of 1942.  She worked up at Pictou in Jul 1942, then joined WLEF until allocated to duties in connection with the invasion of North Africa, arriving at Londonderry on 1 Nov 1942.  For the next four months she escorted UK-Mediterranean convoys, returning to Halifax on 4 Apr 1943.  Later that month HMCS Baddeck was assigned to ERG C-4 for two round trips to Londonderry, then in mid-Jul 1943 went to EG W-2, WLEF.  In Aug 1943 she underwent a major refit at Liverpool, NS, including fo'c's'le extension and, after working up in St. Margaret's Bay in Jan 1944, sailed in Mar 1944 to join EG 9, Londonderry.  In Apr 1944 she transferred to Western Approaches Command for invasion escort duties, based at Portsmouth, and on 13 Jun 1944 beat off an attack by motor torpedo boats while so employed.  In Sep 1944 she was transferred to Northern Command, based at Sheerness, escorting local convoys until her departure for home on 24 May 1945.  She was paid off at Sorel on 4 Jul 1945 and sold for mercantile purposes in 1946, and renamed Efthalia.  After a number of name-changes, she was lost ashore near Jeddah as the Greek-flag Evi on 11 Mar 1966.

 (Stephen Boyd Photo)

HMCS Baddeck (K147) (Flower-class).

HMCS Barrie (K138)

 (Gail Darby Photo)

HMCS Barrie (K138) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Montreal on 12 May 1941, HMCS Barrie arrived at Halifax on 24 May 1941 and was initially employed as a local escort out of Sydney.  On 5 Sep 1941 she left Sydney to join convoy SC.43 for Iceland, but defects necessitated her sailing on to Belfast for two months' refit.  She served as a mid-ocean escort until May 1942, when she was assigned to WLEF on her return from Londonderry with ON.91, and she remained with this force until the end of the war.  When individual escort groups were formed by WLEF in Jun 1943, she became a member of EG W-1, and continued so except for brief service with EG W-8 in the fall of 1944.  In mid-Mar 1944, she commenced a long refit, including fo'c's'le extension, at Liverpool, NS, working up at Bermuda afterward in August.  On 19 May 1945, she left New York with HX.357, her last convoy, and was paid off on 26 Jun 1945 at Sorel.  Sold for merchant service in 1947, she became the Argentinean Gasestado but was taken over by the Argentinean Navy in 1957.  Converted to a hydrographic survey vessel she was renamed Capitan Canepa.  One of Capitan Canepa's most important tasks was a survey in 1967 to delineate the contested territorial waters between Argentina, Uruguay, and Brazil.  The survey quite possibly averted war.  After more than 30 years service to two navies, she was paid off and broken up in 1972.

 (Gail Darby Photo)

HMCS Barrie (K138) (Flower-class).

HMCS Battleford (K165) 

 (Jack Gibson Photo)

HMCS Battleford (K165) (Flower-class).  Built at Collingwood, Ontario, she was launched on 15 Apr 1941.  Commissioned at Montreal on 31 Jul 1941, she arrived at Halifax on 04 Aug 1941, remaining there for six weeks while undergoing repairs, radar installation, and workups.  Briefly a member of Sydney Force, HMCS Battleford transferred to NEW and left Sydney on 28 Nov 1941 to escort convoy SC.57 to Iceland.  Returning to Halifax on 07 Jan 1942, she went to Liverpool, NS, for a refit that kept her idle until the end of Mar 1942.  Arriving in the UK with a convoy early in May 1942, she completed further repairs at Cardiff in mid-Jun 1942, then carried out workups at Tobermory.  From July 1942 to May 1943 she was a member of EG C-1, and in Dec 1942 was escort to convoy ONS.154, which was badly mauled, losing 14 ships.  She participated with other RCN escorts in the destruction of U-356 north of the Azores on 27 Dec 1942.  The German submarine was sunk by depth charges with a loss of all 46 crew members. Arriving at Halifax on 23 Apr 1943, with her last ocean convoy, ONS.2, she commenced a two-month refit at Liverpool, NS, joining EG W-4 of WLEF in mid-Jun 1943.  Early in Apr 1944, she commenced a long refit at Sydney, including fo'c's'le extension, which was completed 31 Jul 1944, following which she proceeded to Bermuda to work up.  Returning to Halifax, she was employed for the balance of the war as a local escort with EG W-3 and was paid off at Sorel 18 Jul 1945.  Sold to the Venezuelan Navy in 1946 and renamed Libertad, she was wrecked 12 Apr 1949.

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Battleford off the US East Coast, 5 October 1943.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Battleford (K165) (Flower-class).

HMCS Beauharnois (K540)

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Beauharnois (K540) (Flower-class).  Built at Quebec City, HMCS Beauharnois was commissioned there on 25 Sep 1944.  She arrived at Halifax on 20 Oct 1944 and left for Bermuda on 06 Nov 1944 to work up.  On 30 Nov 1944 she sailed from Bermuda for St. John's where she joined EG C-4, leaving on 09 Dec 1944 to pick up her first convoy, HX.324.  She was employed on North Atlantic convoys for the next few months, the last one being ONS.45, for which she left Londonderry on 23 Mar 1945.  Among her last duties was acting as escort to the cable vessel Lord Kelvin off Cape Race in May.  She was paid off on 12 Jul 1945 and laid up at Sorel.  Sold for mercantile purposes in 1946, she was renamed Colon, but became a warship again when she was acquired by the Israeli navy.  HMCS Beauharnois was sold to the Israeli Navy in 1948.  Commissioned as INS Wedgewood K18 on 09 Jun 1948, she was later renamed INS HaShomer.   She was paid off by the Israeli Navy in 1954 and broken up in Israel in 1956.

HMCS Belleville (K332)

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Belleville (K332) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Kingston on 19 Oct 1944, she visited the Ontario port for which she was named before leaving for Halifax, where she arrived early in Nov 1944.  HMCS Belleville continued fitting out at Halifax until Mid-Jan 1945, then sailed to Bermuda for a month's working-up.  Further repairs followed on her return, after which she was allocated to EG C-5, leaving St. John's on 28 Mar 1945 to join her first convoy, HX.346.  She made three Atlantic crossing before the war's end, leaving Londonderry for the last time at the beginning of Jun 1945.  She was paid off on 5 Jul 1945, and placed in reserve at Sorel until 1947, when she was sold to the Dominican Republic and re-named Juan Bautista Combiaso.  She was broken up in 1972.

HMCS Bittersweet (K182)

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Bittersweet (K182) (Flower-class).  Built at Sorel for the RN, she was launched on 12 Sep 1940.  HMS Bittersweet was towed to Liverpool, NS for completion so as not to be icebound.  She was commissioned 23 Jan 1941 at Halifax as HMS Bittersweet K182.  On 5 Mar 1941, she left with convoy HX.113 for the Tyne.  There, from 1 Apr 1941 to 6 Jun 1941, the finishing touches were carried out.  During this refit, on 15 May 1941, she was transferred to the RCN and commissioned as HMCS Bittersweet K182.  After working up at Tobermory she left for Iceland on 27 Jun 1941, having been assigned to Newfoundland Command.  She was continuously employed as an ocean escort until 31 Dec 1941, when she arrived at Charleston, SC for refit, resuming her duties in Mar 1942.  Bittersweet served with EG C-5 and C-3 until Oct 1943, one of her most strenuous convoys being ONS.192, which lost seven ships.  She underwent refit at Baltimore, MD, possibly from Dec 1941, & May 1942, but recorded as Oct 1943 to Nov 1943, which included the extension of her fo'c's'le, then proceeded to Pictou to work up.  She then resumed her convoy duties, leaving Londonderry late in Oct 1944 to join her last convoy, ON.262.  Upon arriving in Canada she went to Pictou to commence a refit that was completed at Halifax 10 Feb 1945.  She was then assigned briefly to Halifax Force before transferring in April to Sydney Force, with which she remained until the end of the war.  She was paid off and returned to the RN at Aberdeen on 22 Jun 1945, and broken up at Rosyth the following year.

 (Wayne Maize Photo)

HMCS Bittersweet (K182) (Flower-class), preparing to be towed by HMCS Skeena, May, 1943.  The light line has just been passed in order to pass the heavy tow line.

HMCS Brandon (K149) 

 (Ron Bell Photo)

HMCS Brandon (K149) (Flower-class).  Built at Lauzon, Quebec, she was commissioned at Quebec City on 22 Jul 1941.  HMCS Brandon arrived at Halifax on 1 Aug 1941.  She joined Newfoundland Command in September after working up and left St. John's 26 Sep 1941 for her first convoy, SC.46.  She served as an ocean escort to and from Iceland until Dec 1941, when she arrived in the UK for three months' repairs at South Shields.  From mid-Mar 1942, after three weeks' workups at Tobermory, she served on the "Newfie-Derry" run almost continuously until Sep 1944.  From Dec 1942, onward, she served with EG C-4, helping defend the hard-pressed convoy HX.224 in Feb 1943, and in the following month escorting convoys to and from Gibraltar.  In Aug 1943, she had a three-month refit at Grimsby, England, including fo'c's'le extension.  She left Londonderry 2 Sep 1944, to join her last transatlantic convoy, ONS.251, and, after two months' refit at Liverpool, NS, worked up in Bermuda.  On 5 Feb 1945, she arrived at S. John's to join EG W-5, Western Escort Force, in which she served until the end of the war.  Paid off at Sorel on 22 Jun 1945, she was broken up at Hamilton, Ontario in 1945.

 (Scot Urquhart Photo)

HMCS Brandon (K149) (Flower-class).

 (Scot Urquhart Photo)

HMCS Brandon (K149) (Flower-class).

 (Scot Urquhart Photo)

HMCS Brandon (K149) (Flower-class).

HMCS Brantford (K218)

 (Naval Museum of Alberta Photo)

HMCS Brantford (K218) (Flower-class).  Built at the Midland Shipyards, HMCS Brantford was the last "Flower" class corvette to be built - all further builds were modified from the original plans.  Launched on 6 Sep 1941, she sailed form the Midland Shipyard to the dry dock at Collingwood, Ontario, on 1 May 1942.  Here she received further fittings before proceeding on to Toronto for gun and depth-charge trials.  From there she sailed to Montreal for installation of wireless equipment.  She was commissioned at Montreal on 15 May 1942.  The city of Brantford, Ontario, had adopted the ship, and she was amply supplied with comforts of her crew, including radios, heavy winter clothing, magazines and cigarettes. 

On 12 May 1942, three days before HMCS Brantford's commissioning, the freighter SS Nicoya and the Dutch merchantman Leto were torpedoed North of Cap Magdalen.  Emergency plans put into effect and all St. Lawrence shipping destined for the transatlantic route, or arriving from the Atlantic, was organized in convoys.  Merchant ships were to stop at Sydney on their way to the St. Lawrence, and at Quebec on the way down, picking up their river escorts at those points.  Such convoys were designated as SQ and QS, respectively.  Since HMCS Brantford was due to sail from Montreal to Halifax she was used temporarily to escort two QS convoys.  She sailed from Quebec with QS-2 on 22 May 1942, arriving at Sydney with her four charges three days later, and immediately sailed back to Gaspe to pick up QS-3. 

HMCS Brantford arrived at Halifax on 30 May 1942.  After working up at Pictou, she joined WLEF in July.  When this force was divided into escort groups in Jun 1943, she became a member of EG W-3, transferring to W-2 in Apr 1944.  Lent in Jun 1944, to EG C-3 for one round trip to Londonderry, she left Halifax on 2 Jun 1944 with convoy HX.294 and returned at the end of the month with ONS.242.  HMCS Brantford underwent two refits during her career: the first at Quebec City during the summer of 1943; the second at Sydney, completing 12 Sep 1944, following which, on 26 Sep 1944, she was she was assigned to HMCS Cornwallis for training duties until the end of the war.  On 16 July 1945, she returned to Halifax to de-ammunition and then to Sydney to de-store.  Her last trip under the White Ensign was completed on 3 Aug 1945, when she arrived back at Halifax.  Paid off on 17 Aug 1945, she was turned over to War Assets Corporation for final disposal . She was one of the few corvettes to never have her fo'c's'le extended - maintaining her original configuration.  She was brought by George E. Irving of New Brunswick, and in 1950 was sold to a Honduran company who fitted her out as the steam whaler Olympic Arrow.  Sold into Japanese hands, she was renamed Otori Maru No. 11 in 1956, last appearing in Lloyd's list for 1962-63.

 (Ron Bell Photo)

HMCS Brantford (K218) (Flower-class).

 (Ron Bell Photo)

HMCS Brantford (K218) (Flower-class), at the CPR Dock Digby, Nova Scotia, May 1945.  HMCS Collingwood is seen berthed astern.

HMCS Buctouche (K179) 

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Buctouche (K179) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Quebec City on 05 Jun 1941, HMCS Buctouche arrived at Halifax on 12 Jun 1941.  After working up, she joined Newfoundland Force at St. John's on 29 Jul 1941.  On 26 Aug 1941 she left St. John's for Iceland with convoy SC.41, and thereafter escorted convoys to and from Iceland until Jan 1942, when Londonderry became the eastern terminus.  In Jun 1942, she was transferred to WLEF, with which she was to remain until the end of the war except for two months in the summer of 1944, when she was attached to Quebec Force.  On 7 July 1942, Buctouche under Skr. Lt. G.N. Downey, RCNR, rescued 15 survivors from the Norwegian merchant ship Moldanger that was torpedoed and sunk by U-404 on 27 June at 30-03N, 70-52W.  After the formation of escort groups by WLEF in Jun 1943, Buctouche served principally with EG W-1.  In Oct 1943, she commenced a fourth-month refit at Saint John, completing on 29 Jan 1944, in the process acquiring an extended fo'c's'le.  On 28 Jun 1944, HMCS Buctouche was damaged in a grounding incident at Hamilton Inlet, Labrador but made Pictou on her own for two months' repairs.  She was paid off at Sorel on 15 Jun 1945, and broken up at Hamilton, Ontario, in 1949.

 (Dan Connolly Photo)

HMCS Buctouche (K179) (Flower-class). 

HMCS Calgary (K231) 

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Calgary (K231) (Flower-class).  Built at Sorel, Quebec, she was commissioned there on 16 Dec 1941; arriving at Halifax on 28 Dec 1941.  She served with WLEF until Nov 1942, when she was assigned to duties in connection with Operation "Torch."  She arrived at Londonderry on 03 Nov 1942 but proved to have mechanical defects that precluded her intended use on UK-Mediterranean convoys.  Instead, she had to undergo three months' repairs at Cardiff, completing at the end of Mar 1943.  In Apr 1943 she returned to Canada, arriving at St. John's, Newfoundland on 30 Apr 1943 with HMCS Algoma K127 as escorts for convoy ON.179, then rejoined WLEF.  In Jun 1943, she was transferred to EG-5, Western Support Force, and sailed for the UK with convoy SC.133.  For the next few months she was employed in support of Atlantic convoys and, on 20 Nov 1943, shared in sinking U-536 north of the Azores.  HMCS Calgary returned to Canada early in 1944 for refit at Liverpool, NS, completing the work on 17 Mar 1944.  After working up at Halifax, she left on 2 May 1944 for the UK to join Western Approaches Command, Greenock, for invasion duties.  Initially based at Sheerness, she was moved to Nore Command in September for the duration of the war.  Returning home late in May 1945, she was paid off at Sorel on 19 Jun 1945 and sold in 1946 to Victory Transport & Salvage Co.  She was broken up at Hamilton in 1951.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Calgary (K231) (Flower-class).

HMCS Camrose (K154) 

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Camrose (K154) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Sorel, Quebec, on 30 June 1941, HMCS Camrose arrived at Halifax, Nova Scotia, on 6 June.  She was assigned to Halifax Force after working up, but in October joined Newfoundland Command, leaving St. John’s, Newfoundland, on 8 October for Iceland with convoy SC.48.  She was employed as ocean escort to and from Iceland until February 1942, when she commenced a major refit at Lunenburg, Nova Scotia.  Upon completion in May she resumed her mid-ocean escort duties for one round trip to Londonderry, Northern Ireland, but was assigned in June to Western Local Escort Force. 

In October 1942, HMCS Camrose was allocated to duties concerned with the invasion of North Africa.  She left Halifax on 20 October for the United Kingdom, and for the next five months escorted convoys between Britain and the Mediterranean.  In April 1943 she proceeded to Pictou, Nova Scotia, for a refit lasting five and a half months, including forecastle extension, after which she worked up in Bermuda and was assigned to Escort Group 6.  She left St. John’s, Newfoundland, early in December for Londonderry, where she was based for the next four months in support of convoys, especially to and from Freetown, Sierra Leone and Gibraltar.  While with combined convoys OS.64/KMS.38, she shared with the British destroyer HMS Bayntun the sinking of U-757 in the North Atlantic on 8 January 1944.  In May she joined Western Approaches Command, Greenock, Scotland for invasion duties, escorting convoys to staging ports, and to and from Normandy beaches.  She left the United Kingdom on 2 September for another refit at Pictou, followed by workups in Bermuda, returning in January 1945 to become a member of Escort Group 41, Plymouth, England.  She served with this group until Victory-in-Europe Day, afterward participating in the re-occupation of St. Helier in the Channel Islands.  HMCS Camrose left Greenock, Scotland, for home early in June 1945 and was paid off at Sydney on 22 July.  She was broken up at Hamilton, Ontario in 1947.

 (Dave Chamberlain Photo)

Unknown corvette, HMCS Camrose (K154) and HMCS Collingwood (K180) ca 1945.

HMCS Chambly (K116)

 (Patricia Allan Strowbridge Photo)

HMCS Chambly (K116) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Quebec City on 18 Dec 1940, HMCS Chambly arrived at Halifax on 24 Dec 1940.  After working up she joined Halifax Force, and on 23 May 1941, left Halifax as on of the original seven corvettes forming NEF.  She served continuously as on ocean escort between St. John's and Iceland until 08 Dec 1941 when she returned to Halifax for refit.  During this period she took part in two major convoy battles: HX.133 (Jun 1941), which lost 18.  In the latter case she had left St. John's on 05 Sep 1941 with HMCS Moose Jaw for exercises, and when SC.42 came under attack, they received permission to join the convoy off Greenland in support.  Just before joining on 10 Sep 1941 they came upon U-501 trailing the convoy, and sank her.  HMCS Chambly served as a mid-ocean escort to Iceland for the balance of 1941, then underwent repairs at Halifax from 8 Dec 1941 to 22 Feb 1942.  She then made a round trip to Londonderry as an escort in Mar 1942 and, on her return to St. John's on 28 Mar 1942, was based there to reinforce ocean escorts in the western Atlantic, doubling as a training ship.  In Sep 1942 she resumed regular mid-ocean escort duties, with time out for refit at Liverpool, NS, from 26 Nov 1942 to 13 Feb 1943.  From Mar to Aug 1943, she was a member of EG C-2, then briefly joined the newly formed EG 9 at St. John's and, in Sep 1943, EG 5.  In Dec 1942 she returned to Liverpool, NS for three months' refit, including fo'c's'le extension.  After workups in St. Margaret's Bay she resumed mid-ocean duties, the time with C-1, until her final departure from Londonderry on 11 Mar 1945.  She was refitting at Louisbourg when the war ended, and was paid off and laid up at Sorel on 20 Jun 1945.  Sold in 1946 for conversion to a whale-catcher, she entered service in 1952 under the Dutch flag as Sonja Vinke, and was broken up at Santander, Spain, in 1966.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, PA105310)

HMCS Chambly (K116) and HMCS Orillia (K119).

HMCS Charlottetown (K244)

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Charlottetown (K244) (Flower-class).  Built by the Kingston Shipbuilding Co., Ltd, Ont., she was commissioned at Quebec City on 13 Dec 1941 and arrived at Halifax on 18 Dec 1941.  She was a member of WLEF until mid-Jul 1942, when she was transferred to Gulf Escort Force owing to increased U-boat activity in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.  She was employed as escort to Quebec-Sydney convoys until 11 Sep 1942, when she was torpedoed and sunk by U-517 in the St. Lawrence River near Cap Chat, Quebec.  Six of her crew were lost that day, 4 later died of wounds resulting from the sinking.  She had earlier delivered convoy SQ.35 to Rimouski and was en route back to Gaspé, her base, at the time.

A member of HMCS Charlottetown's crew, Bowser died after the German submarine U-517 sank his ship in the St. Lawrence River in September 1942.  Charlottetown had been sailing with HMCS Clayoquot and, as the ships had not been "zig-zagging," they presented less-difficult targets for U-517.  Most of Charlottetown's crew survived the torpedoing but several, including Bowser, were severely injured by depth charges which exploded as their ship sank.  His funeral at St. Paul's Anglican Church in Gaspé, Quebec, emphasized the proximity of the battle of the St. Lawrence to the Canadian home front

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Charlottetown (K244) (Flower-class).

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Charlottetown (K244) (Flower-class).

