Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Royal Canadian Armoured Corps (RCAC) Part IV, Post Second World War to Present Day

Royal Canadian Armoured Corps (RCAC)

Part IV, Post Second World War to Present Day 

The photos on these pages have been gleaned from the Library and Archives Canada collection and a few by the author.  Many of the photos were filed with detailed information missing from the caption section.  This set of photos has been collated and compiled by the author with information added where photos can be compared with existing tanks and armoured fighting vehicles.  There are errors in some of the data, and any additions, corrections or amendments to data concerning the posted photos here would be most welcome and may be e-mailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com. 

Data current to 11 January 2020.

Canadian Armour post Second World War

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4234038)

Canadian Sherman M4A2(76)W HVSS tank, Petawawa, Ontario, ca. 1963. 

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4234039). 

Canadian Sherman M4A2(76)W HVSS tank (CFR No. 78-874), Camp Petawawa, ca. 1963.  

In 1946 the first of 294 M4A2 (76-mm) Wet Horizontal Volute Spring Suspension (HVSS) Sherman tanks arrived at Camp Borden and at the Long Pointe Ordnance Depot in Montreal.  The Canadians referred to this tank as the M4A2E8.  96 Stuart tanks were also delivered at the same time.  The new Shermans were manufactured by the Fisher Tank Arsenal in Grand Blanc, Michigan between May 1944 and May 1945.  M24 Chaffee light tanks were also purchased at this time.  Compared with the Shermans used by Canadians in the Second World War, the ammunition storage in the new tanks was improved by surrounding the racks with water and etheylene glycol-filled jackets to reduce the probability of explosion in the event of penetration of the armour by enemy fire.  The tanks equipped with this protection system were designated "Wet".  The M4A2E8 was powered by a pair of side-by-side mounted General Motors 6046 diesel engines producing 375 hp mounted in the rear of the hull.  The tank could sustain a speed of 48 kmh (30 mph).  Its main armament was a 76-mm M1A2 long-barreled, high-velocity gun fitted with a muzzle brake.  Its secondary armament included one Browning .30-calibre M1919A4 machine-gun mounted co-axially with the main gun, a bow machine-gun in the front of the hull, and a Browning .50-calibre machine-gun mounted on a post between the loader's and commander's hatches for AA protection.  The HVSS system used four wheels per bogie instead of two, which allowed tracks that were wider (165-mm) to be installed, and which made for better performance on soft ground and allowed for a smoother ride.  The M4A2E8 had a five-man crew.  The driver and co-driver sat in the front of the hull with the driver on the left and co-driver on the right.  The crew commander, loader and gunner sat in the turret.  The crew commander's position was on the right side of the turret, the loader sat on his left and the gunner sat in front of the commander.  After the first batch of the new tanks went to the RCD at Camp Borden 1946, another 30 went to the LdSH at Camp Wainwright, Alberta in March 1947.  Training on the tanks by the LdSH was also conducted at Camp Sarcee in Alberta, and at Camp Petawawa when the RCD moved there in the spring of 1948.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4235213)

Centurion tank on exercise, Camp Gagetown, summer 1963.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4235424)

Centurion tank on exercise, Camp Gagetown, summer 1963. 

  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4235505)

Centurion tank on exercise, Camp Gagetown, summer 1963. 

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4235506)

Centurion tank on exercise, Camp Gagetown, summer 1963. 

  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 42342260)

Centurion Main Battle Tank, Armour training, ca 1965. 

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4746855)

Officer cadets at Royal Canadian Armoured Corps School prepare ammunition for loading into Centurion tank at Meaford Tank Range, 3 Aug 1967. 

 (Author Photo)

The author was transported on the back of this Centurion tank with other soldiers during a "Waincon" exercise at Camp Wainwright, Alberta in May 1975.

  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4235868)

M113 APC, soldier with FNC1 rifle. 

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4235941)

M113 APC, Severn River, Ontario. 

  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4235944)

M113 APC, Severn River, Ontario.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4235948)

M113 APC, Severn River, Ontario. 

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3931030)

M113 with TOW launcher and .50 HMG, Ex Brave Lion, 1986. 

