Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Canadian Warplanes 3: Supermarine Spitfire

Supermarine Spitfire

Data current to 27 Dec 2020.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3583160)

Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. VI, RCAF (Serial No. X4492), in flight, 26 Feb 1944.  Built as X F Mk.1 4492, later converted to X F Mk. V. 

The Supermarine Spitfire is a single-seat fighter aircraft flown by Canadians in over a dozen RCAF and RAF Squadrons during and after the Second World War.  They served in every theatre of the war, from the UK, Italy, Malta, the Far and Middle East and on nearly all operations where fighters were needed on the battlefront.  Many variants of the Spitfires Canadians flew  were built in the UK, using several wing configurations.  The Spitfire was produced in greater numbers than any other British aircraft with more than 20,351 examples of all variants being built.  It was also the only British fighter produced continuously throughout the war.  Nearly 60 remain airworthy, and many more are static exhibits in aviation museums throughout the world.  The Spitfires flown by RCAF Squadrons overseas were owned by the RAF.  Only eleven were actually on RCAF strength.

Supermarine 300 Spitfire F Mk. IA (2), (Serial No. L1090), (Serial No. R7193), 329 F Mk. IIB (2), (Serial No. P8332), Mk. VI (2), (Serial No. X4492), PR Mk. VII (Serial No. X4555), PR Mk. VII Type G (Serial No. R7143), 359 Mk. VIII (1), (Serial No. JG480), (Serial No. JF480), 379 Mk. XIV (1), (Serial No. TZ138), 380 LF Mk. XVIE (1), (Serial No. TE214), Mk. XIX (1), (Serial No. PM627), for a total of 11 aircraft on RCAF strength in Canada.  The Spitfires flown by RCAF pilots overseas during the Second World War were owned by the RAF.

There were 24 marks of Spitfire and many sub-variants. These covered the Spitfire in development from the Merlin to Griffon engines, the high-speed photo-reconnaissance variants and the different wing configurations.  More Spitfire M.k Vs were built than any other type, with 6,487 built, followed by the 5,656 Mk. IXs.  Different wings, featuring a variety of weapons, were fitted to most marks; the A wing used eight .303 in (7.7 mm) machine guns, the B wing had four .303 in (7.7 mm) machine guns and two 20 mm (.79 in) Hispano cannon, and the C, or universal, wing could mount either four 20 mm (.79 in) cannon or two 20 mm (.79 in) and four .303 in (7.7 mm) machine guns.  As the war progressed, the C wing became more common.

One damaged Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VB, RAF (Serial No. ER824), "Miss Torbay", was assembled and flown in Newfoundland with parts from two other damaged Spitfires, RAF (Serial No. ES117) and RAF (Serial No. ER881), but none of them were officially on RCAF rolls.

Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. XXIV (Serial No. VN332)underwent cold weather tests with the RCAF Winter Experimental Establishment (WEE) in Alberta post war.  Sold, it flew as Reg. No. N7929A,

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3583645)

Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. IA, RCAF (Serial No. L1090), 6 Jun 1940.

All RAF aircraft were assigned an Air Ministry (AM) Form 78, which contained details of its service life.  Where known, the details of the Spitfires that saw service in Canada and with the RCAF overseas, are included in the data bank here.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. L1090), included the following data: Construction No. 305, built at Eastleigh (EA), powered by a Merlin III engine, first flew (FF) 24 Aug 1939, 36 Maintenance Unit (MU), shipped to the USA onboard the Sealand, 29 Aug 1939, flown to USAAC Wright Field, Dayton, Ohio.  Transferred to No. 1 Testing Centre, RCAF, Canada, May 1940.  Returned to the UK, 1 Aug 1940, to 3201 M, No. 14 School of Technical Training (SoTT), 13 May 1944, Category E (CE) damage, 4 Sep 1944.  (SPITFIRE, The History.  Eric B. Morgan and Edward Shacklady, Key Books Ltd, Stamford, Lincolnshire, UK, 2000, p. 80).

 (RCAF Photo, Comox Air Museum)

Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. IA, RCAF (Serial No. L1090), with Air Marshall William Avery Bishop, VC, CB, DSO & Bar, MC, DFC, ED.  He was Canada's top flying ace of the First World War, and a Victoria Cross recipient officially credited with 72 victories, making him the top Canadian and British Empire ace of the war.  His son flew Spitfires during the Second World War.

 (RCAF Photo via James Craik)

Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. IA (Serial No. R7129), No. 403 Squadron, RCAF, ca May 1941.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. R7129) included the following data: Construction No. 1457, built at Eastleigh (EA), powered by a Merlin III engine, first flown (FF) 14 Feb 1941, 9 Maintenance Unit (MU), 19 Feb 1941, No. 308 Squadron, 13 May 1941, No. 403 Squadron, RCAF, coded KH-A, 28 May 1941, No. 610 Operational Training Unit (OTU), 5 Aug 1941.  Collided with Spitfire (Serial No. R7150), near Heston, Flying Accident Category E (FACE) damage, destroyed by fire (dbf), 21 Aug 1941, struck off charge (SOC) 27 Aug 1941.

Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. IIB, RCAF (Serial No. P8332), coded LZ-O.  (RCAF Photo)

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. P8332) included the following data: built at the Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF), powered by a Merlin XII engine.  P8332 was a presentation aircraft, Baron (Soebang, Netherlands East Indies), 45 Maintenance Unit (MU), 29 Apr 1941, No. 222 Squadron, 21 May 1941, Air Service Training, Hamble (AST (H)), 27 Aug 1941, 82 MU 7 Dec 1941, shipped to Canada on the Manchester Esquire, 13 Apr 1942, Montreal, Quebec Ins, RCAF Station Rockcliffe, Ontario, A/F A166.  (SPITFIRE, The History.  Eric B. Morgan and Edward Shacklady, Key Books Ltd, Stamford, Lincolnshire, UK, 2000, p. 115).

 (Mike Filey Photo collection)

Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. IIB, RCAF (Serial No. P8332), painted -A166, at old city hall Toronto, Ontario, ca 1943. 

 (Author Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. IIB converted to Mk. VII (Serial No. P8332), (6173), built at the Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF), No. 711.  P8332 is currently on display in the Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, Ontario, painted as an F Mk. IIB, coded ZD-L of No. 222 Squadron.  These are the colours she wore while serving with the Squadron in the Battle of Britain in 1940 and on to 1941.  P8332 was a "presentation" aircraft funded by the Netherlands East Indies, and carries the name "SOEBANG N.E.I.

(Griffin Collection via Mike Kaehler)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. IIB, converted to Mk. VII, RCAF (Serial No. P8332), No. 13 Squadron, RCAF, Downsview, Ontario, Aug/Sep 1946. 

 (RCAF Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VB, RAF (Serial No. ER824), with Tropical airscoop, desert cam and equipment in 1942.  ER824 was built at the Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF).   It went to 46 Maintenance Unit (MU) on 18 Oct 1942, then 82 MU on 18 Nov 1942 and was loaded on Empire Kingsley, 30 Nov 1942.

S/L Herbert J. Russel, an RCAF Engineering Officer at Torbay, Newfoundland, reported that this aircraft was one of several that had been strapped to the deck of a British Steam Merchant ship, "Empire Kingsley", when it was bound for the Caribbean.  The ship was caught in a storm that forced it to stop in St. John's, Newfoundland on Christmas eve.  He was directed to remove this damaged Spitfire and two others as well as a damaged Lockheed P-38 Lightning.  With the damaged aircraft removed, the ship continued on its journey.  The "Empire Kingsley" was eventually sunk a year later by a U-Boat, with nearly all of its crew lost.

The aircraft were transported to Torbay on 26 Dec 1942.  The Spitfire's bent propeller was straighted, and parts of the other two damaged Spitfires (Serial Nos. ES117) and (Serial No. ES881), were used to restore (Serial No. ER824), to flying condition ca 12 Feb 1943.  S/L R.R. "Bob" Norris had flown Spitfires in the Battle of Britain and he agreed to test fly the aircraft.  On 16 March 1943, he took ER824 up for the first of many flights.  It was also flown by Lal Parsons on 19 April 1942, and F/O HA Pattinson.  This aircraft had been one of a number of "Presentation Spitfires" donated by Kabala Province in Nigeria.  The restoration crew named her "Miss Torbay".  The remains of the other two damaged Spitfires were buried at Torbay.  

