Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Canadian Warplanes 5: The Post War Piston Era, Canadair CC-106 Yukon

Canadian Warbirds of the Post-Second World War Piston Era, Canadair CC-106 Yukon

Data current to 15 Feb 2019.

 (DND Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Canadair CL-44/CC-106 Yukon, a Canadian turboprop airliner and cargo aircraft based on the Bristol Britannia, developed and produced by Canadair in the late 1950s and early 1960s.  Although innovative, only a small number of the aircraft were produced for the RCAF (as the CC-106 Yukon), and for commercial operators worldwide (as the CL-44).  The aircraft is named after the Canadian territory of Yukon, and was given to the aircraft by the RCAF's Chief of the Air Staff Air Marshal Hugh Lester Campbell OBE, CD.

Canadair CL-44D, CC-106 Yukon (12), (Serial Nos. 15501, renumbered to 15921, renumbered to 106921), 15922, renumbered to 106922, 15923, renumbered to 106923, 15924, renumbered to 106924, 15925, renumbered to 106925, 15926, renumbered to 106926, 15927, renumbered to 106927, 15928, renumbered to 106928, 15929, renumbered to 15555, renumbered to 106929, 15930, renumbered to 106930, 15931, renumbered to 106931, 15932, renumbered to 16666, renumbered to 106932).

Canadair CC-106 Yukon  (Serial No. 15501, renumbered to 15921, later renumbered to 106921).  (RCAF Photos)

Canadair CC-106 Yukon, No. 426 'Thunderbird' (T) Squadron.  This Squadron was formed in the early part of 1961 under the command of Squadron Leader R. L. Lloyd and referred to as the "Yukon Flight".  The Flight became the nucleus of No. 437 "Husky" (T) Squadron when that unit reformed on 1 October 1961.  Trans-Atlantic proving flights began on the 31st of August, 1961.   No. 426 (T) Squadron was officially disbanded on the 31st of August 1962. 

On the 3rd of March, 1961 Yukon (Serial No. 15927) was delivered to RCAF Station Trenton, Ontario.  This was the sixth accepted by the RCAF but the first made available for training.  The aircraft's unmodified Rolls Royce Tyne engines were removed at Trenton by a Canadair Mobile Repair Party and returned to Cartieville, Quebec.

The second Yukon, (Serial No. 15928) was delivered to RCAF Station Trenton on the 27th of April, 1961. This aircraft also too had unmodified engines which were removed and modified ones were installed.  The aircrafrt was then put into the training program.  In May, (Serial No. 15930) was assigned to No. 4 Operational Training Unit at Trenton.  By the end of May, No. 426 Squadron was operating (Serial Nos. 15925, 15926, 15927 and 15928).

The Yukon Flight used the following aircraft: (Serial Nos. 15923, 15925, 15926, 15927, 15928, 15930 and 15931).

 (DND Photos via Mika Kaehler)

At 15:00 hours on the 9th of June, 1961, a ceremony was held near No. 10 Hangar at RCAF Station Trenton.  Mrs. Campbell performed the naming ritual much as was done when chistening a ship.  She smashed a bottle of champagne on to the nose. 

 (DND Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Canadair CC-106 Yukon in flight. 

 

 (RCAF Photos)

Canadair CC-106 Yukons in flight.

 (Aage. C. Skaarup Photo)

Canadair CC-106 Yukon, RCAF (Serial No. 15922), later (Serial No. 106922).  Was RCAF 15502, re-numbered as 15922 on 30 September 1960.  No confirmation that CAF serial was ever marked.  Operated by No. 437 (T) Squadron at RCAF Station Trenton, Ontario.  Sold 18 November 1971 to aircraft broker Beaver Enterprises.  No Canadian civil registration known.  Sold to Societe Generale d'Alimentation (SGA), registered as 9Q-CWN.  First flight with these markings, in Canada, on 12 November 1973.  Named "Hoto Mbio".  Delivered, Montreal to Toulouse, on 18 November 1973.  First commercial flight, Toulouse to Kinshasa, Zaire on 23 November 1973.  Later stored in Luxembourg.  Operator name changed to TRAMACO, Transports et Manutentions Commerciaux, by 1 February 1977, when commercial flights resumed.  Stored at Kinshara from 1978.  Scrapped there, 1 April 1983.  (RWR Walker)

The author's first flight was in this aircraft from 1 (F) Wing, RCAF Station Marville, France to RCAF Station Trenton, Ontario on 20 June 1963.  The author's father and family, was based at 3 (F) Wing, RCAF Station Zweibrücken, West Germany from 1959 to 1963.  RCAF Station Zweibrücken was in service from 6 Jan 1953 to 29 Aug 1969.

