Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Canadian Warplanes 6: Jets, Canadair CF-104 Starfighter

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter

Data current to 28 Nov 2019.

 (DND Photo via Chris Charland)

Canadair CF-104A Starfighter (Serial No. 12704), with CEPE or AETE depending on when the photo was taken.  It later became a training aid and given the new serial number 820C and used in ABDR.

The Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (CF-111CL-90) was a modified version of the Lockheed F-104 Starfighter supersonic fighter aircraft built under licence in Canada by Canadair.  It was primarily used as a ground attack aircraft, despite being designed as an interceptor.  It served with the RCAF and later the Canadian Armed Forces until it was replaced by the McDonnell Douglas CF-118 Hornet.

Canadair 683A CF-104 Starfighter (200), (Serial Nos. 12701-12900), CF-104D Mk. 1 (22), (Serial Nos. 12631-12652), Mk. 2 (16), (Serial Nos. 12653-12668), for a total of 38 two-seat variants, Lockheed F-104A Starfighter (1), (Serial No. 12700), for a total of 239 of all Marks.  The Serial Numbers changed from 12--- to 104-- in 1970.

 (RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler).

Lockheed F-104A Starfighter (Serial No. 104700).  This was the very first RCAF Starfighter, ex-USAF F-104A-LO, (Serial No. 56-0770).  This aircraft first flew in 1957 with the USAF and eventually, after a few years in storage, it became the test bed for the CF-104 avionics still as an F-104A.  It was delivered to the RCAF on 27 June 1963. It served at Cold Lake, Alberta, in 1963 and then went t the Central Experimental and Proving Establishment (CEPE) at RCAF Station Uplands, Ontario, in 1965.  This aircraft set the Canadian altitude record of 100,110 ft on 14 December 1967, flown by W/C R. A. White of CEPE, out of RCAF Station Uplands.  It only had 780 airframe hours on it when it was transferred to the now Canadian Aviation and Space Museum.   In the first photo, taken at Burbank, California, the aircraft had a mix of RCAF/USAF markings.  On the tail it had 60770 (abbreviated 56-0770) and on the forward fuselage was RCAF + 770.  The second shot shows it wearing the CEPE "X" on the tail and 700 + RCAF.  The Lockheed built duals were in the serial range 12631-12668 and the single seat Canadair built aircraft were in the serial range 12701-12900.

(RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler).

(RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler). 

(RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler).

 (aeroprints Photo)

Lockheed F-104A Starfighter, RCAF (Serial No. 12700), Canada Aviation and Space Museum, Ottawa, Ontario.

(RCAF Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighters, RCAF (Serial Nos. 12701, 12702, 12703, 12704, and 12705), Royal Flush.

(RCAF Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighters, RCAF (Serial Nos. 12701, 12702, 12703, 12704, and 12705), Royal Flush.

(RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighters, RCAF (Serial No. 12740) and (Serial No. 12735), ca 1960s.

 (RCAF Photo via Daniel Racette)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, RCAF (Serial No. 12797).

 (SDA&SM Archives Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, RCAF (Serial No. 12817).

 (RCAF Photo via Fred Paradie)

Canadair CF-104s Starfighters, CAF (Serial No. 104721), and CAF (Serial No. 12829), Norvenich, Germany, June 1969.

 (DND Photo)

NATO Formation including CAF Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, German Air Force Lockheed F-104 Starfighter, USAF McDonnell F-4 Phantom II, RAF Hawker Hunter, Belgian Republic RF-84F Thunderstreak and an Dutch Lockheed RF-104G Starfighter, ca 1969.

 (SDA&SM Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighters, RCAF (Serial No. 12887) and RCAF (Serial No. 12845).

  (RCAF Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighters, RCAF (Serial No. 12845), (Serial No. 12888 and (Serial No. 12887)

 (RCAF Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, RCAF (Serial No. 12888, equipped with the 70-mm Vinten VICON camera pod.

 (RCAF Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighters, RCAF (Serial No. 12779), (Serial No. 12771)

(Bernie Lind Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, RCAF (Serial No. 12868), equipped with the 70-mm Vinten VICON camera pod.