Apparently, once word got around that Canadians were flying a Spitfire in Newfoundland, the AOC in Halifax, "Black Mike" McKewen, immediately demanded it be shipped to Halifax.  It was eventually packed for shipment to Halifax by members of No. 125 Squadron, RCAF.   It was in Digby, Nova Scotia, for a brief period before it made its way back to the UK where an RAF Maintenance Unit (MU) shipped her to Canadians serving with No. 442 Squadron, RCAF, 23 Feb 1944, and later to No. 12 Ground Communications Group (GCF), 23 Apr 1944, who used it for training.  It still carried the name, "Miss Torbay", on the fuselage.  ER824 was sold for scrap to J. Dale on 8 Jul 1948.  (Bert Russell and Larry Milberry, CANAV Books)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VB (Serial No. ER881), built at Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF), powered by a Merlin 46 engine, 
M46 (Maintenance), 12 Maintenance Unit (MU), 27 Oct 1942, 82 MU, 11 Nov 1942, Empire Kingsley, 30 Nov 1942,
damaged in transit, offloaded at St. John's, Newfoundland, Dec 1943.
Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VB (Serial No. ES117), built at Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF), powered by a Merlin 46 engine, 
M46 (Maintenance), 46 Maintenance Unit (MU), 18 Nov 1942, 76 MU, 21 Nov 1942, Empire Kingsley, 30 Nov 1942,
damaged in transit,
offloaded at St. John's, Newfoundland, Dec 1943.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3583113)

Supermarine Spitfire PR Mk. VII Type G, RCAF (Serial No. R7143), 13 (P) Squadron, Rockcliffe, Ontario, 14 Jan 1944.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. R7143), included the following data: Construction No. 1470, built at Eastleigh (EA), powered by a Merlin III engine, Walsall, built as a Mk. I, first flew (FF) 20 Feb 1941, 6 Maintenance Unit (MU) 20 Feb 1941, Director General of Research and Development (DGRD), Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE) Farnborough, 18 Mar 1941, 1416 Flight, 2 Apr 1941, Heston Aircraft Ltd (HAL), 2 Apr 1941, converted to  Photo Reconnaissance (PR) Mk. IV, Rolls-Royce Hucknall (R-RH), 7 Sep 1941, converted to F Mk. VA, No. 140 Squadron 3 Oct 1941, Flying Accident Category B (FACB) damage, 10 Mar 1942, No. 1 Contractors (Civilian) Repair Unit (CRU), 6 MU, 1 Jun 1942, converted to PR Mk. VII Type G, Benson 29 Oct 1942, 47 MU, 12 Dec 1943, armament removed.  Shipped to Canada on the Manchester Progress, 16 Jan 1943, in Canada 10 Feb 1943.  (SPITFIRE, The History.  Eric B. Morgan and Edward Shacklady, Key Books Ltd, Stamford, Lincolnshire, UK, 2000, p. 88).

 (DND Archives Photo, PL-l16608)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. V, 22 May 1943, Rockcliffe, Ontario.

 (Photo courtesy the Comox Air Force Museum)

Supermarine Spitfire PR Mk. VII Type G, RCAF (Serial No. R7143).  This aircraft was not flown in combat in France in 1944.  It was converted to a PR Mk. VII Type G in early 1942 with all of its armament removed and it was in Canada in 1944.  The photo was taken by Red Hill at Rockcliffe, Ontario.  It was used by the Photographic Flight and went to No. 9 (T) Group, post war.  This aircraft was in the RCAF from 1943 to 1947.  This Spitfire and the Consolidated B-24 Liberator behind it were both based at RCAF Station Rockcliffe, Ontario.  The Spitfire was used to shoot down Japanese balloon bombs.

 (Griffon Collection Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Supermarine Spitfire PR Mk. VII Type G, RCAF (Serial No. R7143), Downsview, Ontario, 1946.

 (Griffon Collection Photo via Mike Kaehler)

Supermarine Spitfire PR Mk. VII Type G, RCAF (Serial No. R7143), Downsview, Ontario, 1946.  R7143 was fitted with an oblique camera port for the photo-reconaissance role, but went through a number of conversions from Mk. 1A to PR Mk. VII during its service life, 

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. R7143), included the following data: Construction No. 1470, built at Eastleigh (EA), as an eight-gun fighter powered by a Merlin III engine, Walsall, built as a Mk. I, first flew (FF) 20 Feb 1941, 6 Maintenance Unit (MU) 20 Feb 1941, Director General of Research and Development (DGRD), Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE) Farnborough, 18 Mar 1941, 1416 Flight, 2 Apr 1941, Heston Aircraft Ltd (HAL), 2 Apr 1941, converted to Photo Reconnaissance (PR) Mk. IV, with a Merlin 45 engine, and guns removed, Rolls-Royce Hucknall (R-RH), 7 Sep 1941, converted to F Mk. VA.  Returning to Benson it flew with No. 140 Squadron 3 Oct 1941, Flying Accident Category B (FACB) damage, 10 Mar 1942, No. 1 Contractors (Civilian) Repair Unit (CRU), 6 MU, 1 Jun 1942, converted to PR Mk. VII Type G, low-level, short-range armed reconaissance conversion initially known as the PR Type G, then redesignated to PR Mk. IG, and finally  PR Mk. VII Type G, 29 Oct 1942 at Benson, Osfordshire, UK.  While at Benson, the aircraft suffered Category B (CB) damage in a flying accident.  P/O F.J. Blackwood was on a formation practice flight when he landed at Benson in bad visibly, resulting in a misjudgment of the field and runway.  He tried to skid R7143 around to prevent striking a boundary hedge resulting in the undercarriage collapsing.  After the repair, the aircraft went to No. 47 Maintenance Unit at Sealand where all guns were removed, 12 Dec 1943.  R7143 was shipped to Canada on the Manchester Progress, 16 Jan 1943, in Canada 10 Feb 1943.  R7143 was one of three Spitfires delivered to Canada on 10 Feb 1943.  There it was assigned to No. 13 Squadron, at Rockcliffe, Ontario.  In September 1944, another landing accident led to a prolongued repair which lasted until June 1945, and it was then assigned to No. 9 Transport Group.  

R7143 was transferred to the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) in September, 1947, where it served on Air Search Rescue duties. It became an instructional airframe at the RCN Air Electrical School at HMCS Stadacona.  It was reduced to scrap in 1949-50 by the school staff.  (Pat Murphy; and (SPITFIRE, The History.  Eric B. Morgan and Edward Shacklady, Key Books Ltd, Stamford, Lincolnshire, UK, 2000, p. 88).

 (DND Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VI, RCAF (Serial No. X4492), in flight, 26 Feb 1944.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. X4492) included the following data: Construction No. 1296, built in Eastleigh (EA), powered by a Rolls-Royce Merlin III engine, first flew (FF) 14 Sep 1940, Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE), Farnborough 17 Sep 1940, Photographic Development Unit (PDU), Heston Aircraft Ltd (HAL), converted to Photo Reconaissance (PR) Mk. IV (W), Rolls-Royce Hucknall (R-RH), 18 Apr 1941 converted to F Mk. VA, Merlin 45 engine, No. 1 Photo Reconnaissance Unit (PRU) 29 Apr 1941, 8 Maintenance Unit (MU) 15 Nov 1941, converted to PR Mk. VII Type F, Aeroplane and Armament Experiment Establishment (AAEE), Boscombe Down (BDn), converted to prototype F Mk. VI, Merlin 47 engine, extended wingtips, known as experimental a/c 152, to Regional Operation Centre? (ROC).  Trials with 3 and 4-blade propellers.  No. 140 Squadron, 12 Feb 1942, 47 Maintenance Unit (MU), RAF station Sealand, 5 Dec 1942.  Manchester Dockyards, 9 Jan 1943.

Shipped to Montreal, Quebec, on the Manchester Progress, 16 Jan 1943, arriving 10 Feb 1943.  Unloaded and moved to Ottawa 17 Feb 1943.  Taken on Charge (TOC) with No. 3 Training Command.  No. 13 Squadron, No. 7 Photo Wing RCAF Station Rockcliffe, Ontario, 9 Apr 1943.  X4492 had a 36-inch telephoto camera installed.  First documented flight in Canada.  Flown to Toronto the next day.  It was used in trials, Mar to Jul 1943.  It was in Saint John, New Brunswick, then flown to RCAF Station Rivers, Manitoba, to photograph the total eclipse of the sun on 9 July 1945.  It was equipped with an F24 oblique camera installed to sight upwards.  Pilot F/Lt Tom Percival.  X4492 was flown over Lake Winnipeg at 35,000 feet, a record breaking altitude record for photographing a solar eclipse.  It went into unit storage on 31 Dec 1945.  It took part in the Toronto Airshow, 30 Jun 1946.  No. 9 Transport Group, RCAF station Rockcliffe, 15 Jul 1946.  The aircraft damaged its propellers on take-off at RCAF Rtation Rockcliffe, Ontario, 17 Sep 1946.  It is recorded as awaiting disposal, 11 Oct 1946.  Air Search and Rescue duties, 9 Jan 1947.  Royal Canadian Navy, Director of Naval Services. 2 Sep 1947.  Eventual allocation to RCN/VR unit unknown.  (SPITFIRE, The History.  Eric B. Morgan and Edward Shacklady, Key Books Ltd, Stamford, Lincolnshire, UK, 2000, p. 92).

