Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Canadian Warplanes 3: The Second World War, and post-War, Avro Lancaster

Avro Lancaster

Data current to 10 Dec 2019.

 (RCAF Photo)

Avro 683 Lancaster Mk X (Serial No. NG347) coded QB-P for Papa, Piccadilly Princess”, No. 426 "Tiger" (B) Squadron, RCAF.

This Lancaster was abandoned after it crashed near Hartford Bridge, Hampshire, in the UK, after being severely damaged in the rear fuselage and starboard wing by a night-fighter immediately after dropping its bomb load over the target at Mannheim, Germany on the 10th of August 1943.  The aircraft was destroyed.  The head and shoulders of the “Princess” nose art was recovered the day after the crash by the pilot and ended up on display at the Canadian War Museum in April 1949.  This piece of the fuselage is believed to still be in the possession of the Museum.  (Note: Handley Page Halifax Mk. V, (Serial No. EB247), coded ZL*P, also carried the name “Piccadilly Princess”, when it flew with No. 427 "Lion" (B) Squadron, RCAF).  

The Avro Lancaster is a four-engined heavy bomber, designed and manufactured by Avro as a contemporary of the Handley Page Halifax and the Short Stirling.  All three aircraft were four-engined heavy bombers adopted by the RAF during the same Second World War era.  The Lancaster was powered by four Rolls-Royce Merlin engines and in one version, Bristol Hercules engines.  It first saw service with RAF Bomber Command in 1942 and as the strategic bombing offensive over Europe gathered momentum, it was the main aircraft for the night-time bombing campaigns that followed.  As increasing numbers of the type were produced, it became the principal heavy used by the RAF, the RCAF and squadrons from other Commonwealth and European countries serving within the RAF, overshadowing contemporaries such as the Halifax and Stirling.

The Lancaster had a long, unobstructed bomb bay, which meant that it carry the largest bombs used by the RAF, including the 4,000 lb (1,800 kg), 8,000 lb (3,600 kg) and 12,000 lb (5,400 kg) blockbuster bombs in loads that were often supplemented with smaller bombs or incendiaries.  The Lancaster night bombers delivered 608,612 long tons of bombs in 156,000 sorties over Europe.  The versatility of the Lancaster was such that it was chosen to equip 617 Squadron and was modified to carry the Upkeep"Bouncing bomb" designed by Barnes Wallis for Operation Chastise, the attack on German Ruhr valley dams.  Although the Lancaster was primarily a night bomber, it excelled in many other roles, including daylight precision bombing, for which some Lancasters were adapted to carry the 12,000 lb (5,400 kg) Tallboy and then the 22,000 lb (10,000 kg) Grand Slam earthquake bombs (also designed by Wallis).  This was the largest payload carried by any bomber in the war.

During early 1942, it was decided that the bomber should be produced in Canada, where it was manufactured by Victory Aircraft in Malton, Ontario The Canadian-built Lancaster B X was produced in significant numbers.  A total of 430 of this type were built, earlier examples differing little from their British-built predecessors, except for using Packard-built Merlin engines and American-style instruments and electronics.  In August 1942, a British-built Lancaster B I, (Serial No. R5727), was dispatched to Canada as a pattern aircraft, becoming the first of the type to conduct a transatlantic crossing.  The first Lancaster produced in Canada was named the "Ruhr Express".

Postwar, the Lancaster was supplanted as the main strategic bomber of the RAF by the Avro Lincoln, , a larger version of the Lancaster (three were built in Canada and flown by the RCAF).  The Lancaster took on the role of long range anti-submarine patrol aircraft and air-sea rescue.  It was also used for photo-reconnaissance and aerial mapping.

Beginning in 1946, Lancaster Mk Xs were modified for service with the RCAF.  Fourteen aircraft were modified to perform aerial and photo-reconnaissance missions; these would go on to perform much of the mapping of northern Canada until as late as 1962.  Throughout the 1950s, the RCAF operated seventy modified Lancasters, designated Lancaster 10MR/MPs, as Maritime Reconnaissance and Patrol aircraft in an anti-submarine role.  Modifications involved the installation of radar and sonobuoy operators' positions, removal of the rear and mid-upper gun turrets, installation of a 400-gallon fuel tank in the bomb bay to increase the patrol range, upgraded electronics, radar, and instrumentation, and a cooking stove in the centre section.  They served throughout the 1950s, when they were replaced by the Lockheed Neptune and Canadair Argus.

The B.X was a Canadian-built B.III with Canadian- and US-made instruments and electrics.  On later batches the heavier Martin 250CE was substituted for the Nash & Thomson FN-50 mid-upper turret, mounted further forward to maintain centre of gravity balance.  Canada was a long term operator of the Lancaster, using modified aircraft after the war for maritime patrol, search and rescue and photo-reconnaissance until 1964.  The last flight by the RCAF was by F/L Lynn Garrison in (Serial No. KB-976), on 4 July 1964 at the Calgary International Air Show.

Postwar the RCAF modified the B X (as the Lancaster Mk 10) to fill a variety of roles, with specific designations for each role. These included:

10ARArea Reconnaissance – three aircraft modified for surveillance operations over the Arctic. Fitted with lengthened nose (40 inches (100 cm) longer) and carrying cameras and ELINT equipment. These remained in service until 1964.

10BRBomber Reconnaissance. Minimally modified variant with additional windows for observers in rear fuselage. 13 converted.

10DCDrone controller with Ryan Firebee drones – two modified in 1957 and operational until 1961.

10MR (later 10MP): Maritime Reconnaissance or Maritime Patrol anti-submarine warfare (ASW) aircraft, based on BR with mid-upper turret removed.  70–75 converted. In service from 1950 to 1955.

10NNavigational trainer. Five converted.

10OOrenda jet engine testbed for the engine used in the Avro CF-100 Canuck.

10PPhoto reconnaissance mapping duties. 11 converted 1948–1950.  Retired 1964.

10S&R: Interim search-and-rescue aircraft, minimally modified 10S. Replaced by disarmed 10BR and 10MRs.

