Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Japanese Warplanes of the Second World War preserved (2), Mitsubishi (Imperial Japanese Army Air Service and Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service)

Japanese Warplanes of the Second World War preserved,

Mitsubishi F1M to A6M8

Imperial Japanese Army Air Service and Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service

Data current to 14 Aug 2018.

Mitsubishi F1M1 floatplanes in IJNAF service,  (IJNAF/USN Photos)

Mitsubishi B5M Navy Taype 97 No. 2 Carrier Attack Bomber, code named Mabel folding its wings, IJNAF.  (IJNAF Photos)

Mitsubishi Ki-46-II Army Type 100 Air Defence Fighter (Serial No. 2846), codenamed "Dinah".  (IJAAF Photos)

Mitsubishi Ki-46-II Army Type 100 Air Defence Fighter (Serial No. 2846), codenamed "Dinah", green cross surrender markings.  (IJAAF Photos)

Mitsubishi Ki-46-III Army Type 100 Air Defence Fighter (Serial No. 2846), codenamed "Dinah".  (IJAAF Photos)

Mitsubishi Ki-46-II Army Type 100 Air Defence Fighter (Serial No. 2846), codenamed "Dinah".  This aircraft was captured at Hollandia in New Guinea is Sep 1944 and made airworthy by the 13th BS, 3rd BG whose "Grim Reaper" insignia was applied to the nose.   It was assigned code TAIC 10 and is shown here in USAAF markings before being shipped to USA.  It was test flown at Patuxtent, NAS Anacostia and Eglin AFB.  Five Dinahs were brought to the USA, including Ki-46-III, USAAF FE-4801 and FE-4802 both scrapped at Park Ridge ca. 1950, FE-4806 scrapped at Newark, FE-4807 scrapped at Middletown and Ki-46-IV, FE-4812 scrapped at Middletown.  (USAAF Photo)

Mitsubishi Ki-46-III Army Type 100 Air Defence Fighter, USAAF FE-4801, scrapped at Park Ridge ca. 1950.  (USAAF Photo)

Mitsubishi Ki-46 Army Type 100, reconnaissance aircraft captured by the Soviet Union.  (G.F.Petrova Archive)

Mitsubishi Ki-51-1 Type 99 Assault Plane, code named Sonia.  On the day Hiroshima was destroyed by an atomic bomb, two Ki-51s scored the last Japanese victory against US submarines.   Two depth charges hit USS Bullhead (SS-332), in which she later exploded and sank with all hands.  This sinking was confirmed as the 52nd USN submarine lost during the war.  (USN Photo)

Mitsubishi Ki-51-1 Type 99 Assault Plane, code named Sonia, on display in the Indonesian Air Force Museum, Yoygyakarta.  (Davidelit Photo)

 

Mitsubishi A5M Type 96 carrier-borne fighter, codednamed "Claude".  (IJNAF Photos)

Pearl Harbor

On 07:48 on Sunday morning, 7 Dec 1941, the Imperial Japanese Navy launched a carrier borne air attack in two waves against the USN warships and USAAF aircraft and installations based on the island of Oahu including Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.  The Japanese General Staff variously named the plans for the attack as the “Hawaii Operation”, “Operation AI” and “Operation Z” by the Japanese was a surprise military strike on the morning of December 7, 1941.

The object of the attack was to disable the American Pacific Battle Fleet and to prevent or delay American intervention against Imperial Japanese Navy operations planned for the territories of the British, Dutch and French colonial empires in Southeast Asia.  There were simultaneous Japanese attacks on the US-held Philippines and on the British forces in Malaya, Singapore, and Hong Kong. 

Aichi D3A Vals from the IJN Carrier Akagi.  (IJN Photos)

Mitsubishi A6M2 Model 21 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, IJN carrier Akagi, 7 Dec 1941.  (IJN Photo)

Nakajima B5N2 torpedo bomber, code-named Kate.  (IJNAF Photo)

The US naval base at Pearl Harbor was attacked by 353 Japanese aircraft including Mitsubishi A6M2 Zeke fighters, Aichi D3A Val dive bombers and Nakajima B5N Kate torpedo planes in two waves, launched from six IJN aircraft carriers.