 (DND Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VI, RCAF (Serial No. X4492), in flight, 26 Feb 1944.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3583883)

Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. VI, RCAF (Serial No. X4492), Op Eclipse, RCAF, 20 Aug 1945.

 (DND Photo)

Avro Anson, Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. VI, RCAF (Serial No. X4492), North American B-25 Mitchell Mk. II, No. 13 (P) Squadron, taking part in Operation Eclipse to photograph a solar eclipse, 1945.

The RCAF carried out observations of the 9 July 1945 eclipse of the sun from four aircraft: a Spitfire,
a Mitchell, and two Ansons.  This effort was part of a series of ionospheric observations sponsored by the Canadian Radio
Wave Propagation Committee.  Although the focus of this expedition was not strictly on astronomy, the story is a good illustration of the technology that was in use during the 1940's, which had improved very much since the 1932 eclipse observations.

 (DND Photo)

Operation Eclipse composite photo, 9 July 1945.

Three of the aircraft involved in the RCAF operation were outfitted with a total of seven standard cameras, of the type
commonly used at that time for aerial photography.  The one of the Ansons carried a motion picture camera.  Spectrographic and polarization measurements were made, as well as visual and infrared photographs of the solar corona and 
prominences.  The altitude of the aircraft ranged between 17,000 ft and 34,000 ft.  The cameras were mounted behind special plate glass windows, and all except one were adjusted to automatically take exposures, once started.

Three of the aircraft were kept on the proper heading using a modification to the pilot's gun sight; the pilot kept the
sun centered on the sighting rings, which kept the cameras pointing at the sun.  The spectra obtained during the mission
may have been the first ever taken from an aircraft.  (Lee Walsh)

 (DND Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VI, RCAF (Serial No. X4492), in flight, 26 Feb 1944.

 (DND Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VI, RCAF (Serial No. X4492), in flight, 26 Feb 1944.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3523323)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VI, RCAF (Serial No. X4492), in flight, 26 Feb 1944.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, PL 20234)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VI, RCAF (Serial No. X4492), struck off charge (SOC), 2 Sep 1947.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, PL 16608)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VI, RCAF (Serial No. X4492).

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3583158)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VI, RCAF (Serial No. X4492), 26 Feb 1944.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, PL-16227)

Supermarine Spitfire PR Mk. VII, RCAF (Serial No. X4555), in its original PRU scheme, on display in a May 1943 Victory Drive, Ottawa, Ontario.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. X4555) included the following data: Construction No. 1185, built at Eastleigh (EA), powered by a Merlin III engine, first flew (FF) 25 Sep 1940, 6 Maintenance Unit (MU) 26 Sep 1940, No. 92 Squadron, 28 Sep 1940, Category 2 (C2) damage on operations, 1 Nov 1941, General Aircraft Ltd (GAL), No. 132 Squadron 16 Feb 1941, Heston Aircraft Ltd (HAL) 29 Apr 1942, converted to Photo Reconnaissance (PR) Mk. IV, Merlin 45 engine, 1 Photo Reconnaissance Unit (PRU), Benson 15-11-1942, converted to PR Mk. VII Type G, 47 MU 3 Jan 1943, shipped to Canada on the Tom Couston, 10 Mar 1943, in service with the RCAF, 4 Apr 1944, equipped with a 34-inch telephoto camera installed for trials.  (SPITFIRE, The History.  Eric B. Morgan and Edward Shacklady, Key Books Ltd, Stamford, Lincolnshire, UK, 2000, p. 92).

 (RCAF Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire PR Mk. VII, RCAF (Serial No. X4555), RCAF Station Rockcliffe, Ontario, ca 1943.

  (J. Griffin Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. VIII, RCAF (Serial No. JG480), 18 SFTS, Gimli, Manitoba, 1944.   SJG480 flew with No. 1 Winter Experimental and Training Flight that was located at RCAF Station Gimli, Manitoba.  The flight formed at Kapuskasing, Ontario, on 5 Jul 1943 to test aircraft under winter conditions.  The weather was not cold enough so the flight transferred to Gimli in 1944 and later in 1945 formalized as WEE flight at Edmonton, Alberta.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. JG480) included the following data: Construction No. 5054, built at Eastleigh (EA), powered by a Merlin 66 engine, first flew (FF) 14 Nov 1943, Controller of Research and Development (CRD), Vickers Armstrong, Worthy Down (VAWD), 12 Dec 1943, 52 Maintenance Unit (MU), 28 Jan 1944, RCAF Test and Development Unit, Halifax, Nova Scotia, 26 Feb 1944, winterization tests, 3 Mar 1944.  JG480 became General Instruction (G) airframe No. A517.  Last reported with the RCN at Esquimalt, BC.  (SPITFIRE, The History.  Eric B. Morgan and Edward Shacklady, Key Books Ltd, Stamford, Lincolnshire, UK, 2000, p. 296).

 (World War Photos)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. VIII, RCAF (Serial No. JG480).

 (Gary Cook Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. VIII, RCAF (Serial No. JG480), Lethbridge, Alberta, 1945.

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. VIII, RCAF (Serial No. JF480).

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. JF480) included the following data: Construction No. 4321, built at Eastleigh (EA), powered by a Rolls-Royce Merlin 66 engine, first flew (FF) 13 May 1943, 8 Maintenance Unit (MU), 14 May 1943, 76 MU, 29 May 1943, SS707, 15 June 1943, Casablanca 29 June 1943, Middle East 1 Sep 1943, North West African Air Forces, 1 Nov 1943,  Vickers Armstrong, Worthy Down (VAWD), Dec 1943, 52 MU Jan 1944, RCAF Test and Development Unit, Halifax, Nova Scotia, 26 Feb 1944, winterization tests, struck off charge (SOC) 30 Jun 1945.  (SPITFIRE, The History.  Eric B. Morgan and Edward Shacklady, Key Books Ltd, Stamford, Lincolnshire, UK, 2000, p. 292).

 (CF Photo, REC89-142)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. XVI (Serial No. SM309), coded AU-H, No. 421 Squadron, RCAF, airfield B-90, Petit Brogel, Belgium, 15 Mar 1945.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. SM309) included the following data: built at the Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF), powered by a Merlin 266 engine, 45 Maintenance Unit (MU), 6 Nov 1944, No. 421 Squadron, RCAF, 28 Dec 1944, Category C (CAC) damage on operations, 15 Mar 1945, No. 410 Squadron, RCAF, 17 Fighter Training School (FTS), 11 Feb 1946.  SM309 suffered an engine failure, the pilot made a wheels up landing at Harlaxton, Category B (CB) damage, 28 Mar 1946, struck off charge (SOC), 23 May 1946.

 (Glen Carruthers Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. XVIE, RCAF (Serial No. TE214), on loan from the Canada Aviation and Space Museum to the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, Mount Hope, Ontario.  This Spitfire was manufactured by the Supermarine division of Vickers-Armstrong Limited in 1945, and was accepted by the Royal Air Force and served at the Central Gunnery School RAF in Leconfield, England, from 1945 to 1950.  It was removed from active service and stored in the early 1950s.  From 1956 until 1960 it was displayed at RAF Ternhill, England.  Transferred to the RCAF in 1960, it was refinished as an aircraft from No. 416 (City of Oshawa) Squadron and placed on display at the Canadian War Museum by the Canadian National Aeronautical Collection.  No. 416 Squadron operated Spitfire Mk. XVIe aircraft from September 1945 and March 1946 as part of No. 126 (RCAF) Wing, based at Utersen, Germany.  During late 1988, (Serial No. TE214) was loaned to the Western Canada Aviation Museum in Winnipeg until 1997.  On 25 April 1997, Deputy Prime Minister Sheila Copps presented the CWH Museum with the Spitfire on long-term loan from the Canada Aviation and Space Museum.

The LF Mk. XVI was intended for the low to medium altitude role, and were powered by the Packard/Merlin M266.