HMCS Chicoutimi (K156) 

 (Ron Bell Photo)

HMCS Chicoutimi (K156) (Flower-class).  Built by Canadian Vickers Ltd., Montreal, Quebec, she was commissioned at Montreal on 12 May 1941.  HMCS Chicoutimi arrived at Halifax on 17 May 1941.  She carried out workups and then joined Sydney Force, escorting ocean convoys on the first leg of their eastward journey.  In Sep 1941 she joined Newfoundland Command and left Sydney on 29 Sep 1941 to escort convoy SC.47 to Iceland.  She was employed for the next five months as an ocean escort between St. John's and Iceland and, later, Londonderry.  Reassigned to WLEF, she left 'Derry on 27 Feb 1942, to meet convoy On.71.  She served with WLEF until Aug 1944 (from Jun 1943, on with EG W-1), when she was transferred to HMCS Cornwallis as a training ship.  In Apr 1945, she went to Sydney Force and, on 16 Jun 1945, was paid off at Sorel for disposal.  She was sold to Steel Co. of Canada, Hamilton, Ontario, in Jun 1946 and broken up in the same year.  A credit to her builders, Canadian Vickers, HMCS Chicoutimi required only three short refits during her active career, and she was one of the few corvettes to survive the war with a short fo'c's'le.

HMCS Chilliwack (K131)

 (Naval Museum of Alberta Photo)

HMCS Chilliwack (K131) (Flower-class).  Built by Burrard Dry Dock Co., Ltd, she was commissioned at Vancouver on 8 Apr 1941.  She arrived at Halifax on 19 Jun 1941, was assigned to Newfoundland Command in July, and for the rest of the year escorted convoys between St. John's and Iceland.  Early in Feb 1942 Chilliwack escorted SC.67, her first transatlantic convoy, and was thereafter employed almost continuously as an ocean escort until Nov 1944.  From Jun 1942, onward she was a member of EG C-1, and during this period escorted three convoys around which epic battles were fought: SC.94 (Aug 1942), ONS.154 (Dec 1942), and ON.166 (Feb 1943).  In addition, she assisted in sinking two U-boats: U-356 when escort to ONS.154, 27 Dec 1942; and U-744 when escort to HX.280, on 6 Mar 1944.  On that date, HMCS Chaudiere H99, HMCS St. Catharines K325, HMCS Chilliwack 131, HMCS Fennel K194 and HMCS Gatineau H61, along with two British ships, HMS Icarus and HMS Kenilworth Castle, started one of the longest U-boat hunts Canadian ships participated in during the Second World War.  A total of 291 depth charges, 87,300 pounds of high explosive were required to bring the U-boat to the surface.  Fifteen hundred signals were passed between the ships as they stalked, attacked, waited and again attacked the submarine U-744 through a day and a night of rough weather.  U-744 was forced to surface on 6 March 1944, after a 31-hour pursuit by these Canadian and British ships.  U-744 was then boarded by allied sailors, who retrieved code books and other documents.  Most of this was lost while being transferred between the U-Boat and the allied ships.  After attempts to tow the submarine into port failed, U-744 was scuttled by the allied warships.  In the course of a major refit from Apr to Oct 1943, at Dartmouth, NS, she acquired her long fo'c's'le.  Assigned on 4 Dec 1943 to EG WE-8, WEF, she left for a month's workups in Bermuda.  Reassigned in Apr 1945, to Halifax Force, she was temporarily lent to EG C-1 the following month for one final round trip to Londonderry.  Paid off 14 Jul 1945 and laid up at Sorel, she was broken up at Hamilton, Ontario, in 1946.

 (Kelly Macklem Photo)

HMCS Chilliwack (K131) (Flower-class).

 (Scott Wilson McMurdo Photo)

Photo of the capture of U-744, taken from HMCS Chilliwack, 6 March 1944.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, PA-112996)

Photo of the capture of U-744, taken from HMCS Chilliwack, 6 March 1944.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Chilliwack (K131) (Flower-class).

HMCS Cobalt (K124)

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Cobalt (K124) (Flower-class).  Built at Port Arthur and commissioned there on 25 Nov 1940, HMCS Cobalt was taken to Halifax in advance of completion to beat the St. Lawrence freeze-up, arriving 24 Dec 1940.  Completed early in Jan 1941, she worked up and joined Halifax Force, but left on 23 May 1941 with the other six corvettes and first formed NEF.  For the next six months she operated as an ocean escort between St. John's and Iceland, proceeding in mid-Nov 1941 to Liverpool, NS, for three moths' refit.  Following completion she made two round trips to Londonderry before being assigned in May 1942, to WLEF, with which she was to spend the balance of the war.  She served with EG W-6 from Jun 1943; with W-5 from Apr 1944; and with W-7 from Feb 1945.  During the second of two other extensive refits at Liverpool, NS, from Apr to 20 Jul 1944, her fo'c's'le was lengthened.  She was paid off at Sorel on 17 Jun 1945, and subsequently sold for conversion to a whale-catcher, entering service in 1953 as the Dutch Johanna W. Vinke.  She was broken up in South Africa in 1966.

 (Edmund Ferris Photo)

HMCS Cobalt (K124) (Flower-class). 

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Cobalt (K124) (Flower-class).

HMCS Cobourg (K333)

 (Linda Carleton Photo)

HMCS Cobourg (K333) (Flower-class).  Launched at Midland, Ontario, she was commissioned there on 11 May 1944.  She arrived at Halifax 17 Jun 1944, having visited her namesake port en route.  She arrived in Bermuda in mid-Jul 1944 for three weeks' workups and on her return was allocated to EG C-6, St. John's.  HMCS Cobourg served with the group as a mid-ocean escort for the duration of the war, leaving Londonderry on 27 Mar 1945, to join convoy ON.293 for her last trip westward.  She arrived at Halifax 02 May 1945 for refit and was paid off 15 June 1945 at Sorel to await disposal.  Sold into mercantile service in 1945, she began her new career in 1947 under the name of Camco.  In 1956 she assumed the name Puerto del Sol under Panamanian flag, and on 1 Jul 1971 or 1972, burned and sank at New Orleans.  She was later raised and broken up.

HMCS Collingwood (K180)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Collingwood (K180) (Flower-class).  The first RCN corvette to enter service, HMCS Collingwood, was commissioned on 9 Nov 1940, at Collingwood, arrived at Halifax 04 Dec 1940, and joined Halifax Force in Jan 1941.  She sailed on 23 May 1941 as one of the seven corvettes that were charter members of Newfoundland Command, and in Jun 1941 commenced six months' employment as an escort between St. John's and Iceland.  Early in Dec 1941 she began a two-month refit at Halifax, following which she resumed mid-ocean escort duties between St. John's and Londonderry.  These duties continued, with time off for three minor refits, until the end of 1944.  From Dec 1942, onward she was a member of EG C-4.  HMCS Collingwood was involved in one major convoy battle, that of HX.133 in Jun 1941, when eight ships were torpedoed and six sunk.  During her refit at New York City from Oct to Dec 1943, she received her extended fo'c's'le.  She left Londonderry on 16 Nov 1944, for the last time, refitted briefly at Liverpool, NS, then went to Digby to serve as a training ship from Apr to Jun 1945.  She was paid off on 23 Jul 1945 and laid up at Sorel.  She was sold in Jul 1950 and broken up by Steel Co. of Canada, Hamilton, Ontario, the same year.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Collingwood (K180) (Flower-class).

HMCS Dauphin (K157) 

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Dauphin (K157) (Flower-class).  Built by Canadian Vickers Ltd., Montreal, she was commissioned at Montreal on 17 May 1941 and arrived at Halifax on 24 May 1941.  She joined Sydney Force late in Jun 1941 and in Sep 1941 transferred to Newfoundland Command.  She left Sydney on 05 Sep 1941 to join her maiden convoy, SC.43, continuing on to the UK for further workups at Tobermory and returning to mid-ocean service in mid-Oct 1941.  HMCS Dauphin was almost continuously employed as an ocean escort until Aug 1944, after Dec 1942 as a member of EG A-3, (re-designated C-5 in Jun 1943).  She escorted three particularly strenuous convoys: SC.100 (Sep 1942), On.166 (Feb 1943), and SC.121 (Mar 1943).  In the course of a major refit at Pictou from Apr to Sep 1943, her fo'c's'le was lengthened.  Dauphin left Londonderry for the last time on 11 Aug 1944, underwent refit at Liverpool, NS, then proceeded to Bermuda to work up.  Returning in Jan 1945, she was assigned to EG W-7, Western Escort Force, for the balance of the war.  She was paid off at Sorel on 20 Jun 1945, and sold for conversion to a merchant ship at the yards of Steel and Engine Products, Liverpool, NS.  Named Dundas Kent, just as she neared completion she caught fire and burned at the pier.  After being repaired she entered service in 1949 as the Honduran Cortes.  She became the Ecuadorian flagged vessel San Antonio in 1955.  She was still listed in Lloyd's Register in 1977-78.

HMCS Dawson (K104)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Dawson (K104) (Flower-class).  Built at Victoria, BC, HMCS Dawson was commissioned on 6 Oct 1941 and, after working up, joined Esquimalt Force for local patrol duty.  On 20 Aug 1942, she arrived at Kodiak, Alaska, to take part in the Aleutian campaign under US operational control, returning to Esquimalt 4 Nov 1942.  She resumed her duties with Esquimalt Force until Feb 1943, when she again proceeded to Alaskan waters to work with US naval units until the end of May 1943.  In Sep 1943 she commenced a major refit, including fo'c's'le extension, at Vancouver, worked up following its completion 29 Jan 1944, and on 14 Feb 1944 left for Halifax.  Arriving there 25 Mar 1944, she joined EG W-7, WEF.  Early in Jan 1945, she began a refit at Dartmouth, on completion of which in Apr 1945 she went to Bermuda to work up.  The European war had ended by the time she returned, and she was paid off 19 Jun 1945 at Sorel.  Sold for scrap; she foundered at her moorings on 22 Mar 1946 at Hamilton.  She was later raised and broken up.

HMCS Drumheller (K167) 

(DND Photo)

HMCS Drumheller (K167) (Flower-class).  Built at Collingwood, Ontario, she was commissioned at Montreal on 13 Sep 1941.  HMCS Drumheller arrived at Halifax on 25 Sep 1941.  She joined Sydney Force in Nov 1941 after completing workups, but soon afterward transferred to Newfoundland Command, and left St. John's on 11 Dec 1941 to join her first convoy, SC.59, for Iceland.  HMCS Drumheller was employed for two months on that convoy run, but on 06 Feb 1942, arrived at Londonderry - one of the first Canadian ships to do so.  She left for St. John's the following week, but developed mechanical defects en route and returned to the UK to refit at Southampton.  On completion of the repairs she arrived at Tobermory on 22 Mar 1942 to work up, resuming ocean escort service at the end of Apr 1942 as a member of EG C-2.  She served with the group until Apr 1944, with respite only from mid-Nov 1943 to 15 Jan 1944, while undergoing a refit, including fo'c's'le extension, at New York City.  Her most hectic convoy was the combined ON.202/ONS.18 of Sep 1943, which lost six merchant vessels and three escorts.  On 13 May 1943, while escorting HX.237 she, HMS Lagan, and a Sunderland aircraft collaborated in sinking U-456.  In Apr 1944 HMCS Drumheller was allocated to Western Approaches Command, Greenock, for invasion duties, transferring in September to Portsmouth Command . She served with the latter until the end of the war, escorting convoys in UK coastal waters, and returned to Canada in mid-May, 1945.  Paid off on 11 Jul 1945, at Sydney, she was broken up in 1949 at Hamilton, Ontario.

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Drumheller (K167) (Flower-class).

HMCS Dundas (K229)

 (Jeff Simpson Photo)

HMCS Dundas (K229) (Flower-class), 25 July 1941.  Built at Victoria and commissioned on 1 Apr 1942, she joined Esquimalt Force after working up, and in Aug 1942 made a round trip as convoy escort to Kodiak, Alaska, in support of the Aleutian campaign.  On 13 Sep 1942 she sailed for the east coast to replace an Operation "Torch" nominee, joining WLEF upon arrival at Halifax on 13 Oct 1942.  She served with EG W-7 from Jun 1943, with W-5 from Sep 1943, and with W-4 from Apr 1944.  In the course of a major refit at Montreal from 13 Jun to 19 Nov 1943, HMCS Dundas acquired her extended fo'c's'le. She commenced another long refit early in Jan 1945, at Liverpool, NS, resuming service in Apr 1945.  Paid off on 17 Jul 1945 at Sorel, she was sold later that year and broken up in 1946 at Hamilton, Ontario.

HMCS Dunvegan (K177)

 (Ron Bell Photo)

HMCS Dunvegan (K177) (Flower-class).  Named after a village in Nova Scotia, HMCS Dunvegan was commissioned at Sorel on 9 Sep 1941, and arrived at Halifax a week later.  She joined Sydney Force after working up, but in mid-Nov 1941 was transferred to Newfoundland Command, leaving St. John's on 18 Nov 1941 as ocean escort to convoy SC.55 as far as Iceland.  On her return she underwent repairs at Halifax, and on their completion in Jan 1942, was assigned briefly to WLEF.  On 27 Jan 1942, while escorting convoy HX.172, both engines of HMCS Annapolis stopped because of water in the oil fuel.  HMCS Dunvegan came to her aid.  While trying to pass a line for a tow, HMCS Dunvegan fouled the line in her own propeller.  With rapidly deteriorating weather,  HMCS Annapolis drifted into HMCS Dunvegan and sustained damage to her own propellers and substructure.  As a result of the collision, the two ships limped into Halifax Harbour with HMCS Annapolis towing her would-be rescuer.  Resuming her duties as ocean escort with Newfoundland Command, she arrived at Londonderry on 10 Mar 1942.  In succeeding weeks she made two more round trips to 'Derry, leaving that port for the last time in mid-Jun 1942.  On reaching Halifax, she was assigned to WLEF and, in Jun 1943, to its EG W-8.  In Oct 1943, she proceeded to Baltimore, MD, for a refit which included fo'c's'le extension and lasted until the end of the year.  She then carried out workups off Norfolk, VA, completing the process in Bermuda after some repairs at Halifax.  On her return she resumed her duties with WLEF, from Apr 1944 onward as a member of EG W-6.  On 7 May 1945, she left Halifax as local escort to convoy SC.175, but was detached on 10 May 1945 to act, with HMCS Rockcliffe, as escort to the surrendered U-889.  She was paid off on 3 Jul 1945, at Sydney, and sold in 1946 to the Venezuelan Navy, serving as Indepencia until broken up in 1953.

HMCS Edmundston (K106) 

(DND Photo)

HMCS Edmundston (K106) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Esquimalt on 21 Oct 1941, Edmundston was assigned after workups to Esquimalt Force.  On 20 Jun 1942, she rescued 31 crew members of SS Fort Camosun, disabled by a torpedo from the Japanese submarine I-25 off the coast of Washington. She left Esquimalt for the Atlantic on 13 Sep 1942, arriving at Halifax on 13 Oct 1942, and was assigned to WLEF.  On 4 Jan 1943, she commenced a five-month refit at Halifax, including fo'c's'le extension, carried out workups at Pictou, then joined EG 5 at St. John's.  For the next ten months she was employed in support of North Atlantic, Gibraltar, and Sierra Leone convoys.  She underwent a refit at Liverpool, NS, from May to Jul 1944, worked up in Bermuda in Aug 1944 and, in Oct 1944, joined the newly formed EG C-8.  She served the remainder of the war as an ocean escort, leaving Londonderry on 11 May 1945 with HMCS Leaside K492 and HMCS Poundmaker K675, for the last time as escort for convoy ONS.50.  She was paid off at Sorel on 16 Jun 1945 and sold for mercantile use, entering service in 1948 as Amapala, last noted under Liberian flag in Lloyd's list for 1961-62.

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Edmundston (K106) (Flower-class).

HMCS Eyebright (K150)

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Eyebright (K150) (Flower-class).  Built for the RN, she was commissioned at Montreal on 26 Nov 1940 as HMS Eyebright.  She arrived incomplete at Halifax on 11 Dec 1940 and, after working up, left on 21 Jan 1941, with convoy HX.104 for Sunderland.  There she was completed on 16 Apr 1941, and proceeded to Tobermory to work up.  Transferred to the RCN on 15 May 1941 and commissioned as HMCS Eyebright K150, she was later allocated to EG 4 (RN), based at Iceland, whence she sailed on 12 Jun 1941 to join convoy OB.332 for Halifax.  She joined Newfoundland Command in Jun 1941, and for the next five months was employed as escort to convoys between St. John's and Iceland.  In Nov 1941 she began a refit at Charleston, SC, resuming escort duty late in Jan 1942, and arrived at Londonderry with her first transatlantic convoy, SC.66, on 6 Feb 1942.  In Jan 1943, she joined EG C-3, and in Jul 1943 commenced two months' refit at Baltimore, MD, including fo'c's'le extension.  Following repairs at Pictou and workups at Bermuda in the summer of 1944, she joined EG W-3, WLEF, and saw continuous service in the western Atlantic until the end of the war, with one further round trip to Londonderry as a temporary member of EG C-5.  HMCS Eyebright was returned to the RN at Belfast on 17 Jun 1945, and sold in 1947 for conversion to a whale-catcher.  She entered service in 1950 as the Dutch Albert W. Vinke, last appearing in Lloyd's list for 1964-65.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Eyebright (K150) (Flower-class).

 (Ron Bell Photo)

HMCS Eyebright (K150) (Flower-class).

 (Ron Bell Photo)

HMCS Eyebright (K150) (Flower-class).

HMCS Fennel (K194)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Fennel (K194) (Flower-class).  Built at Sorel for the RN, she was launched on 20 Aug 1940.  In Dec 1940 she was towed to Liverpool, NS for completion and commissioned there on 15 Jan 1941 as HMS Fennel.  She left Halifax on 5 Mar 1941 with convoy HX.113 for the UK, and while there received finishing touches at Greenock.  On 15 May 1941 she was transferred to the RCN and commissioned as HMCS Fennel K194.  Following workups at Tobermory in Jun 1941 Fennel was assigned to NEF, first serving as an ocean escort between St. John's and Londonderry.  In Jun 1942, she commenced a year's service with the newly formed WLEF.  She underwent a refit at New York from mid-Jul to late Sep 1942.  In Jun 1943, she was detached to EG C-2 for one round trip to 'Derry, and on returning she went to Baltimore, MD, for a refit which included the extension of her fo'c's'le, completing on 06 Sep 1943.  After working up at Pictou she resumed her ocean escort duties with C-2, and on 06 Mar 1944, was one of seven escorts of HX.280 that hounded U-744 to its death.  In Aug 1944 she had two months' refit at Pictou, followed by three weeks' workups in Bermuda and at year's end transferred to EG C-1 for the duration of the war.  HMCS Fennel arrived at Greenock 29 May 1945, from one of the last convoys, and was returned to the RN at Londonderry on 12 Jun 1945.  She was sold in 1946 to Kosmos and became the whaling vessel Milliam Kihl.  She was re-built as a buoy-boat in October 1948.  Refitted as whaler in 1951 in Kiel, Germany.  Laid up in 1960/1961.  Last drifting season 1964/1965.  Laid up again in Sandefjord.  Sold to Norwegian ship breakers in Grimstad in 1966.

HMCS Fergus (K686)

 (Judy Agis Photo)

HMCS Fergus (K686) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Collingwood on 18 Nov 1944, HMCS Fergus was the last corvette launched for the RCN.  She arrived at Halifax in mid-Dec 1944, and early in Jan 1945, proceeded to Bermuda to work up.  Arriving at St. John's on 2 Feb 1945, she joined EG C-9, with which she was to served on North Atlantic convoy duty until VE-day.  She left Greenock early in Jun 1945 for return to Canada, was paid off on 14 July 1945 at Sydney and placed in reserve at Sorel.  Sold for mercantile use in November, she was renamed Camco II and, in 1948, Harcourt Kent.  She was wrecked on Cape Pine, Newfoundland, 22 Nov 1949.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Fergus (K686) (Flower-class).

HMCS Forest Hill (K486)

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Forest Hill (K486) (Flower-class).  Laid down and launched as HMS Ceanothus, she was transferred to the RCN and commissioned on 1 Dec 1943 as HMCS Forest Hill K486 on the Clyde, Scotland; named for a village absorbed by Toronto.  Following workups at Tobermory she joined EG C-3 at Londonderry, leaving on 29 Jan 1944, to join her first convoy, ONS.28.  She served as an ocean escort until late in Dec 1944, when she arrived at Liverpool, NS, for an extended refit, on the completion of which, two months later, she sailed for Bermuda to work up.  Returning in Apr 1945, she joined Halifax Force for local duties.  Paid off on 9 Jul 1945 and laid up at Sorel, she was sold on 17 Jul 1948 and broken up at Hamilton in 1952.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Forest Hill (K486) (Flower-class).

HMCS Fredericton (K245)

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, GM1149)

HMCS Fredericton (K245) (Flower-class).  Built at Sorel, Quebec, she was commissioned there on 8 Dec 1941.  After arriving at at Halifax on 18 Dec 1941, she was assigned to WLEF until Jul 1942, when she joined Halifax Force (Aruba Tanker Convoys).  In Sep 1942, after one round trip to Aruba, she was placed under US operational control to escort New York-Guantanamo convoys.  She arrived in New York for the last time on 21 Feb 1943, rejoining WLEF in Mar 1943.  After a major refit at Liverpool, NS, from 9 Jun to 10 Oct 1943, and workups at Pictou, she joined EG C-1 and for the next ten months was employed as an ocean escort.  She left Londonderry on 30 Sep 1944, for convoy ON.256 and upon arriving in Canada, went to Saint John, NB for two months' refit . This was completed in mid-Dec 1944 and, in Jan 1945, the ship proceeded to Bermuda for three weeks' workups.  In Feb 1945 she joined EG C-9, with which she was to spend the balance of the war as ocean escort.  HMCS Fredericton was paid off on 14 Jul 1946, at Sorel and broken up in 1946.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Fredericton (K245) (Flower-class).