 (DND Photo via Chris Charland)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighters, RCAF (Serial Nos. 781, 854, 868 and 862), over Europe.  All four are equipped with the 70-mm Vinten VICON camera pod.

(RCAF Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, RCAF (Serial No. 12898), with drag-chute deployed.  This aircraft is equipped with the 70-mm Vinten VICON camera pod.

 (DND Photo via James Craik)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter line up (Serial Nos. 12627, 12823 and 12808) at 3 (F) Wing, Zweibrucken, Germany, 1963.

(RCAF Photo via James Craik)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter with various stores.  The 70-mm Vinten VICON camera pod is shown at the left of the photo.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4816374)

70-mm Vinten VICON camera pod being shown to Canada's Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson by Wing Commander Bob Edwards and RCAF Officers during a visit to 1 (F) Wing, Marville, France, 18 Jan 1964.

 

(RCAF Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, CAF (Serial No. 104862) equipped with the 70-mm Vinten VICON camera pod.

 (Richard Vandervord Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, CAF (Serial No. 104865), 14 Aug 1971.

 (CAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, CAF (Serial No. 104743), Spangdahlem AFB, Germany, 1970.

 (NATO Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, CAF (Serial No. 104758), German Air Force F-104, and a USAF RF-4C Phantom II.  The Phantom is from the 38th Tactical Fighter Squadron of the 26th Tactical Reconnaissance Wing based at Ramstein Air Base.  The 'RR” tail code began to be used on the 1st of April, 1970 and continued until January, 1973.

 (NATO Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, CAF (Serial No. 104758), German Air Force F-104, and a USAF RF-4C Phantom II, RAF Hawker Hunter, Belgian Republic F-84F Thunderstreak and Dutch F-104.

 (Allied Air Forces Central Europe (AIRCENT) Photo)

French Mirage, German, Belgian, Canadian, Netherlands Starfighters, USAF Thunderchief and a RAF Javelin during Operation Seven-Up a tactical weapons meet at RAF Wildenrath, West Germany on April, 1964.

 (RCAF Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, CAF (Serial No. 104764).

 (RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (Serial No. 767), with bomb dispenser, taking off.

 

 (DND Photo viaJames Craik)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, CAF (Serial No. 104785), checkerboard paint scheme, 441 Silver Fox Tactical Fighter Sqn, CFB Baden-Soellingen, Germany.

 (John Davies Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, CAF (Serial No. 104838), 1 CAG, No. 439 Sqn, CFB Baden-Sollingen, Germany, 31 Dec 1976.

 (Peter Bakema Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, CAF (Serial No. 104756), Tiger Meet markings, Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, Hamilton, Ontario.

 (Mike Freer, Touchdown Aviation Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, CAF (Serial No. 104720), No. 421 Squadron based at Baden Sollingen, Germany.

 (Mike Freer, Touchdown Aviation Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, CAF (Serial No. 104733), No. 439 Squadron based at Baden Sollingen, Germany.

 (DND Photo via Chris Charland)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, CAF (Serial No. 104785), No. 441 Silver Fox Tactical Fighter Sqn, CFB Baden-Soellingen, Germany.

 (Mike Freer, Touchdown Aviation Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, CAF (Serial No. 104756), 1 Canadian Air Group based at Baden Sollingen, Germany.

 (DND Photo via Fred Paradie)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, RCAF (Serial No. 12633) on the landing roll out with its drag chute deployed.  The Safety Systems techs recovered and packed theses chutes.

(DND Photo via James Craik)

Canadair CF-104D Starfighter, CAF (Serial No. 104647), night engine run up.

 (Henk Schakelaar Photo)

Canadair CF-104D Starfighter, CAF (Serial No. 104666).

 (DND Photo)

Canadair CF-104D Starfighter, CAF (Serial No. 104651), Cold Lake, Alberta, night run up. 

(RCAF Photo)

Canadair CF-104D Starfighter, CAF (Serial No. 104645).

(Mike Freer, Touchdown Aviation Photo)

Canadair CF-104D Starfighter, CAF (Serial No. 104653), based at Baden Sollingen, Germany.

 

 

Canadair CF-104 Starfighters preserved in Canada:

 (Mike Kaehler Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (Serial No. 12703), unveiled on 12 July 2018, Canadian Starfighter Museum, St. Andrews Airport, Manitoba.

