Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Canadian Warplanes 3: The Second World War, Short Stirling

Canadian Warplanes of the Second World, Short Stirling

Data current to 7 Jan 2019.

The Short Stirling was the first British four-engined bomber in service during the Second World War, entering RAF Squadrons early in 1941.  Many were flown with RCAF aircrews during the war.  During its use as a bomber, pilots praised the type for its ability to out-turn enemy night fighters and its favourable handling characteristics, while the altitude ceiling was often a subject of criticism.  The Stirling had a relatively brief operational career as a bomber before being relegated to second line duties from late 1943.  During its later service, the Stirling was used for mining German ports; new and converted aircraft also flew as glider tugs and supply aircraft during the Allied invasion of Europe in 1944–1945.

 (IWM Photo, HU 107751)

Short Stirling of No. 1651 HCU (Heavy Conversion Unit) in flight, 1942.

 (IWM Photo, HU 107751)

Short Stirling of No. 1651 HCU (Heavy Conversion Unit) being refuelled at Waterbeach, 1942.

 (IWM Photo, CH 3175)

Short Stirling of No. 7 Squadron at Newmarket Heath in Suffolk, July 1941.

Short Stirling, flown by RCAF aircrew during the Second World War.  (RAF Photo)

 (NMNA Photo)

 

 Short Stirling, flown by RCAF aircrew during the Second World War.  (RAF Photos)

 (IWM Photo, TR 8)

Short Stirling (Serial No. N6101), of No. 1651 Heavy Conversion Unit at Waterbeach, Cambridgeshire in the UK.  Royal Air Force armourers are checking over the sixteen 250 lb bombs before they are loaded on  N6101, 1 April 1942.