 (RCAF Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire FR Mk. XIVE, RCAF (Serial No. TZ138), 1948.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. TZ138), included the following data: Construction No. 6S.676505, built at Aldermaston (ALD), powered by a Griffon 65 engine, Rolls-Royce Hucknall (R-RH), No. 47 Maintenance Unit, RAF Station Sealand in June 1945.  TZ138 was shipped to Canada on the SS Alder Province, 11 Nov 1945.  In Canada, transported by rail to Alberta 11 Dec 1945.  TZ138 was prepared for cold weather tests with 47 Maintenance Unit (MU), flown 25 Jan 1946 by F/Lt Laubma, at RCAF Station Edmonton, Alberta.  Transferred to North West Air Command 11 Feb 1946.  Engine replaced summer 1946,  Second set of trials began 26 Nov 1946, ended 28 Feb 1947.  This aircraft had logged a total flight time of 41.55 hrs, when it nosed over while taxiing in the snow and damaged its propeller.  de Havilland Tiger Moth skis were installed for take-off only, with the skis being dropped after the aircraft was airborne.  The heaters for the gun were inadequate.  TZ138 was struck off strength (SOS) 31 Mar 1949.  It was sold, Reg. No. CF-GMZ, then went to Minneapolis, Minnisota, USA in 1960, later to Massachusetts, Reg. No. N138TZ.  It took part in the National Air races at Cleveland, Ohio.  Currently Reg. No. C-GSPT, based at the British Columbia Institute of Technology, Vancouver International Airport, Vancouver, BC.  (SPITFIRE, The History.  Eric B. Morgan and Edward Shacklady, Key Books Ltd, Stamford, Lincolnshire, UK, 2000, p. 428).

 (SDASM Photo)

 (SDASM Photo)

 (SDASM Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire FR Mk. XIVE, RCAF (Serial No. TZ138), Reg. No. CF-GMZ, Racer No. 80, 1949.  TZ138 was purchased in April 1949 by Ken Brown and James McArthur, who made plans to enter the Tinnerman Air Races held during the 1949 National Air Races at Cleveland, Ohio. The buyers obtained the almost new aircraft from Canadian surplus War Assets for a sum of $1,250.  TZ138 was registered as CF-GMZ on 25 Aug 1949.  It received a DOT certificate of serviceability and was approved for Class “F” racing.  This Spitfire was painted with a blue spinner and had red and blue striping on the fuselage, red propeller tips and the Imperial Oil logo forward of the cockpit. Just behind the propeller, the letters EDMONTON * CANADA were painted in red, and below it the slogan The Crossroads of the World with the letters painted in black.  The canopy frame was painted blue and it No. 80 racing number was painted on the fusleage in black. 

This ex-RCAF Spitfire was the only aircraft to participate in the race retaining all of its original standard features.  CF-GMZ placed 3rd in the 1949 Tinnerman Air Races at Cleveland, with a top speed of 359.565mph.  The winning aircraft in that race was a modified Goodyear F2G Corsair piloted by ex-Navy pilot Ben McKillen, wtih a top speed of 386.069 mph.  TZ138 was later registered in Richmond BC as C-GSPT.

 (Pat Murphy Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire FR Mk. XIVE, RCAF (Serial No. TZ138), Reg. No. CF-GMZ, Richmond, British Columbia.

 (Richard Dumigan Photo)

 (Author Photos, 1971)

Supermarine Spitfire PR Mk. XIX, RCAF (Serial No. PM627), coded YO-X, Toronto, Ontario, alongside HMCS Haida, ca 1972, now in Sweden.  This Spitfire was delivered to the Royal Air Force as in 1945, and served until it was struck off strength in 1951.  It was transferred to the Indian Air Force as (Serial No. HS964) in 1953 and served until it was struck off strength in 1957.  It went on display in the Indian AF Museum, Palam AB, New Dehli, India, from 1957-1971.  This Spitfire was acquired by John Weir with the Canadian Fighter Pilots Association, Downsview, Ontario, on 3 Feb 1971.  The Spitfire arrived disassembled in a Lockheed C-130 Hercules.  After undergoing a static restoration, it was displayed as (Serial No, PM627), coded YO-X & DB-X at the Canadian National Exhibit Grounds, Toronto, from 1972-1973, and at the Ontario Science Center, Toronto, Ontario, from Nov 1973-1978.  It was later displayed at the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, Mount Hope, Ontario, in 1980.  The Spitfire went to David C. Tallichet, MARC, Chino, California in 1982.  It then went to the Flygvapenmuseum, Malmslatt, Sweden, in October 1982, where it is on display as RSwAF as Fv31051.

 (DND Photo via Jim Bates)

Supermarine Spitfire PR Mk. XIX, RCAF (Serial No. PM627), coded YO-X, blue paint scheme, Toronto, Ontario, 1974.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. PM627), included the following data: Construction No. 6S.683524, built at Supermarine (Super), powered by a Griffon 66 engine, 6 Maintenance Unit (MU) from 20 Sep 1945 to 15 June 1952, BRSD Reserve Pool 26 May 1949, No. 2 Squadron, British Air Forces of Occupation (BAFO), 10 Nov 1949,  Gatwick refurbishment, 9 Mar 1951, 9 MU, sold Air Service Training (AST) 15 Feb 1953, to the Israeli Air Force (IAF), (Serial No. HS964), to Canada, then to Sweden.  (SPITFIRE, The History.  Eric B. Morgan and Edward Shacklady, Key Books Ltd, Stamford, Lincolnshire, UK, 2000, p. 462).

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire PR Mk. XIX, RCAF (Serial No. PM627), Royal Swedish Air Force (Serial No. 51), coded 11, Flyvapenmuseum, Linkoping, Sweden.

Supermarine Spitfires flown by the RCAF overseas were on loan from the RAF.  RCAF Sqns that flew Spitfires included Nos. 401, 402, 403, 411, 412, 414, 416, 417, 421, 430, 441, 442 and 443 Squadrons, and No. 13 Squadron from 1944-1946.

 (DND Archives Photo, RE-20633-7)

Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. XIV (Serial No. RB151), Dec 1943.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. RB151), included the following data: Construction No. 5114, built at Eastleigh (EA), powered by a Griffon 55M engine, first flown (FF) 30 Nov 1943, 33 Maintenance Unit (MU) 4 Dec 1943, No. 610 Squadron, 16 Jan 1944, 1 Contractors (Civilian) Repair Unit (CRU). Gem modifications 19 May 1944, No. 610 Squadron, Category C (CAC) damage on operations, 19 Sep 1944, repaired on site (ros), 39 MU, 21 Mar 1946, non-effective aircraft (NEA), 26 Feb 1951, to 6841M (Maintenance) 2 Jul 1951.

No. 411 Squadron, RCAF.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 5010706)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. IIA, RAF (Serial No. P7923), coded DB-R, No. 411 Squadron, RCAF, ca July 1941. 

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. P7923), included the following data: built at Castle Bromwich (CBAF), powered by a Merlin XII engine, this aircraft flew with 12 Maintenance Unit (M) 1 Feb 1941, No. 610 Squadron 25 Feb 1941, No. 130 Squadron 3 July 1941, No. 411 Squadron 27 Jul 1941, 1 CRU 31 Pct 1941, CGS 27 Nov 1942, Flying Accident Category C (FAAC), 11 Jul 1944, repaired on site (ros), Category E (CE) damage, 9 Nov 1944.

 (RAF Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. V, RAF, with clipped wings.

 (IWM Photo, CH 2929)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk VB, (Serial No. R6923), No. 92 Squadron, RAF, 19 May 1941.

No. 401 Squadron, RCAF.

 (DND Photo via Chris Charland)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VB, (Serial No. AA926), coded YO-E, "Jersey", from No. 401 "Ram" (F) Squadron, flown by Pilot Officer Ian Ormstorn.  Ian had his wife’s name, "Marguerite", painted on the port side. 

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. AA926), included the following data: Construction No. 2217, High Post Aerodrome (HPA), powered by a Merlin 45 engine, first flew (FF) 23 Oct 1941, 38 MU 24 Oct 1941, No. 401 Squadron, RCAF, 28 Oct 1941. Overshot landing and groundlooped, undercarriage collapsed, Gravesend, Flying Accident Category C (FAAC) damage, 11 May 1942, Category E (CE) damage, 18 Aug 1942, struck off charge (SOC), flying hours (FH) 235.10hrs.

 (DND Photo via Airman Tachel)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VB, (Serial No. AA926), coded YO-E, "Jersey", from No. 401 "Ram" (F) Squadron, flown by Pilot Officer Ian Ormstorn.  Ian had his wife’s name, "Marguerite", painted on the port side. 