 (Mr Marnier Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (Serial No. 12846), Air Force Museum of Alberta, co-located with The Military Museums, Calgary, Alberta.

 (Author Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (Serial No. 104783), Altantic Canada Aviation Museum, Halifax, Nova Scotia.

 (Author Photos)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (Serial No. 104774), 5 Area Support Group (5 ASG), LFQA, CFB Valcartier, Quebec.

 (Lucky Al Photo)

Canadair CF-104D Starfighter (Serial No. 12784), (Serial No. 104784), CFB St-Jean-sur-le-Richelieu, Quebec.

 (DND Photo via Chris Charland)

Canadair CF-104D Starfighter Mk. I (Serial No. 104646), with AETE at CFB Cold Lake Alberta.

 (Author Photo)

Canadair CF-104D Starfighter Mk. I (Serial No. 104646), National Air Force Museum of Canada, CFB Trenton, Ontario.  This dual-seat Starfighter served with the No. 6 Operational Training Unit in Cold Lake, Alberta, during the 1960s.  The ‘X’ marking on the tail indicates that it was also operated by Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment, a unit that evaluates safety and effectiveness of air force aircraft.  When 104646 flew from Cold Lake to Trenton in 1983, it was the last Starfighter to fly in Canada.  It was stored at the Mountainview storage facility before it was acquired by the museum.  (NAFMC)

 (Author Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter Mk. 2 (Serial No. 104792), 794B, (Serial No. 12792), mounted on a pylon, CFB Borden, Ontario.

 (stemcat5 Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, RCAF (Serial No. 104731), C/N 683A-1031, Comox Air Force Museum, CFB Comox, British Columbia.

 (Author Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (Serial No. 104753), camouflage, mounted on a pylon, Air Force Heritage Museum and Air Park, CFB Winnipeg, Manitoba.

 (Peter Bakema Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (Serial No. 104790), painted as (Serial No. 104756), Tiger Meet colours, Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, Mount Hope, Ontario.

 (NHL4Hamilton Photo)

Canadair CF-104D Starfighter, RCAF (Serial No. 12641), c/n 563A-5311, mounted on a pylon, Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, Mount Hope, Ontario.

 (Mike Kaehler Photo)

Canadair CF-104D Starfighter, RCAF (Serial No. 12645), (Serial No. 104645), CAF Instructional airframe, (Serial No. 878C), CAF ABDR (Serial No. 212AC), Canadian Museum of Flight, Langley, British Columbia.

 (Richard Filiatrault)

Canadair CF-104D Starfighter, Royal Netherlands Air Force (Serial No. D-5805), painted as RCAF (Serial No. 104651).  The real 104651 crashed on 24 Jun 1980 due to an engine bird strike.  Both pilots, one a Canadian Captain and the other a German exchange Pilot, successfully ejected and survived.  They were present at the Museum’s revealing of the restored aircraft.  Alberta Aviation Museum, Edmonton, Alberta.

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (Serial No. 104749), Canada stamp.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 2266826)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter data bank:

The Starfighter was a tactical bomber designed for all-weather strike-reconnaissance role.  Also called the “Widow-maker” due to the high number of casualties among the user nations, the CF-104 was first delivered to the RCAF in 1961.  The first Canadian-built model was a version of the F-104G built by Canadair.  The fastest aircraft to serve in Canada’s Air Force, the Starfighter was derived from the Lockheed F-104.  It was powered by a General Electric J-79-GE 7 engine.  In design and ancillary equipment, the Starfighter incorporated several unique features, the most distinguishing of which was an extremely short, thin wing with a knife-sharp leading edge.  The CF-104 was taken-on-strength (TOS) by the RCAF in March 1961 and was used as a nuclear strike/reconnaissance aircraft until 1972, when it was re-designated as a ground attack aircraft.  It replaced the Sabre.  The Starfighter was used in Europe as part of Canada’s NATO commitment, located at bases in France and Germany. [1]  Most were retired by 1986, and it would appear that Captain Eric Thurston landed the last Starfighter to fly in Canadian Forces service on final delivery to the Turkish Air Force at Diyarbakir, Turkey in 1986.[2]  The McDonnell Douglas CF-18 Hornet gradually replaced the Starfighter. 