HMCS Frontenac (K335)

 (Stuart Graham Photo)

HMCS Frontenac (K335) (Flower-class).  Built at Kingston, Ontario, HMCS Frontenac was commissioned there on 26 Oct 1943.  She arrived at Halifax in mid-Dec 1943 and carried out working-up exercises in St. Margaret's Bay in Jan 1944.  She was then assigned to EG 9, Londonderry, and made the crossing in Mar 1944 as escort to convoy SC.154.  It was decided, however, the EG 9 should be made up only of frigates, and HMCS Frontenac returned to St. John's where in May 1944 she joined EG C-1.  She left Belfast 19 Dec 1944 to escort ON.273, her last westbound convoy, and early in Jan 1945, commenced three months' refit at Liverpool, NS.  On completion she was assigned to Halifax Force and sent to Bermuda to work up, but saw little further service before being paid off at Halifax on 22 Jul 1945.  She was then taken to Sorel, but was sold in Oct 1945 to the United Ship Corp. of New York.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Frontenac (K335) (Flower-class).

 (Alan Soderstrom Photo)

HMCS Frontenac (K335) (Flower-class).

HMCS Galt (K163) 

 (Sue Horsley Photo)

HMCS Galt (K163) (Flower-class).  Built at Collingwood, Ontario, HMCS Galt was commissioned on 15 May 1941, at Montreal.  After she arrived at Halifax on 06 Jun 1941, she was assigned in Jul 1941 to NEF and left St. John's on 25 Aug 1941 with SC.41, her first convoy, for Iceland.  She was to serve on that route until Jan 1942.  In Feb 1942 she commenced a refit at Liverpool, NS, which was completed on 11 May 1942, and after working up in June was assigned to EG C-3.  She arrived at Londonderry for the first time on 5 Jun 1942 with convoy HX.191, and served on the "Newfie-Derry" run for the balance of the year. She arrived Jan 1943, at Liverpool, NS, for another refit which was completed at Halifax in mid-Apr 1943, worked up in St. Margaret's Bay and, in Jun 1943, joined EG C-1.  She left Halifax 13 Mar 1944, for New York for yet another refit, this one including fo'c's'le extension, completing early in May 1944, and a month later left Halifax for Bermuda to work up.  On her return she was allocated for the balance of the war to EG W-5, WEF.  HMCS Galt was paid off 21 Jun 1945 at Sorel, and broken up at Hamilton in 1946.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Galt (K163) (Flower-class).

HMCS Giffard (K402)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Giffard (K402) (Flower-class).  Laid down and launched for the RN as HMS Buddleia, she was renamed HMCS Giffard K402 in Sep 1943.  On 10 Nov 1943, she was transferred to the RCN and commissioned as HMCS Giffard K402; named after a town in Quebec.  After working-up at Tobermory HMCS Giffard joined EG C-1 at Londonderry and on 15 Feb 1944, sailed to join her first convoy, ON.224.  On 7 May 1944 she rescued 49 survivors of the torpedoed HMCS Valleyfield, and the following week resumed her duties as an ocean escort until 27 Nov 1944, when she left Halifax for Liverpool, NS, to undergo a major refit.  Completed in Mar 1945, this was followed by workups in Bermuda, when she arrived in St. John's on 15 Apr 1945, to be employed locally until  her departure on 13 May 1945 with convoy HX.335 for the UK.  HMCS Giffard left Greenock early in Jun 1945 on her final westward voyage, was paid off on 5 Jul 1945 and laid up at Sorel to await disposal.  She was broken up in 1952 in Hamilton.

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Giffard (K402) (Flower-class).

HMCS Guelph (K687)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Guelph (K687) (Flower-class).  Laid down as HMCS Sea Cliff K687 on 29 May 1943, she was built by the Collingwood Shipyards, Collingwood, Ontario.  Renamed HMCS Guelph K687 on 15 Jul  1943, she was launched on 20 Dec 1943.  HMCS Guelph was commissioned at Toronto on 09 May 1944.  She was presented with a black Cocker Spaniel from a local Guelph, Ontario breeder.  Their Mascot was named Rags.  HMCS Guelph arrived at Halifax early in Jun 1944 and left on 2 Jul 1944 escorting RN submarines P.553 and P.554 to Philadelphia.  She then proceeded to Bermuda for workups, leaving there on 2 Aug 1944, for New York, where she joined EG W-3.  She served with this group as a local escort until late Sep 1944 when she was transferred to EG C-8 which, although forming in Londonderry, was to be based at St. John's.  She made her passage eastward as escort to convoy HFX.310.  On her final transatlantic trip she left Belfast on 9 Apr 1945 to be based at Halifax until paid off on 27 Jun 1945 at Sorel.  On 2 Oct 1945 she was sold to a New York buyer; retaining her name under Panamanian flag.  She was last noted in Lloyd's Register for 1964-65 as Burfin, a name she had borne since 1956.

HMCS Halifax (K237)

 (DND Photo) 

HMCS Halifax (K237) (Flower-class).  Built by Collingwood Shipyards Lt., Collingwood, Ontario, she was commissioned on 26 Nov 1941, at Montreal.  HMCS Halifax was the first RCN corvette to be completed with a long fo'c's'le.  Assigned to WLEF on her arrival at Halifax on 18 Dec 1941, she was transferred in Jul 1942, to Halifax Force (Aruba Tanker Convoys).  On 14 Aug 1942 she arrived at Aruba with HA.3, her third tanker convoy, and was assigned to escort TAW.15, a Trinidad-Aruba-Key West convoy which developed into the only major convoy battle of the war in those waters.   Arriving in New York on 14 Sep 1942, she was placed under US control for New York- Guantanamo convoys until Mar 1943, when she joined WLEF.  Between 2 May and 15 Oct 1943, she underwent an extensive refit at Liverpool, NS, followed by workups at Pictou.  On New Year's Day, 1944, she arrived at St. John's to join EG C-1, leaving Londonderry on 11 Aug 1944 for two weeks' refit at Lunenburg.  This refit was followed by three weeks' further repairs at Halifax and, late in Dec 1944, workups in Bermuda.  In Jan 1945, she briefly joined Halifax Force, transferring in Feb 1945 to EG C-9 for the rest of the war.  Paid off on 12 Jul at Sorel, she was sold for conversion to a salvage vessel.

HMCS Hawkesbury (K415) 

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Hawkesbury (K415) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Quebec City on 14 Jun 1944, HMCS Hawkesbury arrived at Halifax in mid-Jul 1944 and proceeded to Bermuda on 6 Aug 1944 for three weeks' working-up.  On 18 Sep 1944 she left for St. John's to join convoy HXF.308 for passage to Londonderry, where she was to join EG C-7, then forming.  She served the remainder of her career on North Atlantic convoy duty, leaving Londonderry early in 5 Jun 1945, for Canada, and was paid off on 10 Jul 1945 at Sydney.  Taken to Sorel, she was later sold for mercantile purposes, entering service after conversion in 1950 to the Cambodian-owned Campuchea.  She was broken up at Hong Kong in 1956.

HMCS Hepatica (K159)

 (Kelly Macklem Photo)

HMCS Hepatica (K159) (Flower-class).  Commissioned in the RN on 12 Nov 1940, at Quebec City, HMS Hepatica arrived at Halifax on 17 Nov 1940 and left on 18 Dec 1940 with convoy HX.97, armed with a dummy 4-inch gun.  The real thing was installed, and other deficiencies remedied, at Greenock, completing on 6 Mar 1941.  After working up in Apr 1941, she joined EG 4, Greenock.  On 15 May 1941 she was transferred to the RCN and commissioned as HMCS Hepatica K159.  In Jun 1941, after brief service as a UK-Iceland escort, she was assigned to NEF for the rest of the year, escorting convoys between Iceland at St. John's.  Late in Jan 1942, she escorted SC.64, the inaugural "Newfie-Derry" convoy, and for the next three months served on that run.  In Jun 1942 she joined the Tanker Escort Force, operating from Halifax, for one round trip to Trinidad and the, late in Jul 1942, joined Gulf Escort Force as a Quebec-Sydney convoy escort.  In Oct 1942 she was reassigned to Halifax Force, escorting Quebec-Labrador convoys and, in Dec 1942, to WLEF.  She was to serve with WLEF for the remainder of the war, from Jun 1943 as a member of EG W-5 and from Apr 1944, with W-4.  During this period HMCS Hepatica had to extensive refits from 11 Feb to 01 Apr 1943 and 20 Mar to 08 Jun 1944 both at New York.  The latter refit included the lengthening of her fo'c's'le, and was followed by three weeks' workups in Bermuda.  She left St. John's 27 May 1945, as escort to HX.358, and on 23 Jun 1945 was handed over to the RN at Milford Haven . She was broken up at Llanelly, Wales, in 1948.

(Gordon Lees Photo)

HMCS Hepatica (K159) (Flower-class).

 (Gordon Lees Photo) 

HMCS Hepatica (K159) (Flower-class).

HMCS Kamloops (K176)

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4902568)

HMCS Kamloops (K176) (Flower Class).  Built by Victoria Machinery Depot Co. Ltd., Victoria, BC, she was commissioned at Victoria on 17 Mar 1941.  HMCS Kamloops arrived at Halifax on 19 Jun 1941 and was assigned to Halifax Force, serving as a local escort until the end of the year.  In Jan 1942, she commenced a year's duty as A/S/ training ship at Halifax and Pictou.  In mid-Feb 1943, she completed a three-month refit at Liverpool, NS, and after working up at Halifax, joined WLEF in Mar 1943.  She transferred in Jun 1943 to EG C-2, Newfoundland Command, and served with this group as an ocean escort for the remainder of the war.  In Sep 1943, she was with combined convoy ON.202/ONS.18, which lost six merchant ships and three of its escort.  On 28 Sep 1943, she sailed as escort to SC.143. The convoy was attacked by Wolfpack Rossbach.  One merchant ship, S.S. Yorkmar was sunk, and one escort, the Polish destroyer Orkan was sunk.  Three U-boats were sunk in the attacks on SC.143.  In mid-Dec 1943 she began a refit at Charlottetown, PEI, completed on 25 Apr 1944, in the course of which her fo'c's'le was extended.  Following workups in Bermuda in Jun 1945 she rejoined EG C-2.  She was paid off at Sorel on 27 Jun 1945, and sold her for scrap that October.

 (Gary Medford Photo)

HMCS Kamloops (K176) (Flower Class)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Kamloops (K176) (Flower Class), Halifax, 1941.

HMCS Kamsack (K171)

 (William Gard Photo)

HMCS Kamsack (K171) (Flower-class).  Built at Port Arthur, Ontario, she was commissioned at Montreal on 04 Oct 1941.  She arrived at Halifax on 13 Oct 1941.  She joined Sydney Force the following month but shortly transferred to Newfoundland Command, and on 19 Jan 1942, left St. John's to pick up convoy SC.65 for Londonderry.  In Jun 1942, after three round trips, she was reassigned to WLEF, then forming, and served in it for the rest of the war.  From Jun 1943, she was a member of EG W-4, and from Apr 1944, a member of EG W-3 . During this period she had two extensive refits, the first, begun at Liverpool, NS, on 12 Nov 1942, was completed at Halifax on 18 Jan 1943; the second, in the course of which her fo'c's'le was extended, was carried out at Baltimore, MD, between late Dec 1943 and mid-Mar1944. HMCS Kamsack was paid off on 22 Jul 1945, at Sorel and sold to the Venezuelan Navy.  On 24 Dec 1945, the Venezuelan ship Kamsack, former HMCS Kamsack K171 arrived at New York City from Sorel, Quebec with a skeleton crew of RCN sailors: Gerald Fitzgerald OIC, Howard Ingram, Leo McTaggart, Maurice Harasym and Clifford Ashton.  Renamed Carabobo, she was wrecked on passage to Venezuela in December, 1945.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Kamsack (K171) (Flower-class).

HMCS Kenogami (K125)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Kenogami (K125) (Flower-class).  Built at Port Arthur, Ontario, she was commissioned at Montreal on 29 Jun 1941.  HMCS Kenogami arrived at Halifax on 04 Jul 1941.  She served briefly with Halifax Force before arriving at St. John's on 24 Aug 1941 to join as convoy escort all the way to the UK, as it lost 18 ships in what proved to be one of the worst convoy battles of the war.  In Feb, 1942, after five months' ocean escort duty between St. John's and Iceland, she made her first tip to Londonderry, joining WLEF on her return.  She received an extensive refit at Halifax through Jun and Jul 1942, and in Oct 1942 resumed her ocean escort duties with EG C-1.  The following month she took part in another fierce convoy battle, that of ONS.154, which lost 14 ships.  In Mar 1943, she made one round trip to Gibraltar, escorting follow-up convoys to the invasion of North Africa.  On 11 May 1943 she left 'Derry for the last time, attached to EG B-4 (RN) with convoy ON.183.  After a two-month refit at Liverpool, N.S., and workups at Pictou, she joined WLEF's EG W-8.  In Apr 1944, she transferred to W-4, but in Dec 1944 rejoined W-8 for the balance of the war.  During this period she underwent a major refit at Liverpool, NS, between Jun and Oct 1944, including fo'c's'le extension, followed by three weeks' workups in Bermuda.  She was paid off on 09 Jul 1945 at Sydney and broken up at Hamilton in 1950.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Kenogami (K125) (Flower-class).

HMCS Kitchener (K225)

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Kitchener (K225) (Flower-class).  Laid down as HMCS Vancouver, she was renamed HMCS Kitchener prior to commissioning.  She was commissioned at Quebec City on 18 June 1942.  HMCS Kitchener arrived at Halifax on 16 Jul 1942 and carried out six weeks' workups at Pictou before briefly joining WLEF in Sep 1942.  It may have been during this unusually long workup that she starred in the film Corvette K-225 with Randolph Scott.  In Oct 1942 she was assigned to duties in connection with Operation "Torch," and arrived at Londonderry on 03 Nov 1942.  For the next four and one-half months she escorted UK-Mediterranean convoys, returning to Halifax on 19 Apr 1943, with convoy ONS.2.  In May 1943 she joined Western Support Force but in Jun 1943 transferred to EG C-5, MOEF, and during the following four months made three round trips to Londonderry.  A major refit, commenced in Oct 1943 at Liverpool, NS, was completed on 28 Jan 1944, followed by two weeks' working-up in Bermuda.  In mid-Apr 1944 she arrived at Londonderry, where she was assigned to invasion duties with Western Approaches Command, based at Milford Haven.  She arrived off the beaches on D-Day escorting a group of landing craft.  From Aug 1944 until the end of the war she served with EG 41, Plymouth, returning home late in May 1945, to be paid off at Sorel 11 Jul 1945.  She was broken up at Hamilton in 1949.

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Kitchener (K225) (Flower-class).

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Kitchener (K225) (Flower-class).

HMCS La Malbaie (K273) 

 (DND Photo)

HMCS La Malbaie (K273) (Flower-class).  Built at Sorel, Quebec, she was laid down as HMCS Fort William.  Renamed in Nov 1941, she was commissioned at Sorel on 28 April 1942 as HMCS La Malbaie.  She arrived at Halifax on 13 May 1942 and, after working up there and at Pictou, joined WLEF late in Jun 1942.  After undergoing mechanical repairs at Halifax from 11 Aug to 20 Dec 1942, she was assigned to EG C-3, arriving at Londonderry for the first time on 12 Jan 1943, from HX.221.  She served with C-3 until her final departure from 'Derry on 26 Oct 1944.  During this period she underwent a major refit at Liverpool, NS, mid-Sep to mid-Dec 1943.  Late in Dec 1944, she joined Halifax Force for the duration of hostilities, was paid off on 28 Jun 1945, at Sorel, and broken up at Hamilton, Ontario, in 1951.  A pre-launching photo of HMCS La Malbaie served as the model for the 20 cent Canadian stamp of 1942.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo,  MIKAN No. 2242400)

HMCS La Malbaie (K273) (Flower-class) Corvette under construction, stamp study.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 2204003)

Corvette shipbuilding, Canada 20 cent stamp, issued in 1942.

HMCS Lachute (K440)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Lachute (K440) (Flower-class).  Built at Quebec City, she was commissioned there on 26 Oct 1944.  HMCS Lachute arrived at Halifax in mid-Nov 1944 and left for Bermuda on 02 Dec 1944 for three weeks' workups . Assigned on her return to EG C-5 at St. John's, she left there on 5 Jan 1945, to escort her first convoy, SC.164.  She served the remainder of her career as a mid-ocean escort, leaving Londonderry on 26 May 1945 to join ON.305, the last westbound convoy of the war.  On 10 Jul 1945 she was paid off and placed in reserve at Sorel.  In 1947 she was sold to the Dominican Republic and joined its navy as Colon.  Deleted from the active list in 1978, she was driven ashore in a hurricane on 31 Aug 1979 alongside her sister Juan Alejandro Acosta (former HMCS Louisburg K401).

HMCS Lethbridge (K160)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Lethbridge (K160) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Montreal on 25 Jun 1941, HMCS Lethbridge arrived at Halifax on 04 Jul 1941.  She served briefly with Sydney Force before joined NEF and leaving Sydney on 11 Oct 1941 with convoy SV.49 for Iceland.  She was employed between St. John's and Iceland until Feb 1942, and thereafter on the "Newfie-Derry" run.  On 20 Jun 1942, she left Londonderry for the last time, and on her return to Halifax joined Gulf Escort Force to escort Quebec-Sydney convoys.  After refitting at Liverpool, NS, from 10 Sep to 22 Oct 1942 and working up at Pictou, she arrived at New York on 18 Nov 1942 to be placed under US control as escort to New York-Guantanamo convoys.  In Mar 1943, she returned to Halifax to join WLEF for the remainder of the war, from Jun 1943, as a member of EG W-3 and from Apr 1944, as a member of W-5.  She acquired her extended fo'c's'le during a refit at Sydney from Jan to Mar 1944, which was followed by three weeks' working-up at Bermuda in Apr 1944.  She was paid off on 23 Jul 1945, at Sorel and sold to Marine Industries Ltd., who resold her in 1952 for conversion to a whale-catcher.  The conversion was completed in 1955, she entered service under the Dutch flag as Nicolaas Vinke.  She was broken up at Santander, Spain, in 1966.

HMCS Lévis (K115) 

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Lévis (K115) (Flower-class).  Commissioned on 16 May 1941, at Quebec City, Levis arrived at Halifax on 29 May 1941, worked up there and in Jun 1941, joined NEF.  On 13 Sep 1941, after one round trip to Iceland, she left St. John's as ocean escort to convoy SC.44.  On 19 Sep 1941 she was torpedoed by U-74, 120 miles east of Cape Farwell, Greenland, resulting in the loss of 18 lives.  She initially survived the torpedoing but sunk later that day while under tow by HMCS Mayflower.  During the several hours she remained afloat, the remainder of her ship's company were taken off by her sisters HMCS Mayflower and HMCS Agassiz.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, PA136257)

HMCS Lévis (K115) (Flower-class), shortly after she was torpedoed by U-74.  She sank sunk off Greenland, 19 Sep 1941.

HMCS Lindsay (K338)

 (Dave Chamberlain Photo)

HMCS Lindsay (K338) (Flower-class).  Launched and commissioned at Midland on 15 Nov 1943, HMCS Lindsay arrived at Halifax in Dec 1943 and late in Jan 1944, sailed to Bermuda for three weeks' workups.  Upon her return she was briefly attached to EG W-5, but left Halifax on 23 Apr 1944 to join Western Approaches Command at Londonderry.  For the next four months she served in UK waters, taking part in the D-Day invasion, as an unallocated unit.  In Sep 1944, she joined the RN's EG 41, Plymouth Command, for service in the Channel.  On Saturday May 20th 1944 at 04:50 hrs while sailing back to Londonderry from Larne at 12 knots in line with HMCS Port Arthur, HMCS Trentonian, HMCS Alberni (Senior Officer), and HMCS Lindsay, last in the column - HMCS Lindsay was involved in a collision with a civilian fishing trawler, the St. Springwell.  Damage was minimal.  HMCS Springwell was found totally responsible.  The owners of the trawler attempted to sue for damages but later dropped the suit due to impending travel and witness costs.  In Aug 1944, HMCS Lindsay went into drydock in Milford Haven, South Wales, to have the damage to her bow from her collision with St. Springwell repaired.  On 22 Jan 1945, HMCS Lindsay was damaged in collision with HMS Brilliant southwest of the Isle of Wight.  Following temporary repairs at Davenport from  22 Jan to 19 Feb 1945, she sailed for Canada via Londonderry, arriving at Halifax early in Mar 1945.  She left there on 15 Mar 1945 for Saint John, where she was under refit until 22 Jun 1945, then proceeded to Sydney and was paid off on 18 Jul 1945.  She was sold for mercantile use in 1946 and renamed North Shore, later passing into Greek registry for Mediterranean passenger service until the name of Lemnos.  She was broken up ten years later.

 (Dave Chamberlain Photo)

HMCS Lindsay (K338) (Flower-class). 

