Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Canadian Warplanes 6: Jets, Avro CF-100 Canuck

Avro CF-100 Canuck

Data current to 11 Sep 2020.

 (DND Archives Photo, PC-1089)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4B (Serial No. 18423), and Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18470).  These aircraft are armed with rocket pods instead of wing tip tanks.

Avro CF-100 Canuck

The Avro Canada CF-100 Canuck (affectionately known as the "Clunk") was a Canadian jet interceptor/fighter in service during the Cold War both in NATO bases in Europe and as part of NORAD.  The CF-100 was the only Canadian-designed fighter to enter mass production, serving primarily with the RCAF and the Canadian Armed Forces, and also in small numbers in Belgium.  For its day, the CF-100 featured a short takeoff run and high climb rate, making it well suited to its role as an interceptor.

Production consisted of 5 pre-production CF-100 Mk. 2 aircraft, 74 machine gun armed CF-100 Mk. 3 aircraft, 280 CF-100 Mk. 4 aircraft armed with both machine guns and rocket pods, and 331 CF-100 Mk. 5 aircraft armed only with rocket pods.

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 1, (2 prototypes built), (Serial Nos. 18101-18102), Mk. 2, (10 built), (Serial Nos. 18103-18112), Mk. 3, (70 built), Serial Nos. 18113-18182), Mk. 4A, (137 built), (Serial Nos. 18183-18319), Mk. 4B, (144 built), (Serial Nos. 18320-18463), Mk. 5 (329 built), (Serial Nos. 18464-18792), for a total number of 692 built.

 (DND Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 3, head on, showing its eight .50 calibre gun pack under the nose.  It carried 1600
rounds of ammunition.

            The CF-100 was the first military jet fighter wholly designed and built in Canada.  This two-seat all-weather jet interceptor weighs roughly 17 tons and is powered by two Canadian-built Orenda jet engines.  It had a top speed of 650 mph and a range of 1,000 miles. The Mk. 1 was equipped with Rolls-Royce Avon engines.  The Mk. 2 had Avro Orenda 2 engines.  The Mk. 3 had Avro Orenda 8 engines.  The Mk. 4A had Avro Orenda 9 engines.  The Mk. 4B was equipped with Avro Orenda 11 engines.  The Mk. 5 was also equipped with Avro Orenda 11 engines.  The Canuck was the first straight-winged aircraft to reach Mach 1 without the aid of rocket power. 

            The CF-100 was an interceptor as opposed to a fighter.  It lacked the daylight air-fighting capability of its contemporary, the Canadair CL-13 Sabre, but made up for this shortfall with its foul weather and high altitude capabilities.  The aircraft was taken on strength (TOS) in June 1951 and remained in service for thirty years.  The CF-100 was originally used for the defence of northern Canada, but was eventually employed by 1 Canadian Air Division in France and Germany.  When it was superseded in its interceptor role, many CF-100s were fitted with powerful electronic countermeasure (ECM) equipment.  These aircraft were among the few in the world capable of carrying out “barrage” jamming, completely blanking-out the “scopes” on a defensive radar site.  The CF-100 was retired in December 1981, and was replaced by the Voodoo.  The Canuck was Canada’s greatest indigenous military aviation success.

            The Canuck (affectionately known as the Clunk), was the only Canadian-designed fighter to enter mass-production.  The CF-100 is not considered to be truly supersonic since it could not exceed the speed of sound in level flight.  However, on 18 December 1952, S/L Janusz Zurakowski, the Avro company chief development test pilot, broke the sound barrier flying the CF-100 Mk 4 prototype in a dive from 30,000 feet.  For details of S/L Janusz Zurakowski’s flying history, see CWS.

            In the early 1950s, Canada needed an interceptor (fighter) able to patrol the vast areas of Canada’s north and operate in all weather conditions.  The two-seat fighter crewed by a pilot and navigator, was designed with two powerful engines and an advanced radar and fire control system housed in its nose that enabled it to fly in all-weather or night conditions.  For its day, the CF-100 featured a short takeoff run and high climb rate, making it well suited to its role as an interceptor.

            Design of the XC-100 to meet an RCAF specification for an all-weather fighter was initiated at Avro Canada in October 1946.  Chief Engineer Edgar Atkin’s work on the CF-100 was subsequently passed to John Frost formerly of de Havilland who, along with Avro’s Chief Aerodynamicist Jim Chamberlin, reworked the original fuselage design.

 (Avro Canada Photo)

Avro CF-100 Mk. 1 prototype (Serial No. 18101), with S/L Bill Waterton, the test pilot, at Malton airport, Ontario, 11 March 1950.

            The CF-100 Mk. 1 prototype (Serial No. 18101), emerged out of the factory, painted gloss black overall with white lightning bolts running down the fuselage and engines.  The CF-100 prototype flew its maiden flight on 19 January 1950 with Gloster Aircraft Company Chief Pilot S/L Bill Waterton at the controls.  Waterton was on loan from the Gloster firm, another member of the Hawker Siddeley Group.  The Mark 1 was powered by two Avon RA 3 turbojets with 28.9 kN (2,950 kgp/6,500 lbf) thrust each.

            The second prototype (Serial No. 18102), was also powered by Rolls-Royce Avons, although subsequent pre-production and production series aircraft used the Avro Orenda turbojet.  Five pre-production Mk. 2 test aircraft were produced (Serial Nos. 18103-18107), all fitted with the Orenda 2 jet engines; one was fitted with dual controls and designated a Mk. 2T trainer.  The first production version, designated Mk. 3, incorporated the APG-33 radar and was armed with eight 0.5 inch machine-guns.  The Mk. 3CT and Mk. 3DT were again dual control versions supplied to operational training units.

            In September 1950, the RCAF ordered 124 examples of the Mk. 3 version; the first of these entering RCAF service in 1953.  These were armed with eight .50-caliber machine guns.  The definitive version rocket-armed Mk. 4A was based on prototype Mk. 4 (a modified Mk 3) first flying on 11 October 1952.  The nose housed the much larger APG-40 radar with wingtip pods each containing up to 30 Mighty Mouse FFAR (folding fin aerial rockets) in addition to the guns.  As the last 54 of an order for the Mk 3 were changed into the Mk. 4 in 1954, total orders for the Mk.4 rose to 510.  The Mk. 4B version had more powerful Orenda 11 engines.