The F-104A was the first production version of the Starfighter.  The Lockheed 583A Starfighter was a USAF variant of the F-104 flown by a number of RCAF pilots.  The CF-104D Mk. 1 was a two-seat trainer version of the CF-104 built by Lockheed for the RCAF and powered by a licence-built J79-OEL-7 engine.  The Mk. 2 was also a two-seat trainer.

            The first unit to operate the Starfighter was No.6 Strike/Reconnaissance Operational Training Unit (6 ST/R OTU), which later became 417 Squadron and trained personnel for the entire program.  On unification date the NATO establishment was split between three bases in Germany.  On 19 September 1970, 1 Canadian Air Group, or 1 CAG replaced the 4 Wing title.  At the end of 1971 the nuclear role was dropped with both strike/attack squadrons converting to the conventional attack role.  This saw a major change to Starfighter appearance and introduced the M61 Vulcan 20mm cannon, on single-seat aircraft, not previously installed on Canadian operated aircraft.  Air-to-ground conventional weapons were added to fulfil the role.

            The reconnaissance role was dropped by 439 Squadron in mid 1972 when it also switched to conventional mud-moving role.  Few reconnaissance pods were maintained in use after this.  This continued until squadrons started to stand down for the arrival of the Hornet.  The first to go was 439 Squadron on 29 November 1984.  This was followed by 421 Squadron in late 1985 and 441 Squadron in early 1986.  The first European based Hornets, from the newly equipped 409 Squadron, arrived in April 1985, thus both types were operated from CFB Baden-Soellingen for 10 months.  The Canadian Armed Forces exported surplus aircraft, with 22 going to DenMk. In 1971 and a further 22 to Norway in 1972.  In January 1986, 50 CF-104s began their transfer to Turkey.

            The RCAF Starfighter fleet carried the serial range of 12701 to 12900 for the Canadair manufactured single-seat CF-104, with 12631 to 12652 and 12653 to 12668 for the Lockheed-built CF-104D Mk 1 and Mk 2.  Starting on 28 July 1970 the fleet received new serials to fall into the new Canadian Armed Forces designation system.  The single-seat CF-104 became 104701 to 104900 and the two-seaters became 104631 to 104668.  In both cases the last three of the prior serial was maintained, replacing the prefix “12” with “104”.

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter survivors in Canada:

CMF, Langley, British Columbia, Canadair CF-104D Starfighter (Serial No. 104645).[3] 

CAFM, CFB Comox, British Columbia, Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (Serial No. 104731).[4] 

CFB Cold Lake Alberta, Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (Serial No. 104702), mounted on a pylon.[5] 

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (Serial No. 104816), painted as (Serial No. 104880), C/N 1116, built up from parts of (Serial No. 104816), and (Serial No. 104803), mounted on a pylon near Cold Lake. 

Innisfail, Alberta, Canadian Military Members Memorial, Lockheed F-104F, C/N 5070, 29+17, painted as a CF-104, mounted on a pylon. 

R-AM, Wetaskiwin, Alberta, Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (Serial No. 104763).[6] 

AFHM&AP, CFB Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (Serial No. 104753).[7] 

WCAM, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canadair CF-104D Starfighter (Serial No.). 

BBMM, CFB Borden, Ontario, Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (Serial No. 104792).[8] 

CALSM Markham, Ontario, Canadair CF-104D Starfighter (Serial No. 877C), Canadair CF-104D Starfighter (Serial No. 643), Canadair CF-104D Starfighter (Serial No. 644), Canadair CF-104D Starfighter (Serial No. 8-658), Turkey, Lockheed F-104G Starfighter (Serial No. FX-99), Belgium. 

CA&SM, Ottawa, Ontario, Lockheed CF-104A Starfighter (Serial No. 104700).[9] 

Canadian Forces Command and Staff College, 215 Yonge Boulevard, North York, Toronto, Ontario, Canadair CF-104D Starfighter (Serial No. 104652). 

CWHM, Mount Hope, Ontario, Canadair CF-104D Starfighter (Serial No. 104641), painted as (Serial No. 12641), mounted on a pylon.  Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (Serial No. 104790), painted as (Serial No. 104756).[10] 

NAFM, CFB Trenton, Ontario, Canadair CF-104G Starfighter (Serial No. 104646). 