HMCS Long Branch (K487) 

 (Dale Davies Photo)

HMCS Long Branch (K487) (Flower-class).  Built for the RN as HMS Candytuft, she was launched on 28 Sep 1943.  Transferred to the RCN in Sep 1943 she was commissioned on 5 Jan 1944 as HMCS Long Branch K487; named after a village near Toronto.  In Apr 1944, following a month's workups at Tobermory, HMCS Long Branch joined EG C-5 at Londonderry, and sailed to pick up her maiden convoy, ONS.233.  She developed mechanical defects on the crossing and was under repair at St. John's for six weeks.  She left St. John's 14 Jun 1944 to resume her duties, but returned from her next westbound convoy with the assistance of HM tug Tenacity.  Repaired, she left St. John's on 23 Jul 1944 to join HXS.300, the largest convoy of the war, and continued as an ocean escort until her final departure from "Derry on 27 Jan 1945.  Arriving at Halifax on 11 Feb 1945, she commenced a refit on completion of which, in Apr 1945, she was assigned to Halifax Force for local duties.  On 17 Jun 1945 she was paid off at Sorel for disposal.  Sold for commercial use in 1947, she was renamed Rexton Kent II (later dropping the "II") and finally scuttled off the east coast in 1966.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4950836)

HMCS Long Branch (K487) (Flower-class)

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Long Branch (K487) (Flower-class), 5-inch Gun and shell, 1944.

HMCS Louisburg (K143)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Louisburg (K143) (Flower-class).  Built at Quebec City and commissioned there on 2 Oct 1941, HMCS Louisburg arrived at Halifax on 15 Oct 1941.  She was assigned to Sydney Force until mid-Jan 1942, when she was transferred to Newfoundland Command.  On 1 Feb 1942 she left St. John's for Londonderry as escort to convoy SC.67, another of whose escorts, HMCS Spikenard, was lost.  After a long refit at Halifax, from 27 Mar 1942 to 27 Jun 1942, HMCS Louisburg made two more round trips to 'Derry before being assigned to duties in connection with Operation "Torch," the invasion of North Africa.  She arrived at Londonderry on 23 Sep 1942, then proceeded to the Humber for fitting of extra A/A/ armament.  This work was completed on 18 Oct 1942.  On 9 Dec 1942, while anchored at Londonderry, she was accidentally rammed by HMS Bideford, necessitation five weeks' repairs at Belfast.  HMCS Louisburg had scarcely commenced her "Torch" duties when, on the afternoon of 6 Feb 1943 near Cape Tenes, Algeria convoy KMF-8 (Gibraltar to Bone) was attacked by Italian Savoia-Marchetti SM.79 Sparviero bombers HMCS Louisburg was hit by bombs and torpedoes and sank in position 36º15'N, 00º15'E.  Forty-three of her crew were lost including several RN sailors and 2 Canadian sailors who died later of injuries received as a result of the sinking.

 (Riggio family, Photo)

Savoia-Marchetti S.M.79 bombers of the 193ª Squadriglia Bombardamento Terrestre (193th Land Bombing Squadrilla), 87º Gruppo (87th Group), 30º Stormo(87th Wing).

HMCS Louisburg (K401)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Louisburg (K401) (Flower-class).  Built at Quebec City, she was launched on 13 Jul 1943 and commissioned there on 13 Dec 1943.  She sailed to Halifax in advance of completion in order to escape the freeze-up, arriving in late Dec 1943, and was not ready for service until Feb 1944.  Late in Mar 1944 she went to Bermuda for workups and upon returning to Halifax was assigned as an unallocated unit to Western Approaches Command, Londonderry.  She sailed for the UK on 23 Apr 1944 and spent the next four months on escort duties associated with the invasion.  In Sep 1944 she was allocated to EG 41, Plymouth, and late in Mar 1945, returned home for refit at Saint John.  Upon completion of this refit she was paid off at Sorel on 25 Jun 1945 and placed in reserve there.  She was sold in 1947 to the Dominican Navy and renamed Juan Alejandro Acosta.  Deleted from active list in 1978, she was driven ashore in a hurricane on 31 Aug 1979 alongside her sister Colon (former HMCS Lachute).

HMCS Lunenburg (K151)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Lunenburg (K151) (Flower-class).  Launched on 10 Jul 1941 at Lauzon, Quebec, she was commissioned on 4 Dec 1941, at Quebec City.  She arrived at Halifax on 13 Dec 1941 and after working up did escort duty between Halifax and St. John's.  In Jul 1942, she was transferred to Halifax Force as escort to Quebec City-Hamilton Inlet (Labrador) convoys.  HMCS Lunenburg arrived at Sydney on 31 Aug 1942 to join Gulf Escort Force, but two weeks later was detached for Operation "Torch" duties.  Arriving at Londonderry on 27 Sep 1942, she proceeded to Liverpool for extra A/A armament and in Nov 1942 began a four-month stint escorting convoys between the UK and the Mediterranean.  At the end of Mar 1943, she returned to Liverpool for a major refit, including fo'c's'le extension, completing on 17 Aug 1943.  After a brief sojourn in Canadian waters she was assigned to EG 6, Western Approaches Command, arriving at Plymouth late in Nov 1943.  For the next five months she operated in support of convoys between the UK and Gibraltar, and between Londonderry and other UK ports, as well as patrolling the Northwestern Approaches from her Londonderry base.  On 11 Jan 1944, while so employed, she was attacked by U-953 (Oblt Karl-Heinz Marbach) 50N-18W but was not hit.  When the group's corvettes were replaced with frigates in Apr 1944, HMCS Lunenburg went to Western Approaches Command Greenock, to be based at Portsmouth for invasion duties.  For the next five months she was employed primarily in the English Channel.  She left Londonderry on 23 Sep 1944 for refit begun at Saint John, NB, but completed at Halifax in mid-Jan 1945.  Following work-ups in Bermuda she returned to the UK via the Azores, to serve with Plymouth Command until the end of the war.  In May 1945, she visited St. Helier during the re-occupation of the Channel Islands.  She left Greenock in mid-Jun 1945 for Halifax, was paid off at Sorel on 23 Jul 1945, and broken up at Hamilton in 1946.

 (Debbie King Photo)

HMCS Lunenburg (K151) (Flower-class) in the English Channel off Portland 10 Jun 1944

HMCS Matapedia (K112) 

 (Ron Bell Photo)

HMCS Matapedia (K112) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Quebec City on 9 May 1941, HMCS Matapedia arrived at Halifax on 24 May 1941.  She was assigned to Sydney Force as a local escort until late Sep 1941, when she was transferred to Newfoundland Command for ocean escort work between St. John's and Iceland.  On her first trip, she left Sydney on 29 Sep 1941 for Iceland with convoy SC.47.  After three round trips she left St. John's on 6 Feb 1942, with SC.68 for Londonderry, returning in Mar 1942 with ON.70.  It was to her only trip to the UK, as she joined WLEF on her return and, with the exception of a stint with Gaspé Force from Nov to Dec 1944, remained with WLEF until the end of the war.  She underwent a major refit at Pictou.  On 8 May 1943, she was rammed amidships in a thick fog off Sambro Lightship by SS Scorton, and seriously damaged. After temporary repairs at Dartmouth from 10 Sep to 12 Oct 1943, she was towed to Liverpool, NS, for full repairs and refit, including fo'c's'le extension.  This was completed early in Feb 1944, and a month later she proceeded to Bermuda for two weeks' workups, on her return joining EG W-4 for the balance of the war.  She underwent one further major refit from 15 Feb to 28 Apr 1945, at Halifax, again followed by workups in Bermuda, but the war was over now and she was paid off at Sorel on 16 Jun 1945.  HMCS Matapedia was broken up at the Steel Company of Canada, Hamilton, Ontario in 1950.

 (Charles James Sadler Photo)

HMCS Matapedia (K112) (Flower-class).

HMCS Mayflower (K191)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Mayflower (K191) (Flower-class).  Built for the RN, she was commissioned at Montreal on 28 Nov 1940 as HMS Mayflower.  She arrived at Halifax on 11 Dec 1940 to work up and complete stores.  On 9 Feb 1941, HMS Mayflower left with convoy HX.108 for the UK, fitted, like her sister HMS Hepatica, with a dummy gun.  This and other shortcomings were looked after on the Tyne River, where she was pronounced complete on 5 May 1941.  On 15 May 1941, she was transferred to the RCN and commissioned as HMCS Mayflower K191.  Soon after, she left Loch Ewe as a member of EG 4 with convoy OB.332 for Iceland on 10 Jun 1941.  Later that month she joined Newfoundland Command, and for the remainder of the year served between Iceland at St. John's as an ocean escort.  During this period she took part in the battle of convoy SC.44, when four merchant ships and HMCS Levis were lost,  HMCS Mayflower collected survivors of the latter.  After a major refit at Charleston, SC, from 9 Dec 1941 to 9 Feb 1942, HMCS Mayflower resumed her mid-ocean role on the "Newfie-Derry" run until Apr 1944.  In Mar 1943, while escorting Convoy ON.77 from Liverpool, England, the SS Imperial Transport was torpedoed by U-94.  Her crew was rescued by the Free French corvette Aconit.  HMCS Mayflower was ordered to sink the stricken vessel at daybreak with gunfire.  When daybreak came, a boarding party was sent over and it was determined she would be saved.  Five days later, under escort of HMCS Mayflower, the SS Imperial Transport made port at St. John's, Newfoundland.  In Apr 1942, she became a member of EG A-3, transferring to C-3 in Feb 1943.  She underwent two further long refits: from 29 Oct 1942 to 11 Jan 1943, at Pictou; and from 29 Nov 1943 to 14 Feb 1944, at Norfolk, VA.  She received her extended fo'c's'le during the latter, following which she worked up in St. Margaret's Bay, then sailed on 21 Apr 1944 for the UK to join Western Approaches Command, Greenock, for invasion duties.  She left Oban on 31 May 1944 to escort blockships for Normandy and arrived off the beaches on the day after D-Day.  For the remainder of the war she operated in UK waters, and on 31 May 1945, was paid off for return to the RN.  Laid up at Grangemouth, Scotland, she was broken up at Inverkeithing in 1949

 (Naval Museum of Alberta Photo)

HMCS Mayflower (K191) (Flower-class).

HMCS Merrittonia (K688) 

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Merrittonia (K688) (Flower-class).  Laid down as HMCS Pointe Claire, she was renamed HMCS Merrittonia, Ontario, in Mar 1944.  Commissioned at Quebec City on 10 Nov 1944, she arrived at Halifax in mid-Dec 1944 and sailed to Bermuda for a month's workups.  On her return HMCS Merrittonia was assigned to EG C-7 and left St. John's on 7 Feb 1945 to meet the group, which was westbound with convoy ON.283 from Britain.  Thereafter, she was continuously employed on North Atlantic convoy duty.  She left Londonderry for the final time at the beginning of Jun 1945.  She was paid off on 11 Jul and laid up at Sorel for disposal.  Purchased by K.C. Irving Ltd., Moncton, NB, on 16 Nov 1945, she was wrecked on the Nova Scotia coast on 30 Nov 1945.

 (John Vukson Photo)

HMCS Merrittonia (K688) (Flower-class).

HMCS Midland (K220)

 (Ron Bell Photo)

HMCS Midland (K220) (Flower-class).  Built at Midland, Ontario, she was commissioned at Montreal on 17 Nov 1941.  She arrived at Halifax on 30 Nov 1941, and spent her entire career with WLEF, from Jun 1943, as member of EG W-2.  She underwent two extensive refits: the first at Liverpool, NS, from 30 Nov 1942 to 14 Apr 1943; the second at Galveston, Texas from mid-Mar 1944 to 25 May 1944.  The latter refit included the extension of her fo'c's'le.  Upon its completion she returned briefly to Halifax before leaving on 1 Jul 1944 for three weeks' working-up in Bermuda.  She was paid off at Sydney on 15 Jul 1945.  Sold in 1946 to the Great lakes Lumber Co., she was broken up the same year at Fort William (now Thunder Bay), Ontario.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4821041)

HMCS Midland (K220) (Flower-class).

HMCS Mimico (K485)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Mimico (K485) (Flower-class).  Laid down as HMS Bulrush, she was transferred to the RCN and renamed HMCS Mimico prior to launching.  She was commissioned on 8 Feb 1944 at Sunderland, UK.  On 18 Apr 1944, after working up at Stornoway, she arrived at Oban, Scotland, where she was assigned to Western Approaches Command for escort duty in connection with the invasion.  She arrived off the Normandy beaches with a convoy on the day after D-Day.  She remained on escort duty in the Channel, assigned briefly in Sep 1944 to Portsmouth Command and, in Oct 1944, to Nore Command, based at Sheerness.  In Feb and Mar 1945, she refitted at Chatham, then returned to Sheerness and resumed her previous role until late in May 1945, when she left the UK for the last time.  She was paid off on 18 Jul 1945, and laid up at Sorel.  After the war, Mimico was sold to civilian service and became Honduran Olympic Victor in 1950, Japanese Otori Maru No. 12 in 1956, Kyo Maru No. 25 from 1962-1978.

HMCS Moncton (K139) 

 (Ron Bell Photo)

HMCS Moncton (K139) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Saint John, NB on 24 Apr 1942, she arrived at Halifax on 12 May 1942.  She was the last of the RCN's initial Flower class programme to complete, owing to heavy demands on her builder, the Saint John Dry Dock Co., for repair work to war-damaged ships.  After working up she joined WLEF, Halifax, and when the force was divided into escort groups in Jun 1943, she became a member of EG W-5.  She remained in this service until transferred to the west coast in Jan 1944, proceeding there via Guantanamo, Cristobal, Balboa, and San Pedro, Cal.  Upon arrival she was assigned to Esquimalt Force, of which she remained a member until VJ-Day.  In the course of an extensive refit at Vancouver from 5 May to 7 Jul 1944, her fo'c's'le was extended.  She was paid off at Esquimalt on 12 Dec 1945, and sold for conversion to a whale-catcher at Kiel.  She entered service in 1955 as the Dutch-flag Willem Vinke and was broken up at Santander, Spain, in 1966.

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Moncton (K139) (Flower-class).

HMCS Moose Jaw (K164) 

(RCN Photo)

HMCS Moose Jaw (K164) (Flower-class).  Built at Collingwood, she was commissioned at Montreal on 19 Jun 1941, and arrived at Halifax on 27 Jun 1941 for final fitting-out.  After working up, she arrived at St. John's on 25 Aug 1941 to join Newfoundland Command, and on 5 Sep 1941, sailed with HMCS Chambly for exercises.  The two were ordered to reinforce the beleaguered convoy SC.42, which lost 18 ships, and just before joining on 10 Sep 1941, they surprised and sank U-501 astern of the convoy.  HMCS Moose Jaw, which had rammed the U-boat, required ten days' repairs at Greenock, following which she arrived at Tobermory on 1 Oct 1941 to work up.  For the next four months she operated between St. John's and Iceland, but in Jan 1942, she arrived at Londonderry from SC.64, the inaugural "Newfie-Derry" convoy.  On 19 Feb 1942, she ran aground on the south entrance of St. John's harbour en route to join convoy HX 176, and although re-floated soon afterward proved to be holed and leaking in several places.  Temporary repairs were carried out at St. John's from 20 Feb to 05 Mar 1942 and permanent repairs at Saint John, NB, from 15 Mar to 25 Jun 1942.  Briefly assigned to WLEF, she was detached in Sep 1942 for duties in connection with Operation "Torch", and made her passage to the UK with convoy SC.107, which lost 15 ships to U-boats.  During the next five months HMCS Moose Jaw was employed escorting UK-Mediterranean convoys, returning to Halifax on 19 Apr 1943 with convoy ONS.2.  Refitted there, she joined Quebec Force at the end of May 1943 for escort duties in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, later transferring to Gaspé Force.  She underwent a major refit, including fo'c's'le extension, at Liverpool, NS, from 19 Dec 1943 to 23 Mar 1944.  After working up in St. Margaret's Bay she left Halifax on 1 May 1944 for the UK, to join Western Approaches Command, Greenock, for invasion duties.  She served in the Channel until Sep 1944, when she joined EG 41, Plymouth, and escorted coastal convoys from her base at Milford Haven until the end of the war.  She left for home in May 1945, was paid off at Sorel on 08 Jul 1944 and broken up at Hamilton in 1949.

HMCS Morden (K170)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Morden (K170) (Flower-class).  Built at Port Arthur, Ontario, she was commissioned at Montreal on 6 Sep 1941.  Morden arrived at Halifax on 16 Sep 1941.  She joined Newfoundland Command and left St. John's 23 Nov 1941 to escort SC.56, her first convoy, to Iceland.  She continued on to the UK, however, to carry out two months' refit and repairs at Southampton.  She left the Clyde on 5 Mar 1942, to pick up westbound convoy ON.73, and was thereafter continuously in service as an ocean escort until the fall of 1943 - from Aug 1942, as a member of EG C-2.  The following is from the memoirs of Larry Restall "We detected a surfaced submarine (later found to be U-756) attempting to break into convoy at night.  I was on the after gun crew during action stations, firing at the sub which dived.  We attempted to ram but the sub was able to submerge.  We passed over the submarine and dropped a pattern of depth charges.  According to German records the sub never reported again."  On 22 Oct 1942, the SS Winnipeg was torpedoed and sunk by U-443 while enroute from Liverpool to Saint John, NB.  HMCS Morden rescued all who were aboard her.  After a brief refit at Lunenburg in Jun 1943, and workups at Pictou, she sailed for Plymouth to join EG 9.  She left Devonport on 15 Sep 1943 to join the group on patrol south of the Sicily Islands, but the group was ordered to the assistance of combined convoy ONS.18/ON.202 which lost six merchant ships and three of its escort.  In Oct 1943 Morden rejoined EG C-2 and was given an extensive refit at Londonderry between late Nov 1943 and the end of Jan 1944.  The work done included the lengthening of her fo'c's'le.  She left 'Derry for the last time on 14 Nov 1944.  In May 1945, on completion of a long refit at Sydney and Halifax, she joined EG W-9 of WLEF and left New York on 23 May 1945 as local escort to HX.358, the last HX convoy.  Paid off on 29 Jun 1945, at Sorel, she was broken up at Hamilton in 1946.

HMCS Nanaimo (K101)

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Nanaimo (K101) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Esquimalt on 26 Apr 1941, HMCS Nanaimo arrived at Halifax on 27 Jun 1941 and for the next three months carried out local duties.  In Oct 1941 she was assigned to Newfoundland Command, leaving Halifax on 11 Oct 1941 to join convoy SC.49 for Iceland, her first trip as an ocean escort.  After three round trips to Iceland, she escorted SC.68 to Londonderry in Feb 1942.  Her return trip with ON.68 was to be her last Atlantic crossing, for in Mar 1942 she was reassigned to WLEF. 

On 16 Jun 1942, the SS Port Nicholson was sunk by U-87.  The Port Nicholson formed part of convoy XB 25, one of the coastal convoy routes between Halifax Harbour and Boston.  She was under the command of her master, Harold Charles Jeffrey, and was carrying a cargo of 1,600 tons of automobile parts and 4,000 tons of military stores.  The convoy was tracked by the German submarine U-87, commanded by Joachim Berger.  At 4.17 hours on the morning of 16 June 1942 he fired a torpedo at the convoy, which was then 100 miles (160 km) off Portland, Maine.  He fired a second torpedo a minute later, but the gale conditions at the time prevented him from observing the results accurately, and he recorded that while one torpedo had hit a ship, the other seemed to have missed.  In fact, both torpedoes struck the Port Nicholson, the first in the engine room, the second in the stern.  Two men in the engine room were killed immediately, and as the Port Nicholson began to settle by the stern, the remaining crew abandoned ship and were picked up by HMCS Nanaimo.  The Port Nicholson did not sink immediately, and by dawn was still afloat.  Her master returned to the ship, accompanied by the chief engineer, and Lieutenant John Molson Walkley and three ratings from HMCS Nanaimo, to see if the ship could be salvaged.  While they were aboard, worsening weather caused the ship to suddenly start to sink.  The party abandoned her, but their boat was overturned in the suction as Port Nicholson went down, drowning Jeffrey, Walkley, the chief engineer and a rating.  The two surviving ratings were rescued by HMCS Nanaimo, which landed the survivors from Port Nicholson at Boston. 

With the formation of escort groups in Jun 1943, HMCS Nanaimo became a member of EG W-9, transferring to W-7 in Apr 1944.  In Nov 1944, she was allocated to Pacific Coast Command, arriving at Esquimalt on 07 Dec 1944.  There she underwent a refit that lasted until 21 Feb 1945 but left her one of the few corvettes to survive the war with a short fo'c's'le.  She was paid off for disposal at Esquimalt on 28 Sep 1945, and subsequently sold for mercantile use.  Converted to a whale-catcher at Kiel in 1953, she entered service as the Dutch-flag Rene W. Vinke, finally being broken up in South Africa in 1966.

  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4821017)

HMCS Nanaimo (K101) (Flower-class), 4-inch Mk. IX Gun, ca 1945.

(City of Vancouver Archives CVA 1184-3365)

HMCS Nanaimo (K101) (Flower-class), Vancouver, ca 1945.

