Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Canadian Warplanes 7: Helicopters, Canadair CL-84 Dynavert

Canadair CL-84 Dynavert

Data current to 5 Aug 2020.

Canadair CX-131/CX-84/CL-84-1 Dynavert (4).

 (SDA&SM Archives Photo)

Canadair CL-84-1/CX-84/CX-131 Dynavert.

The Canadair CL-84 Dynavert, designated by the Canadian Forces as the CX-131, was a V/STOL turbine tiltwing monoplane designed and manufactured by Canadair between 1964 and 1972.  Only four of these experimental aircraft were built with three entering flight testing.  Two of the CL-84s crashed due to mechanical failures, but there were no fatalities in either of the accidents.  Despite the fact that the CL-84 was successful in the experimental and operational trials carried out between 1972 and 1974, none of the prospective customers placed any orders for the type.

The Dynavert  vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft was designed in the mid-1960s with its first roll-out in late 1964.  The Dynavert incorporated a unique tilt-wing and was intended to be developed for use as a troop transport, ground support, reconnaissance, and search and rescue.  It was able to take off and hover like a helicopter, or operate in conventional level flight at 350 mph.  The Dynavert was powered by a pair of Lycoming LTC1K-4C turboprops.[1]

The prototype CL-84 (Serial CF-VTO-X) crashed in 1967; CX-8401 crashed in 1973.  There are two survivors: CA&SM, Ottawa, Ontario (Serial No. CX-8402).  WCAM (Serial No. CX-8403), Winnipeg, Manitoba.[2]

[1] Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadair_CL-84.

[2] Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadair_CL-84.

 (RCAF Photo)

One of the CX-131 CL-84 Dynaverts with LCol R.E.R. Borland, Senior Staff Officer Tactical Aviation, Mobile Command, CFB St.Hubert, Quebec, on the right, and Mr. Bill Longhurst Chief Pilot Canadair, on the left.  LCol Borland was the first non-company pilot to fly the CL-84 V/Stol aircraft.  They are both wearing what appears to be an original MA-2 torso ejection harness, similar to those used by the USN and USAF.  These harnesses were eventually modified to remove the full body cover.

 (USN Photo)

 Canadair CL-84-1/CX-84 Dynavert, Aug 1973.  

 (Canadair Photo)

Canadair CL-84-1/CX-84 Dynavert, Montreal.

 (Canadair Photo)

Canadair CL-84-1/CX-84 Dynavert (Serial No. CX8402) and (Serial No. CX8401) pair in flight. 

 (Canadair Photo)

 Canadair CL-84-1/CX-84 Dynavert, CF-VTO-X.

 (Canadair Photo)

 Canadair CL-84-1/CX-84 Dynavert, CF-VTO-X.

 (SDA&SM Archives Photo)

Canadair CL-84-1/CX-84 Dynavert.

 (Canadair Photo)

Canadair CL-84-1/CX-84 Dynavert.

 (SDA&SM Archives Photo)

Canadair CL-84-1/CX-84 Dynavert. 

(USN Photos)

Canadair CL-84-1/CX-84 Dynavert.

 (USN Photos)

Canadair CL-84-1/CX-84 Dynavert, test flown from the USS Guam.

 (Bzuk Photo)

Canadair CL-84-1/CX-84 Dynavert.  Royal Aviation Museum of Western Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

 

 (Author Photos)

Canadair CL-84-1/CX-84 Dynavert (Serial No. CX8402).  Canada Air and Space Museum, Ottawa, Ontario.