Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Canadian Warplanes 6, Jets, de Havilland DH.100 Vampire

Canadian Warplanes, Jets, 

de Havilland DH.100 Vampire

Data current to 21 Nov 2018.

The de Havilland Vampire is a British jet fighter developed and manufactured by the de Havilland Aircraft Company.  It had the distinction of being the second jet fighter to be operated by the RAF, after the Gloster Meteor, and the first to be powered by a single jet engine.

In 1946, a single Vampire F.1 began operating on an evaluation basis in Canada at the Winter Experimental Establishment in Edmonton, Alberta.  The Vampire F.3 was selected as one of two types of operational fighters for the RCAF and was first flown in Canada on 17 January 1948 where it went into service as a Central Flying School training aircraft at RCAF Station Trenton, Ontario.  Operating a total of 86 aircraft, the Vampire F.3 became the first jet fighter to enter RCAF service in any significant numbers.

The Vampire had the function of introducing Canadian fighter pilots not only to jet propulsion, but also to other amenities such as cockpit pressurisation and the tricycle landing gear arrangement.  It proved to be a popular aircraft, being easy to fly and regarded by some pilots as "hot rod."   In Canadian service, the Vampire served in both operational and air reserve units (400, 401, 402, 411, 438 and 442 squadrons).  During the late 1950s, the type was retired and was replaced in RCAF service by the Canadair CL-13 Sabre.  (Wikipedia)

de Havilland DH.100 Vampire Mk. I (1), (Serial No. TG372), Mk. III (85), (Serial Nos. 17001-17042, 17044-17086), for a total of 86 aircraft.

(DND Photo via James Craik) 

de Havilland DH.100 Vampire, RCAF (Serial No. 17067).

 (DND Photo via James Craik)

de Havilland DH.100 Vampire, RCAF (Serial Nos. 17067, 17019 and 17007).

 (RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

de Havilland DH.100 Vampire, RAF (Serial No. 17018).

 (DND Photo via James Craik)

 (DND Photo via James Craik)

 (DND Photo via James Craik)

de Havilland DH.100 Vampire, RAF (Serial No. VZ278), loaned to RCAF No. 421 Sqn for transition training in the UK, ca 1948.

 (RCAF Photo)

de Havilland DH.100 Vampire (Serial No. 17021), GO, in flight.

 (RCAF Photo)

de Havilland DH.100 Vampires, RCAF (Serial No. VZ339), 421 Sqn, RAF Odingham ca 1948.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584168)

de Havilland DH,100 Vampire, 11 Dec 1948.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584696)

de Havilland DH.100 Vampire, 14 Aug 1952.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584697)

de Havilland DH.100 Vampire, 14 Aug 1952.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584697)

de Havilland DH.100 Vampire (Serial No. 17042), FB-U, 14 Aug 1952.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584724)

de Havilland DH.100 Vampire (Serial No. 17042) runway overshoot, 25 Sep 1952.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584725)

de Havilland DH.100 Vampire (Serial No. 17042) runway overshoot, 25 Sep 1952.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584138)

de Havilland DH.100 Vampire ca. 1948.

 (RCAF Photo)

de Havilland DH.100 Vampire (Serial No. 17021), RCAF Station Chatham.

(DND Photo)

de Havilland DH.100 Vampire Mk. III, RCAF (Serial Nos. 17067, 065, 078, 002).

  (DND Photo)

de Havilland DH.100 Vampire, RCAF (Serial No. 17078).

(DND Photo)

de Havilland DH.100 Vampire, RCAF (Serial No. 17074).