BADM, CFB Bagotville, Québec, Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (Serial No. 104704).[11]  Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (Serial No. 104774), two hulks, one to be restored. 

CFB St Jean, Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (Serial No. 104784).[12] 

CFB Valcartier, Québec, Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (Serial No. 104774).  On display at 5 CDSB Valcartier, LFQA. 

ACAM, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canadair CF-104 Starfighter (Serial No. 104783).[13]

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter survivors outside of Canada:

Aalborg AB, Denmark (Serial No. 104825). 

Aalborg AB, Denmark (Serial No. 104832), RDAF 723 Squadron and 726 Squadron. 

Aalborg AB, Denmark (Serial No. 104771). 

Aalborg, Denmark Danish Science and Technical Museum (Serial No. 104888). 

Billund, Denmark (Serial No. 104657). 

Billund, Denmark (Serial No. 104846). 

Billund, Denmark (Serial No.), Danish Air Force Museum (DAFM). 

Skrydstrup, Denmark, Central Workshop (Serial No. 104662). 

Egeskov Veterans Museum, (EVM), Fyn, Denmark (Serial No. 104766). 

North Zealand Aviation Museum (NZAM), Slaerup, in Denmark (Serial No. 104814). 

Flesland Air Station Defence Museum, Bergen, Norway, Royal Norwegian Air Force (RNoAF) CF-104 (Serial No. 104801).

Kjeller, Norway, RNoAF), (Serial No.). 

Norwegian Technical Museum (NTM), RNoAF (Serial No.). 

Oslo, Norway, Air Force Museum (Serial No.). 

Oslo School of Trade, Norway (Serial No.). 

Ana Jet Us, Erhac, Turkey (Serial No. 104795). 

Turkish Military Museum, Istanbul (Serial No.).  

Canadair CF-104D Starfighter, Reg. No. N104RB), USA, still flying. 

Canadair CF-104 Starfighter, Reg. No. N104RN), USA, still flying.

            RCAF members and their Canadian families living in Germany during the 1960s were well aware of the Starfighter and the hazards associated with living near an airbase where crashes were often a routine occurrence.  For the German people, the “Starfighter crisis” developed into a political issue, as many of the F-104 Starfighters acquired for the German Air Force crashed after being modified to serve for Luftwaffe purposes - specifically for terrain, weather, and ground mechanic support issues.  In Luftwaffe service, 292 of the 916 Starfighters crashed, claiming the lives of 115 pilots and leading to cries that the Starfighter was fundamentally unsafe from the West German public, which referred to it as the Witwenmacher (widow-maker), fliegender Sarg (flying coffin), and Erdnagel (ground nail).

Steinhoff and his deputy Günter Rall noted that the non-German F-104s proved much safer - Spain, for example, lost none in the same period.  The Americans blamed the high loss rate of the Luftwaffe F-104s on the extreme low-level and aggressive flying of German pilots rather than any faults in the aircraft.  Steinhoff and Rall immediately left their daily work and went to America to learn to fly the Starfighter under Lockheed instruction and noted some specifics in the training (a distinct lack of mountain and foggy-weather training), combined with handling capabilities (sharp start high G turns) of the aircraft that could create accident situations.

            Steinhoff and Rall immediately changed the training regimen for the F-104 pilots, and the accident rates quickly fell to those comparable or better than other air forces.  They also brought about the high level of training and professionalism seen today throughout the Luftwaffe, and the start of a strategic direction for Luftwaffe pilots to tactically and combat train outside Germany.  However, the F-104 never lived down its reputation as a widow-maker and was replaced much earlier by the Luftwaffe than other national air forces.[14]

 

[1] Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadair_CF-104.

[2] E-mail LGen Huddleston/Maj Skaarup, 27 April 2009.

[3] The Museum’s aircraft was one of a number of Lockheed-built two place trainers, spending its flying career at Canadian Forces Base Cold Lake, Alberta, before becoming a battle-damage repair airframe at Mountain View, Ontario, near CFB Trenton.