            Five versions, or “marks”, were produced, ending, from 1955 onwards, with the high-altitude Mk. 5 that featured a 1.06m (3 ft. 6 in.) extended wingtip and enlarged tailplane, along with removal of the machine guns.  The proposed Mk. 6 was to have mounted Sparrow II missiles and been powered by afterburning Orenda 11IR engines in an effort to provide an “interim” fighter prior to the introduction of the Avro CF-105.  A projected transonic swept-wing CF-103 was built in mock-up form in 1951, but was considered obsolescent even before the CF-100’s demonstrated ability to exceed the speed of sound in a dive.

            The Canuck was affectionately known in the RCAF as the “Clunk” because of the noise the front landing gear made as it retracted into its well after takeoff.  Its less-attractive nickname was the “Lead Sled”, a reference to its heavy controls and general lack of manoeuvrability, a nickname it shared with a number of other 1950s aircraft.  Others included CF-Zero, the Zilch, the Beast, all references to an aircraft many pilots considered less glamorous than day fighters like the CL-13 Sabre.

            The aircraft operated under the US/Canadian North American Air Defence Command (NORAD) to protect North American airspace from Soviet intruders such as nuclear-armed bombers.  Additionally, as part of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), four Canuck squadrons were based in Europe with 1 Canadian Air Division from 1956–1962, and were for some time the only NATO fighters capable of operating in zero visibility and poor weather conditions.

            The CF-100 served with nine RCAF squadrons at its peak in the mid-1950s. Four of these squadrons were deployed to Europe from late 1956–1962 under the NIMBLE BAT ferry program, replacing NATO RCAF squadrons equipped with Canadair CL-13 Sabre day fighters to provide all-weather defence against Soviet intruders.  Canucks flying at home retained natural metal finish, but those flying overseas were given a British-style disruptive camouflage scheme- dark sea grey and green on top, light sea grey on the bottom.

            During his Avro Canada years, the Chief Development Pilot, S/L Janusz Zurakowski, continued to fly as an aerobatic display pilot, with spectacular results, especially at the 1955 Farnborough Airshow in the UK, where he displayed the CF-100 in a “falling-leaf.”  He was acclaimed again as the “Great Zura” by many aviation and industry observers who could not believe a large, all-weather fighter could be put through its paces so spectacularly.  His performance led to Belgium purchasing the CF-100.

            In its lifetime, a total of 692 CF-100s of different variants were produced, of which 53 aircraft were delivered to the Belgian Air Force.  Although originally designed for only 2,000 hours, it was found that the Canuck’s airframe could serve for over 20,000 hours before retirement.  Consequently, though it was replaced in its front line role by the McDonnell CF-101B Voodoo, the Canuck served with 414 Squadron of the Canadian Forces at CFB North Bay, Ontario, until 1981, in reconnaissance, training and electronic warfare roles.  After the CF-100 was retired, a number of aircraft still remain across Canada (and elsewhere) as static displays.  Its planned successor, the CF-105 Arrow along with the sophisticated Orenda Iroquois engine, both Canadian-designed, was cancelled in 1959 in a controversial decision by the Canadian government.

(DND Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 1 (Serial No. 18101), coded FB-D.  First prototype Canuck, powered with Avon engines.  In overall black finish for intitial tests.  To Central Experimental and Proving Establishment at RCAF Station Rockcliffe, Ontario, for initial RCAF trials winter of 1950-1951.  To Wright Field, Ohio for USAF evaluation in November 1950.  Tested without canopy during flight number 126, in mid 1952.  Formally taken on charge by RCAF on 3 Sep 1952, immediatley loaned to Avro Canada.  Wing tip pod cone jettisoning trials in December 1952, photographed from the Avro Jetliner.  Used by Avro Canada for rocket trials at Point Petre Range in 1953.  First Canuck wing tip rockets fired there on 27 Jan 1953, by Avro Canada pilot Peter Cope.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4047130)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 1 (Serial No. 18101), coded FB-D, first prototype.  RCAF personnel with A/M Curtis, MND Claxton and test pilot Squadron Leader Bill Waterton.  This aircraft emerged from the factory, painted gloss black overall with white lightning bolts running down the fuselage and engines.  The CF-100 prototype flew its maiden flight on 19 Jan 1950 with Gloster Aircraft Company Chief Test Pilot Squadron Leader Bill Waterton at the controls.  18101 flew for 40 minutes and reached a maximum altitude of 5000 feet and achieved a maximum speed of 215 mph.  The Canuck's speed was limited as the landing gear failed to retract.

 (Aerospace Heritage Foundation of Canada Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 1 (Serial No. 18102), coded FB-K.  This was the second prototype Canuck, dressed in the same black paint scheme as 18101 for early trials.  First flown in July 1950, it was also fitted with Avon engines.  19102 went to the Central Experimental and Proving Establishment at RCAF Station Rockcliffe, Ontario, for initial RCAF trials from October 1950.  A speed of Mach 0.848 in a dive was achieved in early trials.  18102 was fitted with a nose-mounted pitot tube for early company trials.  It crashed on 5 Apr 1951 into Komoka Bog, west of London, Ontario, the first Canuck loss and first fatal one.  The probable cause was a failure of the pilot's oxygen system.  It was formally taken on charge by RCAF on 23 Jun 1951, and struck off  charge on the same day.

(DND Photo via James Craik)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 1 (Serial No. 18102), coded FB-K, second prototype.

 (DND Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 1 (Serial No. 18102), coded FB-K, second prototype, alongside a North American F-86 Sabre (Serial No. 47-616), coded FU-616.

 (DND Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 1 (Serial No. 18102), coded FB-K in flight.  This prototype is equipped with wing tip tanks that have stabilizing fins facing out.