 (DND Photo via Airman Tachel)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VB, (Serial No. W3131), coded YO-N, from No. 401 "Ram" (F) Squadron, flown by Pilot Officer A.E. Harley.

(RCAF Photo via Francois Dutil)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VB (Serial No. AD234), coded YO-X, flown by P/O Hugh Godefroy, No. 401 Squadron, RCAF, Oct 1941. 

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. AD234), included the following data: Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF), powered by a Merlin 45 engine, 33 Maintenance Unit (MU), 12 Sep 1941, No. 401 Squadron, RCAF, 26 Oct 1941, Air Service Training (AST), 22 Feb 1942.  Damaged by a Focke-Wulf Fw 190 and abandoned near Woodchurch, Kent in the UK on 13 Mar 1942, struck off charge (SOC) 31 Mar 1942.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4997399)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VB, coded YO-R, No. 401 Squadron, RCAF, over Kent, England in 1942.

No. 402 Squadron, RCAF.

 (Aldo Bidini Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. Vb (Serial No. EP120), coded AE-A, No. 402 Squadron, RCAF, currently airworthy, Reg. No. G-LFVB, The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire, in the UK.  It is painted in the markings it carried when serving with No. 402 Squadron, RCAF, although it served with several different units during the Second World War.  Pilots flying EP120 destroyed seven Axis aircraft.

 (Tim Felce Photo)

 (Aldo Bidini Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. Vb (Serial No. EP120), coded AE-A, No. 402 Squadron, RCAF, currently airworthy, Reg. No. G-LFVB, The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.  During the Second World War, EP120 was assigned to No. 501 Squadron in 1942, and then subsequently to No. 402 Squadron, RCAF.  Pilots of this aircraft destroyed seven German aircraft during its wartime career.  Post-war, it was an instructional airframe, then displayed as a Gate guardian.  It was acquired by the fighter collection in 1993 and restored to airworthiness.  It is currently painted in its No. 402 Squadron, RCAF, markings.

 (Aurore Defferriare Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. Vb (Serial No. EP120), coded AE-A, No. 402 Squadron, RCAF, currently airworthy, Reg. No. G-LFVB, The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. Vb (Serial No. EP120), Reg. No. G-LFVB, AE-A, 402 (RCAF) Squadron, The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire. Airworthy.  Assigned to No. 501 Squadron in 1942, and then subsequently to No. 402 Squadron, RCAF.  Pilots of this aircraft destroyed seven German aircraft during its wartime career.  Post-war, it was an instructional airframe, then displayed as a Gate guardian.  It was acquired by the fighter collection in 1993 and restored to airworthiness.  It is currently painted in its No. 402 Squadron, RCAF, markings.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. Vb (Serial No. EP120), coded AE-A, No. 402 Squadron, RCAF, currently airworthy, Reg. No. G-LFVB, The Fighter Collection, Duxford, Cambridgeshire. 

 (RAF Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VB (Serial No. W3834), coded YO-Q, No. 401 Squadron, RCAF, in England, ca summer 1943. 

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. W3834), included the following data: built at Eastleigh (EA), this aircraft was powered by a Merlin 45 engine.  It first flew (FF) on 2 Sep 1941.  38 Maintenance Unit (MU) 5 Sep 1941, No. 266 Squadron, coded UO-P, 13 Sep 1941, No. 154 Squadron 23 Feb 1942, Flying Accident Category C (FAAC), 12 Apr 1942, Air Service Training, Exeter (ASTE), Merlin 45 installed, 5 USAAF, 6 Aug 1942, No. 421 Squadron, RCAF, 10 Mar 1943, No. 416 Squadron, RCAF, 23 May 1943, No. 401 Squadron, RCAF, 1 June 1943, No. 126 Wing, 10 Aug 1943, Heston Aircraft Ltd (HAL), 12 Nov 1943, No. 1659 Conversion Unit (CU), 5 Jan 1945, struck off charge (SOC) 17 Sep 1945.

No. 417 Squadron, RCAF.

  (IWM Photo, TR865)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. Vbs of No. 417 Squadron, RCAF, flying in loose formation over the Tunisian desert on a bomber escort operation, April 1943.

 (RCAF Photo, PL 8515)

Supermarine Spitfire. F Mk. VIII (Serial No. JF336), coded AN-O, No. 417 Squadron, RCAF.  Harmonization of the guns.  The aircraft has to be jacked-up level to ensure the guns are lined-up correctly to test fire, ca Nov 1943.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. JF336), included the following data: Construction No. 4026, built at Eastleigh (EA), powered by a Merlin 63A engine, first flew (FF) 25 Feb 1943, 39 Maintenance Unit (MU), 26 Feb 1943, Fort Jersey, 11 May 1943, Casablanca, 30 May 1943, North West Africa, 1 Jul 1943, Middle East 1 Sep 1943, Mediterranean Army Air Force, 1 Nov 1943, No. 417 Squadron, RCAF, hit by flak and abandoned 8 Dec 1943.

 (RCAF Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire. F Mk. VIII (Serial No. JF880), No. 417 Squadron, RCAF, Italy, 1944.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. JF880), included the following data: Construction No. 4728, built at  High Post Aerodrome (HPA), powered by a Merlin 66 engine, first flew (FF) 31 Aug 1943, 39 Maintenance Unit (MU), 3 Sep 1943, 47 MU, 11 Sep 1943, shipped on the Ocean Rider, 23 Sep 1943, to Casablanca, North African Air Support Control (ASC), 31 Oct 1943, USAAF 31 Jan 1944, Mediterranean Army Air Force, 21 Jun 1945, struck off strength (SOC, 14 Mar 1946.

 (RCAF Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire. HF Mk. VIII (Serial No.), coded AN-O, No. 417 Squadron, RCAF, Italy, 1944.  Note the high-altitude wingtips.

 (IWM Photo, MH6849)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. IXE, No. 412 Squadron, RCAF, coded VZ-W, taxing at airfield B108, Rheinem Germany, 1945.

  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, PA-136915)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. IXE, No. 412 Squadron, RCAF, coded VZ-W, taxing at airfield B108, Rheinem Germany, 1945.

 (IWM Photo CL 1718)

Supermarine Spitfire PR Mk. XI (Serial No. PL883), of No. 400 Squadron, RCAF, taxiing through a flooded area at B78, Eindhoven, the Netherlands, ca Dec 1944.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. PL883), included the following data: built at Aldermanston (ALD), powered by a Merlin 70 engine, 6 Maintenance Unit (MU), 3 Jul 1944, No. 400 Squadron, RCAF, Category AC (CAC) damage on operations 26 Jul 1944, Benson, 14 Oct 1944.  Destroyed in an air raid, Eindhoven, Netherlands, Category E (CE) damage, 1 Jan 1945.

No. 403 Squadron, RCAF.

 (IWM Photo, CL186)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. IX, No 403 Squadron, RCAF, being serviced by an RAF Repair and Salvage Unit working to repair damage to the aircraft at a forward airstrip in Normandy, 19 June 1944.   The propeller blades are wooden.  It would appear that the repair team is trying to lift and move the wing backwards to straighten it out.  A few of the men are pushing on the cannon while those behind are watching the wing root area.

No. 412 Squadron, RCAF.

(IWM Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. IX (Serial No. MJ275), coded VZ-J, and (Serial No. MJ452), coded VZ-L, No. 412 Sqn, RCAF, with 250-lb bombs, Heesch, Netherlands, ca Feb 1945.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. PL883), included the following data: built at the Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF), powered by a Merlin 66 engine, 33 Maintenance Unit (MU) 20 Oct 1943, No. 416 Squadron, RCAF, 30 Jan 1944, Category C (CAC) damage on operations, 30 Jan 1944, Air Service Training (AST), 83 Group Service Unit (GSU), 19 Sep 1944, No. 412 Squadron, RCAF, 23 Nov 1944, Category C (CAC) damage on operations, 16 Feb 1945.  On an armed reconnaissance patrol, PL883 was shot down by flak and crashed in flames, Zelhem, Netherlands, 30 Mar 1945, F/Lt W.J. Anderson KIA.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. MJ452), included the following data: built at the Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF), powered by a Merlin 66 engine, 9 MU, 1 Nov 1943, General Aircraft Ltd (GAL), 29 Aug 1944, 83 Group Service Unit (GSU), 9 Sep 1944, No. 412 Squadron, RCAF, coded VZ-L, 23 Nov 1944, No. 130 Squadron, 17 May 1945, Air Service Training, Hamble (ASTH), to 6081M, 15 Aug 1946, No. 5 School of Technical Training (5SoTT), 26 June 1947, struck off charge (SOC), reduced to group assemblies (rtga).