HMCS Napanee (K118) 

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Napanee (K118) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Montreal on 12 May 1941, HMCS Napanee arrived at Halifax on 17 May 1941.  She was assigned initially to Sydney Force but transferred in Sep 1941 to Newfoundland Command, leaving Sydney for Iceland with convoy SC.47 on 29 Sep 1941.  She served on that route until Jan 1942, when she sailed with SC.65, the first of many "Newfie-Derry" convoys she would escort until Aug 1944.  The worst of them was ON.154, which lost 14 ships in Dec 1942, but HMCS Napanee assisted in sinking one of its attackers, U-356, on 27 Dec 1942.  In Mar 1943, she made a side trip to Gibraltar with EG  C-1, which she had joined in Sep 1942.  She arrived at Montreal 22 May 1943, for a five-month refit, including fo'c's'le extension, afterward working up at Pictou and joining EG C-3.  She left 'Derry for the last time on 3 Aug 1944, refitted again at Pictou, then carried out three weeks' workup in Bermuda.  On her return she joined EG W-2, on the "triangle run" until the end of the war.  She was paid off on 12 Jul 1945, at Sorel, and was broken up at Hamilton in 1946.

HMCS New Westminster (K228) 

 (DND Photo)

HMCS New Westminster (K228) (Flower-class).  Built at Victoria, she was commissioned there on 31 Jan 1942, and assigned to Esquimalt Force until the threat of Japanese invasion had abated.  Ordered to Halifax to release an east-coast corvette for Operation "Torch" service, she arrived there on 13 Oct 1942, a month after leaving Esquimalt.  Assigned to WLEF, she operated on the "triangle run" until May 1943, when she began a major refit at Sydney.  This refit included fo'c's'le extension and was not completed until 10 Dec 1943.  The ship was then made a part of EG C-5, and in Jul 1944, sailed with HXS.300, the largest convoy of the war.  She left Londonderry on 14 Dec 1944, for the last time, returning home to refit at Saint John until early Mar 1945.  Allocated to Sydney Force until the end of hostilities, she was paid off at Sorel on 21 Jun 1945, and in 1947 sold for commercial purposes.  She became the mercantile Elisa in 1950; Portoviejo in 1952 and Azura in 1954.  Sold in 1966 for breaking up at Tampa, Florida.

HMCS Norsyd (K520) 

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Norsyd (K520) (Flower-class).  The name is a contraction of North Sydney.  HMCS Norsyd was commissioned at Quebec City on 22 Dec 1943 and, en route to Halifax, was diverted to Indiantown, NB, for fitting-out that was not completed until mid-Mar 1944.  She arrived in Bermuda later that month to work up, and on her return was assigned to EG W-7, escorting local convoys, until Nov 1944, when she was transferred to EG C-2, St. John's, taking her first convoy, HX.323, eastward early in Dec 1944.  On 27 May 1945, she began a refit at Halifax and soon after its completion, on 25 Jun 1945 was paid off and laid up at Sorel.  She was sold into mercantile service in 1948 as Balboa.  In 1946 she was purchased by the Mossad Le Aliya bet (The Institute for Immigration B.) the ship was called “Hagana” (Defence), and it sailed to Palestine in the end of Jul 1946 from Yugoslavia.  It was caught by HMS Venus several days later, boarded and brought to Haifa, were it’s occupants were interned in Palestine.  After the Declaration of Israel’s Independence, it was converted back to its Corvette configuration and commissioned on 18 Jul 1948 as INS Haganah.  She served until she was broken up in 1956.

 (Clay Restall Photo)

HMCS Norsyd (K520) (Flower-class).

HMCS North Bay (K339)

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS North Bay (K339) (Flower-class).  Built at Collingwood, Ontario, she was commissioned there on 25 Oct 1943.  HMCS North Bay arrived at Halifax on 29 Nov 1943, and in Dec 1943 carried out workups in St. Margaret's Bay.  On completion of these she was assigned to EG 9, Londonderry, making her passage there as escort to convoy SC.154 early in Mar 1944.  When EG 9 became a frigates-only group, HMCS North Bay returned to St. John's in Apr 1944 and became a member of EG C-4.  From 11 Dec 1944 to mid-Feb 1945, she underwent a refit at Sydney and proceeded to Bermuda to work up.  On completing this exercise she sailed directly to St. John's to join EG C-2, but later in Apr 1945 she was transferred to C-3 and, on 30 Apr 1945, left St. John's to join convoy SC.174 for a final trip to Londonderry.  She returned in May 1945 with ON.304 and was paid off on 01 Jul 1945 and laid up at Sorel.  In 1946 she was sold for merchant service and became the Bahamian Kent County II; renamed Galloway Kent in 1950; renamed Bedford II in 1951.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3394476)

HMCS North Bay (K339) (Flower-class), Hedgehog array, Oct 1943.

HMCS Oakville (K178)

 (Naval Museum of Alberta Photo)

HMCS Oakville (K178) (Flower-class).  Built at Port Arthur, Ontario, she was commissioned at Montreal on  18 Nov 1941.  She arrived at Halifax ten days later and joined Halifax Force on her arrival.  On its formation in Mar 1942, she transferred to WLEF.  In Jul 1942 she returned to Halifax Force to escort Halifax-Aruba convoys and, on her second arrival at Aruba late in Aug 1942, was diverted to reinforce convoy TAW.15 (Aruba-Key West section).  The convoy was attacked 28 Aug 1942 in the Windward Passage, losing four ships, but HMCS Oakville sank the seasoned U-94, in part by ramming.  After temporary repairs at Guantanamo she arrived at Halifax on 16 Sep 1942 and there completed repairs on 01 Dec 1942.  She then joined the US Eastern Sea Frontier Command to escort New York-Guantanamo convoys until 22 Mar 1943, when she arrived at Halifax to join WLEF.  She served with three of its escort groups: W-7 from Jun 1943; W-8 from Dec 1943; and W-6 from Apr 1944.  After minor repairs at Halifax, she proceeded to Bermuda for workups in May 1944, thereafter returning to her duties with EG W-6.  A refit begun at Lunenburg early in Apr 1945, was discontinued in Jun 1945 and the ship was paid off at Sorel on 20 Jul 1945.  She was sold to the Venezuelan Navy in 1946.  On 10 Jan 1946, Venezuelan vessel Oakville, former HMCS Oakville K178, arrived at New York city with a skeleton crew: Frank Peter Hindley, Gerald James Ryan and Frederick Jackson.  Renamed Patria, she served in the Venezuelan Navy until 1962

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Oakville (K178) (Flower-class).

HMCS Orillia (K119)

 (David Rose Photo)

HMCS Orillia (K119) (Flower-class).  Commissioned 25 Nov 1940, at Collingwood, she arrived at Halifax on 11 Dec 1940 for completion and was assigned to Halifax Local Defence Force until 23 May 1941.  HMCS Orillia sailed that day for St. John's to become one of the seven charter members of the NEF, and for the balance of the year escorted convoys between St. John's and Iceland.  In Sep 1941, she was escort to convoy SC.42, which lost 18 ships.  She arrived at Halifax 24 Dec 1941 for a refit, upon completion of which on 22 Mar 1942, she joined EG C-1, leaving St. John's 02 Apr 1942 with SC.77 for Londonderry.  On her arrival she was sent to Tobermory for three weeks' workups, then returned to the "Newfie-Derry" run until Jan 1944.  Orillia took part in major battles around convoys SC.94, which lost 11 ships in Aug 1942 and ON.137 in Oct 1942, which lost only 2 ships despite being heavily attacked.  She was a member of EG C-2 from Nov 1942 to May 1944, when she joined EG C-4 following two months' refit at Liverpool, NS.  She left Londonderry for the last time on 16 Jan 1944, to commence a long refit, again at Liverpool, which included the lengthening of her fo'c's'le.  This refit was completed on 3 May 1944, but further repairs were completed at Halifax late in Jun 1944.  She arrived in Bermuda on 29 Jun 1944 for three weeks' workups, on her return joining EG W-2, Western Escort Force, for the duration of the war.  Paid off on 02 Jul 1945, at Sorel, she was broken up at Steel Co. of Canada, Hamilton, Ontario, in Jan 1951.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Orillia (K119) (Flower-class).

HMCS Owen Sound (K340) 

 (Dan Dunbar Photo)

HMCS Owen Sound (K340) (Flower-class).  Built at Collingwood, Ontario, she was commissioned there on 17 Nov 1943.  HMCS Owen Sound arrived at Halifax on 13 Dec 1944, and in Feb 1944 was assigned to EG 9, Londonderry.  On 10 Mar 1944, while acting as escort to convoy SC.157, she assisted HMCS St. Laurent and HMS Forester in the destruction of U-845.  In May 1944 she transferred to EG C-2 at Londonderry and, in Oct 1944, to newly formed C-7.  She left 'Derry 6 Feb 1945 for her last westward trip, as escort on On.283 and, on arrival at Halifax, commenced refit.  On completion of the refit in mid-May 1945 she sailed for Bermuda for three weeks' working up and on her return was paid off on 19 Jul 1945 and placed in reserve at Sorel.  Later that year she was sold to the United Ship Corp. of New York, to become the Greek-flag merchant ship Cadio, last appearing in Lloyd's list for 1967-68.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Owen Sound (K340) (Flower-class).

HMCS Parry Sound (K341) 

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Parry Sound (K341) (Flower-class).  Built at Midland, Ontario, she was commissioned there on 30 Aug 1944.  HMCS Parry Sound arrived at Halifax late in Sep 1944 and left in Oct 1944 for three weeks' working-up in Bermuda.  From Bermuda she sailed direct to St. John's, arriving on 11 Nov 1944, and was assigned to EG C-7.  As the group was in Londonderry at the time, she sailed on 17 Nov 1944, in company with several US-built Russian sub-chasers, to join.  Her first convoy was ONS.39, which she picked up at the end of the year.  She left St. John's on 17 Jan 1945, for convoy HX.332 but developed defects and had to turn back.  It was mid-Mar 1945 before repairs were completed, and HMCS Parry Sound returned to convoy duty on 07 Apr 1945.  She departed Londonderry for the last time early in Jun 1945 and was paid off at Sydney on 10 Jul 1945.  Sold for conversion to a whale-killer, she entered service in 1950 as the Honduran Olympic Champion 1950, Japanese Otori Maru No. 15 in 1956, Kyo Maru No. 22 in 1961 until 1978.

HMCS Peterborough (K342) 

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Peterborough (K342) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Kingston on 01 Jun 1944, she arrived at Halifax on 26 Jun 1944 and in Bermuda on 17 Jul 1944 to work up.  HMCS Peterborough left Bermuda on 07 Aug 1944 for St. John's, where, in Sep 1944, she joined EG C-6 and sailed for her first convoy, HXF.308, on 18 Sep 1944.  Continuously employed as a mid-ocean escort for the rest of her career, she left St. John's on 27 May 1945, to join convoy HX.358, the last HX convoy of the war.  In mid-Jun 1945 she left Londonderry for home, where she was paid off on 19 Jul 1945 and laid up at Sorel.  She was sold to the Dominican republic in 1947 and renamed Gerardo Jansen, serving until disposed of for scrap in 1972.

HMCS Pictou (K146) 

(Ken Macpherson, Naval Museum of Alberta, Photo MC-2774)

HMCS Pictou (K146) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Quebec City on 29 Apr 1941, HMCS Pictou arrived at Halifax on 12 May 1941.  She joined Newfoundland Command and left St. John's on 06 Jun 1941 with HX.131 for Iceland, one of the first two corvettes to escort an HX convoy.  She remained on the St. John's-Iceland run for the rest of the year.  After brief repairs at Halifax she returned to St. John's, where breakdowns forced her to turn back from three successive convoys.  She finally crossed with H.180 in Mar 1942, to Londonderry, carried out further repairs at Liverpool and, on completion early in Jun 1942, join EG C-4.  On 5 Aug 1942, while escorting convoy ON.116, she was rammed in a fog near St. John's by the Norwegian SS Hindanger, suffering severe damage to her stern.  After completing repairs at Halifax on 20 Sep 1942, she joined EG C-2.  On her return from the UK with ON.149 in Dec 1942, she required further repairs at Halifax, followed immediately by refit at Liverpool, NS.  In May 1943, she joined EG C-3, and on 17 Dec 1943 left Londonderry for the last time.  From early Jan to 31 Mar 1944, she was refitting at New York, incidentally receiving her extended fo'c's'le.  She then proceeded to Bermuda for three weeks' working-up, returning in mid-Jun 1944 to join EG W-5, Western Escort Force.  Paid off on 12 Jul 1945, at Sorel, she was sold for conversion to a whale-catcher, entering service in 1950 as the Honduran-flag Olympic Chaser.  Again sold in 1956, she served as the Otori Maru No. 7 until converted to a barge in 1962.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3393539)

HMCS Pictou (K146) (Flower-class), firing a depth charge, March 1942.

(RCN Photo)

HMCS Pictou (K146) (Flower-class).

HMCS Port Arthur (K233)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Port Arthur (K233) (Flower-class).  Built by the Port Arthur Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Port Arthur, Ontario, she was commissioned on 26 May 1942 at Montreal.  She arrived at Halifax on 10 Jun 1942 and was allocated to WLEF at the end of Jul 1942.  In Sep 1942 she was appointed to Operation "Torch" duties, arriving at Londonderry on 01 Nov 1942 from convoy SC.105, and during the next four months escorted UK-Mediterranean convoys.  On 19 Jan 1943, while so employed, HMCS Port Arthur sank the Italian submarine Tritone off Bougie, Algeria.  She arrived at Halifax on 23 Mar 1943, and, after brief repairs there, joined Western Support Force at St. John's.  On 1 May 1943, her CO, Lt E.T. Simmons, was awarded the DSO.  Early in Aug 1943 she began a major refit at Liverpool, NS, completing on 31 Dec 1943.  After working up at Halifax, she joined EG W-9, WEF.  In Apr 1944, she was assigned to Western Approaches Command for invasion duties and left St. John's on 24 Apr 1944 for Londonderry.  During the following four months she was occupied as a convoy escort in support of the invasion, and in September joined Portsmouth Command.  In Feb 1945, she returned to Canada, where VE-Day found her still under refit at Liverpool, NS.  She was paid off 11 Jul 1945 at Sorel and broken up at Hamilton in 1948.

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Port Arthur (K233) (Flower-class), clearing Port Arthur Harbour for overseas service, 16 May 1942.

HMCS Prescott (K161)

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3604328)

HMCS Prescott (K161) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Montreal on 26 Jun 1941, HMCS Prescott arrived at Halifax on 04 Jul 1941 and was attached briefly to Halifax Force before arriving at St. John's on 31 Aug 1941 to join Newfoundland Command.  She spent the rest of the year escorting convoys between St. John's and Iceland, but early in 1942 experienced mechanical difficulties requiring two months' repairs at Liverpool, NS.  Resuming her mid-ocean duties on 21 Apr 1942, she made two round trips to Londonderry before being transferred to WLEF in July.  In Sep 1942 she was assigned to duties in connection with Operation "Torch", returning to Canada on 04 Apr 1943.  Late that month she began a six-month refit at Liverpool, NS, including extension of her fo'c's'le.  After work-ups at Pictou she sailed from St. John's on 19 Dec 1943 for the UK to join EG 6, Londonderry.  She served with the group, principally as escort to UK- Gibraltar/Freetown convoys, until Apr 1944, when its corvettes were replaced with frigates, then joined Western Approaches Command, Greenock, for invasion duties.  In Sep 1944 she returned to Liverpool, NS, for another refit and, after working up, went back to the UK to serve with Nore Command until the end of the war.  Returning to Halifax late in May 1945, she was paid off at Sorel 20 Jul 1945 and broken up in 1951 at Hamilton.

HMCS Quesnel (K133)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Quesnel (K133) (Flower-class).  Named for the town of Quesnel, BC, she was built by Victoria Machinery Deport Co., Ltd, Victoria, BC and commissioned on 23 May 1941 at Esquimalt.  She displaced 950 tons with a draught of  8'3" forward and 13' 5" aft when fully loaded.  Her overall length was 205 feet with a beam of 33 feet.  Her single steam reciprocating engine gave her a maximum speed of 16 knots.  After her "shake down" cruise to Prince Rupert in June 1941, the remainder of the year was spent performing various duties such as ASW training, towing gunnery targets and providing sea training to junior officers from Royal Roads.  Shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor, HMCS Quesnel was part of the rounding up of Japanese fishing vessels on the west coast of Vancouver Island.  She also acted as a tender to the Battleship HMS Warspite when she was working up in the strait of Juan De Fuca and Nanoose Bay.  In the spring of 1942, HMCS Quesnel carried out A/S patrols in the Strait of George and in Queen Charlotte and Millbank Sounds.  She also provided protection to individual ships from US ports to Alaska.  During this time HMCS Quesnel provided a screen to RMS Queen Elizabeth while she waited off Esquimalt for ideal tidal conditions to be dry docked in Feb 1942.  In June 1942 HMCS Quesnel provided escort to the US tanker Lombardi, arriving in Kodiak, Alaska on 16 Jun 1942.  En route back to Esquimalt, on 20 Jun 1942, she intercepted a message intended for HMCS Edmundston, requiring immediate assistance for the Fort Camosun, torpedoed by a Japanese submarine, position 47 22 N 125 30 W, approx 70 miles south west of cape Flattery.  Several Canadian and US ships responded but HMCS Quesnel was first on the scene.  On approaching the Fort Camosun HMCS Quesnel picked up a contact and delivered a depth charge attack.  Visible results were negative and contact was not regained.  The entire crew of Fort Camosun, 51 men, were rescued by HMCS Quesnel.  With the assistance of HMCS Edmundston, HMCS Vancouver and tugs, the Fort Camosun was brought to anchor in Neah Bay for pumping out before eventually making to to Esquimalt for repairs.  The balance of the summer of 1942 was spent on A/S patrol and intercepting unidentified ships in BC waters.  On 13 Sep 1942, HMCS Quesnel, in company with HMCS Timmins, HMCS Dundas, HMCS Edmundston and HMCS New Westminster departed Esquimalt for Halifax via the Panama Canal.  She arrived in Halifax on 13 Oct 1942 and was assigned to Western Local Escort Force until Jun 1944.  On 11 and 12 May 1943, while escorting convoy ON-180, HMCS Quesnel gained a contact.  A depth charge attack was made but no further contact was made.  With the division of the force into escort groups in Jun 1943, she became a member of EG W-1.  During this period she underwent a refit, including fo'c's'le extension, from early Sep to 23 Dec 1943, at Pictou.  This refit was followed by workups in St. Margaret's Bay and Bermuda.  In Jun 1944 Quesnel joined Quebec Force and spent five months escorting Labrador-Quebec convoys.  In Nov 1944 she was transferred to Halifax Force, going to Sydney for refit and, on completion late in Jan 1945, to Bermuda for workups.  She resumed escort duty late in Mar 1945, temporarily attached to EG W-5 and W-8 of WLEF until the end of the war.  While escorting her final convoy, HX-335, HMCS Quesnel rescued 17 of the crew from the damaged Esso Pitsburg on 12 May 1945, arriving at Halifax on 25 May 1945.  On 7 Jun 1945, she landed her ammunition at Shelburne, NS, and two days later arrived at Sydney, NS, to de-store.  HMCS Quesnel then proceeded to Sorel, Quebec where she was paid off on 3 Jul 1945.  She was sold on 5 Oct 1945 to the United Steel and Metal Company, Hamilton, Ontario, and was broken up there in 1946.  During her time escorting convoys in the Atlantic, HMCS Quesnel participated in 48 convoys and made ports of call at Goose Bay, Labrador; St. John's, Nfld; Sydney, NS; Halifax, NS; Saint John, NB; Boston, MA; New York, NY; and several ports in Quebec.

 (Bev Lundahl Photo)

HMCS Quesnel (K133), Thunderbird totem.

HMCS Regina (K234) 

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4950906)

HMCS Regina (K234) (Flower-class).  Built at Sorel Quebec, HMCS Regina arrived at Halifax on 6 Jan 1942, and was commissioned on 22 Jan 1942.  She served with WLEF from mid-Mar 1942 until Sep 1942, when she was reassigned to Operation "Torch."  Crossing as escort to convoy SC.108, she arrived at Belfast on 22 Nov 1942 for refit, following which she was employed as escort to UK-Mediterranean convoys.  While thus engaged on 8 Feb 1943, she sank the Italian submarine Avorio in the western Mediterranean, north of Phillipville, Algeria.  Returning to Canada late in Mar 1943, she briefly rejoined WLEF before commencing a refit at Sydney on 9 Jun 1943.  The work was completed at Pictou in mid-Dec 1943 and workups carried out there, followed by further repairs at Halifax and Shelburne.  HMCS Regina joined EG C-1 in Feb 1944, and at the beginning of Mar 1944 left Argentia to escort SC.154 to the UK, but was detached in mid-ocean with HMCS Valleyfield to escort an RN tug towing the convoy rescue ship Dundee toward Horta.  She left Horta on 14 Mar 1944, this time escorting the damaged HMCS Mulgrave, under tow for the Clyde.  Arriving at Londonderry toward the end of Mar 1944, HMCS Regina was assigned to Western Approaches Command for invasion duties.  She was employed as an escort to Channel and coastal convoys until 8 Aug 1944, when she was torpedoed and sunk off Trevose Head, Cornwall, by U-667.  Thirty of her ship's company were lost.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4950907)

HMCS Regina (K234) (Flower-class), June 1942.

 (Gary Medford Photo)

HMCS Regina (K234), Pictou, NS.