 (DND Photo via Chris Charland)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 3B (Serial No. 18133), No. 445 "Wolverine" AW (F) Squadron, RCAF Station North Bay, Ontario.

  (RCAF Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 2T (Serial No. 18105), coded BR, No. 434 Squadron.  Flown as a development aircraft for the Mk. 2T, from Malton, in the early 1950s.  JATO trials in Aug 1952, at RCAF Station Uplands, Ontario.  Used by Central Experimental and Proving Establishment for autopilot trials from Dec 1952.  Included tests done at the autopilot manufacturer, in Minneapolis, Minnisota.  Used for bombing trials in 1953 and 1954.  By this time, aircraft was roughly to Mk. 3 standards, but was never officially redesignated.  18105 was damaged during these trials on 23 Sep 1953, when its canopy blew off during a high G turn with four 1,000 pound bombs.

 (DND Photo via Chris Charland)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 3 (Serial No. 18125), coded JF, No. 3 All-Weather (AW) Operational Training Unit (OTU) based at RCAF Station North Bay and later RCAF. Station Cold Lake, Alberta.  This aircraft was later converted to a dual Mk. 3D.  It was struck off strength at RCAF Station Lincoln Park on 3 August, 1960.

(RCAF Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 3A (Serial No. 18125), coded JF, No. 3 OTU.  Operated by No. 3 AW(F) Operational Training Unit at RCAF Station North Bay, Ontario, in 1955.  Converted to Mk. 3T, and then Mk. 3D.

(RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Avro  CF-100 Canuck Mk. 3 (Serial No. 18148), coded NQ, No. 423 Squadron, RCAF Station St. Hubert, Quebec.  Took part in Operation Prairie Pacific, air show tour of western Canada in summer of 1954.  Still with this unit spring of 1955.  At No. 3 Operational Training Unit 3 OTU), RCAF Station Cold Lake, Alberta by 1957.  Converted to Mk. 3T.  Taken on charge by Canadian Armed Forces on 1 Feb 1968, but retained RCAF serial number.

 (RCAF Photo via Luc Dube)

Avro  CF-100 Canuck Mk. 3 (Serial No. 18---), of No. 423 Squadron, RCAF Station St-Hubert, Quebec.

 (RCAF Photo via Luc Dubé)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 2T, coded BH, No. 430 Squadron, jet-assisted take-off (JATO).

(RCAF Photo)

Avro  CF-100 Canuck Mk. 3, top view.

(RCAF Photo)

Avro  CF-100 Canuck Mk. 3 (Serial No. 18149), coded NQ, No. 423 Squadron, ca 1956.

 (RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Avro  CF-100 Canuck Mk. 3 (Serial No. 18149), coded NQ, No. 423 Squadron, ca 1956.

(RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Avro  CF-100 Canuck, nose on shot.

(RCAF Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 3B (Serial No. 18157).  With No. 3 F(AW) Operational Training Unit at RCAF Station North Bay, Ontario at time of crash.  Crashed on night landing, 21 Apr 1954 at North Bay.  Official cause was originally "pilot disorientation".  Later determined to be a flap fitting failure, resulting in flaps blowing up in flight, based on similar subsequent incidents, and further examination of saved wreckage.

 (DND Photo via Chris Charland)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4 (Serial No. 18112), coded FB-S, from the Central Experimental & Proving Establishment (CEPE), RCAF Station Uplands, Ontario.

RCAF test and development work was carried out at Ottawa Air Station (Rockcliffe and Shirley's Bay) where, eventually, a special flight was formed for this purpose. The outbreak of the Second World War greatly increased the demands for test flying for research and experiment, and, as a result, the flight was expanded into the Test and Development Establishment in Nov 1940.  Six years later its name was changed to the Experimental and Proving Establishment (EPE).  On 1 Sep 1951 the Central Experimental and Proving Establishment (CEPE) was formed by the amalgamation of the EPE at RCAF Station Rockcliffe, Ontario, the Winter Experimental Establishment (WEE) at Edmonton, Alberta, and the RCAF (National Research Council) Unit at Arnprior, Ontario.  Headquarters CEPE was located at Rockcliffe, with detachments at several sites across Canada.  In 1957 CEPE was moved to RCAF Station Uplands, a move necessitated by the longer runways required for testing new jet aircraft.

(RCAF Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4 (Serial No. 18197), and (Serial No. 18207), coded UD, 419 Squadron, over St Hubert, Québec, 24 March 1955.  18197 flew with  No. 419 Squadron at RCAF Station North Bay, Ontario in early 1955.  Featured in the 1955 RCAF recruiting calendar.  Became Instructional Airframe A653, used at Camp Borden, Ontario.

(RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4 (Serial No. 18197), No. 419 Squadron, RCAF Station North Bay, Ontario in early 1955, minus its wing tanks.

 (RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4 (Serial No. 18197), No. 419 Squadron at RCAF Station North Bay, Ontario in early 1955.  After its flying career it became instructional trainer A653.

(DND Image Library Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4A, RCAF (Serial No. 18225), No. 428 AW(F) Squadron, at RCAF Station Uplands, Ontario.  First ECM Canuck operated by No. 104 (K) Unit at RCAF Station St. Hubert, PQ from early 1957.  Unit later became an Electronic Warfare Unit.

(RCAF Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4A (Serial No. 18300).  Flown by Avro Canada for several development programs.  Performed spinning trials in May 1955.  Trials for High Altitude Version, which lead to the Mk. 5, and used for trial installations of Sparrow missiles.  Fired first Sparrow from a Canuck on 31 Jul 1957.

(RCAF Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18300), armed with Sparrow air-to-air missiles.

(DND Image Library Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5, RCAF (Serial No. 18300) with Sparrow missiles.

(DND Image Library Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck, RCAF, with Sparrow missile.

(DND Image Library Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck, RCAF, with Sparrow missile.