10S : Standard – designation applied to baseline standard, with Merlin 224 engines, Marin mid-upper turret and H2S radar, for aircraft retained postwar for future use. Sometimes referred to by unofficial designation 10U.

B.XV: As per Lancaster B.IV/Lincoln B.1 but built in Canada and renamed Avro Lincoln XV.  Three were built before order was cancelled when war ended.

Of the 17 surviving and largely intact Lancasters known to exist, two are airworthy; one, called Vera (Serial No. FM213), coded VR-A, is in Canada, operated by the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum in Mount Hope, a suburb of Hamilton, Ontario, and the other, (Serial No. PA474), is based in Coningsby, in the UK, operated by The Battle of Britain Memorial Flight.  In 2014, "Vera" toured the UK in a series of joint displays with the BBMF aircraft.  For the 2018 flying season, to commemorate the 75th anniversary of Operation Chastise, the Canadian Warplane Heritage Lancaster is painted in the markings of Guy Gibson's 617 Squadron aircraft (Serial No. ED932), coded AJ-G, when he commanded the "Dambusters" raids.

Another Lancaster, Just Jane, based in East Kirkby Lincolnshire Aviation Heritage Centre is able to taxi but is not currently airworthy, though there are plans to return her to flight in the future.  The fourth Lancaster with working engines and able to taxi is "Bazalgette" (Serial No. FM159), based at the Bomber Command Museum of Canada in Nanton, Alberta.  It has been carefully restored from a vandalised state and is now a major tourist attraction.

In 2017, formerly retired after its Cold War service and more than 50 years on display in Edmundston, New Brunswick, Lancaster (Serial No. KB 882) was moved to its new home at the National Air Force Museum of Canada at CFB Trenton, Ontario, where it will be restored and placed alongside the museums' restored Handley Page Halifax (Serial No. NA 33).

Avro 683 Lancaster Mk. III (1), (Serial No. EE 182), Mk. X and Mk. XP (228)), (Serial Nos. FM101-FM105, FM110, FM111, FM115, FM118, FM120, FM122- FM124, FM126- FM128, FM130, FM136, FM140, FM148, FM153, FM155, FM159, FM172, FM199, FM206-FM229, KB721, KB732, KB733, KB739, KB744, KB746- KB748, KB757, KB760, KB764, KB771- KB774, KB781, KB783, KB789, KB791, KB794, KB796, KB801, KB802, KB807, KB810- KB812, KB819, KB820, KB823- KB827, KB829, KB830, KB833, KB836- KB841, KB843, KB844, KB847- KB849, KB851, KB852, KB854, KB856, KB857, KB860- KB865, KB867, KB868, KB871- KB873, KB875- KB878, KB880- KB886, KB888- KB896, KB898-KB900, KB912- KB934, KB936- KB970, KB972- KB979, KB981- KB984, KB986, KB988, KB990- KB992, KB994- KB999), for a total of 229 aircraft.

Avro Lancaster in flight during the Second World War.  (RAF Photo)

Avro Lancaster, RAF (Serial No. R5852), in flight during the Second World War.  (IWM Photo, CH 6071)

 (City of Vancouver Archives Photo, AM640-S1-: CVA 260-1518)

Avro Lancaster, RCAF, on display at an airshow at Richmond, British Columbia, Aug 1945.

 (City of Vancouver Archives Photo, AM640-S1-: CVA 260-1523)

Avro Lancaster rear turret view, Vancouver, British Columbia, Aug 1945.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3614986)

Avro Lancaster B Mk. X (Serial No. KB760), coded NA-P, with aircrew and groundcrew, No. 428 (Ghost) Squadron, RCAF.  They flew the squadron's 2,000th sortie, a raid on Bremen, Germany.

Avro 683 Lancaster in flight.  (RAF Photo)

Avro 683 Lancaster, Canada stamp.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 2264450)

 

Avro Lancaster B Mk. II, RCAF (Serial No. LL725), EQ-C, of No. 408 Squadron being bombed up Linton-on-Ouse, Yorkshire, ca. 1944.  (RAF Photo)

Avro Lancaster LQ-A.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584030)

 

Avro Lancaster bombing a target in Europe, 21 March 1945.  (Library & Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4207036)

 

Avro 683 Lancaster, wartime flight.  (RAF Photo)

Avro 683 Lancasters with the RCAF on a bomb run over coastal batteries, Wangerooge, ca 1944.  (RAF Photo)

Avro Lancaster nose art, 1 Feb 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4542797)

Avro Lancaster Ruhr Express preparing for its first Operation over Germany.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4542803)

RCAF Avro Lancaster "Ruhr Express" being bombed up for a mission over Berlin. Ground crews are steering two "cookies" (block-buster bombs) into position under the bomb-bay.  This aircraft was the first Canadian built Lancaster.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4542805)

 (RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

In honour of all those that got the aircraft over target and the many that did not make it back home.  Two air gunners of the Moose squandron of the Canadian Bomber Group in Briyain, Flight Sergeants G.E. Berteau, Penhold, Alberta, and L. Nozzolillo, Toronto, (310 Broadview Avenue) Ontario, examine the remains of the first Canadian-built Lancaster to fly operationally, the "Ruhr Express".  Just before dawn on a snowy January morning, the "Ruhr Express" caught fire after a successful attack on Nuremburg, and was gutted.  She had made 50 flights over German-held territory, and every time brought back her crew safely, including the last mission.  Only the tail plane and rear structure escaped the flames.

Avro Lancaster rear gun turret with four .303-inch Browning machineguns, Sergeant Noixeux, Wireless air gunner and Sergeant Lavois, Pilot, 2 May 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4558161)

Avro Lancaster B Mk. II (Serial No. DS848), QO-R with aircrew, 432 Sqn, 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3615003)

Of the 7,377 aircraft built, 3,736 were lost during the War (3,249 in action and 487 in ground accidents).