Four US Navy battleships were sunk and four others damaged.  Three cruisers, three destroyers, an anti-aircraft training ship and one minelayer were also sunk or crippled.  The Japanese air attack also concentrated on surrounding airfields, where 188 US aircraft and hangers were destroyed.  Casualties on the ground were calculated at 2,402 men killed and a further 1,282 wounded.  The Japanese lost 29 aircraft and five midget submarines, with 65 servicemen killed or wounded.  One Japanese sailor was captured.

The attack on Pearl Harbor immediately propelled the United States into conflict with Japan and its Axis allies, both in the Pacific and in Europe.

Photograph from a Japanese plane of Battleship Row at the beginning of the attack. The explosion in the center is a torpedo strike on the USS Oklahoma.  Two attacking Japanese planes can be seen: one over the USS Neosho and one over the Naval Yard.  (IJNAF Photo)

Photograph taken from the air by another Japanese aircraft during the attack on Pearl Harbor.  (IJNAF Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M Zeke wreckage being recovered from Pearl Harbor, one of the 29 IJNAF aircraft shot down during the 7 Dec 1941 attack.  (USN Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M Zeke wreckage found after the attack on Pearl Harbor, one of the 29 IJNAF aircraft shot down during the 7 Dec 1941 attack.  (USN Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M2 Model 21 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, coded 61-131, (Serial No. 5450), flown by the 361st Kokutai, found on Saipan in 1944.  It was test flown as No. 29 in the USA.  This aircraft is now on display in the National Museum of Naval Aviation, NAS Pensacola, Florida, painted as EII-140.  (USAAF Photos)

Mitsubishi A6M2 Model 21 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, coded 61-131, (Serial No. 5450), painted as EII-140, on display in the National Museum of Naval Aviation, NAS Pensacola, Florida.  (NMNA Photo)

 (USAAF Photos)

 (Edgar Diegan Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M5 Model 52 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”(Serial No. 4340), TAIC 7, with partial Japanese and USAAF FE-130, later T2-130 markings. This is the Zero that is presently displayed at the National Air & Space Museum hanging from the 2nd Floor, Second World War gallery in Washington, D.C.

 (350z33 Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M5 Model 52 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”(Serial No. 4340), TAIC 7, coded 61-131, USAAF FE-130, later T2-130, on display in the National Air and Space Museum, Washington, D.C.  This aircraft came from a group of 12 Japanese aircraft captured on Saipan Island in April 1944. Navy personnel removed the Zeros from the island and sent them to the United States for evaluation in July.  The earliest records pertaining to the Museum's Zero show that it was evaluated in 1944 at Anacostia Naval Air Station across the river from Washington, D. C., in Sep 1944 and then in Jan 1945 at Eglin Field, Florida.  In Feb 1945 it went to Wright Field, Dayton, Ohio.  As of 13 July 1945, this Zero had flown for 93 hours and 15 minutes in Allied hands.  The aircraft was moved to Freeman Field, Indiana ca 4 Mar 1946 where it remained until 14 Jun 1946.  While in U. S. Navy and Army Air Forces custody, the aircraft was stripped of all markings and colors. Today, the only remaining clue to the original identity of the airplane is the manufacturer's serial number 4340, etched and painted on major components.  Curators selected the markings of an aircraft from the 261st Naval Air Corps because an aircraft of this unit was captured at Saipan.  The 261st NAC was more commonly known as the Tiger Corps.  It was activated on 1 Jun 1943, and was soon assigned to the newly organized 1st Air Fleet.  The Tiger Corps moved to the Marianas on 16 Feb 1944, and participated in some of the fiercest fighting of the war. 

Mitsubishi A6M7 Model 62 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, (Serial No. 23186), I-E, NASM in storage.  This aircraft was among about 145 captured Japanese aircraft shipped to the U. S. from the Yokosuka, Japan, area in October-November 1945.  The fighter bomber was probably based at Misawa, a testing facility operated by the First Naval Air Technical Bureau (abbreviated Kugisho in Japanese, equivalent to the U. S. Navy Bureau of Aeronautics).  After tests were carried out in the United States, the Navy exhibited the airplane outdoors at Naval Air Station Willow Grove, Pennsylvania, for many years.  The NASM acquired the aircraft from Willow Grove on 3 Mar 1962, then lent it to the Bradley Air Museum in Windsor Locks, Connecticut, for restoration.  Bradley technicians did not complete the project before the aircraft was transferred to the San Diego Aero-Space Museum where a volunteer crew spent more than 8,500 man-hours restoring the airplane.  It remains on exhibit in San Diego.  (USAAF Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M7 Model 62 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, (Serial No. 23186), I-E, San Diego Aero-Space Museum, California.  (Author Photos)