(RCAF Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5, RCAF (Serial No. 18323), fitted with dummy Sparrow AAMs for trials.  This Canuck was also flwon in trials for a High Altitude Version, with Central Experimental and Proving Establishment in December 1955, flown by Paul Hartmann.  The trial led to the development of the Mk. 5.  As shown here, it was flown by Avro Canada for early Sparrow missile trials in aerodynamic tests with 4 dummy Sparrows fitted.  It was later flown in afterburner trials.  It has also been reported as being a Mk. 5/6, probably as a result of developmental modifications.

(RCAF Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18323), armed with Sparrow air-to-air missiles.

 (22 Wing Heritage Office Archives Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4A, RCAF (Serial No. 18311), coded JF, No. 3 AW (F) OTU (All-Weather Fighter Operational Training Unit), RCAF Station Cold Lake, Alberta.  In 1953 this unit adopted the nickname "Night Witches", suggested by the wife of the unit's Engineering Officer, and the orange and black logo seen on the nose, denoting its all-weather day-or-night operations.

 (RCAF Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4B (Serial No. 18330), and (Serial No. 18364), No. 423 Squadron, based at No. 2 (F) Wing, RCAF Station Grostenquin, France, 9 Oct 1962.  These aircraft were participating in training at the Air Weapons (training) Unit at Decimomannu, Sardinia.   CF-100s were flown by the RCAF in Europe from 1956 to 1962.  18330 was ferried to Europe in Operation Nimble Bat 1, Nov 1956.  It flew with No. 423 Squadron at 2 (F) Wing, Grostenquin, France, and later from 4 (F) Wing at Baden-Soellingen, Germany in 1962.  It also flew with No. 428 and No. 445 Squadrons.

 (Joint Imagery Centre Photo, PL-82750)

Avro CF-100 Canuck (Serial No. 18101), at 2 (F) Wing, Grostenquin, France.  This Canuck took part in the 1955 Farnborough Airshow in the UK.

 (DND Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4B (Serial No. 18330), ferried to Europe in Operation Nimble Bat 1, Nov 1956.  It flew with No. 423 Squadron at 2 (F) Wing, Grostenquin, France, and later from 4 (F) Wing at Baden-Soellingen, Germany in 1962.  It also flew with No. 428 and No. 445 Squadrons.

(RCAF Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4B (Serial No. 18336), coded FG, No. 433 Squadron at RCAF Station Cold Lake, Alberta in 1955.  Used for operational trials for Mk. 4B.  Moved from RCAF Station Cold Lake, Alberta to North Bay, Ontario late 1955.  Crashed near end of ferry flight to North Bay.  Also reported as having flown with No. 409 Squadron.

 (RCAF Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4B (Serial No. 18330), and (Serial No. 18364), No. 423 Squadron, based at No. 2 (F) Wing, RCAF Station Grostenquin, France, 9 Oct 1962.  18364 flew with No. 428 Squadron, RCAF Uplands, Ontario, coded HG, before being feried to No. 423 Squadron at 4 (F) Wing, Baden-Soellingen, Germany, in 1962.  It was fitted with a camera fairing in front of the windshield for training at Sardinia while with this unit. 18364 also flew with No. 445 Squadron.

 (DND Photo via James Craik)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18343), coded DL, No. 432 Squadron, on the line at RCAF Station Hamilton, Ontario,  in preparation for the fly-past at the Canadian International Air Show.  Viewed from under another aircraft of No. 432 Black Cougar CF-100 Squadron from RCAF Station Bagotville, Quebec.

 (DND Photo via James Craik)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18343), coded DL, No. 432 Squadron, on the line at RCAF Station Hamilton, Ontario,  in preparation for the fly-past at the Canadian International Air Show.  Viewed from under another aircraft of No. 432 Black Cougar CF-100 Squadron from RCAF Station Bagotville, Quebec.

 (DND Photos via James Craik)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18343), coded DL, No. 432 Squadron, on the line at RCAF Station Hamilton, Ontario,  in preparation for the fly-past at the Canadian International Air Show.  Viewed from under another aircraft of No. 432 Black Cougar CF-100 Squadron from RCAF Station Bagotville, Quebec.

(DND Photos via James Craik)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18343), coded DL, No. 432 Squadron, on the line at RCAF Station Hamilton, Ontario,  in preparation for the fly-past at the Canadian International Air Show.  Viewed from under another aircraft of No. 432 Black Cougar CF-100 Squadron from RCAF Station Bagotville, Quebec.

 (DND Image Library Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4A, RCAF (Serial No. 18362), coded HG, (Serial No. 18227), coded HG, and (Serial No. 18330) coded HG, No. 428 Squadron, Uplands, Ontario.  18362 flew with No. 428 Squadron, RCAF station Uplands, Ontario, before serving in Europe in 1962, with No. 445 Squadron at 1 (F) Wing, Marville, France.

(RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4B (Serial No. 18362), coded HG, No. 428 Squadron, RCAF station Uplands, Ontario, before serving in Europe in 1962, with No. 445 Squadron at 1 (F) Wing, Marville, France.

 (Bob Bromley Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck, No. 423 Squadron aircraft, being armed with a 7-tube rocket pod at NATO gunnery range, Decimomannu, Sardinia, circa 1960.  The nose-mounted cine cameras were standard at this time at the Air Weapons Unit. 

 (Bob Bromley Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck (Serial No. 18370), No. 423 Squadron, firing a salvo of 2.75-inch rockets.  The 7-tube practice pods became available in 1960 providing a two-pass capability on each sortie, six rockets being fired per pass.

 (DND Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck, No. 445 Squadron, with the starborad wing rocket pod being loaded at 1 (F) Wing, Marville, France, August 1958.

 (Hugh MacKechnie/Avro Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4A, RCAF (Serial No. 18372), coded SA, No. 445 Squadron, in a vertical climb, over RCAF Station Uplands, Ontario in 1955.  This CF-100 also flew with No. 423 and 440 Squadrons.

 (RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4B, RCAF (Serial No. 18383), coded NQ, No. 423 Squadron, at 2 (F) Wing, RCAF Station Grostenquin, France in 1957.  Later with No. 440 Squadron at Zweibrucken, Germany in 1959.