 (RAF Photo via James Craik)

An impressive aerial photograph of 12 Lancasters of the RCAF Bomber Group Ghost Squadron lined up nose to tail taken 31 May 1945, the day they left for Canada. 15 Canadian built Lancasters took off at one minute intervals from their Bomber Station at Middleton St. George Yorkshire in the UK.  They were the first of the Canadian Squadrons to leave the United Kingdom after VE Day.  More followed daily until all aircrew were gone.  They were heading home to join "Tiger Force" for the war in the Pacific. 

Post war Lancasters in RCAF service:

(RCAF Photo courtesy of the Canadian Aviation Preservation Association)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, RCAF (Serial No. FM128), AP-U in flight, post war.

(RCAF Photo via Mark Allen)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, RCAF (Serial No. FM207), MN-207 in flight, post war.

(RCAF Photo courtesy of the Shearwater Aviation Museum)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, RCAF (Serial No. KB976), post-war in flight.

 (RCAF Photo via Mike Maehler)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, RCAF (Serial No. FM110), of 404 Sqn is starting engine No. 3 at RCAF Station Greenwood, Nova Scotia with the fire guard standing by and the back door still open. 

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584032)

Avro Lancaster cockpit.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584365)

Avro Lancaster OSC camera  installation.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584855)

Avro Lancaster radio altimeter installation.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584318)

Avro Lancaster Shoran equipment.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584029)

Avro Lancaster installation and equipment.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584572)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, RCAF (Serial No. FM217), Rockcliffe, Ontario, 6 Sep 1951.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3586596)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, RCAF (Serial No. FM211), VC-DHZ, Air Navigation School, 8 Aug 1949.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3207414)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, RCAF (Serial No. FM207), 2 Apr 1951.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584468)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, RCAF (Serial No. FM216), coded AP-D, 28 Dec 1959.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4236026)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, Reg. No. CF-IMF, Spartan Air Services Ltd.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3562607)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, Reg. No. CF-IMF, and de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito, Spartan Air Services Ltd.

 (DND Phot via Chris Charland)

Avro Lancaster Mk. 10MP (Serial No. KB959), No. 404 "Buffalo" (MR) Squadron, RCAF Station Greenwood, Nova Scotia.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3586595)

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3586597)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, VC-DHP, Polaris, RCAF, 8 Aug 1949.  "Polaris", Lancaster (Serial N0. FM208), came off the assembly line at Malton in July 1945, one of three converted to Mark 10-N, a flying classroom for navigator trainees.  It was stationed at Trenton. It was bought by Ajax Aircraft Ltd. on 28 May 1957, registered as CF-KHH, with the intent to use it to fly fuel into northern Canada.  However, it sat at Dorval airport for years before eventually being scrapped. (Don Christopher)

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584699)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, RCAF (Serial No. 212), AK-A, 26 Aug 1952.

(USN Photo)

Avro Lancaster Mk. 10MP, RCAF (Serial No. KB868), No. 405 Squadron, running up at NAS Jax, Florida, Feb 1955.

 (DND Photo via James Craik)

Avro Lancaster Mk. 10MP, RCAF (Serial No. KB868), No. 405 Squadron.  KB868 previously served with 431 Sqn (SE-E) until Mar 45.  It was flown back to Canada in June 1945, modified to Mk. 10MP and eventually scrapped in June 1955.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584509)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, RCAF, 28 May 1951.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584502)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, coded AK-A, 23 May 1951.

 (RCAF Photo)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, RCAF (Serial No. FM211), coded GS-X, Zenith.

(Nanton Bomber Command Museum Photo)

Avro Lancaster Mk. 10C, RCAF (Serial No. FM 209).  This aircraft was used as a jet engine test bed.  It was converted by Avro Canada as a Mk.10C test bed for two 3,000 pound thrust Avro Chinook TR.4 Mk. II axial-flow turbojets in outer nacelles in 1951 and scrapped in 1956.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3580433)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, RCAF (Serial No. FM211), coded DHZ, 2 May 1949.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584553)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, RCAF (Serial No. FM217), 18 Jun 1951.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584072)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, RCAF, 1947.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584103)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, RCAF, 1947.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584666)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, RCAF (Serial No. 217), 26 Aug 1952.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584476)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, RCAF, warming up, 2 Feb 1951.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3643745)

Avro Lancaster Mk. XP, RCAF (Serial No. FM214), AK-B, 408 Sqn, Aug 1949.

 (RCAF Photo)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, RCAF (Serial No. FM 219), RX.

 (RCAF Photo)

Avro Lancaster Mk. XN, RCAF (Serial Nos. KB973 and KB892), AJ.

 (DND Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Avro Lancaster (Serial No. FM219), of 407 Sqn along with a line-up of 407 Sqn Lockheed Neptunes at RCAF Station Comox, British Columbia. 

 (RCAF Photo)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X (Serial No. KB851) with Ryan Firebee drone KD-4656, 1962.

(NDIL image PCN-1965)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X (Serial No. KB851) with Ryan Firebee drone KD-4656.

(RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Avro Lancaster with Ryan Firebee drone.

(RCAF Photo via Mike Kehler) 

Avro Lancaster Mk. XP (Serial No. KB976).

  (RCAF Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Avro Lancasters on the line with 407 Sqn, RCAF Station Comox, British Columbia.

 (USN - NAS Jacksonville Photo)

Avro Lancaster Mk. 10MP of No. 405 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force, at the Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Florida, in February 1955.  405 Sqn had been reactivated on 31 Mar 1950 as No. 405 Eagle Squadron, as a maritime patrol squadron based at Greenwood, Nova Scotia.

 (RCAF photo via Mike Kaehler)

Avro Lancaster Mk. XN (Serial No. KB986) as Instructional Trainer A561 being towed out of the hanger at 2 Maritime OTU.

 (RCAF photo via Mike Kaehler)

Avro Lancaster Mk. XN (Serial No. KB986), Dunnville, Ontario.

Surviving Avro Lancasters in Canada include the following:

 (DND Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X (Serial No. FM104), 107 Rescue Unit ca 1950s.