Mitsubishi A6M2 Model 21 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, captured, restored and test flown by Allied Air Forces.  Coded EB-201, this aircraft eventually made its way to Wright Field, Dayton, Ohio, in July 1943.  (USAAF Photos)

Mitsubishi A6M5 Model 52 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, (Serial No. 2193), TAIC 8.  This particular Zeke was built by Mitsubishi ca December 1943.  It was originally assigned to the 261st Kokutai with tail code 61-108.  It was one of 12 captured by the USMC at Aslito Airfield, Saipan in March 1944.  American intelligence coded this aircraft as TAIC 8.  In the USA, this Zero was transported to the USAAF test organization at Wright Field, Ohio.  Late in 1945 it was relocated at Eglin Field, Florida.  This colour photo was taken in the US some months after the Second World War had ended.  (USAAF Photo)

 

Mitsubishi A6M5 Zero Model 52 in IJNAF service.  (IJNAF Photos)

Mitsubishi A6M5 Model 52 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, (Serial No. unknown).  This aircraft was shipped to the USA, where it was designated USAAF FE-323.  It was loaned to the University of Kansas in 1946.  Its subsequent fate is unknown.   (USAAF Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M5 Model 52 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”captured at Atsugi Naval Air Base in Japan at the end of the war.  (USAAF Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M2 Model 21 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke” abandoned on an airfield in Japan being examined by American soldiers.  (USAAF Photo)

 (Tataroko Photo)

 ( Momotarou Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M2 Model 21 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, (Serial No. 31870), on display at the National Museum of Nature and Science, Tokyo, Japan.

Mitsubishi A6M3-22 Model 22 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, two-seater (Serial No. 31870), on display at the National Museum of Nature and Science, Taito, Tokyo, Japan.

Mitsubishi A6M7 Model 62 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, (Serial No. 62343), on display in the Chiran Peace Museum for Kamikaze Pilots, Minamikyushu, Kagoshima, Japan.

 (Paul Richter Photo)

 (Wason Llwolmpaisan Photo)

 (Oren Rozen Photos)

Mitsubishi A6M5 Model 52 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, composite of (Serial Nos. 4168/4240/4241), coded 81-161, on display in the Yushukan War Museum within the Y?sh?kan Japanese military and war museum located within Yasukuni Shrine in Chiyoda, Tokyo.

 (fareastfling, King Kaptures Photos)

 (Tokyobling'sblog Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M5a Model 52 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, (Serial No. 4685), coded 210-118, B, (also reported as Serial No. 82729), displayed in the "Yamato Museum", Kure Maritime Museum, Hiroshima, Japan.  This aircraft rested on the bottom of Lake Biwa where it crashed due to engine failure in August 1945.  The pilot survived and was on hand to help in restoration when it was recovered from the lake in 1978 almost intact.

Mitsubishi A6M5 Model 52 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, (Serial Nos. 4708), is on display at the Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Museum, Minatomiri Odori Boulevard, Nagoya, Japan. 

Mitsubishi A6M5 Model 52 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, is on display at MCAS Iwakuni, Japan.

Mitsubishi A6M5 Model 52 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, is on display at Shizuoka, Japan.

Mitsubishi A6M5 Model 52 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, is on display in Beijing, China.

Mitsubishi A6M5 Model 52 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke” (model TBC) is on display in the Museum Dirgantara Mandala in Yogyakarta, Indonesia.

Mitsubishi A6M5 Model 52 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”(Serial No. 1493), (also reported as Serial No. 92717), on display inside the Kawaguchiko Motor Museum, Fujikawaguchiko, Yamanashi prefecture, Japan.  (Josephus37 Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M2 Model 21 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”(Serial No. 91518), coded EII-102, on display inside the Kawaguchiko Motor Museum, Fujikawaguchiko, Yamanashi prefecture, Japan.