(DND Image Library)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4B, RCAF (Serial No. 18386), coded SA, served with No. 445 AW (F) Squadron when it transferred from RCAF Station North Bay, Ontario to 1 (F) Wing, RCAF Station Marville, France, in 1956.  18386 also flew with No. 423 Squadron.

 (DND Image Library Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4B (Serial No. 18406), No. 423 Squadron at 4 (F) Wing, RCAF Station Baden-Soellingen, Germany, in 1962.  This CF-100 also flew with No. 419 Squadron.

(RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4B (Serial No. 18409), being lifted by a crane.  This aircraft flew with No. 423, No. 433 and No. 440 Squadrons.

(DND Image Library)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4B, RCAF (Serial No. 18410),  and No. 419 Squadron.  This CF-100 also flew with No. 409 Squadron.

 (DND Photo via James Craik)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4B (Serial No. 18421), No. 440 Squadron.

(DND Image Library)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4B, RCAF (Serial No. 18421), No. 440 Squadron.

 (RCAF Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4B (Serial No. 18426).  This Canuck flew with No. 419, No. 440 and No. 445 Squadrons.

(RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4B (Serial No. 18434), at Ancienne Lorrette, Quebec, with specially modified white tip pods that contain IR detection equipment and cameras.  18434 flew with No. 440 Squadron at RCAF Station Bagotville, Quebec.  It was part of a 9-plane detachment to Uplands and St. Hubert in February 1956.  18434 crashed on 23 Jul 1956 during night exercises leading to deployment to France, both crew ejected safely.  Same crew ejected from 18403.

 (RCAF Photo via James Craik)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4B (Serial No. 18434), No. 440 Squadron at RCAF Station Bagotville, Quebec, shown here at Ancienne Lorrette, Quebec, with specially modified white tip pods that contain IR detection equipment and cameras.

 (DND Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck (Serial No. 18450), No. 440 Squadron, firing a full combat load of rockets over the Decimomannu, Sardinia range.

 (DND Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18556) firing six rockets from 3-tube practice launchers.  This was during the first annual ADC rocket meet, Cold Lake, Alberta, September 1957.

 (DND Photo)

LAC Jack Studds and Cpl Arneil remove the starboard 3-tube rocket launcher on a CF-100 with No. 419 Squadron.

 (DND Photo)

LAC Ron Maddack of the 4 (F) Wing Photo Section removing movie film from an N9 wing camera for immediate processing and assessment.

 (DND Image Library Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5D, RCAF (Serial No. 18473), over Niagara Falls.  This Canuck served with No. 419 and No. 440 Squadrons.  It was converted to a Mk. 5C ECM trainer at Malton, Ontario by de Havilland Canada in 1964.  It served with the Electronic Warfare Unit and No. 414 (EW) Squadron at RCAF Station St. Hubert, Quebec in the 1960s.  It was taken on charge by the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) on 1 Feb 1968, but retained its RCAF serial number.  It was being flown with No. 414 Squadron when it crashed into farm house near St. John, Quebec on 20 Aug 1968.

 (DND Image Library Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5D, RCAF (Serial No. 18473), coded AQ, over Niagara Falls.  Converted to Mk. 5, date unknown, possibly before delivery.  With No. 423 Squadron of St. Hubert, Quebec, when it visited Trenton in September 1956.  Later with No. 414 Squadron at RCAF Station North Bay, Ontario.  Part of this unit's team in the first Air Defense Command rocket meet, September 1957.

 (DND Image Library Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5D, RCAF (Serial No. 18473), over Niagara Falls.  No. 423 "Eagle" AW (F) Squadron based at RCAF Station St. Hubert, Quebec.  Its crew wa sin Ontario participating in the Canadian National Exhibition's International Air Show in August, 1956. 

(RCAF Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18532), No. 425 Squadron.  With No. 425 AW (F) Squadron at RCAF Station St. Hubert, Quebec.  18532 also flew with No. 409 and No. 410 Squadrons.  Scrapped at Hamilton, Ontario, ca 27 Oct 1963.

 (DND Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18539), coded DL, No. 432 Squadron, over RCAF Station Bagotville, Quebec, 16 Aug 1957.  With No. 413 Squadron from RCAF Station Bagotville, Quebec, when it was detached to Sept-Isles, Quebec on 13 and 14 Oct 1961 for Exercise Sky Shield.  Also with No. 416 Squadron, dates unknown.  Arrived at Hamilton, Ontario by rail car for scrapping on 27 Oct 1963.

 (DND Photo via James Craik)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18551), coded AN, No. 410 Squadron at RCAF Station Uplands, Ontario.  One of several squadron aircraft detached to Harmon Air Force Base, Newfoundland, in October 1957.  With Electronic Warfare Unit at RCAF Station St. Hubert, Quebec in the 1960s.

 (RCAF Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18551), coded AN, No. 410 Squadron, RCAF Station Uplands, Ontario, with a Convair F-102 Delta Dagger, USAF (Serial No. 56-1300), 10 Oct 1957.  The CF-100 was flown by F/O Ed Wilkie when No. 410 Squadron was visiting Ernest Harmon AFB where the Americans were doing conversion training from F-89s to the F-102s.

(RCAF Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18551) coded AN, No. 410 Squadron, with a Convair F-102 Delta Dagger, USAF (Serial No. 56-1300).

 (DND Archives Photo, RNC-1155-2)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18525).

 (DND Photo via Howard Stymiest)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18527), No. 425 Squadron from RCAF Station St-Hubert, over St. Margarets, NB

 (RCAF Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18556), coded HY, No. 410 Squadron at RCAF Station Uplands, Ontario.   This was one of several squadron aircraft detached to Harmon Air Force Base, Newfoundland, in October 1957.  It later served with the Electronic Warfare Unit at RCAF Station St. Hubert, Quebec in the 1960s.

(RCAF Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18631).  With No. 416 Squadron, RCAF Station St. Hubert, Quebec, in 1957.  With No. 414 Squadron, dates unknown.  With No. 409 Squadron at RCAF Station Comox, British Columbia, in January 1962, one of the last operational fighter CF-100s.