(RCAF Photo via Mike Kehler) 

Avro Lancaster Mk. XP (Serial No. KB104).

 (DND Photo via James Craik)

 (DND Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X (Serial No. FM104), 107 Rescue Unit ca 1950s.

 (Author Photo)

Avro 683 Lancaster Mk. X (Serial No. FM104), mounted on a pylon on the Toronto waterfront before being taken down for restoration.  FM104 has been transferred by the Toronto City Council to the British Columbia Aviation Museum, Sidney, on Vancouver Island, British Columbia.

 (Author Photos)

Avro 683 Lancaster Mk. X (Serial No. FM104), undergoing restoration in the Canada Air and Space Museum, Toronto, Ontario.  FM104 has been transferred by the Toronto City Council to the British Columbia Aviation Museum, Sidney, on Vancouver Island, British Columbia.

Avro Lancaster Mk. 10MR (Serial No. FM104), built as a Mk. X at Victory Aircraft in Malton, Ontario.  Flown to England in January 1945. Kept in reserve at No. 32 Maintenance Unit for RCAF No. 408 Squadron RCAF and RCAF No. 428 Squadron.  Returned to Canada 10 June 1945 in expectation of use with Tiger Force against the Japanese.  Converted in November 1945 to Mk. 10SR and assigned to No. 10 RU at Naval Station Argentia, Newfoundland.  Converted to Mk. 10MR in April 1951 and assigned to No. 107 Unit at RCAF Station Torbay, Newfoundland.  Struck off 10 February 1964.  Displayed mounted on a concrete pylong on the harbourfont grounds of the Canadian National Exhibition, Toronto, Ontario in 1964.  Purchased by RCAF Association and put on display in Coronation Park in 1965.  Ownership transferred to Heritage Toronto in 1990.  Moved to Toronto Aerospace Museum (later the Canadian Air and Space Museum) in 1999.  Following the museum's closure in 2011, the plane went into storage.  In the fall of 2018, FM104 was moved to the British Columbia Aviation Museum and will be restored by the museum in conjunction with Victoria Air Maintenance Ltd., at Victoria, BC.

 (Author Photo)

Avro 683 Lancaster Mk. X (Serial No. FM136), NA-P, mounted on a pylon at the Calgary Airport, ca. 1977, before its restoration.

 (Author Photo)

 (Author Photo)

 (Author Photos)

 (Daniel Photo)

Avro 683 Lancaster Mk. X (Serial No. FM136), NA-P, 420 Squadron.  Aerospace Museum of Calgary, Alberta.

Avro Lancaster Mk. 10MR (Serial No. FM136), built at Victory Aircraft in Malton, Ontario as a Mk. X.  Flown to England June 1945 but returned to Canada 29 August 1945. S erved as RCAF Maritime Reconnaissance plane with RCAF No. 404 Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood, Nova Scotia and with No. 407 Squadron at RCAF Station Comox, British Columbia.  Flown to RCAF Station Fort Macleod in 1961 for scrap.  Purchased in 1961 by Lynn Garrison and put on display mounted on a concrete pylon in 1962 at entrance to the Calgary Municipal Airport, Alberta, as a memorial to those who trained under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan.  Transferred to Calgary Aerospace Museum in 1992.  It wears the colours of (Serial No. KB895), which flown by Calgary's Ronnie Jenkins.

 (Joanna Poe Photo)

Avro Lancaster nose section art replica, port side, "Sugar's Blues" at the Bomber Command Museum of Canada, Nanton Alberta.

 (Eric Friedebach Photo)

Avro Lancaster nose section art replica, starboard side, "The 'Ell Cat" at the Bomber Command Museum of Canada, Nanton Alberta.

 (Author Photo)

Avro 683 Lancaster Mk. X (Serial No. FM159), mounted on concrete pedestals, long before its restoration, ca 1981.  Now restored with four of its engines in running condition, (Serial No. FM159), F2-T, is named in honour of Canadian born, Ian W. Bazalgette, VC, 635 Squadron.  Museum centre-piece.  National Bomber Command Air Museum, Nanton, Alberta.

 (Tony Hisgett Photo)

 (Joanna Poe Photo)

 (National Bomber Command Museum Photo)

Avro 683 Lancaster Mk. 10MR (Serial No. FM159), with all four engines running.  FM159 was built at Victory Aircraft in Malton, Ontario as a Mk. X.  It was flown to England in May 1945 and returned to Canada in September 1945.  It was flown as an RCAF Maritime Reconnaissance aircraft from 1953 to 1958 with No. 103 Squadron, RCAF Station Greenwood, Nova Scotia and No. 407 Squadron at RCAF Station Comox, British Columbia.   It was flown to RCAF Station Vulcan, Alberta in 1960 for scrapping, but was pPurchased that year and moved to Nanton, Alberta for display, where it was mounted on a concrete pylon beside the main highway.   FM159 has undergone gradual restoration since the formation of the Nanton Lancaster Society in 1986, and all four engines now run.  It wears the colours of (Serial No. ND811) in honour of Ian Bazalgette, VC.

 (DND Photo via James Craik)

Avro Lancaster Mk. 10MR (Serial No. FM212), coded EQ-W, in RCAF service.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584699)

Avro Lancaster Mk. 10MR (Serial No. FM212), coded AK-W, in RCAF service.

 (John Meneely Photo, 1995)

Avro Lancaster Mk. 10MR (Serial No. FM212), coded EQ-W, built at Victory Aircraft in Malton, Ontario as a Mk. X.  Returned to factory, by then owned by Avro Canada, in 1948 and converted to a Mk. 10P.  Served with 9 Squadron, 418 Squadron and 408 Squadron. Struck off 9 October 1964.  Stored at RCAF Station Dunnville, Ontario.  Sold to the City of Windsor, Ontario and moved on barge.  Placed on display on a concrete pylong in Jackson Park.  Currently undergoing restoration by the Canadian Historical Aircraft Association.