 (John Hawley Photo)

HMCS Rimouski (K121) 

(RCN Photo)

HMCS Rimouski (K121) (Flower-class).  Commissioned on 26 Apr 1941 at Quebec City, HMCS Rimouski arrived at Halifax on 12 May 1941 and was assigned to Newfoundland Command.  She shared with HMCS Pictou the honour of being one of the first two corvettes to escort an HX convoy (HX.131, in Jun 1941).  On 20 Jan 1942, after three months' refit at Halifax, she left St. John's to join convoy SC.65 for Londonderry.  After three round trips, she joined WLEF in Jun 1942.  In the course of a five-month refit at Liverpool, Nova Scotia, begun 24 Mar 1943, she received her extended fo'c's'le.  Upon completion she was assigned to EG C-1, MOEF, transferring to C-3 in Dec 1943.  In Apr 1944 while at Londonderry, she was allocated to Western Approaches Command, Greenock, for invasion duties, and left Oban on 31 May 1944 to escort blockships for Normandy.  She was employed until Aug 1944 as escort to Channel and coastal convoys, and then returned to Canada, where she served briefly as a Halifax-based training ship.  A refit begun at Louisbourg early in Nov 1944 was completed at Liverpool and Halifax in Feb 1945.  After working up, she returned to the UK to be based at Milford Haven as a member of EG 41, Plymouth, for the duration of the war.  Returning to Canada in Jun 1945 she was paid off at Sorel on 24 Jul and broken up at the Steel Company of Canada, Hamilton, Ontario in 1950.

 (John Pickford Photo)

HMCS Rimouski (K121) (Flower-class).

 (John Pickford Photo)

HMCS Rimouski (K121) (Flower-class).

 (John Pickford Photo)

HMCS Rimouski (K121) (Flower-class).

HMCS Rivière du Loup (K357)

 (USN Photo)

HMCS Rivière du Loup (K357) (Flower-class), off the eastern Seaboard on 1 Nov 1944.  Photographed from a US Navy Blimp.

Built at Quebec City, she was commissioned there on 21 Nov 1943.  She arrived at Halifax on 18 Dec1943 requiring a month's repairs.  She carried out working-up exercises in Bermuda early in Feb 1943, returning on 18 Feb 1943 to complete the exercises in St. Margaret's Bay.  Continuing mechanical problems necessitated further repairs, which continued at Halifax until early in Aug 1943.  Having lost most of her original crew during this period, she had to return to Bermuda to work up again.  Early in Sep 1944, Riviere du Loup returned to Halifax and joined EG W-3, WEF.  In Oct 1944 she was assigned to EG C-3 and left St. John's on 13 Nov 1944 to pick up her first transatlantic convoy, HX.319.  On arrival in the UK, still dogged by troubles, she underwent a month's repairs at Belfast. 

On 10 Jan 1945, forty-seven sailors on HMCS Riviere-du-Loup refused to turn to for duty.  The following  is from the book "Mutiny and the Royal Canadian Navy" by Christopher M. Bell - "The most serious wartime mutiny, if judged by the punishments handed out, took place during the final year of the war in the corvette HMCS Rivière-du-Loup, also attached to the Western Approaches command.  The ship had been an unhappy one for some time, and the executive officer was especially unpopular with the crew, who had little respect for his professional abilities.  When the ship’s captain, Lieutenant R.N. Smillie, RCNVR, went into hospital to have an infected hand treated, men became alarmed by rumours that the first lieutenant would be taking the ship to sea the following day.  On the morning of 10 January 1945, forty seven sailors refused to turn in for duty and instead locked themselves in the forward mess.  Smillie rushed back to the ship but was unable to gain access to the mutineers. Rear-Admiral R.H.L. Bevan, the Flag-Officer-in-Charge, Northern Ireland, decided to wait matters out rather than attempt to force entry into the mess deck.  The mutineers surrendered several hours later and were escorted ashore.  They left behind a long list of complaints to justify their action.  The most serious charge, that senior officers (and especially the first lieutenant) were incapable of properly handling the ship, was clearly what had triggered the mutiny.  Other complaints, which undoubtedly contributed to the men’s general discontent, were presumably added to the list to bolster their case for mutiny.  These included excessive drinking by officers, the use of foul language to address ratings, and other disrespectful behaviour.  The subsequent board of enquiry blamed the incident primarily on ‘injudicious and tactless handling of the ratings by the Executive Officer’, and the crew’s concerns about his competence.  Both the captain and the first lieutenant were relieved of their duties.  Petty officers and leading seamen were reprimanded for failing ‘to notice trouble brewing’ and were drafted to other ships.  Forty-four of the 47 mutineers were sentenced to terms of between 42 and 90 days in Belfast Gaol."

 Riviere-de-Loup's career as a mid-ocean escort ended with her arrival at Halifax late in May 1945, from convoy ON.304, and she was paid off on 02 Jul 1945 and placed in reserve at Sorel.  In 1947 she was sold to the Dominican Navy and renamed Juan Bautista Maggiolo.  She was broken up in 1972.

  (Steve Rose Photo)

HMCS Rivière du Loup (K357)

HMCS Rosthern (K169)

(RCN Photo)

HMCS Rosthern (K169) (Flower-class).  Built by Port Arthur Shipbuilding Co. Ltd, she was commissioned on 17 Jun 1941, at Montreal.  HMCS Rosthern arrived at Halifax on 26 Jun 1941.  She joined Newfoundland Command and left St. John's for Iceland on 7 Oct 1941 as ocean escort to convoy SC.48.  She proceeded on to the Clyde, where mechanical defects kept her for two months, and arrived at Halifax on 28 Dec 1941 for further repairs, not resuming service until mid-Feb 1942.  She left Argentia, Newfoundland, on 27 Feb 1942 with HX.177 for Londonderry, and was thereafter employed continuously on North Atlantic convoys until Jun 1944.  In Apr 1942 she became a member of EG A-3, re-numbered C-5 in May.  HMCS Rosthern took part in three major convoy battles: SC.100 (Sep 1942); ON.166 (Feb 1943); and SC.121 (Mar 1943).  She left Londonderry for the last time on 27 May 1944, and on her return to Canada became a training ship at Halifax for navigation and ship-handling, attached at first to WLEF and then, from Dec 1944 onward, to Halifax Force.  She carried out workups at Bermuda in Dec 1944 escorting HMCS Provider on the homeward trip.  Rosthern had no long refits during the war, and never did have her fo'c's'le lengthened.  Paid off on 19 Jul 1945, at Sorel, she was sold to Steel Co. of Canada, Hamilton, Ontario, in Jun 1946 and broken up there the same year.

 (Gary Medford Photo)

HMCS Rosthern (K169).

HMCS Sackville (K181)

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Sackville (K181) (Flower-class).  Built by Saint John Dry Dock & Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Saint John, NB, she was launched on 15 May 1941.  Commissioned on 30 Dec 1941, at Saint John, N.B., HMCS Sackville arrived at Halifax on 12 Jan 1942.  She joined NEF after working up, and on 26 May 1942 left St. John's to escort HX.191 as part of the newly formed EG C-3.  In Apr 1943, she transferred to C-1, and in Sep 1943 briefly joined EG 9 in support of the beleaguered combined convoy ONS.18 / ON.202, which lost six merchant vessels and three escorts.  In Oct 1943 HMCS Sackville transferred to C-2 for the balance of her war career.  She underwent two major refits: at Liverpool, NS, and Halifax, from 14 Jan to 02 May 1943; and at Galveston, Texas, from late Feb to 7 May 1944, when her fo'c's'le was extended.  Upon her return from working up in Bermuda, in Jun 1944, she made a crossing to Londonderry.  Soon after leaving for the westward journey she split a boiler and had to return to 'Derry for repairs.  She left again on 11 Aug 1944, to limp home as escort to ONS.248, refitted at Halifax and, in Sep 1944, briefly became a training ship at HMCS Kings.  In Oct 1944 she began, at Halifax, refit and reconstruction to a loop-laying vessel, and work was still in progress by VE-Day.  The ship was paid off on 8 Apr 1946, but re-commissioned 4 Aug 1950, as a depot ship, reserve fleet.  She was refitted in 1950 but remained inactive until 1953, when, as a Canadian Naval Auxiliary Vessel (CNAV), she began a survey of the Gulf of St. Lawrence that was to last several years.  She also carried out a number of cruises to the Baffin Island-Greenland area.  Extensive modification in 1968 reflected HMCS Sackville's new status as a research vessel, and she was operated by the Department of National defence on behalf of the Bedford Institute of Oceanography.  In 1983, as the sole surviving corvette, she was transferred to the Canadian Naval Corvette Trust (now Canadian Naval Memorial Trust) and restored to her wartime appearance.

 (Johnny Forget Photo)

HMCS Sackville (K181) (Flower-class), summer 1942. 

  (Gary Medford Photo)

HMCS Sackville (K181) (Flower-class).  Photo taken from HMCS Kamloops K176 while convoy escort for ONS.18 & ON.202, Sep 1943.

 (Gary Medford Photo)

HMCS Sackville (K181) (Flower-class).

 (Gary Medford Photo)

HMCS Sackville (K181) (Flower-class).

  (Gary Medford Photo)

HMCS Sackville (K181) as CNAV Sackville (113).  As a Canadian Naval Auxiliary Vessel (CNAV) (113), she began a survey of the Gulf of St. Lawrence that was to last several years.  She also carried out a number of cruises to the Baffin Island-Greenland area.  Extensive modification in 1968 reflected HMCS Sackville's new status as a research vessel operated by the Department of National defence on behalf of the Bedford Institute of Oceanography.  In 1983, as the sole surviving corvette, she was transferred to the Canadian Naval Corvette Trust (now Canadian Naval Memorial Trust) and restored to her wartime appearance.

 (Author Photo)

HMCS Sackville (K181) (Flower-class), alongside in Halifax Harbour, 2005.

(Author Photos)

HMCS Sackville (K181) (Flower-class), alongside in Halifax Harbour, 2005.

 (Author Photos)

QF 4-inch/45 Gun Mk IX, mounted on the forward deck in a gun turret, HMCS Sackville.

 (Author Photos)

HMCS Sackville (K181) (Flower-class), Hedgehog Anti-Submarine projector/mortars, 40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun Mk. VIII on AA mount.

HMCS Saskatoon (K158)

 (Naval Museum of Manitoba Photo)

HMCS Saskatoon (K158) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Montreal on 9 Jun 1941, HMCS Saskatoon arrived at Halifax on 22 Jun 1941.  She joined Halifax Force after working up and in Aug 1941 made a trip to the Bahamas, returning at the end of Sep 1941.  She remained on local escort duty until Mar 1942, then joined WLEF on its formation.  She served with this force on the "triangle run" until the end of the war, becoming a member of EG W-8 when it was established in Jun 1943, and transferring to W-6 in Apr 1944.  During her career she had two major refits: at Halifax from 11 Aug to 17 Nov 1942; and at Pictou from mid-Dec 1943 to 01 Apr 1944.  Following the latter, which included fo'c's'le extension, she worked up for three weeks at Pictou and another three in Bermuda.  She was paid off on 25 June 1945 at Sorel and soon afterward sold for conversion to a merchant vessel.  Renamed Tra los Montes, she served as a whaler from 1948.  Renamed Olympic Fighter (1950), Otori Maru No. 6 (1956), and Kyo Maru No. 20 (1961).  Last in Lloyd's Register for 1978.

  (Ron Bell Photo)

HMCS Saskatoon (K158) (Flower-class).

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Saskatoon (K158) (Flower-class).

HMCS Shawinigan (K136)

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Shawinigan (K136) (Flower-class).  Built by George T. Davie & Sons Ltd., Lauzon, Quebec.  Commissioned on 19 Sep 1941, at Quebec City, HMCS Shawinigan arrived at Halifax on 27 Oct 1941.  She joined Sydney Force in November but on 13 Jan 1942, arrived at St. John's to join Newfoundland Command.  She left 25 Jan 1942 to escort convoy SC.66 to Londonderry, the first of three round trips.  In mid-May 1942 she left 'Derry for the last time, and in Jun 1942 was assigned to Halifax Force as escort to Quebec-Labrador convoys.  She joined WLEF that November, almost immediately commencing a refit at Liverpool, NS.  This refit was completed in mid-Mar 1943, and in Jun 1943 Shawinigan joined the recently established EG W-3.  In Apr 1944, while undergoing another refit at Liverpool, during which she had her fo'c's'le extended, she was transferred to W-2 and, on completion of the refit on 16 Jun 1944, proceeded to Bermuda to work up.  At 0230 hours on 25 Nov 1944, while on independent A/S patrol out of Sydney, she was torpedoed in the Cabot Strait by U-1228 (Oberleutnant zur See Friedrich-Wilhelm Marienfeld).  She exploded and sank immediately with all hands. A memorial dedicated to the 91 lost was erected at Shawinigan, Quebec.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Shawinigan (K136) (Flower-class).

HMCS Shediac (K110) 

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3554094)

HMCS Shediac (K110) (Flower-class).  Built at Lauzon, Quebec, she was commissioned at Quebec City on 08 Jul 1941.  HMCS Shediac arrived at Halifax on 18 Jul 1941.  She served briefly with Halifax Force and Sydney Force before joining Newfoundland Command in Oct 1941, leaving Sydney 5 Oct 1941 to escort convoy SC.48 to Iceland.  After three round trips there, she accompanied SC.67 to Londonderry in Jan 1942, again the first of three return trips.  Following a six-week refit at Liverpool, NS, she joined WLEF in Jul 1941, returning in Oct 1941 to the "Newfie-Derry" run as a member of EG C-1.  She took part in two major convoy battles: ONS.92 (May 1942); and ONS.154 (Dec 1942).  On 4 Mar1943, while escorting KMS.10, a UK-Gibraltar convoy, she assisted in the destruction of U-87 west of the Azores.  She left Londonderry for the last time on 28 Mar 1943, underwent refit at Liverpool, NS, from 27 Apr to 1 Jul 1943, then joined WLEF's EG W-8.  Transferred to the west coast, she left Halifax 3 Apr 1944, and arrived at Esquimalt 10 May 1044.  She refitted at Vancouver from mid-Jun to mid-Aug 1944, in the process receiving her extended fo'c's'le.  She was paid off at Esquimalt on 28 Aug 1945 and sold in 1951 for conversion to a whale-catcher, entering service as the Dutch-flag Jooske W. Vinke in 1954.  She was broken up at Santander, Spain, in 1965.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Shediac (K110) (Flower-class).

HMCS Sherbrooke (K152) 

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Sherbrooke (K152) (Flower-class).   Commissioned at Sorel on 05 Jun 1941, HMCS Sherbrooke arrived at Halifax on 12 Jun 1941.  She joined Halifax Force later that month but transferred in Sep 1941 to Newfoundland Command and left Sydney on 29 Sep 1941 to escort convoy SC.47 as far as Iceland.  After two round trips to Iceland, she left St. John's on 14 Jan 1942, to join SC.64, the first "Newfie-Derry" convoy, and was thereafter employed as an ocean escort on that run principally with EG C-4.  She took part in two particularly hard-fought convoy battles: ON.127 (Aug 1942); and HX.229 (Mar 1943).  Her westbound trip after the latter convoy was her last; after a major refit at Lunenburg from Apr to Jun 1943, and work-ups at Pictou, she joined EG W-2 of WLEF, transferring in Apr 1944, to W-7 and in Oct 1944, to W-1.  Late in May 1944, she underwent a refit at Liverpool, NS, that included fo'c's'le extension, followed by a month's repairs at Halifax and three weeks' workups in Bermuda in Oct 1944.  She was paid off at Sorel on 28 Jun 1945, and broken up at Hamilton, Ontario, in 1947.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Sherbrooke (K152) (Flower-class). 

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3455882)

HMCS Sherbrooke (K152) (Flower-class), QF 4-inch gun firing,  June 1945.

HMCS Smiths Falls (K345) 

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Smiths Falls (K345) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Kingston on 28 Nov 1944, she was the last RCN corvette to enter service.  She arrived at Halifax late in Dec 1944 and remained there fitting out until 10 Feb 1945, then proceeded to Bermuda for work-ups.  On her return Smiths Falls was assigned to EG C-2, Londonderry, and made her passage there as escort to convoy SC.171 early in Apr 1945, the first of three crossing before the end of hostilities.  She left Londonderry early in Jun 1945 for the last time, and was paid off 08 Jul 1945 and placed in reserve at Sorel for disposal.  Sold for conversion to a whale-catcher, she entered service in 1950 as the Honduran-flag Olympic Lightning, but was sold to Japanese owners in 1956 and renamed Otori Maru No. 16 then, Kyo Maru No. 23 from 1961 until 1978.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Smiths Falls (K345) (Flower-class).

HMCS Snowberry (K166)

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Snowberry (K166) (Flower-class).  Built for the RN, she was commissioned at Quebec City on 26 Nov 1940 as HMS Snowberry.  She arrived at Halifax on 13 Dec 1940 for further work and sailed 09 Feb 1941, with convoy HX.108 for the UK.  There she completed fitting out at Greenock, completing 3 Apr 1940, and worked up at Tobermory before joining Western Approaches Command, Greenock, in May.  On 15 May 1941 she was transferred to the RCN and commissioned as HMCS Snowberry K166.  She left Aultbea early in Jun 1941 to join convoy OB.332, arriving at Halifax on 23 Jun 1941 to join Newfoundland Command.  From Jul to Oct 1941 she made three round trips to Iceland, and on 08 Dec 1941 arrived at Charleston, SC, for six weeks' refit.  On 12 Feb 1942, she left St. John's to escort SC.69 to Londonderry.  In Mar 1942 she joined the newly formed WLEF, shifting in June to Halifax Tanker Escort Force for one round trip to Trinidad and two round trips to Aruba with Tanker convoys.  In Sep 1942 she was placed under US control, escorting New York-Guantanamo convoys until Mar 1943, when she arrived at Charleston, SC, for refit, including fo'c's'le extension.  On completion in mid-May 1942, and after workups at Pictou, she joined the newly established EG 5 (later EG 6) and returned to UK waters in Aug 1942.  While serving with this support force on 20 Nov 1943, as escort to a U.K.-Gibraltar/ Freetown convoy, she took part in the sinking of U-536 north of the Azores.  When the group replaced its corvettes with frigates in Mar 1944, HMCS Snowberry proceeded to Baltimore, MD, for five weeks' refit, afterward returning to Halifax.  She went to Bermuda to work up in July 1944, and on returning was briefly assigned to WLEF but left St. John's in mid-September for the UK.  There she joined Portsmouth Command for the balance of the war.  She was handed back to the RN at Rosyth on 8 Jun 1945, and sunk as a target vessel off Portsmouth in 1946.  She was salvaged and broken up at Thornaby-on-Tees in 1947.

 (Ron Bell Photo)

HMCS Snowberry (K166) (Flower-class).

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Snowberry (K166) (Flower-class).

HMCS Sorel (K153)

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Sorel (K153) (Flower-class).  

Commissioned at Sorel on 19 Aug 1941, HMCS Sorel arrived at Halifax on 30 Aug 1941.  She joined Sydney Force in Oct 1941 but transferred in Nov 1941 to Newfoundland Force, leaving St. John's on 18 Nov 1941 to escort convoy SC.55 to Iceland.  On her next trip, mechanical defects forced her to go on to the UK, and she arrived at Leith, Scotland, 17 Jan 1942, for ten weeks' repairs.  She left Londonderry on 23 Apr 1942 to join convoy ON.88, and in May 1942 joined WLEF.  Between 19 Oct 1942, and Feb 1943, she underwent refit, including fo'c's'le extension, successively at Liverpool, NS, Pictou, and Halifax.   In Feb 1943 she entered service as a training ship, first at Digby, then at St. Margaret's Bay, and at Pictou.  In Sep 1943, she was temporarily allocated to EG C-3 for one round trip to Londonderry, and on her return underwent refit at Halifax and Dartmouth.  This refit was completed on 31 Mar 1944, and she then proceeded to Bermuda for workups and on her return was assigned to WEF's EG W-4 for the rest of the war.  Paid off on  on 22 Jun 1945, she was sold to the Yugoslav Navy on 16 Nov 1945.   While manned by a Yugoslav crew, she ran aground on the southern point of Henry Island on 13 Dec 1945.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Sorel (K153) (Flower-class).

HMCS Spikenard (K198)

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MC-2975)

HMCS Spikenard (K198) (Flower-class).  Built for the RN, she was commissioned on 06 Dec 1940, at Quebec City as HMS Spikenard.  She arrived at Halifax five days later to complete fitting out and working up.  She left Halifax on 21 Jan 1941, escorting convoy HX.104 to the UK, where she received her finishing touches at South Shields, Tyne, from 04 Feb to 21 Apr 1941.  She arrived at Tobermory on 22 Apr 1941 to work up, and on 15 May 1941 she transferred to the RCN and was commissioned as HMCS Spikenard.  On 10 June 1941 she left Aultbea to escort convoy OB.332.  Arriving at Halifax on 25 Jun 1941, she joined Newfoundland Command, and between Jul 1941 and Jan 1942, made three round trips to Iceland as ocean escort.  On 1 Feb 1942, she left St. John's for convoy SC.67 on the recently inaugurated "Newfie-Derry" run, and on 10 Feb 1942 HMCS Spikenard was torpedoed and sunk by U-136, (Type VIIC) about 465 nautical miles west of Malin Head, Ireland in position 56º10'N, 21º07'W, while escorting convoy SC-67. 