 (RCAF Photo via James Craik)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18631), No. 416 Squadron, in formation with Lockheed CP-122 Neptune, RCAF (Serial No. 24119).  18631 flew with No. 416 Squadron at RCAF Station St. Hubert, Quebec in 1957.  With No. 414 Squadron, dates unknown.  With No. 409 Squadron at RCAF Station Comox, BC in January 1962, one of the last operational CF-100s.

 (DND Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5, No. 428 Squadron, RCAF Station Uplands, Ontario, 16 March 1960.

 (DND Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18593) and (Serial No. 18539), coded DL, No. 432 Squadron, RCAF Station Bagotville, Quebec, 16 Aug 1957.

 (RCAF Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18724), RCAF Station St-Hubert, on a "Saturday Alert," Wing Commander W. L. Smokey Drake's dog Friday, 1958.

 (DND Photo via James Craik)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18727), St Hubert, Québec.  18727 carried its RCAF number for testing and ferry flight.  Accepted by Belgium on 14 April 1958.  To Belgium AF as (Serial No. AX-43).  Sold for scrap, late 1963 or earlier.

(DND Photo via James Craik)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18748), coded AN, No. 411 Squadron, on the flight line at Uplands, Ontario.  18748 flew with No. 410 Squadron at RCAF Station Uplands, Ontario in 1959.  It was taken on strength by the Canadian Armed Forces on 1 Feb 1968, but retained its original RCAF serial number.

 (DND Photo via Doug Jermyn)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18760) flight testing a JT15D jet pod slung under the left side of the fuselage.  18760 flew with No. 433 Squadron, from 25 July 1958.  it was with this unit when its left main gear collapsed on landing at North Bay, Ontario ca Mar 1959.  It also lew with No. 410 Squadron, dates unknown.  To storage at No. 10 Repair Depot, Lethbridge, Alberta on 17 May 1961.  To No. 3 AW(F) Operational Training Unit at RCAF Station Bagotville, Quebec, in Aug 1962.  To storage at No. 6 Repair Depot, Trenton in June 1963.  Served with No. 414 Squadron, dates unknown.  Leased to United Aircraft Canada Ltd. 1 Sep 1967, for use as an engine test bed.  18760 had 1031.5 hours airframe time when it arrived at P&WC at St. Hubert, Quebec, on 22 Nov 1967.  It became CAF (Serial No. 100760) when renumbered.  Not actually re-marked until after 1 Nov 1970.

 (DND Photo via Chris Charland)

Convair B-36H Peacemaker (Serial No. 52-1356), 11th Bombardment Wing, Carswell AFB, Fort Worth, Texas, intercepted by a pair of CF-100 Mk. 5's from No. 428 "Ghost" AW (F) Squadron. 

 (RCAF Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18780), (Serial No. 100780), No. 414 SquadronWith Electronic Warfare Unit at RCAF Station St. Hubert, Quebe in the 1960s.  Still with this unit when it became No. 414 (EW) Squadron.  Became instructional airframe A 780.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4314017)

Avro CF-100 Canucks on the flight line for the visit of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Ottawa airport, 12 Oct 1957.

Avro CF-100 Canucks preserved:

(DND Photo via James Craik)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 2 (Serial No. 18103), coded JF, 3rd prototype.  Operated by No. 3 AW(F) Operational Training Unit at RCAF Station Cold Lake, Alberta, in 1955.

 (RCAF Photo) 

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 2 (Serial No. 18103), coded FB-J, 3rd prototype fitted with an Orenda 2 engine.  This was the only Mk. 2 that was not a dual control, all other Mk. 2s were converted to dual control trainers.  It made its first flight on 20 June 1951.  18103 is currently on display at the Canadian Air Land Sea Museum, Markham, Ontario.

 (Author Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 2T, RCAF (Serial No. 18104), CF (Serial No. A611), painted as (Serial No. 100104), Royal Military College Saint-Jean, Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Québec.

 (Andre Blanchard Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 2T, RCAF (Serial No. 18106), CF (Serial No. A615), pre-production coded VC-FBK, Military Memorial Museum, Campbellford, Ontario.  Previouslly located at Centralia, Lambeth and Carlow, Ontario. 

 (Author Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 3D (Serial No. 18126), coded KE, No. 440 Squadron, painted as a prototype.  The Hangar Flight Museum, Calgary, Alberta.

(RCAF Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 3D (Serial No. 18138), coded SA-138, No. 445 Squadron, formation flight.  Served with No. 445 Squadron at RCAF Station North Bay, Ontario, summer of 1953.  With No. 440 Squadron at RCAF Station Bagotville, Quebec, in July 1954, when it took part in the Ontario Centennial Airshow at Windsor, Ontario.  Also with No. 3 F(AW) Operational Training Unit, dates unknown.  Converted to Mk. 3D, date unknown.

  (AHunt Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 3D, RCAF (Serial No. 18138), C/N 038, wings and fuselage from Mk. 5C (Serial No. 18766) and (Serial No. 18791), (Serial No. 100791), No. 445 Squadron.  18138 was one of 56 CF-100s converted in 1955 from Mk. 3B to Mk 3D dual trainers.  It saw service with No. 440 Squadron, Bagotville, Quebec, and No. 445 Squadron, Uplands, Ontario, as well as with No. 3 AW(F) OTU, North Bay, Ontario.  Canadian Museum of Flight, Langley, British Columbia.

 (Tony Hisgett Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 3D (Serial No. 18152), coded JF-152, No. 3 Operational Training Unit (OTU), mounted on a pylon, Bomber Command Museum of Canada, Nanton, Alberta.

 (Author Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4A (Serial No. 18194), coded HG, No. 428 Squadron, CAF (Serial No. 646B).  This aircraft was previously used as a training frame for the Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear School.  Base Borden Military Museum, CFB Borden, Ontario.

 (RCAF Photo via James Craik)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4B (Serial No. 18434) at Ancienne Lorrette, Quebec, with specially modified white tip pods that contain IR detection equipment and cameras.  Mountain View, Ontario, placed in storage for the CA&SM.