 (Asisbiz Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. IX (Serial No. MJ275), coded VZ-R, No. 412 Sqn, RCAF, taxiing past a USAAF Martin B-26 Marauder, Heesch, Netherlands, 22 Mar 1945.

 (IWM Photo, CL1451)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. IXE, coded VZ-H, No. 412 Squadron, RCAF, carrying three 250-lb bombs, assisted by a ground-crewman on the wing to stear around potholes in the runway, B80/Vokel, Netherlands, 19 Oct 1944.

(IWM Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. IXE (Serial No. MJ255), coded VZ-S, No. 412 Squadron, RCAF, Tilly-sur-Seulles, Normandy.  This aircraft crashed on 11 June 1944, photo taken on 17 June 1944.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. MJ255), included the following data: built at the Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF), powered by a Merlin 66 engine, 33 Maintenance Unit (MU), 24 Oct 1943, No. 405 Squadron, RCAF, 8 Nov 1943, No. 412 Squadron, 21 Nov 1943.  MJ255's engine cut out and it crash landed in Normandy, Category E (CE) damage, 11 June 1944.

 (RAF Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. IX, RAF.

No. 416 Squadron, RCAF.

 (Libary and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3941007)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. IX, (Serial No. MJ832), coded DN-T, No. 416 (City of Oshawa) Squadron, RCAF.  This aircraft was damaged by flak in the Flenville area of France on 8 May 1944, but was repaired.  Squadron Leader Sten T. Lundberg was shot down by flak while flying this Sptifire, as he attacked a train in the Cayeux-Berck area on 21 May 1944.  This was during Ramrod 905.  He became a POW at Luft Stalag III.  His Kriegsgefangenen Nummer (POW Number) was 5838.  Luft Stalag III was the camp made famous by the "Great Escape".  On his return to Canada, he became a pioneer in early helicopter aviation.  The remains of his Spitfire were apparently collected but later abandoned by the Luftwaffe at Vught, Holland, 11 Nov 1944.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. MJ832), included the following data: built at the Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF), powered by a Merlin 66 engine, 33 Maintenance Unit (MU), 24 Dec 1943, No. 416 Squadron, RCAF, coded DN-T, later DN-Y, 30 Jan 1944.  Damaged by flak while attacking a train and abandoned over France 21 May 1944.

No. 421 Squadron, RCAF.

 (IWM Photo, CL 782)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. IXs of No. 421 Squadron RCAF prepare to taxi out from their dispersals at B2/Bazenville, Normandy, for a routine dusk patrol.

 (IWM CL1779)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. XVIs of No. 421 Squadron RCAF, stand parked in the snow at B56/Evere, Belgium, as a Lockheed Hudson of Transport Command lands on the cleared main runway.

 (RCAF Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire L.F Mk. XVI (Serial No. SM483), No. 403 Squadron RCAF, following a crash landing on the rooftop of a four story building at 153 Boulevard Auguste Reyers, Brussels on 3 February 1945.  It broke in two and the tail fell into the street after an engine failure while taking off from B.56 Brussels/Evere.  The aircraft was destroyed but the extremely lucky pilot, RCAF F/O R. Tegerdine of Oakland, California, fell out of the aircraft, then dropped through the hole in the roof caused by the crash and walked out of the building with only minor scratches.

 (Nilfanion Photos)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. XVIE (Serial No. TB752), coded KH-Z, No. 403 Squadron, RCAF, built in 1944, currently preserved in the Spitfire and Hurricane Memorial Museum, Manston Road, Ramsgate, Kent in the UK.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. TB752), included the following data: built at the Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF) in the United Kingdom in 1944, powered by a Merlin 266 engine, 33 Maintenance Unit (M), 21 Feb 1945, 66 Squadron, 25 Mar 1945, No. 409 Squadron, RCAF, 29 Mar 1945, No. 403 Squadron, RCAF, 19 Apr 1945, Category C (CAC) damage on operations, 26 Apr 1945, No. 410 Squadron, RCAF, 102 Flight Refresher School (FRS), 19 Apr 1951, 7256M (Maintenance), RAF Manston, 7279M, 8080M, refurbished at Rochester airport Jan 1979, gate guardian at RAF Manston.

(RCAF Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. IX (Serial No. NH188), coded AU-H, in flight, now with the Canada Aviation and Space Museum, Rockcliffe, Ottawa, Ontario.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. NH188), included the following data: Construction No. 2161, built by the Supermarine division of Vickers-Armstrong Limited at the Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF) in the United Kingdom in 1944.  It is powered by a Merlin 66 engine.  6 Maintenance Unit (MU), 1 May 1944, Air Service Training, 18 May 1944, No. 308 (Polish) Squadron, 15 Jun 1944, Category E (CE) damage on operations, 8 Oct 1944, No. 416 Squadron, RCAF, coded DN-S.  It was damaged by anti-aircraft fire around D-Day, and was stored by the RAF from late 1944 to 1946.  30 Nov 1944, 47 MU, 17 Sep 1947, Royal Netherlands Air Force (Serial No. H-64), later (Serial No. H-109).  Sent to the Dutch East Indies (today's Indonesia) in 1947, it was flown infrequently until its return to Holland in 1950.   It was sold to the Belgian Air Force in 1952, rebuilt, and then used as a trainer, Belgian Air Force (Serial No. 3-53), later (Serial No. SM-39).  NH188 was written off after a crash in 1954.  A private company then purchased the aircraft and rebuilt it to tow targets, coded 00-ARC.  John N. Paterson of Fort William, Ontario, purchased the Spitfire and brought it to Canada in 1961, Reg. No. CF-NUS.  After rebuilding it, Paterson donated the aircraft to the Museum in 1964, flying it to Ottawa for Air Force Day.  It is now in the CA&SM, coded AU-H.

(RCAF Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. IX (Serial No. NH188), coded AU-H, in flight, now with the Canada Aviation and Space Museum, Rockcliffe, Ottawa, Ontario.

 (Author Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. IX (Serial No. NH188), coded AU-H, Canada Aviation and Space Museum, Rockcliffe, Ottawa, Ontario.

 (Author Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. IX (Serial No. NH188), coded AU-H, Canada Aviation and Space Museum, Rockcliffe, Ottawa, Ontario.

 (Author Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. IX (Serial No. NH188), coded AU-H, Canada Aviation and Space Museum.

No. 41e Squadron, RCAF.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3645494)

Supermarine Spitfire FR Mk. XIVB, RAF (Serial No. MV348), coded S, "Violet Dorothy III", No. 414 (Sarnia Imperials) Squadron, RCAF, June 1945.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. MV348), included the following data: built at Eastleigh (EA), powered by a Griffon 65 engine, (Interim) Super production prototype, 4 Apr 1944,  39 MU, 4 Apr 1945, No. 414 Squadron, RCAF, 26 May 1945, No. 2 Squadron, 9 Aug 1945,  Flying Accident Category C (FAAC) damage, 10 Nov 1945, 123 Wing HQ, 23 Jan 1946, 2 Squadron, British Air Forces of Occupation (BAFO), 22 Feb 1947, repaired on site (ros), 13 May 1949.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3645495)

Supermarine Spitfire FR Mk. XIVB, RAF (Serial No. MV348), coded S, "Violet Dorothy III", No. 414 (Sarnia Imperials) Squadron, RCAF.

 (RCAF Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire FR Mk. XIV, RAF (Serial No. RN119), coded AE-J, No. 402 Squadron, RCAF, 126 Wing, 2nd TAF, Heesch, the Netherlands, 4 March 1945.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. RN119), included the following data: built at Supermarine (Super), powered by a Griffon 65 engine, 33 MU, 8 Nov 1944, No. 402 Squadron, RCAF, coded AE-J, 8 Feb 1945, Category C (CAC) damage on operations, 21 Mar 1945, No. 412 Squadron, RCAF, 28 Jun 1945, to the Belgian Air Force (Serial No. SG-45), 10 Jun 1948.

 (Asisbiz Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire FR Mk. XIV, (Serial No. RM727), coded AE-P, No. 402 Squadron, RCAF, Nov 1944.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. RM727), included the following data: Construction No. 6S.432276, built at Chattis Hill (CHA), powered by a Griffon 65 engine, 33 Maintenance Unit (MU), 25 Jun 1944, No. 91 Squadron, 31 Jul 1944, No. 402 Squadron, RCAF, coded AE-P, 9 Nov 1944, Category C (CAC) damage on operations, 10 Mar 1945, No. 405 Squadron, RCAF, 12 Apr 1945, shot down by flak near Parchim, Germany, 19 Apr 1945, No. 402 Squadron, RCAF, 26 Apr 1945, 3 Base Recovery Unit (BRU).