Convoy SC.67 sailed early in Feb 1942 from St. John's bound for Londonderry.  HMCS Spikenard K198 was the senior ship of the escort for SC.67.  Other escorts included Corvettes HMCS Chilliwack K131, HMCS Shediac K110, HMCS Louisburg K143, HMCS Lethbridge K160 and HMCS Dauphin K157.  Just before 2300 hrs on 10 Feb 1942, the convoy was due south of Iceland, when HMCS Chilliwack attacked a submerged contact on the port bow of the formation.  Almost immediately thereafter, HMCS Louisburg at the rear of the convoy spotted the wake of a torpedo running down her port side.  HMCS Spikenard had been zigzagging on the starboard wing of the convoy when another torpedo struck the nearby tanker, Heina.  A few seconds later, a torpedo struck HMCS Spikenard, ripping out her forepeak and destroying the bridge and radio.  HMCS Spikenard may have become aware of U-136 in the few minutes before, as action stations had been sounded and her speed increased just before she was hit.  Within minutes, HMCS Spikenard sank by the fore and headed for the bottom.  Only eight men survived, found by a westbound British ship the next day.  HMCS Spikenard had been torpedoed at about the same time as the tanker, and sank so quickly, that the other escorts didn't realize she was gone until morning.

HMCS St. Lambert (K343) 

 (DND Photo)

HMCS St. Lambert (K343) (Flower-class).  Built at Quebec City, she was commissioned there on 27 May 1944.  She arrived at Halifax on 19 Jun 1944 and in Jul 1944 sailed for Bermuda to work up.  On her return  in mid-Aug 1944, HMCS St. Lambert was assigned to EG C-6, Londonderry, and left St. John's 18 Sep 1944 to join convoy HXF.308 for her passage there.  She served on North Atlantic convoys for the rest of her career, leaving St. John's on 27 May 1945, as escort to HX.358, the last HX convoy of the war.  In mid-Jun 1945 she sailed for Londonderry on her final trip homeward and was paid off on 20 Jul 1945 and laid up at Sorel for disposal.  Sold in 1946 for conversion to a merchant ship, she became the Panamanian Chrysi Hondroulis and, in 1955, the Greek-flag Loula, last noted in Lloyd's Register for 1957-58.

HMCS Stellarton (K457)

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Stellarton (K457) (Flower-class).  Built at Midland, Ontario, she was commissioned at Quebec City on 29 Sep 1944, HMCS Stellarton arrived at Halifax late in Oct 1944 and sailed for Bermuda early in Nov 1944 to work up.  She left Bermuda on 4 Dec 1944 for St. John's, where she joined EG C-3 and on 4 Jan 1945, sailed to pick up her first convoy, HX.329.  She was employed for the rest of the war as a mid-ocean escort, and left Londonderry for the last time on 21 May 1945 to join ON.304.  On 1 Jul 1945 she was paid off and placed in reserve at Sorel until 1946, when she joined the Chilean navy as Casma.  She was paid off in 1967 and broken up in 1969.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Stellarton (K457) (Flower-class).

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Stellarton (K457) (Flower-class).

HMCS Strathroy (K455) 

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Strathroy (K455) (Flower-class).  Built at Midland, Ontario, she was commissioned there on 20 Nov 1944.  HMCS Strathroy arrived at Halifax in Dec 1944 and immediately escorted her first convoy, HF.147, to Saint John, NB.  She arrived there on 18 Dec 1944 for completion of fitting-out that could not be done at the builder's prior to freeze-up.  She then carried out workups in Bermuda, and on completing these joined Halifax Force in Apr 1945, for local escort duties.  On 12 Jul 1945 she was paid off and laid up at Sorel for disposal.  She was purchased in 1946 by the Chilean Navy and renamed Chipana; serving until paid off on 30 Sep 1966.  She was broken up in 1969.

HMCS Sudbury (K162) 

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Sudbury (K162) (Flower-class).  Built at Kingston, Ontario, she was commissioned on 15 Oct 1941, at Montreal.  HMCS Sudbury arrived at Halifax on 26 Oct 1941.  She joined Sydney Force as local escort to ocean convoys but in Jan 1942, joined Newfoundland Command, making one round trip to Londonderry.  On her return she transferred to the newly formed WLEF and in June 1942 to Halifax Tanker Escort Force.  In the following three months she made two round trips to Trinidad and one to Aruba, escorting tankers both ways.  In Sep 1942 Sudbury was placed under US control, escorting New York-Guantanamo convoys.  She arrived at Liverpool, NS, on 26 Dec 1942, for two months' refit, worked up at Halifax and then joined WLEF, in Jun 1943, becoming a member of EG W-9.  In Sep 1943 she was lent to EG C-5 for her second transatlantic trip, afterward resuming service with W-9 until New Year's Day, 1944, when she left for the west coast.  She arrived at Esquimalt on 3 Feb 1944, and later that month commenced refit, including fo'c's'le extension, at Vancouver.  On completion on 10 May 1944, she joined Esquimalt Force for the duration of the war, being paid off on 28 Aug 1945, at Esquimalt.  After the war HMCS Sudbury was sold and converted for use as a salvage tug, entering service in 1949 under her original name.  She was broken up at Victoria in 1967.

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Sudbury (K162) (Flower-class).

HMCS Summerside (K141)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Summerside (K141) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Quebec City on 11 Sep 1941, HMCS Summerside arrived at Halifax on 25 Sep 1941.  She was assigned to local escort duty out of Halifax and later Sydney but left St. John's on 11 Dec 1941 as ocean escort to SC.59 for Iceland, returning with ON.50.  It was to be her only trip there.  She left St. John's on 25 Jan 1942, for convoy SC.66 to Londonderry, returning with ON.71 to join WLEF in Mar 1942.  In Jul 1942 she was transferred to Gulf Escort Force until, earmarked for duties in connection with Operation "Torch", she left Halifax on 19 Oct 1942 for the UK.  For the next four months she was employed on UK-Mediterranean convoys, returning to Canada in mid-Mar, 1943, for a major refit at Saint John from 11 Apr to 25 Sep 1943.  Her fo'c's'le was extended in the process.  After working up at Halifax she joined EG C-5 and in Apr 1944, after seven transatlantic trips, was assigned at Londonderry to Western Approaches Command for invasion duties.  She was employed in UK waters until returning to Canada for two months' refit at Liverpool, NS, commencing in mid-Oct 1944.  After further repairs at Halifax were completed on 18 Jan 1945, she proceeded to Bermuda for three weeks' workups.  In Mar 1945 she sailed for the UK to serve with EG 41 (RN) out of Plymouth until the war's end.  She returned to Canada at the end of May 1945, was paid off at Sorel on 06 Jul 1945 and broken up at Hamilton, Ontario, in 1946.

 (CFB Esquimalt Naval and Military Museum Photo)

HMCS Summerside (K141) gunshield art, 7 Feb 1943.

HMCS The Pas (K168) 

 (Derwyn Crozier-Smith Photo)

HMCS The Pas (K168) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Montreal on 21 Oct 1941, HMCS The Pas arrived at Halifax on 04 Nov 1941.  She joined Halifax Force as a local escort, but in Mar 1942, was reassigned to WLEF, then forming.  In Jun 1942 she was transferred to Halifax Tanker Escort Force, and during the next three months made three round trips between Halifax and Trinidad-Aruba.  In Sep 1942 she came under US control as escort to New York-Guantanamo convoys but arrived at Liverpool, NS, on 29 Nov 1942, for two months' refit.  Following workups locally, she rejoined WLEF and, on its division into escort groups in Jun 1943, became a member of EG W-4.  The ship was badly damaged in collision with the American SS Medina in the western Atlantic on 21 Jul 1943, while escorting convoy ON.192, and was under repair at Halifax and Shelburne until early Oct 1943.  She then returned to her duties with WLEF until Sep 1944 (from Apr 1944 as a member of EG W-3), when she underwent a refit at Sydney and, on completion of this late in Nov 1944, joined HMCS Cornwallis as a training ship for the balance of the war.  The Pas never did receive an extended fo'c's'le.  She was paid off on 24 Jul 1945, at Sorel and broken up at Hamilton, Ontario, the following year.

 (CFB Esquimalt Naval and Military Museum Photo)

HMCS The Pas (K168) (Flower-class).

 (Ron Bell Photo)

HMCS The Pas (K168) (Flower-class), St. Margaret's Bay, Nova Scotia, 11 Nov 1942.

HMCS Thorlock (K394) 

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Thorlock (K394) (Flower-class).  Built at Midland, Ontario, HMCS Thorlock was commissioned there on 13 Nov 1944, and arrived at Halifax on 16 Dec 1944.  On 7 Jan 1945, she left for Bermuda to work up, setting out on 01 Feb 1945 for the return journey northward.  Later that month she was allocated to EG C-9 and on 26 Feb 1945 left Halifax to pick up her first convoy, SC.168.  She served for the remainder of the war as an ocean escort, making five transatlantic trips.  On 12 May 1945, when on the final leg of an Atlantic crossing with convoy ON.300 from the UK, she was diverted, along with HMCS Victoriaville, to accept the surrender of U-190 and escort the U-boat to Bay Bulls, Newfoundland.  She was paid off on 15 Jul 1945, and placed in reserve at Sorel.  Sold in 1946, she served in the Chilean Navy as Papudo until disposed of for scrap in 1967.

HMCS Timmins (K223) 

(RCN Photo)

HMCS Timmins (K223) (Flower-class).  Built at Esquimalt, she was commissioned there on 10 Feb 1942.  HMCS Timmins served with Esquimalt Force until transferred to the east coast.  Upon arrival at Halifax on 13 Oct 1942 she was assigned to WLEF.  With its division into escort groups in Jun 1943, she became a member of EG W-6, transferring to W-2 in Apr 1944.  She commenced a two-month refit at Liverpool, NS, late in Jun 1943, followed by workups at Pictou.  A second refit, again at Liverpool, was carried out between late Jun and mid-Oct 1944.  It included the extension of her fo'c's'le and three weeks' working-up in Bermuda followed.  HMCS Timmins was paid off on 15 Jul 1945, at Sorel, and sold later that year for commercial use.  She entered service in 1948 as the Honduran-flag Guayaquil and, ironically, foundered at Guayaquil, Ecuador, on 3 Aug 1960.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Timmins (K223) (Flower-class).

HMCS Trail (K174) 

 (Terry Marentette Photo)

HMCS Trail (K174) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Vancouver on 31 Apr 1941, she left Esquimalt 31 May 1941 for the east coast, arriving at Halifax on 27 Jun 1941.  In Aug 1941 she joined Newfoundland Command, departing St. John's on 23 Aug 1941 to escort convoy HX.146 as far as Iceland.  During the year she made four round trips there, and on 20 Jan 1942, left St. John's to join SC.65 for the first of two round trips to Londonderry.  She returned to Halifax on 02 Apr 1942 and, after a brief refit at Liverpool, NS, joined Halifax Force for Northern Waters in June.  Between Jul and Nov 1942 she was employed escorting convoys between Labrador and Quebec City, also calling at Gaspé and Hamilton Inlet.  She arrived at Halifax in Nov 1942 to join WLEF for the balance of the war, as a member successively of escort groups W-6 (from Jun 1943); W-5 (from Apr 1944) and W-4 (from Dec 1944).  She underwent a refit at Lunenburg from mid-Jul to 03 Sep 1943, followed by workups at Pictou, and a further refit at Liverpool, NS, between mid-Jul and 23 Oct 1944.  Following the latter, which included extension of her fo'c's'le, she underwent additional repairs at Halifax and then proceeded to Bermuda to work up in Dec 1944.  She left there on 7 Jan 1945, for Boston, MA, to resume service with WLEF until paid off on 17 Jul 1945 at Sorel.  In August 1950, HMCS Trail was sold to the Steel Co. of Canada, Hamilton, Ontario, and was ship was broken up at Hamilton.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Trail (K174) (Flower-class).

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Trail (K174) (Flower-class).

HMCS Trentonian (K368)

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Trentonian (K368) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Kingston on 01 Dec 1943, HMCS Trentonian departed for Halifax on 26 Dec 1943.  HMCS Trentonian arrived at Halifax late in Dec 1943 and, after further fitting-out at Liverpool, NS, and Halifax, left the latter port for Bermuda on 18 Feb 1944, to work up.  Returning at the beginning of Mar 1944, she was assigned to Western Approaches Command and left for Londonderry on 23 Apr 1944 to join.  For three months she carried out escort duty in connection with the invasion and on 13 Jun 1944, while escorting the cable vessel Monarch off Normandy, she was shelled in error by a US destroyer.  The Monarch was hit several times resulting in numerous casualties, luckily however, HMCS Trentonian was not hit during this incident.  Late in Aug 1944 she transferred to EG 41 (RN) and, based at different times at Plymouth and at Milford Haven, escorted Channel convoys.  While so engaged on 22 Feb 1945, she was torpedoed and sunk near Falmouth by U-1004, with the loss of six lives. 

U-1004 was eventually scuttled in "Operation Deadlight", the code name for the scuttling of German U-boats aquired by the Allies after the end of the war.

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Trentonian (K368) (Flower-class).

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Trentonian (K368) (Flower-class).

HMCS Trillium (K172) 

 (Library and Archives Canada/DND Photo)

HMCS Trillium (K172) (Flower-class), and MTB V-252, at Jetty No. 5 on Halifax side of the Narrows.  Built at Montreal for the RN, she was commissioned at there on 31 Oct 1940 as HMS Trillium.  She arrived at Halifax on 14 Nov 1940 and in the Clyde on 20 Dec 1940 for final fitting out at Greenock, which was completed on 3 Mar 1941.  In Apr 1941, after three weeks' workups at Tobermory, she joined EG 4 (RN), Greenock, for outbound North American convoys.  On 15 May 1941, HMS Trillium was transferred to the RCN and commissioned as HMCS Trillium.  She left Aultbea on 10 Jun 1941 with OB.332 for St. John's to join Newfoundland Command.  After two round trips to Iceland she arrived at Halifax on 28 Aug 1941 for three months' refit there and at Lunenburg.  On completion of the refit in Dec 1941 she made one further round trip to Iceland and, on 20 Jan 1942, left St. John's for convoy SC.65 to Londonderry.  After two return trips on the "Newfie-Derry" run she went to Galveston, Texas, for refit from 16 Apr to 23 Jun 1942.  Following workups at Pictou, she resumed mid-ocean service with EG A-3 from Aug 1942 until Apr 1943, when she arrived at Boston for a refit that included the extension of her fo'c's'le.  This was completed on 27 Jun 1943, after which she worked up at Pictou before joining EG C-4.  Late in Apr 1944 she returned to Pictou for a two-month refit, followed by additional repairs at Halifax, and early in Aug 1944 went to Bermuda to work up.  She arrived at St. John's 2 Sep 1944, to join EG C-3.  On 14 Jan 1945, while escorting the Milford Haven section of ON.278, she sank a coaster in a collision and required five weeks' repairs, afterward resuming mid-ocean service until the end of the war.  HMCS Trillium was unique in that she spent her entire career as a mid-ocean escort, participating in three major convoy battles: SC.100 (Sep 1942); ON.166 (Feb 1943); and SC.121 (Mar 1943).  She left St. John's on 27 May 1945, for the UK, where she was returned to the RN at Milford Haven on 27 Jun 1945.  Sold in 1947 for conversion to a whale-catcher, she entered service as the Honduran-registered Olympic Runner in 1950, Otori Maru No. 10 in 1956 and Kyo Maru No. 16 in 1959.  Last in Lloyd's Register for 1972/1973.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Trillium (K172) (Flower-class).

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Trillium (K172) (Flower-class).

HMCS Vancouver (K240)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Vancouver (K240) (Flower-class).  Laid down and launched as HMCS Kitchener K240, she was renamed HMCS Vancouver K240 in Nov 1941.  Commissioned at Esquimalt on 20 Mar 1942, she joined Esquimalt Force and, on 20 Jun 1942 escorted the torpedo-damaged SS Fort Camosun to Victoria.  In Aug 1942 she left for Kodiak, Alaska, to perform escort service for several weeks in support of the Aleutian campaign.  On 24 Feb 1943, she again arrived at Kodiak to serve under US control until the end of May 1943.  In mid-Sep 1943 she emerged from three months' refit at Vancouver with an extended fo'c's'le.  Reassigned in Feb 1944, to WLEF, she arrived at Halifax on 25 Mar 1944.  After serving briefly with escort groups W-3 and W-1, she was transferred in Jun 1944 to Quebec Force as escort to Quebec City-Goose Bay convoys for three months.  Late in Nov 1944, after a month's refit at Charlottetown, PEI, she proceeded to Bermuda to work up, and on her return rejoined W-1 for the balance of hostilities.  She was paid off on 26 Jun 1945, at Sorel, she was sold on 5 Oct 1945 and broken up at Hamilton, Ontario, in 1946.

 (Ron Bell Photo)

HMCS Vancouver (K240) (Flower-class).

 (Ron Bell Photo)

HMCS Vancouver (K240) (Flower-class).

HMCS Ville de Québec (K242) 

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Ville de Québec (K242) (Flower-class).  Built by Morton Engineering & Dry Dock Co., Quebec City, Quebec, she was laid down on 7 Jun 1941 as HMCS Quebec.  Renamed in Apr 1942, she was commissioned on 24 May 1942, at Quebec City as HMCS Ville de Quebec K242.  She sailed for Halifax on 06 Jun 1942, and arrived there on 12 Jun 1942 having escorted Quebec-Sydney convoy QS.7 en route.  After a brief period for final fitting of equipment, she sailed on her first operation cruise on 06 Jul 1942.  Late in Jul 1942, after working up at Pictou, she was assigned to WLEF and used almost exclusively as an escort to convoys between Boston and Halifax.  In Sep 1942, HMCS Ville de Québec was allocated to Operation "Torch."  For her Atlantic crossing she was assigned as escort to Convoy HX-212.  Not being a regular member of the escort group, she was assigned to pick up survivors.  When she arrived in Liverpool on 21 Sep 1942, she landed 172 merchant seamen from some of the six ships that had been torpedoed and sunk.  She arrived at Londonderry on 10 Nov 1942, sailing again on 26 Nov 1942 as escort to convoy KMS.4G to Bone, North Africa.  For the succeeding four months was employed on UK-Mediterranean convoys.  On 13 Jan 1943, she sank U-224 west of Algiers.  She made one attack with depth-charges and, as she was turning to make another, saw the U-boat break surface in the middle of the depth-charge pattern.  HMCS Ville de Quebec turned and rammed the U-boat, sinking it.  She returned to Canada in Apr 1943, carried out brief repairs at Halifax, then arrived at Gaspé on 12 May 1943 to join Quebec Force, escorting Quebec-Sydney and Quebec-Labrador convoys.  In Sep 1943 she returned to Halifax and later that month joined EG W-2, WLEF.  In mid-Jan 1944, she began an extensive refit at Liverpool, NS, completing early in May 1944, and on 22 May 1944 left for a month's workups in Bermuda.  On her return she joined EG C-4 for one round trip to Londonderry, transferring in Sept 1944 to EG 41, Plymouth.  Based at Milford Haven, she served with that group for the balance of the war.  On 22 Apr 1945, HMCS Ville de Quebec K242 returned to Halifax with convoy ONS.2, and was later paid off on 06 Jul 1945 at Sorel.  Sold for mercantile use in 1946 and renamed Dispina; Dorothea Paxos in 1947; Tanya in 1948; and Medex in 1949.  She was listed on Lloyd's Register until 1952.

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Ville de Québec (K242) (Flower-class).

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS Ville de Québec (K242) (Flower-class).

HMCS West York (K369)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS West York (K369) (Flower-class).  Built by Midland Shipyards, Ltd., Midland, Ontario, she was commissioned at Collingwood, Ontario, on 6 Oct 1944.  HMCS West York arrived at Halifax in mid-Nov 1944 and left a month later for Bermuda to work up.  In Feb 1945, she joined EG C-5 at St. John's, leaving 16 Feb 1945 to rendezvous with her maiden convoy, HX.338.  She made three round trips across the Atlantic before the end of her career, the last one as escort to ON.305, which she joined from Londonderry at the end of May 1945.  Paid off on 9 Jul 1945, and laid up at Sorel, she was sold later that year for commercial use.  As SS West York, she was towing the decommissioned HMCS Assiniboine when the towline parted and the destroyer was wrecked on Prince Edward Island, 7 Nov 1945. The former West York sailed under a variety of names and flags, returning to Canadian registry in 1960 as Federal Express.  On 5 May 1960 she was rammed by Polaris (Swedish vessel) while moored at Montreal.  She broke free from her moorings and rammed into Thorshope (Norwegian vessel) and sank within 30 minutes.  Later partly raised and scrapped.

 (RCN Photo)

HMCS West York (K369) (Flower-class).