(DND Image Library Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5D, RCAF (Serial No. 18472),  (Serial No. 100472), firing rockets.  The Mk. 5 nose cone enclosed a Hughes MG-2 fire control system and APG-40 radar.  In addition to the eight 50 caliber machine guns, the Mk. 4’s were armed with wing tip mounted rocket pods.  These pods contained fifty-eight 70-mm (2.74 in) diameter unguided folding-fin aerial rockets (FFARs), also known as Mighty Mouse rockets.  The FFARs proved to be significantly more potent at destroying a large bomber, but were also known to be inaccurate and unpredictable.

 (Imer Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5D (Serial No. 18472), (Serial No. 100472), painted as KE-437 (Serial No. 18437), No. 440 Squadron, on the port side, painted as DL-742 (Serial No. 18741), No. 432 Squadron, on the starboard side, mounted on a pylon.  Air Defence Museum, 3 Wing, CFB Bagotville, Québec.  This aircraft was renumbered from RCAF (Serial No. 18472) on 23 October 1970.  Served with No. 414 (EW) Squadron at CFB North Bay, Ontario.  Last flight was on 10 November 1981, when it was flown from North Bay to Bagotville.  Displayed at CFB Bagotville, Québec, in RCAF markings.  Carried incorrect RCAF serials 18431 and 18741 for a period while on display.  Air Defence Museum of Bagotville (BADM), Le Musée de la défense aérienne de Bagotville (MDAB) Alouette, Québec.

 (Author Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5D (Serial No. 18476), (Serial No. 100476), No. 440 Squadron, Alberta Aviation Museum, Edmonton, Alberta.  Renumbered from RCAF (Serial No. 18476).  Flown with No. 414 (EW) Squadron at CFB North Bay, Ontario. Operational as late as January 1980.  Last flight on 22 January 1982, when it was delivered from North Bay to Edmonton.

 (Author Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5C (Serial No. 18488), No. 428 Squadron, mounted on a pylon in Centennial Park, on Highway 2, at the West end of the city, Moncton, New Brunswick.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4118640)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18493), (Serial No. 100493), after it overshot the runway, 31 Dec 1973.  100493 was flown by the Electronic Warfare Unit based at RCAF Station St. Hubert, Quebec.  It went into storage at CFD Mountainview, Ontario in 1980.  It was reported to have 5244 hours airframe time when stored.   100493 was used in the training film, "A Man for All Occurances".

 (Author Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5D (Serial No. 18493), (Serial No. 100493), Base Borden Military Museum, 16 Wing, CFB Borden, Ontario.

 (Bill Cumming Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5D (Serial No. 18500), (Serial No. 100500), No. 414 Squadron, mounted on a pylon, 22 Wing, CFB North Bay, Ontario.  Renumbered from RCAF (Serial No. 18500) on 23 October 1970.  Flew with No. 414 (EW) Squadron, at CFB North Bay, Ontario.  Flown by Major P. Growen on 10 October 1980, when he reached 3,000 hours on type.  Last flight was on 27 July 1981.  Designated for static display at CFB North Bay.

 (NHL4Hamilton Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5C (Serial No. 18506), (Serial No. 100506), No. 428 Squadron, Canadian Air Land Sea Museum, Markham, Ontario.  This aircraft was previously on display at Mount Hope, Ontario until 2012.   It was converted to Mk. 5, date unknown, possibly before delivery.  18506 flew with No. 433 Squadron, dates unknown.  With Electronic Warfare Unit at RCAF Station St. Hubert, Quebec in the 1960s.

 (Timo Explorer Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck  Mk. 5, RCAF (Serial No. 18602), CAF (Serial No. A683), mounted on a pylon near Haliburton Highlands Secondary School, Haliburton, Ontario.

 (Treknschmidt Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5D, RCAF (Serial No. 18619), CAF (Serial No. A682), No. 414 Squadron, mounted on a pylon in Paul Coffey Park, Malton, Ontario.

 (Timo Explorer Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5M (Serial No. 18626), painted as (Serial No. 101028), No. 414 Squadron, mounted on a pylon in Lee Park, North Bay, Ontario. 

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5M (Serial No. 186806), reported to be stored at the Museum of Flight, Seattle, Washington.

 (Author Photyo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18731), (Serial No. 100731), Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario.  Previously (Serial No. 18731), parked near the Land Forces Technical Staff College.

 (Author Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5C (Serial No. 18746), located facing the main parade square, College Militaire Royale (CMR), Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec.

 (Author Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5D (Serial No. 18747), (Serial No. 100747), Atlantic Canada Aviation Museum, Halifax, Nova Scotia.  Renumbered from RCAF 18747 on 23 October 1970.  Retired from Aerospace Engineering and Test Establishment in February 1973, their last Canuck.  Had been used for tests of infrared line scan equipment. To open storage at CFB Mountain View, Ontario, with only 1,275 hours hrs airframe time, early 1973.  Became Instructional Hrs airframe 792 B briefly in early 1982.  To ACAM in 1995.  On display at CFB Shearwater in April 1995.  On display at the ACAM in Halifax, NS, by 2007, marked as 18747.

 (Author Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5D (Serial No. 18752), CAF (Serial No. 793B), 16 Wing, CFB Borden, Ontario.  Previously at CFB Uplands, Ontario.

 (Author Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5C/D (Serial No. 100757).  Renumbered from RCAF 18757 on 23 October 1970.  Flew with 414 (EW) Squadron, North Bay detachment. Delivered by 414 Squadron to National Aeronautical Collection, Rockcliffe on 26 October 1979.  Each engine had 1 hour left before major overhaul when delivered.  Canada Aviation and Space Museum, Ottawa, Ontario.

 (ceasol Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18759), (Serial No. 100759), No. 416 Squadron, Reynolds Alberta Museum, Wetaskiwin, Alberta.