 (NMUSAF Photo)

 (Goshimini Photo)

 (Valder 137 Photos )

Mitsubishi A6M2 Model 21 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”preserved in the National Museum of the USAF, Dayton, Ohio.

Mitsubishi A6M2 Model 21 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, wreckage at the Ni'ihau crashsite of IJNAS pilot Shigenori Nishikaichi, 12-13 Dec 1941.  He was killed in a struggle with people on the island.  The aircraft on display at the Pacific Aviation Museum, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii is painted in his A6M2's colours.  (USN Photo)

 (Cliff Photo)

 (InSapphoWeTrust Photo)

 (Messerly Photos)

 (Lepeu1999 Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M2 Model 21 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”on display at the Pacific Aviation Museum, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.  This aircraft was made airworthy in the early 1980s before it was grounded in 2002.  A6M2 Model 21 Zero Nakajima Manufacture Number 500, built by Nakajima in December, 1942, this aircfraft served with Air Group 201 of the 24th Air Flotilla in the Solomon Islands.  It was abandoned to the jungles of Ballale Island due to combat damage.  Recovery and restoration began in 1964.  It was repowered by an American Pratt and Whitney R-1830, and used to depict BII-120 which pilot Shigenori Nishikaichi flew from carrier Hiryu in the attack Pearl Harbor.  The original BII-120 landed on Niihau after running low on fuel and was destroyed with some fragments remaining.  Authentic markings correspond to BI-120, Manufacture number 2262.

Mitsubishi A6M3 Model 32 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, wearing green cross surrender markings at Bougainville, 1945, in RNZAF hands.  Mitsubishi A6M5 "Zeke" (Serial No. 3835) was captured at Kara, Bougainville and later shipped to New Zealand.  Reg No. NZ6000, it is displayed at the War Memorial Museum in Auckland, New Zealand.

Mitsubishi A6M5 Model 52 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, (Serial No. 3844), wearing green surrender crosses at Bougainville, Solomon Islands, Sep 1945; note missing stabilizer on aircraft and jeep in background.  This aircraft was restored by the Auckland Air Museum, New Zealand, where it is currently on display.  (State Library of Queensland, Australia Photo)

 (Oren Rozen Photo)

 (Tab-chan Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M3 Model 22 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, (Serial No. 3835/3844), coded 2-152, Auckland War Memorial Museum, NZ.

Zero fighters preserved in the United States include one in the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C, one in the National Museum of the United States Air Force at Dayton, Ohio, one in the National Museum of Naval Aviation at Pensacola, Florida, one in the Pacific Aviation Museum in Honolulu, Hawaii, one in the San Diego Air and Space Museum, San Diego, California and one in the Flying Heritage Collection, Evrett, Washington.

 

Mitsubishi A6M3-22 two-seat Model 21 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”.  (IJNAF Photos)

Mitsubishi A6M3-22 two-seat Model 21 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, captured example taken into service with the French Air Force in the Far East in 1945.  (Armee de l'Air Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M3-22 two-seat Model 21 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, coded UI-161, before restoration, with the Flying Heritage Collection, Evrett, Washington.  (Goshimini Photo)

 (Articseahorse Photos)

 ( Goshimini Photo)

 (John Velt Photo)

 (Ken Fielding Photos)

Mitsubishi A6M3-22 two-seat Model 21 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, coded UI-161, Reg. No. N3852 with the Flying Heritage Collection, Evrett, Washington.

  (Goshimini Photo)

 (Hakaisinn6105 Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M5 Model 52 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, Flying Heritage Collection, Evrett, Washington.

Mitsubishi A6M2 Model 21 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, (Serial No. 5784), coded V-173, retrieved as a wreck after the war and later found to have been flown by Saburo Sakai at Lae, on display inside the Australian War Memorial in Canberra, Australia.  (AWM Photo) 

Another aircraft recovered by the Australian War Memorial Museum in the early 1970s now belongs to Fantasy of Flight in Polk City, Florida.  Along with several other Zeros, it was found near Rabaul in the South Pacific.  The markings suggest that it was in service after June 1943 and further investigation suggests that it has cockpit features conducive to the Nakashima built Model 52b.  If this is correct, it is most likely one of the 123 aircraft lost by the Japanese during the assault of Rabaul.  The aircraft was shipped in pieces to the attraction and it was eventually made up for display as a crashed aircraft.  Much of the aircraft is usable for patterns and some of its parts can be restored to one day make this a basis for a flyable aircraft.