[4] No. 417 Squadron, CFB Cold Lake, Alberta.  Flew in unit’s 1972 display team at Moose Jaw air show.  Flown in solo displays in 1975 by F/L Dave Leach, RAAF.  Still with this unit in 1983.  Mounted on pedestal at CFB North Bay, Ontario shortly after being struck off.  On display at Comox Museum in 2005.

[5] Joe Hoffner Memorial Park at Grand Centre, Cold Lake, Alberta.

[6] With No. 417 Squadron at CFB Cold Lake, Alberta, when it was with the Deadeye Zip team of 1979.  Special red white and blue paint scheme for Squadron stand-down, from July 1983.  Still in this scheme when it arrived at CFD Mountain View, Ontario for storage and eventual disposal.  On display at the Reynolds Alberta Museum in Wetaskiwin, Alberta in 1995, reported on loan from government.  Also was a Pedestal Monument, at CFB Edmonton, dates unknown.

[7] With No. 417 TF (OT) Squadron at CFB Cold Lake, Alberta.  Flew lead in squadron’s 1977 air display team, pilot was Capt. J.D. Bradshaw.  Later served with 10 Field Technical Training Unit at CFB Cold Lake, Alberta, probably as a training aid.  Reported preserved at the Air Force Heritage Museum and Airpark in Winnipeg.

[8] With the Canadian Air Group at CFB Baden-Soellingen when struck off.  Repair instructional airframe.  Reported on display at CFB Borden, Ontario by 2006.

[9] Transferred to National Air Museum in 1969, as RCAF 12700. Serial number remarked while in the museum, not clear if it was still on DND books at the time. Sometimes reported as a CF-104A, but this was unofficial.

[10] With Aerospace Engineering and Test Establishment in 1970, for trials with Canadian developed practice bomb carrier.  With No. 417 Squadron at CFB Cold Lake, Alberta in 1975.  Later served with Canadian Air Group at CFB Baden-Soellingen, Germany.  Became a repair instructional airframe, 1860C and 875C. Still at Baden-Soellingen 1995.  At the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum in Hamilton by 2006.

[11] At Aerospace Engineering and Test Establishment, CFB Cold Lake, Alberta, in 1975, still in AETE markings in 1983.  Became repair instructional hrs airframe 820C.  Still at Cold Lake in 1995.  Later to static display at Suffield, Alberta.  CF-104 construction number 1004, serial number 12704, built by Canadair, first flight 14 August 1961, taken on service by the RCAF as CF-104 serial number 12704 on 12 October 1961.  It was assigned initially to CEPE, which later was merged with several other units as AETE and it spent its entire career with the test units, re-serialised as 104704 effective June 2, 1970.  It became instructional hrs airframe “820B” (date unknown), and was reclassified as 820C on 18 October 1983 then became an ABDR training aid on 20 December 1989.   It went to the CFB Cold Lake fire dump (noted in April 1995) and was SOS on 2 May 1996. It went to CADC in 1996, and then to CFB Suffield, Alberta as “contaminated scrap” for ABDR at CFB Suffield, Alberta. It then was used for ABDR at CFB Suffield and then became a range target at CFB Suffield.  At some point, it was moved to the Bagotville Air Defence Museum (CFB Bagotville), (date Unknown) where it is stored in derelict condition, February 2002.

[12] Served with Canadian Air Group at CFB Baden-Soellingen, Germany.  Became a Pedestal Monument, at CFB Lahr, Germany.  Reported on display at College Militaire Royal at St. Jean, Québec, ca. 2006.

[13] With No. 417 Squadron, CFB Cold Lake, Alberta.  With this unit’s Deadeye Whiskey display team in 1972.  With the Deadeye Zip team of 1976.  With the Alberta Arrows team in 1977.  Spent entire career at Cold Lake.  In storage at CFD Mountain View, Ontario in 1988.  Delivered to Halifax by truck in June 1989.  Preserved, on display at Atlantic Canada Aviation & Space Museum, Halifax.

[14] Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luftwaffe.

 (CAF Photo)

Canadair CF-104 Starfighters, Nos. 441, 439, and 421 Squadrons.  Nicknamed the Purina puppy chow bird, the Tiger bird, and the toothbrush, ca 1983.