HMCS Wetaskiwin (K175) 

(Ken Macpherson, Naval Museum of Alberta Photo)

HMCS Wetaskiwin (K175) (Flower-class).  Laid down as HMCS Banff, she was renamed HMCS Wetaskiwin during construction.  Commissioned at Esquimalt on 17 Dec 1940 as HMCS Wetaskiwin K175,  she was the first west coast-built corvette to enter service.  She patrolled out of Esquimalt until 17 Mar 1941 when HMCS Alberni, HMCS Agassiz and HMCS Wetaskiwin departed Esquimalt for Halifax.  Enroute they stopped at San Pedro, California for fuel, where a party for the crew, hosted by actress Mary Pickford and her husband Douglas Fairbanks, was held for them. They arrived at Halifax on 13 Apr 1941.  On 23 May 1941, HMCS Alberni, HMCS Agassiz and HMCS Wetaskiwin left Halifax for St. John's to join the recently formed NEF.  In Jun 1941 she escorted her first convoy, HX.130, to Iceland, and during the next eight months made six round trips there with eastbound convoys.  She returned to Halifax on 24 Jan 1942, and in Feb 1942 commenced a major refit at Liverpool, NS.  After working up in May 1942 she joined EG C-3, arriving in Londonderry on 5 Jun 1942 for the first time from convoy HX.191.  During this period Wetaskiwin participated in two major convoy actions: SC.42 (Sep 1941); and SC.48 (Oct 1941).  On 31 July 1942, while escorting ON.115, she shared with HMCS Skeena the sinking of  U-588.  In mid-Jan 1943 she arrived at Liverpool, NS, for refit, which was completed on 9 Mar 1943 and followed by further repairs at Halifax.  In May 1943, she joined EG C-5, and that Dec 1943 went to Galveston, Texas, for a long refit, including extension of her fo'c's'le.  Following its completion on 6 Mar 1944, she returned briefly to Halifax before proceeding to Bermuda for work-ups late in Apr 1944.  Returning northward, she re-joined C-5, leaving Londonderry on 23 Sep 1944 for the last time to join EG W-7, WLEF, for the remainder of the war.  She was paid off at Sorel on 19 Jun 1945, and sold in 1946 to the Venezuelan Navy, which re-named her Victoria.  She was discarded in 1962.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Wetaskiwin (K175) (Flower-class).

 (Marlene Hill Photo)

HMCS Wetaskiwin (K175) (Flower-class).

 (Marlene Hill Photo)

HMCS Wetaskiwin (K175) (Flower-class).

 (Marlene Hill Photo)

HMCS Wetaskiwin (K175) (Flower-class).

HMCS Weyburn (K173) 

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4950904)

HMCS Weyburn (K173) (Flower-class).  Commissioned at Montreal on 26 Nov 1941, she arrived at Halifax on 06 Dec 1941 and joined Halifax Force for local escort work, but was soon in need of repairs.  These were carried out at Halifax during Mar and Apr 1942, following which she joined WLEF.  In Jul 1942 she transferred to Gulf Escort Force for Quebec City-Sydney convoys but in Sep 1942 was allocated to duties in connection with Operation "Torch."  She arrived at Londonderry on 27 Sep 1942 from convoy SC.100, and at Liverpool on 02 Oct 1942 for fitting of Oerlikon A/A guns.  The work was completed on 21 Oct 1942 and in Nov 1942, HMCS Weyburn began four months' employment as escort to UK-Mediterranean convoys.  On 22 Feb 1943 HMCS Weyburn was mined off Cape Espartel east of Gibraltar in position 35º46'N, 06º02'W.  Twelve members of her crew including her commanding officer were lost with the ship.  The mine had been laid by U-118 on 1 Feb 1943.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4821036)

HMCS Weyburn (K173) (Flower-class).

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No.4950903)

HMCS Weyburn (K173) (Flower-class).

HMCS Whitby (K346)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Whitby (K346) (Flower-class).  Built at Midland, Ontario, she was commissioned at there on 6 Jun 1944.  She did not arrive at Halifax until 16 Aug 1944, owing to a layover en route at Shelburne for repairs.  Following workups in Bermuda in Sep 1944 she sailed direct to St. John's, arriving on 30 Sep 1944, and was assigned to EG C-4.  She left St. John's on 5 Oct 1944 for Londonderry to join the group, with which she was to serve for the balance of the war.   HMCS Whitby left Londonderry for Canada in mid-Jun 1945, and was paid off on 16 Jul 1945 and then placed in reserve at Sorel.  She was sold in 1946 for merchant service.  HMCS Whitby was acquired by the Portuguese Navy from the USA, and renamed NRP Bengo on 29 Apr 1948, probably for the delivery voyage to Mozambique, and on 1 Oct 1948 converted to pilot tender and renamed Bengo.  She was still in service as the pilot vessel Bengo at Lourenco Marques (now Maputo) in Mozambique in Aug 1977.

HMCS Windflower (K155)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Windflower (K155) (Flower-class), during acceptance trials in 1940, no armament fixed.  Built for the RN, she was commissioned on 20 Oct 1940 as HMS Windflower, at Quebec City.  She arrived at Halifax on 31 Oct 1940 and left on 6 Dec 1940 with convoy HX.94 for the UK.  There, at Scotsoun, she completed fitting out on 2 Mar 1941, following which she went to Tobermory to work up.  Later in Mar 1941 she was assigned to EG 4 (RN), Greenock, escorting convoys between the UK and Iceland.  On 15 May 1941 she was transferred to the RCN and commissioned as HMCS Windflower.  She left Aultbea on 10 Jun 1942 for St. John's with OB.332, and on arrival transferred to Newfoundland Command.  After two round trips between St. John's and Iceland, she arrived at Liverpool, NS, on 29 Aug 1942 for a short refit, resuming her ocean escort duties in mid-Oct 1942.  She made one more round trip to Iceland, and on 7 Dec 1941, while making her second trip, was rammed and sunk in convoy SC.58 by the Dutch freighter Zypenberg in dense fog off the Grand Banks.  Twenty-three of her complement were lost.

HMCS Woodstock (K238) 

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Woodstock (K238) (Flower-class).  Built by Collingwood Shipyards Ltd., Collingwood, Ontario, HMCS Woodstock was commissioned on 1 May 1942, at Montreal.  She arrived at Halifax on 23 May 1942 and, after working up at Pictou, joined WLEF.  Assigned to Operation "Torch," she arrived on 23 Sep 1942 at Londonderry from convoy HX.207 and proceeded to the Humber for six weeks' refit, including extra A/A armament.  While serving as escort to UK-Mediterranean convoys, on 10 Jan 1943, she sank MTB 105, 250 miles northwest of the Azores, after a merchant ship carrying it had been sunk.  HMCS Woodstock returned to Canada arriving in Halifax on 24 Mar 1943 with convoy ON.172, and in Apr 1943, after repairs at Halifax, joined EG C-1 for one round trip to the UK.  In Jun 1943 she was transferred to EG 5, Western Support Force, at St. John's but late that month was reassigned to EG C-4 at Londonderry.  She escorted only one convoy as member of that group before commencing refit late in Jun 1943 at Liverpool, NS.  Completed at Halifax in mid-Sep 1943, the refit was followed by three weeks' workups at Pictou, the ship then rejoining C-4.  In Apr 1944, while at Londonderry, she was allocated to Western Approaches Command for invasion duties, and was so employed for the next three months.  She left 'Derry for the last time on 3 Aug 1944, for two months' refit at Liverpool, NS.  She left Halifax on 18 Oct 1944 for the west coast, arriving at Esquimalt a month later to join Esquimalt Force.  On 27 Jan 1945, she was paid off there for conversion to a loop-layer but upon re-commissioning on 17 May 1945 was employed as a weather ship until finally paid off on 18 Mar 1946.  Sold in 1948 for conversion to a whale-catcher, she entered service in 1951 as the Honduran-flag Olympic Winner.  She passed into Japanese ownership in 1956, and was renamed Otori Maru No. 20, and in 1957, Akitsu Maru.  She was broken up at Etajima in 1975.

 (DND/RCN Photo, NP 1069)

HMCS Woodstock (K238) (Flower-class), with a depth charge exploding astern of her.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4950910)

RCN Corvette in drydock.

Castle Class Corvettes

HMCS Arnprior (K494)

 (Bill Perks Photo)

HMCS Arnprior (K494) alongside in St John's, NFLD with the surrendered U-190 across the jetty from her.  ML Q095 in the background.  Laid down as HMS Rising Castle K398, she was built by Harland & Wolff Ltd., Belfast, Ireland.  After completion, she was transferred and commissioned into the RCN on 8 Jun 1944 as HMCS Arnprior K494 (renamed on the day she was commissioned).  After working up at Tobermory she joined EG C-1 at Londonderry in August, leaving on 19 Aug 1944 to join her first convoy, ONM.249.  HMCS Arnprior was continuously employed as an ocean escort for the balance of the war.  At the beginning of Jun 1945, she left Greenock for St. John's, Newfoundland, where she underwent a two-month refit, and from September was based at Halifax, Nova Scotia.  She was paid off there on 14 Mar 1946, and sold later that year to the Uruguayan Navy, which renamed her Montevideo and operated her as a training ship until 1975.

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Arnprior (K494) Castle-class.

HMCS Bowmanville (K493) 

(RCN Photo)

HMCS Bowmanville (K493) (Castle-class).  Built by William Pickersgrill & Sons Ltd., Sunderland, UK, she was laid down and launched as HMS Nunney Castle.  After completion she was as transferred to the RCN and commissioned at Sunderland, U.K. as HMCS Bowmanville K493 on 28 Sep 1944.  Following workups at Tobermory, HMCS Bowmanville joined EG C-4 at Londonderry, sailing on 24 Nov 1944 to join her first convoy, ON.268.  She served continuously as an ocean escort for the rest of the war.  Early in Jun 1945, she left Londonderry for the last time, and was based at Halifax, Nova Scotia, until paid off on 15 Feb 1946.   She was sold into mercantile service in 1947 under the Chinese flag, and first renamed Ta Shun, then Yuan Pei.  In 1949 she was taken over by the Chinese Communist government, re-armed and renamed Kuang Chou.

HMCS Copper Cliff (K495) 

 (William Carey Photo via Jeff Tripp)

HMCS Copper Cliff (K495) (Castle-class).  Built at Blyth, UK, she was laid down as HMS Hever Castle K521.  After completion she was transferred to the RCN and commissioned at Blyth, UK, on 25 Jul 1944, as HMCS Copper Cliff K495.  After working up at Tobermory in August she was assigned to EG C-6 but in fact joined EG C-7 then forming at Londonderry, in Oct 1944 and was thereafter continuously employed as an ocean escort.  HMCS Copper Cliff left Londonderry for her final westward crossing early in Jun 1945, and later that month sailed from Halifax for Esquimalt.  There, on 21 Nov 1945, she was paid off into reserve.  In 1946 she became the Chinese-flag merchant ship Ta Lung, soon afterward renamed Wan Lee, and was taken over by the Chinese Communist government in 1949.

 (Jeff Tripp Photo)

Depth charge exploding astern of HMCS Copper Cliff

 (Jeff Tripp Photo)

HMCS Copper Cliff (K495) (Castle-class).

 (Jeff Tripp Photo)

 (Elizabeth Wagner Photo)

HMCS Copper Cliff (K495) (Castle-class). (John Vukson Photo)

HMCS Copper Cliff (K495) (Castle-class). (Jeff Tripp Photo) 

HMCS Copper Cliff (K495) (Castle-class). (John Vukson Photo)

HMCS Copper Cliff (K495) (Castle-class).

HMCS Hespeler (K489)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Hespeler (K489) (Castle-class).  Built at Leith, Scotland, she was laid down and launched as HMS Guildford Castle K378.  On completion, she was transferred to the RCN and commissioned on 28 Feb 1944 as HMCS Hespeler K489 at Leith.  Following workups at Tobermory she arrived at Londonderry in April to become a member of EG C-5.  HMCS Hespeler sailed on 21 Apr 1944 to meet her first convoy, ONS.233, and for the next 11 months was employed as an ocean escort.  On 23 Jul 1944, she left St. John's with EG C-5 to escort the largest convoy of the war, HXS.300.  She left 'Derry for the last time on 08 Mar 1945, to escort ON.289 westward, and upon arriving at Halifax began a refit, completing it at Liverpool, Nova Scotia, in Jul 1945.  She then sailed for the west coast and on 15 Nov 1945 was paid off into reserve at Esquimalt.  Sold in 1946 to the Union Steamship Co., Vancouver, she was converted to a coastal passenger ship, SS Chilcotin.  In 1958 she became the Liberian-flag Stella Maris and in 1965, the Greek Westar.  She was sold again in 1965 to become an Alaskan Cruise Liner.  A few days into her voyage to Vancouver, on 28 Jan 1966, a fuel line became disconnected spraying oil into the engine room.   An explosion and fire followed - the ship being declared a constructive loss.  Alaskan Cruise Lines sold the hulk for scrapping at La Spezia, Italy, saving only the ship's bell.

HMCS Humberstone (K497)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Humberstone (K497) (Castle-class).  Built at Glasgow, Scotland, she was laid down and launched as HMS Norham Castle.  On completion she was transferred to the RCN and commissioned as HMCS Humberstone K497 at Glasgow on 06 Sep 1944.  After working up at Tobermory she arrived in October at Londonderry to join EG C-8, then forming.  She left 'Derry 22 Oct 1944 to join convoy ON.261 for her first Atlantic crossing and continued in service as an ocean escort for the remainder of the war.  HMCS Humberstone left Londonderry 12 May 1945, for her last convoy, ONS.50, and in Jun 1945 sailed to Esquimalt, where she was paid off on 17 Nov 1945 . She was sold to Chinese owners in 1946 and converted for merchant service as Taiwei, subsequently undergoing five more name-changes before becoming the Korean South Ocean in 1954.  She was broken up at Hong Kong in 1959.

 (Michael Goodfellow Photo)

HMCS Humberstone (K497), St. Johns, Newfoundland.

HMCS Huntsville (K499)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Huntsville (K499) (Castle-class).  Built by Ailsa Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Troon, Scotland, she was laid down and launched as HMS Woolvesey Castle K461.  On completion she was transferred to the RCN and commissioned as HMCS Huntsville on 6 Jun 1944, on the Clyde.  She worked up at Stornoway early in July and joined EG C-5 at Londonderry later that month, leaving on 11 Aug 1944 for ONS.248, her first convoy.  In Nov 1944 Huntsville missed a convoy while under repair in Halifax and acted as local escort to one convoy from St. John's to New York - seemingly the only ship of her class to visit there.  Rejoining the Atlantic convoy cycle in Dec 1944, she left Londonderry for the last time on 16 Apr 1945, to meet ON.297.  In May 1945 she commenced refit at Halifax, completed in Aug 1945, and in Sep 1945 she was placed in reserve.  Paid off for disposal on 15 Feb 1946 at Halifax, and sold that year, she entered service in 1947 as SS Wellington Kent.  Renamed Belle Isle II in 1951.  Following a collision near Trois-Rivieres., Quebec, on 19 Aug 1960, she grounded and burned out.

 (Colin Trotter Photo)

HMCS Huntsville (K499) (Castle-class). 

HMCS Kincardine (K490)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Kincardine (K490) (Castle-class).  Laid down and launched as HMS Tamworth Castle, she was, on completion, transferred to the RCN and commissioned at Middlesbrough on 19 June 1944 as HMCS Kincardine.  After working up at Tobermory and Stornoway she arrived at Londonderry late in Aug 1944 to join EG C-2 but had to return to her builder's for repairs.  Returning to Londonderry in mid-Sep 1944, she remained on local duties until 02 Oct 1944, when she left to join ON.257, her first convoy.  HMCS Kincardine served as an ocean escort for the remainder of the war, leaving 'Derry for the last time at the beginning of Jun 1945.  Briefly allocated to HMCS Cornwallis for training in Jul 1945, she then underwent a minor refit at Liverpool, Nova Scotia.  She was placed in maintenance reserve at Halifax in Oct 1945, and then she was paid off there on 27 Feb 1946.  Later that year she was sold to the French government and resold in 1947 to Moroccan interests, to be renamed Saada.

HMCS Leaside (K492) 

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Leaside (K492) (Castle-class).  Laid down and launched as HMS Walmer Castle K460, she was transferred to the RCN and commissioned on 21 Aug 1944, at Middlesbrough as HMCS Leaside K492.  Following workups at Tobermory in Sep 1944 HMCS Leaside arrived at Londonderry early in Oct 1944 to join EG C-8, then forming.  She sailed on 22 Oct 1944 to meet ON.261, her first convoy, and served the rest of the war as an ocean escort.  On 11 May 1945, HMCS Leaside K492, HMCS Edmundston K106 and HMCS Poundmaker K675 departed Londonderry for the last time as escort for convoy ONS.50. HMCS Leaside left St. John's in Jun 1945 for Esquimalt, where she was paid off for disposal on 16 Nov 1945.  Sold in 1946 to the Union Steamship Co., Vancouver, she was converted to a coastal passenger vessel and renamed Coquitlam.  In 1950 she was renamed Glacier Queen.  In 1970 she stripped in anticipation of becoming a floating restaurant but the plans for the restaurant fell through and she was left as a hulk.  The hulk sank in Cook Inlet, Alaska, on 8 Nov 1978, but was raised and towed to sea and scuttled in Jan 1979.

 (Robert Cooke Photo)

HMCS Leaside (K492) (Castle-class) on the day of her commissioning.

HMCS Orangeville (K491) 

 (Bill Abercrombie Photo)

HMCS Orangeville (K491) (Castle-class).  Laid down and launched as HMS Hedingham Castle, she was transferred to the RCN and commissioned at Leith on 24 Apr 1944 as HMCS Orangeville K491.  After working up at Tobermory in May she joined EG C-1 at Londonderry, leaving on 04 Jun 1944 to meet ONS.239, her first convoy.  She spent the remainder of the war on North Atlantic convoy duty, leaving 'Derry for the last time on 21 Apr 1945, to escort ONS.48.  After refitting at Liverpool, Nova Scotia, from May to Aug 1945, HMCS Orangeville was placed in maintenance reserve at Halifax and finally paid off on 12 Apr 1946.  She was sold later that year for conversion to mercantile use under the Chinese flag and renamed Ta Tung.  In 1951 she was taken over the the Nationalist Chinese government, rearmed and renamed Te-An.

HMCS Petrolia (K498)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS Petrolia (K498) (Castle-class).  Laid down and launched as HMS Sherborne Castle K453, she was built by Harland & Wolff Ltd., Belfast, Ireland.  She was, on completion, transferred to the RCN and commissioned on 29 Jun 1944 as HMCS Petrolia K498 (renamed the day she was commissioned), at Belfast.  Following workups at Tobermory, she joined EG C-4 at Londonderry in Aug 1944, leaving on 2 Sep 1944 for her first convoy, ONS.251.  An ocean escort for the rest of the war, she left Londonderry for the last time early in Jun 1945.  In Aug 1945 Petrolia underwent a refit at Charlottetown and was placed in maintenance reserve at Halifax in Oct 1945.  Paid off at Liverpool, Nova Scotia on 8 Mar 1946, she was sold not long afterward to a New York buyer and renamed Maid of Athens.  In 1947 she was transferred to Indian registry and renamed Bharat Laxmi, serving until broken up at Bombay in 1965.

HMCS St. Thomas (K488)

 (DND Photo)

HMCS St. Thomas (K488) (Castle-class).  Built at Smith's Dock Co., South Bank-on-Tees, UK, she was laid down and launched as HMS Sandgate Castle.  On 4 May 1944 she was transferred to the RCN and commissioned at Middlesbrough as HMCS St. Thomas K488.  In Jun 1944 St. Thomas carried out workups at Tobermory, leaving later that month for Londonderry where, in Jul 1944, she became part of EG C-3.  She sailed on 3 Aug 1944 to join ON.247, her first convoy, and was employed as an ocean escort for the rest of the war.  On 27 Dec 1944, while escorting HX.327, north-west of the Azores, she sank U-877 in the North Atlantic with her squid mortar.  She rescued 35 of the U-boats crew, while HMCS Sea Cliff rescued another 21.  She left Londonderry for the last time on 11 Apr 1945, commencing refit on arrival at Halifax 30 Apr 1945.  Following completion of the refit in Jul 1945 she sailed for the west coast and was paid off at Esquimalt on 22 Nov 1945.  In 1946 she was sold to the Union Steamship Co., Vancouver, converted to a coastal passenger vessel, and renamed Camosun.  She was renamed Chilcotin in 1958 and, later that year, Yukon Star.  After several years idleness, she was broken up at Tacoma in 1974.

HMCS Tillsonburg (K496)

 (Sean Cox Photo)

HMCS Tillsonburg (K496) (Castle-class).  Built by Ferguson Bros. Ltd., Port Glasgow, Scotland, she was laid down and launched as HMS Pembroke Castle.  On completion she was transferred to the RCN and commissioned on the Clyde on 29 Jun 1944 as HMCS Tillsonburg K496.  Following working-up at Stornoway, Tillsonburg arrived at Londonderry on 19 Aug 1944, sailing a week later for St. Johns, Newfoundland, to join EG C-6, then forming.  Unlike her sisters, she first escorted an eastbound convoy, HXF.308, leaving St. John's on 18 Sep 1944 to join it.  An ocean escort for the balance of the war, she left Londonderry for her last crossing in mid-Jun 1945.  Briefly based at St. John's, Sydney, and Halifax, she was paid off at Halifax on 15 Feb 1946, and later that year was sold to Chinese owners for mercantile service.  Initially named Ta Ching, she was renamed Chiu Chin in 1947.  In 1951 she was taken over by the Nationalist Chinese government, rearmed and renamed Kao-An.  She was discarded in 1963.

RCN, Misc.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3715774)

RCN Corvette in drydock, Portsmouth, England facing HMS Victory.