 (Dave Miller Photo)

 (Dave Miller Photo)

 (Author Photo)

 (Svdmolen Photo)

 (Redkryptonite Photo)

 (Dave Miller Photo)

Avro Lancaster Mk. 10MR (Serial No. FM213), coded VR-A, Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, Mount Hope, Ontario.  Built at Victory Aircraft in Malton, Ontario as a Mk. X.  Stored at RCAF Station Trenton, Ontario from 1945 to 1950.  Converted to Mk. 10MR by de Havilland Canada.  Served with No. 405 Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood, Nova Scotia and 107 Rescue Unit at RCAF Station Torbay, Newfoundland.  Struck off 30 June 1964.  Stored at RCAF Station Dunnville, Ontario.  Purchased by and displayed at the Royal Canadian Legion in Goderich, Ontario.  Purchased by the Canadian Warplane Museum and moved to Hamilton in November 1979.  After restoration, FM213 was flown for first time on 11 September 1988.  It wears the colours of (Serial No. KB726), No. 419 Squadron, in honour of Andrew Mynarski, VC.  Along with Britain's (Serial No. PA474), it is one of only two airworthy Lancasters.

 (Author Photo, ca 1974)

Avro Lancaster Mk. 10XAR (Serial No. KB839), built at Victory Aircraft in Malton, Ontario as a Mk. X.  Flown to England 1 January 1945.  Assigned to RCAF No. 431 Squadron, coded SE-G, and then to No. 419 Squadron, coded VR-D, "D Daisy." KB839 flew 26 sorties.  Returned to Canada 5 June 1945.  Sent to Avro Canada and converted to Mk. XAR.  Served with No. 405 Squadron and No. 408 Squadron until 1961.  Stored at RCAF Station Dunnville.  Flown to RCAF Station Greenwood, Nova Scotia in 1964 and mounted on pedestal.  Later transferred to Greenwood Military Aviation Museum, CFB Greenwood, Nova Scotia.  Wears the colours of (Serial No. JB226), coded LQ-G, of No, 405 Squadron which was lost 18 November 1943.

 (Author Photo)

 (Author Photo)

Avro Lancaster Mk. 10XAR (Serial No. KB839), CFB Greenwood.

 (Author Photo)

Avro Lancaster Mk. 10XAR (Serial No. KB839), CFB Greenwood.

 (RCAF Photo)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, RCAF (Serial No. KB882) over Edmundston, New Brunswick in the late 1940s.

 (Author Photo)

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, RCAF (Serial No. KB882), Edmundston, New Brunswick.

(Author Photo) 

Avro Lancaster Mk. X, (Serial No. KB882), AR, Edmundston, New Brunswick.  This aircraft has been moved to the National Museum of the RCAF, CFB Trenton, Ontario as of Oct 2017.  

Avro Lancaster Mk. 10AR (Serial No. KB882), built at Victory Aircraft in Malton, Ontario as a Mk. X.  Flown to England in 24 February 1945.  Assigned to No. 431 Squadron without code, and then toNo. 428 Squadron, coded NA-R "Rabbit Stew".  Flew 19 sorties.  Returned to Canada 2 June 1945.  Stored in Alberta.  Sent to Avro Canada in 1952 and converted to Mk. 10P.  Served with No. 408 Squadron at RCAF Station Rockcliffe, Ontario.  Struck off 26 May 1964 Purchased in 1964 by City of Edmundston, New Brunswick.  Ownership transferred to the National Air Force Museum at CFB Trenton, Ontario.  KB882 was moved in September 2017.  Restoration work began immediately and will be completed by 1 April 2024, the 100th anniversary of the RCAF.  Will be restored as post-War Mk.10AR.

 (Author Photo)

 (Author Photo)

Avro 683 Lancaster Mk. X, nose section with twin .303-inch Browning machineguns.

 (Author Photo)

 (Author Photo)

 (Author Photo)

Avro Lancaster Mk. 10AR (Serial No. KB944), preserved in the Canada Air and Space Museum, Ottawa, Ontario.  KB944 was built at Victory Aircraft in Malton, Ontario as a Mk. X.  Flown to England 8 March 1945 as Mk. X.  Assigned to No. 425 Squadron, coded KW-K.  Did not fly any sorties and returned to Canada 15 June 1945.  Stored at RCAF Station Fort Macleod, Alberta.  Converted to Mk. 10S by Fairey Aviation, Easatern Passage, Nova Scotia. Served with No. 404 Squadron at RCAF Station Greenwood, Nova Scotia.  Struck off January 1957.  Stored at RCAF Station Dunnville, Ontario.  Restored by the RCAF.  Purchased by National Aviation Museum in May 1964.  Wears the colours of (Serial No. KB760), of No. 428 Squadron.

 (David Merrett Photo)

Avro Lancaster B Mk. X (Serial No. KB889).  This Canadian built Lancaster was delivered to Britain in March 1945 and returned to Canada that June without seeing any service.  KB889 was later converted for Maritime Reconnaissance use.  Struck off charge by the RCAF in 1965, the aircraft was displayed in Ontario before being sold to prolific warbird collector Doug Arnold in the UK in 1984.  The aircraft was put on the UK register as G-LANC, but was never flown.  It was sold in 1986 to the Imperial War Museum, Duxford, UK.  The aircraft was restored over eight years to static condition, and has been on display since 1994 as NA-I.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Avro Lancaster B Mk. X (Serial No. KB889), c/n 37190.  Canadian built in early 1945, she was delivered to the UK in March, but returned to Canada in June for service with the Royal Canadian Air Force.  Retired in 1965, she went on display at the ‘Age of Flight’ museum at Niagara Falls until moved by barge to Oshawa for a planned restoration to fly.  Stored until 1984, she then made a second journey to the UK, but this time not under her own power.  Owned by Doug Arnold’s Warbirds of Great Britain, she was stored first at Blackbushe and later Bitteswell, at some point going on the British civil register as G-LANC.  In 1986 she was sold to the Imperial War Museum (IWM) and arrived at Duxford in May 1986.  A full and complete restoration, both inside and out, was then carried out to a very high standard and was completed in 1994.  She wears the markings of 428 Squadron and represents (Serial No. KB743), a Lancaster B Mk. X lost on the night of 18th/19th August 1944, during an operation to Bremen.  KB743 was actually the only aircraft lost that night, from the 288 taking part in the operation.  She is on display in the ‘AirSpace’ hangar at the Imperial War Museum, Duxford Airfield, Cambridgeshire, UK.  26 Jan 2018.