Mitsubishi A6M2 Model 21 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, (Serial No. 840) is on display at the Australian Aviation Heritage Centre at Winnellie, Northern Territory, Australia.  It consists of the wreckage of the forward fuselage, inboard wings, engine, and propeller.

Mitsubishi A6M6c Model 53c Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, coded EII, California.  (Kevin Collins Photos)

Only four flyable Zero airframes exist; three have had their engines replaced with similar American units; only one, the Planes of Fame Museum’s A6M5 bearing tail number 61-120 (recovered from Saipan) has the original Sakae engine.

Mitsubishi A6M5 Model 52 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, (Serial No. 5357), coded 61-120, was recovered from Saipan in 1945.  This aircraft still has its original Sakae engine.  This aircraft was coded TAIC 5 and test flown at NAS Anacostia.  It is currently flying as Reg No. NX46770, with the Planes of Fame Museum, Chino, California.  (USN Photos)

  (Armchair Aviator's Photo)

 (Toshi Aoki Photo)

 (Kogo Photo)

 (Goshimini Photo)

 (Greg Goebel Photo)

 (Toshi Aoki Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M5 Model 52 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, (Serial No. 5357), coded 61-120, was recovered from Saipan in 1945.  It was test flown as TAIC 5, Reg No. NX46770, painted as 61-120, on display at the Planes of Fame Museum, Chino, California.

 (Armchair Aviator's Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M3 Model 22 Zero, c/n 3869m replica, X-133, Reg. No. N7122, American Airpower Heritage Flying Museum, Commemorative Air Force, Midland, Texas.

 (Blayd Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M2 Model 21 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”.  Although not a survivor, the “Blayd” Zero is a reconstruction based on templating original Zero components recovered from the South Pacific.  In order to be considered a “restoration” and not a reproduction, the builders used a small fraction of parts from the original Zero landing gear in the reconstruction.  Restored as an A6M2 Model 21, it is currently owned by the Texas Flying Legends Museum. 

The Commemorative Air Force’s A6M3 was recovered from Babo Airfield, New Guinea, in 1991.  It was partially restored from several A6M3s in Russia, then brought to the United States for restoration.  The aircraft was re-registered in 1998 and displayed at the Museum of Flying in Santa Monica, California.  It currently uses a Pratt & Whitney R1830 engine.

Mitsubishi A6M3 Model 32 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, coded Q-102 and V-187, both numbered -870, found damaged at Buna, Papua-New Guinea in 1943.  (USAAF Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M3 Model 32 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, ca 1945.  (IJAAF Photos)

Mitsubishi A6M7 Model 62 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, with green cross surrender markings, 1945.  (USAAF Photos)

Mitsubishi A6M7 Model 52 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”.  One was shipped to the USA, in 1945, where it was  designated USAAF FE-322, but scrapped at Park Ridge ca. 1950.  (USAAF Photos)

  (nattou Photos)

 (Yamato Museum Photo)

 (At by At Photo)

Mitsubishi A6M7 Model 62 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, Yamato Museum, Kure Hiroshima.

Mitsubishi A6M8 Model 64 Zero-Sen (Navy Type 0 Carrier Fighter), codename “Zeke”, with a Kinsae 64 engine.  One of two prototypes completed.  One was shipped to the USA and designated USAAF FE-311.  This aircraft was scrapped at Park Ridge ca. 1950.  (IJAAF Photo)

Axis Warplane Survivors

A guidebook to the preserved Military Aircraft of the Second World War Tripartite Pact of Germany, Italy, and Japan, joined by Hungary, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, and Yugoslavia; the co-belligerent states of Thailand, Finland, San Marino and Iraq; and the occupied states of Albania, Belarus, Croatia, Vichy France, Greece, Ljubljana, Macedonia, Monaco, Montenegro, Norway, Cambodia, China, India, Laos, Manchukuo, Mengjiang, the Philippines and Vietnam.

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