 (Photo courtesy of Doug Jermyn)

 (Pierre Gillard Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18760), (Serial No. 100760), No. 425 Squadron, previously mounted on a pylon at St. Hubert, it has been dismounted, Québec Aerospace Museum (QAM), Musée de l’aérospatiale du Québec, St. Hubert, Québec.  Renumbered from RCAF (Serial No. 18760) on 23 October 1970.  Leased to United Aircraft Canada Ltd., carried small turbofans under fuselage for in flight testing, from 1967.  Returned to CAF on 31 December 1971, then back to UAC at unknown date.  Had flown 850 test hours, in over flights, by January 1981.  Most tests were with JT15D engine.  Flew last flight of a CF-100 on 28 June 1982, on engine test flight from St. Hubert, Québec.  Now on display on pedestal at St. Hubert.

 (Krystal Wilson Photo)

 (Paul Nity Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18761), No. 3 OTU, 4 Wing, CFB Cold Lake, Alberta.

 (Author Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18764).  This aircraft was taken on strength by the RCAF in 1958 and served with 416 and 425 Squadrons.  Royal Western Canada Aviation Museum, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

 (Author Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18773), CFA (Serial No. 814B), (Serial No. 100773).  This aircraft served with No. 416 Squadron at CFB Chatham, New Brunswick and with No. 425 Squadron, Bagotville, Quebec.  It was taken on strength by the Canadian Armed Forces on 1 Feb 1968 as Instructional Airframe as (Serial No. 814B).   It went into storage at CFD Mountainview, Ontario in 1980, still carrying its RCAF serial number.  It had 966 hours airframe time when stored on 12 Feb 1990.  It was preserved at CFB Trenton, Ontario, until coming to the  New Brunswick Military History Museum, 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown, New brunswick, in 2011.  Stored in the 403 Squadron lines. 

 (Author Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 18774), (Serial No. 100774), painted black to represent the CF-100 prototype, National Air Force Museum of Canada, 8 Wing, CFB Trenton, Ontario.

 (Author Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5D (Serial No. 18784), (Serial No. 100784), mounted on a pylon,  shown here on display at CFB Baden Soellingen, Germany, before it was brought to Winnipeg in 1993.  Renumbered from RCAF (Serial No. 18784) on 23 October 1970, this aircraft was flown by No. 414 (EW) Squadron while based at CFB North Bay, Ontario in 1980.  It is painted in an approximation of No. 1 Canadian Air Division camouflage for type before its retirement in 1981.  It was flown to CFB Baden-Soellingen, Germany for display, on 17 December 1981.  This reported to have been the last trans-Atlantic Canuck flight.  It was brought back to Canada on the closure of CFB Baden-Soellingen in 1993.  It is currently on display outside the Air Command Headquarters Museum, Air Force Heritage Museum and Airpark (AFHM&AP), 17 Wing, CFB Winnipeg, Manitoba. (My Photo)

 (Author Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5D (Serial No. 18784), (Serial No. 100784), mounted on a pylon, at Air Command Headquarters Museum, Air Force Heritage Museum and Airpark (AFHM&AP), 17 Wing, CFB Winnipeg, Manitoba.

 (Author Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5D (Serial No. 18785), (Serial No. 100785), No. 414 Squadron, Uplands, Ontario, ca 1972.

 (Author Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5D (Serial No. 18785), black.  Renumbered from RCAF (Serial No. 18785), on 23 October 1970.  Flew with No. 414 (EW) Squadron at CFB North Bay, Ontario.  Painted in black scheme based on original Canuck prototype scheme, for type retirement in 1981.  Delivered to Museum at Rockcliffe on 10 February 1982, last CAF Canuck flight.  On loan to the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, Mount Hope, Ontario.

 (The A-Team Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5D, RCAF (Serial No. 18790), (Serial No. 100790), No. 409 Squadron.  Renumbered from RCAF (Serial No. 18790), on 23 Oct 1970.  This Canuck also flew with No. 414 Squadron, CFB North Bay, Ontario.  It had been struck off strength on 13 Oct 1981, prior to its last flight.  CAFM, CFB Comox, British Columbia.

Avro CF-100 Canuck Survivors outside of Canada: 

 (NMUSAF Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4A (Serial No. 18241), CAF (Serial No. A631), coded HG, No. 428 Squadron, National Museum of the USAF, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, Ohio, USA.  This aircraft was previously on display at Bellville, Ontario, before being moved to the NMUSAF in 1999.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5D (Serial No. 18504), (Serial No. 100504), Castle Air Museum, Atwater, California.  Renumbered from RCAF (Serial No. 18504) on 23 October 1970.  Flown by No. 414 (EW) Squadron at CFB North Bay, Ontario.  Last flight on 20 January 1982, when it was flown from North Bay to Castle AFB, California. On Display at Castle AFB.

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5 (Serial No. 100775), mounted on a pedestal, W. Soplata College, Ohio.  Parts of several other aircraft are incorporated into this Canuck. 

 (Author Photos)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5C (Serial No. 18779), (Serial No. 100779), placed on display in May 1976 at the Peterson Air and Space Museum, Peterson AFB, Colorado Springs, Colorado.  Renumbered from RCAF (Serial No. 18779) on 23 October 1970.  Used by Electronic Warfare Unit.  Still flew with this unit when it became No. 414 (EW) Squadron.  On display at NORAD HQ in Colorado, delivered there on 27 May 1976 by 414 Squadron crew.

 (Ad Meskens Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 5, RCAF (Serial No. 18534), CAF (Serial No. A690), No. 425 Squadron, Musée Royal de l’Armée et d’Histoire Militaire, Royal Museum of the Armed Forces and of Military History, Brussels, Belgium. 

 (Steve Fitzgerald Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4B (Serial No. 18393), No. 441 Squadron.  

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Avro CF-100 Canuck Mk. 4B (Serial No. 18393), No. 441 Squadron.  Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom.  This Canuck entered service with the RCAF in May 1955 . On 1 Nov 1957 while operating from No. 4 (F) Wing based at Baden-Soellingen, Germany, it suffered a double engine failure.  The pilot carried out a successful dead-stick landing at No. 3 (F) Zweibrucken, Germany.  It was retired from RCAF service in October 1962, and from then until 1975 it was placed with the College of Aeronautics at Cranfield in the UK.  In 1975 she was flown to the IWM at Duxford by the late Ormond Haydon-Baillie, Reg. No. G-BCYK.