Avro Lancasters in Canadian service, data bank:

            The four-engine Lancaster was developed from the Avro Manchester, and became the premier heavy bomber for the RAF during the Second World War.  Lancasters were built in Canada under licence by Victory Aircraft Limited, Malton, Ontario.  The first Canadian built “Lanc” flew overseas in September 1943.  The Lancaster was designed to carry a maximum internal load of 18,000 pounds.  On a range of 1,000 miles its normal load was 14,000 pounds. A number of Bomber Command versions were modified to carry the 22,000 pound “Grand Slam,” the heaviest bomb load lifted by any bomber during the Second World War.  The four basic Lancasters were the Mk. I with four Rolls-Royce Merlin XX engines, the Mk. II with four Bristol Hercules VI air-cooled radial engines, the Mk. III essentially the same as the Mk. I but with four Packard-built Merlin engines, and the Canadian manufactured Mk. X, a version of the Mk. III fitted with Packard-built Merlin engines.[1]

The first Lancaster combat mission came on 2 March 1942 and the first bombing raid on Essen, Germany, followed 8 days later.  The Lancaster Mk.1 was fitted successively with Merlin XX engines and remained the only version in service throughout 1942 and 1943.  In Canada, Victory Aircraft Limited of Malton, Ontario, manufactured 430 Lancaster Mk. Xs that had Packard built Merlin 28’s of 7,400 built.  After the war a number of Lancasters conducted photo-survey operations in the high arctic.  Lancasters were also employed on search and rescue duties towards the end of their post-war RCAF service.  

The Mk. B X was a Canadian-built B III with Canadian and US-made instrumentation and electronics.  On later batches the heavier Martin 250CE was substituted for the Nash & Thomson FN-50 mid-upper turret, mounted further forward to maintain centre of gravity balance.  Canada was a long term operator of the Lancaster, utilising modified aircraft in post-war maritime patrol, search and rescue and photo-reconnaissance roles until 1964.  The last flight by the RCAF was flown on 4 July 1964 at the Calgary International Air Show.[2]

Following exemplary service with the RCAF’s No. 6 Group in Bomber Command, the Lancaster was used post-war in Canada for photo-reconnaissance, air-sea rescue and maritime patrols. The last Lancaster was retired from RCAF service on 1 April 1964.  The Lancasters of the CWHM and the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight (BBMF) in England are the only two flying today.

There are 17 largely complete examples of Lancasters in the world and a at least eight Lancaster survivors in Canada including one in the ASMC, Calgary, Alberta, Avro 683 Lancaster Mk. X (Serial No. FM136), NA-P, 420 Squadron.[3]  NLAM, Nanton, Alberta, Avro 683 Lancaster Mk. X (Serial No. 7841), (Serial No. FM159), F2-T, in honour of VC winner Ian W. Bazalgette, 635 Squadron.[4]  Avro 683 Lancaster Mk. X (Serial No. FM118), fuselage and parts in storage.[5]  CA&SM, Ottawa, Ontario, Avro 683 Lancaster Mk. X (Serial No. KB944).[6]  CH2A, Windsor, Ontario, Avro 683 Lancaster Mk. XP (Serial No. FM212), camouflage, EQ-W, formerly mounted on a pylon in Jackson Park, now stored indoors and under restoration.[7]  CWHM, Mount Hope, Ontario, Avro 683 Lancaster Mk. X (Serial No. CX213), (Serial No. FM213), painted with (Serial No. KB726), C-GVRA.[8]  CASM, Toronto, Ontario, Avro 683 Lancaster Mk. X (Serial No. FM104).[9]  Edmundston, New Brunswick, Avro 683 Lancaster Mk. X AR (Serial No. KB882).[10]  GMAM, CFB Greenwood, Nova Scotia, Avro 683 Lancaster Mk. X (Serial No. KB839), 696, silver.[11]  Resolute Bay, Northwest Territories, Avro 683 Lancaster Mk. X (Serial No. FM221).[12] 

Canadian Lancaster survivors overseas: Imperial War Museum, Duxford, Cambridgeshire, UK, Avro 683 Lancaster Mk. X (Serial No. KB889).[13]  Private owner, Florida, USA, Avro 683 Lancaster Mk. X (Serial No. KB976).[14]  North Weald Airfield, Epping, Essex, UK, Avro 683 Lancaster Mk. X (Serial No. KB994)[15]

            Lancaster B Mk. I (Serial No. PA474)  “City of Lincoln” has been flown by the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight in the UK since 1973.  The paint scheme is periodically changed to represent notable Lancasters, and the aircraft is currently flown as (Serial No. EE139) “Phantom of the Ruhr”, wearing the codes HW-R on the port side and BQ-B on the starboard side.[16]

            The CWHM Lancaster is painted to represent the aircraft flown when Pilot Officer Andrew C. Mynarski, a mid-upper turret air-gunner on a Lancaster, was posthumously awarded one of the two Victoria Crosses earned by members of the RCAF during the Second World War.[17] 

            The Nanton Lancaster is dedicated to the memory of Squadron Leader Ian Willoughby Bazalgette, who was the ’Master Bomber’ of a Pathfinder squadron who was also posthumously awarded the VC.[18]

 

[1] Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avro_Lancaster.

[2] Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avro_Lancaster.