After the Normandy campaign two sub-units of 511 Forward Repair Unit (FRU), Odiham, known as Base Aircraft Repair Unit (BARU) and Base Aircraft Salvage Unit (BASU) operated on the Continent.  In Nov 1944, 511 FRU disbanded and many of the personnel were posted to the BARU at Courtrai, which was then renamed 151 Repair Unit; at the same time BASU was renamed 3 BRU.  (Chris Thomas)

No. 430 Squadron, RCAF.

 (RCAF Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire FR Mk. XIV, RAF (Serial No. RM795), coded T, No. 430 Squadron, RCAF. 

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. RM795), included the following data: built at Supermarine (Super), powered by a Griffon 65 engine, 39 MU, 31 Aug 1944, 2 Squadron, 23 Nov 1944, No. 130 Squadron, repaired, failed to return (FTR) operations cancelled.  No. 414 Squadron, British Air Forces of Occupation (BAFO), 3 Jan 1949, Reserve Pool, 20 Apr 1949, non-effective aircraft (NEA), 1 Aug 1950, sold, Vickers Armstrong (VA), 10 Nov 1950, to Belgian Air Force, 15 Nov 1950.

 (RCAF Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire FR Mk. XIV (Serial No. NH757), coded D, No. 414 Sqn, RCAF, being refueled prior to a sortie, at Wunsdorf, Germany in April 1945.  Note the camera ahead of the roundel.  NH757 was flown to photograph sites in Germany, on occasion engaging in aerial combat with the last remnants of the Luftwaffe.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. NH757), included the following data: built at Aldermanston (ALD), powered by a Griffin 65 engine, 29 Maintenance Unit (MU), 26 Mar 1945, No. 414 Squadron, RCAF, 26 Apr 1945, No. 2 Squadron, 9 Aug 1945, wheels up landing at Sylt, 2 Sep 1946, Category E (CE) damage, 12 Sep 1946.

 (Author Photo)

 (Author Photo)

 (Author Photo)

 (Author Photo)

 (Aldo Bidini Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire LF Mk. XVIE (Serial No. SL721), coded AU-J, No. 421 Squadron, RCAF, Reg. No. N9721WK, later Reg. No. C-GVZB.  Michael Potter, Vintage Wings of Canada, Gatineau, Quebec.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. SL721), included the following data: Construction No. 4756 (also reported as No. 4494), built at the Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF), powered by a Merlin 266 engine, 6 Maintenance Unit (MU), 27 Aug 1945, Fighter Command Communications Squadron (FCCS), Northolt, 10 Oct 1946, Vickers-Armstrong South Marston (VASM), 29 Oct 1946, Metropolitan Communication Squadron, 5 Feb 1948, Flying Accident Category A (FACA) damage, 17 Jul 1948, VASM, special finish, gun bays removed, converted to luggage compartment.  Delivered by M Lithgow to RAF Bovington for use of AOC Fighter Command, 17 Dec 1948, VASM, Feb 1949 repainted and modifications, No.  31 Squadron, 11 Apr 1949, Central Gunnery School (CGS) 4 Aug 1951, non effective strength (NES), 13 Dec 1954.  Sold to F.Wilensk, 11 Feb 1955, to the USA in 1966 as Reg. No. N8R.  Sold to D. Arnold, Reg. No. G-BAUP.   San Diego, Reg. No. N8WK.  Later Reg. No. N9721WK, now in Canada, Reg. No. C-GVZB.  Michael Potter, Vintage Wings of Canada, Gatineau, Quebec.

Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. XIVE, RAF (Serial No. RM747), fuselage c/n 6S–432296.  This aircraft is in storage in the Vintage Wings of Canada hangar at Gatineau, Québec.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. SL721), included the following data: Construction No. 6S.432296, built at Chattis Hill (CHA) in the UK.  Powered by a Griffon 65 engine, 33 Msaintenance Unit (MU), 17 Jul 1944, No. 322 (Dutch) Squadron, at Deanland near Hailsham, East Sussex, in the UK, 5 Aug 1944, exchanged with No. 350 (Belgian) Squadron, Hawkinge on 9 August.  After a very short time, No. 350 Squadron engaged incoming V-1’s on “Anti Diver” patrols and RM747 was first flown as such by F/O Verpoorten on the afternoon of 13 August.  It is believed to have been coded MN-D.  Its last sortie with No. 350 was in the late afternoon of 31 August when the squadron provided top cover for a force of 100 Lancasters bombing St Omer.

Although there is no record of any damage being incurred, RM747 is thought to have sustained Category B (CB) damage on or about 1 Sep 1944.  It was sent to Air Service Training (AST), probably at Hamble, for repairs on 9 September.  The repairs were not completed until 10 March 1945.  No. 451 Squadron, RAAF, British Air Forces of Occupation (BAFO), 29 Jun 1945, based at Fassberg, Germany, until it was disbanded the following month.  RM747 was then returned to the UK for storage at No. 29 Maintenance Unit (MU), at High Ercall, on 29 July 1945.  Following reconditioning, RM747 was air-tested as G-15-115, before joining the Royal Thai Air Force (Serial No. U-14-5/93), 10 May 1950.  During the 1980s it was part of a playground at Sawankalok, Thailand.  At some point, the wing (s) and cowlings of (Serial No. RM873) were fitted to (Serial No. RM747), while her engine and wings came from a Canadian Spitfire (Serial No. RM873)

 (Mike Kaehler Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire HF Mk. IXe, (Serial No. TE294), painted as (Serial No. MK304), coded Y2-K.  The original Y2-K, (Serial No. MK304), was produced at Castle Bromwich, albeit as a Merlin 66-powered LF Mk IXe. 

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. TE294), included the following data: built at Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF), powered by a Merlin 70 engine, 39 Maintenance Unit (MU), 7 June 1945, No. 122 Squadron, 10 Apr 1946, Flying Accident Category A (FAAC) damage, 24 Sep 1946, repaired on site (ros).

The remains of this fighter were rescued from a South African scrapyard in the 1990s and partly rebuilt by volunteers at the Comox Air Force Museum as a millennium project and as an homage to the wartime pilots of No. 442 Squadron, RCAF.  No. 442 Squadron is currently an RCAF Search and Rescue Squadron based at 19 Wing, Comox, British Columbia.  It was restored at Vintage Wings of Canada, Gatineau, Quebec.  TE294 is now airworthy, and was first flown 7 June 2017.  It is painted as (Serial No. MK304), coded Y2-K, as flown by Flt Lt Arnold Roseland, No. 442 Squadron, RCAF.  

No. 442 Squadron, RCAF (no badge during the Second World War).

 (RCAF Photo)

Y2K is dedicated to and carries the name of Flight Lieutenant Arnold Roseland of 442 Squadron.  Roseland was one of only a handful of Canadian fighter pilots who fought both the Japanese and the Germans during the war.  “Rosey” Roseland was a member of 14 Squadron, a P-40 Kittyhawk unit flying in the home defence of Canada’s West Coast and in combat operations in the Aleutian Island chain against Japanese Army and Navy positions on the island of Kiska.  Later in the war, 14 Squadron became 442 Squadron, reforming at RCAF Station Rockcliffe in Ottawa before going overseas and transitioning en masse to the Supermarine Spitfire.  Roseland flew in a Spitfire with the letter “K” on the side, K” being used by at least three aircraft he had flown since 18 March 1944.  Roseland’s flight record in the Spitfire included 117 flights totaling 130 hours and 10 minutes.  He flew more than 50% of his Spitfire operations in a Y2-K–marked aircraft, making that aircraft in the squadron truly “his”.  In his nearly two years on P-40s and P-40 Kittyhawks before going to Europe, Rosey had 220 flights and 348 hours, flying out of Great Britain and France. 