Exercise Brave Lion was designed to test the Canadian Air-Sea Transportable Brigade Group, or CAST, whic was a Canadian Forces battle group dedicated to the rapid reinforcement of Norway in the event of a land war in Europe.  The Group was based on a mechanized infantry brigade, supported by two Rapid Reinforcement Fighter Squadrons equipped with Canadair CF-116 Freedom Fighters and a variety of supporting units.  Manpower varied between 4,800 and 5,500 troops depending on how it was counted.  CAST formed in 1968 as part of a widespread realignment of Canadian forces in Europe, and disbanded again in 1989 when the Forces were recombined into larger battalion sized group in West Germany.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4221652)

M113 C & R Lynx boarding a barge on exercise, Bavaria, Germany, 1964. 

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3930991)

Bandvagen BV-206 on operations 1988.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3930986)

AVGP Grizzly on exercise, Brennfjell, Norway, 30 Mar 1984. 

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3930983)

AVGP Grizzly on exercise, Skibotn, Norway, 1984. 

(Author Photo)

LAV III on duty, heading out of the Engineer Compound at 5 CDSB Gagetown, New Brunswick, 5 May 2014. 

(CF Photo)

Bison Maintenance vehicle, call sign 88A, Kabul Airfield, Afghanistan, 2003, with a Lockheed CC-130 Hercules in the background. 

 (Author Photo)

LAV III, Armour School, ready to go to the field 5 CDSB Gagetown, Oct 2016.

 (Author Photo)

Leopard 2A6M with L/55 barrel, C Sqn, RCD, 5 CDSB Gagetown, Oct 2016. 

The Canadian Army acquired 80 Leopard 2A4 and 20 Leopard 2A6 tanks from the Netherlands in 2007.  Twenty Leopard 2A6M were borrowed from the German Army beginning in mid-2007 to support the Canadian deployment to Afghanistan, with the first tank handed over after upgrading by KMW on 2 August 2007, and arriving in Afghanistan on 16 August 16, 2007.  Two Bergepanzer 3 Büffel were purchased from the German Army for use with the Canadian deployment in Afghanistan.  An additional fifteen Leopard 2A4 tanks were purchased from the German Army as Logistic Supply Vehicles (for spare parts).  A further 12 surplus Pz 87 were purchased from Switzerland in 2011 for conversion to armoured recovery vehicles.  A final total of 112 tanks of all variants is to be fielded by the Canadian Army: 82 gun tanks (42 2A4+, 20 2A4M CAN and 20 2A6M CAN - all delivered as of March 2016),  12 ARVs (11 of 12 delivered as of March 2016) and 18 AEVs (conversion of which is ongoing).

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4849068)

Taurus Armoured Recovery Vehicle (ARV), 4 CMBG, Ex Certain Sentinel, Germany, Feb 1979.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4886180)

Taurus Armoured Recovery Vehicle (ARV), 4 CMBG, Ex Certain Sentinel, Germany, Feb 1979. 

The Taurus armoured recovery vehicle (ARV) is designed to recover and tow vehicles bogged down or disabled by enemy action or mechanical failure.  It is also capable of carrying out bulldozing operations, changing components such as turrets on other vehicles, and fuelling vehicles. The winch has a 35,000 kg pull, up to 100,000 kg at 3 to 1 mechanical advantage.  The Taurus armoured recovery vehicle can pull maximum transmission unit power packs and, in a pinch, can pull the entire Leopard C2 turret, including the 105-mm gun.

(CF Photo)

Taurus ARV, Masum Ghar, Afghanistan.

 (Author Photo)

Wisent 2 Armoured Engineer Vehicle (AEV), 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown, New Brunswick, 24 Nov 2016.  

The Wisent 2 Armoured Engineering Vehicle is is based on the Leopard 2 main battle tank and is designed to provide engineer support to mechanized combat forces. It is one of 17 produced by FFG in New Brunswick for the Canadian Army.  The Wisent 2 is capable of performing a wide range of tasks under battlefield conditions including dozing, ripping, excavating, craning, grappling, welding, cutting, winching, and towing”.

  (Author Photo)

MTV-R (Mobile Tactical Vehicle Recovery) Recovery vehicle, equipped with a 20,000 kg winch and an integrated crane.  This is an M113 ARV variant with Palfinger crane, Armour School lines, 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown, New Brunswick.