[3] FM136 was part of the second production batch of 130 aircraft ordered from Victory Aircraft Limited, Malton, Ontario.  Serial numbers in this batch included FM100-FM229.  Aircraft were equipped with Packard built Rolls-Royce Merlin 28, 38 or 224 engines.  TFM 136 was manufactured in 1945 by Victory Aircraft, assigned to No. 20th and 30th Maintenance Units in England, never issued to active Squadron.  Returned to Canada and converted to Maritime Reconnaissance.  The aircraft was taken on strength by No. 404 ‘Buffalo’ (MP) Squadron (Greenwood, Nova Scotia) as RX-136.  Transferred to No. 407 ‘Demon’ (MP) Squadron, CFB Comox, British Columbia.  Struck off strength April 1961.  Lancaster FM136 was purchased from Crown Assets Disposal Corporation by Lynn Garrison, in 1961.  He created The Lancaster Memorial Fund to see the aircraft displayed, in 1962, on a pedestal at McCall Field, Calgary, as a memorial to those who trained under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan.  It was subsequently moved to the Aerospace Museum of Calgary in 1992.  A new shelter was built for it in 2007.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avro_Lancaster.

[4] FM159 was flown to England May 1945 Stored at No. 32 Maintenance Unit awaiting assignment to a squadron.  Returned to Canada September 1945.  Modified to Mk. X Maritime Reconnaissance, 407 Squadron (RX-159), 103 Rescue Unit.  Part of the second production batch of 130 aircraft ordered from Victory Aircraft Limited, Malton, Ontario.  Serial numbers of this batch included FM100-FM229.  Aircraft were equipped with Packard built Rolls-Royce Merlin 28, 38 or 224 engines.  On display at the Nanton Lancaster Society Air Museum, Nanton, Alberta.

[5] FM118 was flown to England April 1945.  Stored at No. 32 Maintenance Unit awaiting assignment to a squadron.  Returned to Canada June 1945.  Part of the second production batch of 130 aircraft ordered from Victory Aircraft Limited, Malton, Ontario, Canada.  Serial numbers of this batch included FM100-FM229.  Aircraft were equipped with Packard built Rolls-Royce Merlin 28, 38 or 224 engines.  The majority of the fuselage is in storage at the Nanton Lancaster Society Air Museum, Nanton, Alberta.  Other surviving pieces can also be found in storage with the BCATP Museum, Brandon, Manitoba.

[6] KB944 was flown to England March 1945.  No. 32 Maintenance Unit, 425 Squadron (KW-K).  Returned to Canada 15 June 1945.  Part of the first production batch of 300 aircraft ordered from Victory Aircraft Limited, Malton, Ontario.   KB944 was built in Canada in 1945 by Victory Aircraft.  Later that year, after briefly serving overseas, it was put into stored reserve in Canada where it went on to spend most of the following years, except for a brief period in 1952 serving with 404 Maritime Patrol Squadron at Greenwood, Nova Scotia.  In 1964 the RCAF refurbished this aircraft and placed it in the CA&SM.  Aircraft has been fully restored to its wartime configuration and is on public display at the CA&SM, Ottawa, Ontario.

[7] FM212 was retained in Canada during the war.  Modified to Mk. X Photographic Survey, 408 Squadron (MN-212).  Part of the second production batch to 130 aircraft ordered from Victory Aircraft Limited, Malton, Ontario.  Serial numbers in this batch included FM100-FM229. Aircraft were equipped with Packard built Rolls-Royce Merlin 28, 38 or 224 engines.   this Lancaster has been renamed “Bad Penny” to commemorate the first RAF Lancaster to fly into Holland during Operation Manna to save the Dutch from starvation in the closing days of Second World War, 29 April 1945.  On 29 April, 2007 (to coincide with the 62nd anniversary of Operation Manna) FM212 was removed from storage in Jackson Park and towed to the Sears parking lot of Devonshire where it was on display and open for tours through the aircraft.  On 13 May 2007, FM212 was towed from Devonshire Mall to Windsor Airport where it is on display and undergoing extensive restoration to return the aircraft back to a flight worthy status over the next few years.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avro_Lancaster.

[8] FM213 was retained in Canada during the war.   Modified to Mk. X Maritime Reconnaissance, 107 Rescue Unit (CX-213).  Returned to storage during 1958.  Part of the second production batch of 130 aircraft ordered from Victory Aircraft Limited, Malton, Ontario.  Serial numbers of this batch included FM100-FM229. Aircraft were equipped with Packard built Rolls-Royce Merlin 28, 38 or 224 engines.  This aircraft was retired from active duty with the RCAF on 6 November 1963, and then stored at Dunnville, Ontario.  FM213 had 4,392.3 hours on the airframe when it was handed over.  It would probably have been sold for scrap metal except for the intervention of The Royal Canadian Legion in Goderich.  The aircraft was acquired by the CWHM in 1978, underwent a ten-year restoration, and has remained flyable since 1988.  Restored and maintained in flying condition by Canadian War Plane Heritage Museum, Mount Hope, Ontario, it is flown in the paint scheme of (Serial No. KB726), VR-A, it is known as the “Mynarski. Memorial Lancaster in honour of Canadian VC recipient Andrew Mynarski.

[9] FM104 was flown to England in January 1945, Stored at Maintenance Unit awaiting assignment to a squadron.  Returned to Canada June 1945.  Modified to Mk. X Maritime Reconnaissance, No. 10 Rescue Unit.  Part of the second production batch of 130 aircraft ordered from Victory Aircraft Limited, Malton, Ontario, Canada. Serial numbers of this batch included FM100-FM229. Aircraft were equipped with Packard built Rolls-Royce Merlin 22, 38 or 224 engines.  FM105 was donated to the City of Toronto in 1964 and placed on a pedestal on Lakeshore Drive.  After sitting outside for 36 years, the aircraft was removed from the pedestal and placed on loan to the Canadian Air and Space Museum, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.  The aircraft is now under long-term restoration to static display condition.  With spare parts from the remainder of FM118, it is planned to be complete as a museum quality piece in 2015.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avro_Lancaster.