3 (F) Wing was one of four RCAF wings consisting of three figher squadrons each, established in Europe in the early 1950s to support the goals of NATO in Europe during the Cold War.  These wings were part of  No. 1 Air Division.  Two wings were located in France (RCAF Station Marville and RCAF Station Grostenquin), and two were located in West Germany, (RCAF Station Zweibrücken and RCAF Station Baden Soellingen).

 (RuthAS Photo)

Canadair CC-106 Yukon (Serial No. 15927), later (Serial No. 106927), Gatwick Airport, London, UK, 1968.  Was RCAF 15927.  No confirmation that CAF serial was ever marked.    Operated by No. 437 (T) Squadron at RCAF Station Trenton, Ontario.  Sold 18 November 1971 to aircraft broker Beaver Enterprises, stored at Montreal.  Sold on 29 September 1971, to AER (Aerotransportes Entre Rios), became LV-JYR.  Disapeared on flight from Montevideo to Santiago de Chile, over Andes Mountains, on 20 June 1972.  Wreckage never found.  (RWR Walker)

 (DND Photo via James Craik)

Canadair CC-106 Yukon (Serial No. 15928), later (Serial No. 106928), offloading at RCAF Station Trenton, Ontario.  Was RCAF 15928.  No confirmation that CAF serial was ever marked.    Operated by No. 437 (T) Squadron at RCAF Station Trenton, Ontario.  Sold 18 November 1971 to aircraft broker Beaver Enterprises, stored at Montreal.  Sold on 1 January 1972 to TAR (Transporte Aereo Rioplatense.  Registered as LV-PRX for ferry flight, later received permanent registration LV-JZB.  Retained this registration when leased to AER on 3 November 1973.  Sold to ALAS Uruguay Cargo on 3 November 1978, registered as CX-BKD.  Scrapped after leaving runway on landing with gear partially extended on 10 October 1979.  Hulk burned, apparently before any official investigation of the accident.  (RWR Walker)

  (DND Photo via James Craik)

Canadair CC-106 Yukon, RCAF (Serial No. 106930).  Was RCAF 15930.  No confirmation that CAF serial was ever marked.  Operated by No. 4 (T) Operational Training Unit at RCAF Station Trenton, Ontario.  Sold 18 November 1971 to aircraft broker Beaver Enterprises, stored at Montreal.  Sold to SGA.  Named "Gegitelo", registered as 9Q-CWK.  Flew first service, Toulouse to Kinshasha, Zaire on 7 December 1973.  Withdrawn from use, stored at Manston, UK in 1980.  Kept this registration when sold to Katale Air Transport in 1981.  This company may have also operated under the name Uni-Air.  Later stored at Goma, Zaire, scrapped on 1 April 1983.  (RWR Walker)

 (RCAF Photo via Chris Charland)

 (Steve Williams Photo)

Canadair CC-106 Yukon (Serial No. 15932), later (Serial No. 106932), London Gatwick Airport, 17 May 1969.  Delivered as RCAF 15512, became 16666 on 21 April 1961, then 15932 on 1 May 1962.  Fitted with VIP interior.  No confirmation that CAF serial was ever marked.  17 November 1971 - Struck off.  In storage at CFTSD at Saskatoon, Saskatchewan when sold.  Sold to aircraft broker Beaver Enterprises on 18 November 1972, registration CF-JSN issued same day. Stored at Montreal.  Sold to Andeas Airlines on 1 May 1974, registered as HC-AZH.  Withdrawn from use on 1 January 1985, stored at Guayaquil, Equador.  Ownership transferred to Ecuador Air Force in November 2000.  The Canada Aviation and Space Museum in Ottawa is attempting to raise funds to have this aircraft returned to Canada.  (RWR Walker)

A diamond formation made up of three Canadair CC-106 Yukons with a Canadair CT-114 Tutor in the slot position.