[10] KB882 was flown to England May 1945.  No. 32 Maintenance Unit, 434 Squadron, 428 Squadron (NA-R).  Returned to Canada 2 June 1945.  Modified to Mk. X Aerial Reconnaissance, 408 Squadron (AK-882).  Part of the first production batch of 300 aircraft ordered from Victory Aircraft Limited, Malton, Ontario.  Serial numbers of this batch include KB700-KB999.  The first 75 aircraft of this batch were equipped with Packard built Rolls-Royce Merlin 38 engines.  The remaining 225 aircraft were equipped with Packard built Rolls-Royce Merlin 224 engines.  Deliveries commenced to England in September 1943 and were completed in May 1945.  Average rate of production was approximately 4 aircraft per week.  KB 882 was built by Victory Aircraft in 1945 and delivered to Britain.  The aircraft joined No. 428 Squadron in March of that year.  Flown on six operational sorties over Germany, the aircraft was returned to Canada in June 1945 and entered storage.  In 1952 the aircraft was modified to Mk 10P configuration and flew with No. 408 Squadron.  In 1964 the aircraft was purchased by the City of Edmundston, New Brunswick and has since been on outside display at the Municipal Airport.

[11] KB839 was flown to England January 1945.  No. 32 Maintenance Unit, 431 Squadron, 419 Squadron (VR-D).  Returned to Canada June 5, 1945.  Modified to Mk. X Aerial Reconnaissance, 408 Squadron (AK0839).  Patch of the first production batch of 300 aircraft ordered from Victory Aircraft Limited, Malton, Ontario.  Serial numbers of this batch included KB700-KB999.  The first 75 aircraft of this batch were equipped with Packard built Rolls-Royce Merlin 38 engines.  Whilst the remaining 225 aircraft were equipped with Packard built Rolls-Royce Merlin 224 engines.  Deliveries commence to England in September 1943 and were completed in May 1945.  Average rate of production was approximately 4 aircraft per week.  Built by Victory Aircraft and delivered to No. 419 Squadron in January 1945.  The aircraft completed 26 sorties, wearing the code letters VR-D.  It was twice damaged by German anti-aircraft fire.  It returned to Canada after the end of the war in Europe, initially for service against Japan but was modified after the war to Mk 10AR Arctic Reconnaissance specification.  After being struck off charge in 1963, the aircraft was preserved at CFB Greenwood, Nova Scotia.  It has received several restorations and is now displayed outside at the GMAM, CFB Greenwood, Nova Scotia.

[12] FM221 was retained in Canada during the war.  Modified to Mk. X Bomber Reconnaissance in 1948, coded VP-DDR.  Aircraft crashed at Resolute Bay, Northwest Territories, Canada, 23 Sep 1950.  The wreckage is still visible.

[13] KB889 was flown to England March 1945.  No. 32 Maintenance Unit, 428 Squadron.  Returned to Canada 4 June 1945.  Modified to Mk. X Maritime Reconnaissance, 408 Squadron (AR-889).  Part of the first production batch of 300 aircraft ordered from Victory Aircraft Limited, Malton, Ontario.  Serial numbers in this batch included KB700-KB999.  The first 75 aircraft of this batch were equipped with Packard built Rolls-Royce Merlin 38 engines.  The remaining 225 aircraft were equipped with Packard built Rolls-Royce Merlin 224 engines.  Deliveries commenced to England in September 1943 and were completed in May 1945.  Average rate of production was approximately 4 aircraft per week.  KB889 was delivered to Britain in March 1945 and returned to Canada that June without seeing any service.  This aircraft was later converted for Maritime Reconnaissance use. Struck off charge by the RCAF in 1965, the aircraft was displayed in Ontario before being sold to prolific warbird collector Doug Arnold in the UK in 1984.  The aircraft was put on the UK register as G-LANC, but was never flown.  Sold in 1986 to the Imperial War museum, the aircraft was restored over eight years to static condition, and has been on display since 1994 as NA-I.  Aircraft has since been completely restored to its wartime configuration and is currently on public display at the Imperial War Museum, Duxford, England.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avro_Lancaster.

[14] Part of the first production batch to 300 aircraft ordered for Victory Aircraft Limited, Malton, Ontario, KB976 was flown to England May 1945, but saw no action, serving with No. 32 Maintenance Unit, 405 Squadron (LQ-K).  Returned to Canada 17 June 1945.  Modified to Mk. 10 Aerial Reconnaissance, 408 Squadron (MN-976).  KB 976 was struck off charge in 1964.  Lancaster KB976 made the last official flight as an RCAF aircraft on 4 July 1964 at the Calgary International Air Show with F/L Lynn Garrison, as Captain, and F/L Ralph Langemann as co-pilot.  Lynn Garrison then purchased KB976 from Crown Assets Disposal Corporation as an addition to his historic collection.  He created the Air Museum of Canada in April, 1964.  KB976 was sold for an abortive conversion to a fire bomber.  Sold in 1974 to the Strathallan Collection in Scotland, KB976 was flown across the Atlantic and then statically displayed until 1987.  Bought by collector Charles Church, the aircraft was moved to Woodford for restoration to airworthy condition, where the airframe was damaged in a hangar collapse.  The rebuild was abandoned and the aircraft was later sold to Doug Arnold before finally being bought by Kermit Weeks in 1992.  The aircraft has since been stored at his Fantasy of Flight museum in Florida awaiting restoration. Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avro_Lancaster.

[15] KB994 was flown to England in June 1945, where it served with No. 32 Maintenance Unit, 408 Squadron (EQ-K).  Returned to Canada 16 June 1945.  Aircraft was struck off Charge from the RCAF 22 Jan 1947.  On a farm in Alberta until acquired by 408 Squadron Museum, CFB Edmonton, Alberta, 1984-1988.  Sold to Charles Church and shipped to Manchester, England.  Registered as G-BVBP, stored dismantled at Bedford, Biggin Hill, UK, fuselage to be used in the rebuild of KB976.  Forward fuselage under restoration with David Arnold, Flying A Services, North Weald Airfield, Epping, Essex, England.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avro_Lancaster.

[16] Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avro_Lancaster.