F/L Roseland was flying one of the Spitfires, coded K, when he shot down a pair of Focke-Wulf Fw 190s.  He flew K on three separate sorties on 30 June 1944, just two weeks before he was killed.  His Squadron Intelligence officer typed it out afterward for his combat reports: 
 
“I was flying Yellow 3 in 442 Squadron which was on patrol heading due south at 1800’ just under layer of cloud in the vicinity of VILLER BOCAGE. I suddenly spotted 4 FW 190’s flying due North directly below yellow flight. I immediately broke 180º and down to attack at the same time reporting the presence of e/a [Enemy Aircraft] to the remainder of the squadron. The e/a sighted me and began climbing all out for cloud using violent evasive action but still in fairly compact formation and turning slightly to starboard. I attacked second from left from 20º to 0º opening fire from approx 450 yds. My first burst struck engine and cockpit and e/a began to smoke. I closed in slightly to line astern and my second burst hit tail and e/a immediately burst into flame and rolled over onto its back. I broke starboard and positioned myself on e/a to starboard, which was very near cloud. My port cannon jammed and I had difficulty in getting strikes on e/a which was using violent evasive action. By the time it entered cloud it was smoking badly. I followed into cloud for 30 sec. then diving slightly spotted e/a directly ahead. My starboard cannon also ceased firing so I fired short burst of M/G [Machine Gun - Ed.] until within 50 yards. E/A dove into cloud at an angle of 45º. Pilot apparently bailed out while in cloud. First e/a confirmed by F/L Wright. 

I claim 2 FW 190’s DESTROYED. Cine gun used [gun camera]

(SGD), A. Roseland. F/L.”

Arnold Roseland was just 28 years old when he died in an aerial gunfight over Normandy in the summer of 1944.  The No. 442 Squadron Operational Record Book, (ORB) for 13 July 1944 records he was flying another Spitfire, Y2P and that, "F/L A.W. Roseland, the Flight Commander of “B” Flight chased a Hun into the clouds and was not seen again."  He apparently died when his parachute caught on the tail of his burning Spitfire and he was thrown to his death when the aircraft struck the ground.  Since that day, Rosey’s remains have lain in a well-tended grave site at the Bretteville-sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery in Calvados, France.  (Dave O’Malley, Roseland Spitfire Project)

No. 441 Squadron, RCAF.

 (IWM Photo, CL 76)

Ground crew refuel and re-arm one of the first Supermarine Spitfires to land in France, a Mk. IX of No. 441 Squadron, RCAF, at Advanced Landing Ground B3/Sainte Croix-sur-Mer, Normandy, on the afternoon of 10 June 1944.

 (RAF Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VIII (Serial No. JF835), c/n 4612, coded UM-T, flown by RCAF Flying Officer Paul “Gus” Ardeline, DFC, serving with No. 152 (Hyderabad) Squadron, RAF, operating from Sinthe airstrip in Burma, in 1945.  The maple leaf is green, inside the blue and white roundel under a black panther.  F/O Ardeline shot down a Japanese Mitsubishi Ki-46 twin-engine reconnaissance aircraft code named "Dinah" on 24 Sep 1944 while flying this aircraft.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. JF835), included the following data: Construction No. 4612, built at Chattis Hill (CHA), powered by a Merlin 63 engine, first flew (FF) 7 Aug 1943, 39 Maintenance Unit (MU), 9 Aug 1943, No. 222 MU, 27 Aug 1943, Cardinal Gibbons, 3 Sep 1943, Casablanca, 20 Sep 1943, North African Air Support Control (ASC), 31 Oct 1943, India, 1 Jan 1944.

 (RAF Photo)

 Supermarine Spitfire Mk. IX (Serial No. EN398), coded JE-J.   This aircraft was built at the Chattis Hill (CHA) factory and made its first flight on 13 Feb 1943.  On 18 February it was delivered to RCAF No 402 Squadron at RAF Kenley in the UK.  There Ian Keltie took possession of it and used EN398 (then coded AE-I) exclusively until mid March (by now coded AE-B), when 402 moved.   Keltie's last mission in EN398 occurred on 13 March 1943.  When 402 moved however, EN398 was left for their replacement squadron, also Canadian, RCAF No. 416 Sqn.  RAF Kenley housed four RCAF squadrons, Nos. 403 and 416 with Spitfire Mk. IXs, and Nos. 411 and 421 Sqns with Spitfire Mk. Vs.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. EN398), included the following data: Construction No. 4612, built at Chattis Hill (CHA), powered by a Merlin 63 engine, first flew (FF) 13 Feb 1943, No. 402 Squadron, RCAF, 18 Feb 1943, No. 416 Squadron, RCAF, 23 Mar 1943, Station HQ Kenley, 4 Apr 1943, Air Service Training (AST) modifications, No. 416 Squadron, 16 Apr 1943, No. 421 Squadron, RCAF, 27 Jul 1943, AST, 26 Aug 1943, Category C (CAC) damage on operations, 24 Sep 1943, AST, 83 Group Service Unit (GSU), 23 Mar 1944, Scottish Aviation, 22 Aug 1944, 9 Maintenance Unit (MU), 9 Jan 1945, 80 Operational Training Unit (OTU), 24 May 1945, 29 MU, 21 Mar 1946, sold as scrap to H. Bath, 10 Nov 1949.  W/C Johnson shot down 16 of his final total of 34 enemy aircraft in this aircraft.

On 16 March 1943, Acting Wing Commander "Johnnie" Johnson arrived to take command of the four Canadian units based at Kenley, leading the wing.  Johnson took over EN398, and noted that his Spitfire was painted with a green maple leaf below the cockpit.  Johnson stated, "I found the engineer officer and together we had a look at her, gleaming and bright in a new spring coat of camouflage paint.  Later I took her up for a few aerobatics to get the feel of her, for this was the first time I had flown a Mk. IX.  She seemed very fast, the engine was sweet and she responded to the controls as only a thoroughbred can.  I decided she should be mine, and I never had occasion to regret the choice."

As a wing commander, Johnson was allowed to paint his initials JE-J on the sides of the fuselage, in place of the usual squadron code letters AE.  He also had the Spitfire's guns re-harmonised to converge their fire to a single point ahead of the aircraft, rather than the standard pattern which spread the rounds evenly over a circle a few yards across.  The first successful engagement for Johnson in EN398 was on 3 April 1943 when he shot down a Focke-Wulf Fw 190.  By the time Johnson relinquished command of the Kenley Wing in September 1943 he had shot down 12 enemy aircraft, shared in the destruction of five more, inflicted damage on six and shared in damaging one, all while flying EN398.  Also, RCAF Squadron Leader Robert "Buck" McNair shot down an Fw 190 while flying this Spitfire on 20 July 1943.  EN398 was eventually sold for scrap in October 1949.

  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, PL15946)

Group Captain Robert Wendell "Buck" McNair, DSO, DFC & Two Bars (15 May 1919 – 15 January 1971), Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) flying ace of the Second World War, with 16 or 16.5 victories and five probables.  He is shown here with his Spitfire, when he was flying with RCAF No. 403 Sqn, Apr 1943.

 (RCAF Photo via Asisbiz)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. IX (Serial No. BS428), coded AE-U, No. 402 Squadron, RCAF, 1942.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. BS428), included the following data: Construction No. 3298, built at Eastleigh (EA), powered by a Merlin 61 engine, first flew (FF) 26 Aug 1942, No. 402 Squadron, RCAF, coded AE-U, 26 Aug 1942, Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE) Nov 1942, flown in negative G trials,  Aeroplane and Armament Experiment Establishment (AAEE), Boscombe Down (BDn), 14 Jan 1943, flown in level speed performance trials with and without a 500lb bomb on mod carrier 19 Jan 1943, brief handling trials with 250lb and 500lb bomb comparison trials and range detection, ice guard, flown with guns removed, fuel cooling installation in the wing root.  New carrier of RAF design and manufacture installation, 15 Feb 1943, No.  416 Squadron, RCAF, 23 Mar 1943, Air Service Training (AST) 31 Mar 1943, modifications, No. 421 Squadron, RCAF, 20 May 1943, Category C (CAC) damage on operations, 24 Jun 1943, repaired on site (ros), No. 405 Squadron, RCAF, 14 Sep 1943, No. 611 Squadron, 15 Oct 1944.  Sold as scrap to H. Bath, 24 Nov 1949.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, PL30827)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. IX, coded DB-R, No. 411 Squadron, RCAF, with Stan Rivers and Ken Allenby painting pre-invasion stripes on the fighter prior to 6 June 1944 at Tangmere, United Kingdom.  On 6 June 1944, under overcast skies, RCAF fighter and fighter-bomber pilots flew with 171 Allied squadrons to protect the soldiers on the beach from the Luftwaffe and to attack German formations on the ground.  No. 441, No. 442 and No. 443 Squadrons of the RCAF became the first allied aircraft to operate over France since 1940.  They continued to support the Allied offensive throughout the campaign that followed.  Seven RCAF aircraft were lost, and 20 RCAF members were killed during operations in support of the landings.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, PL30259)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. IX, Flying Officer H.W. ‘Bud’ Bowker works on the guns of the Spitfire he flew for the RCAF during the Normandy invasion.

 (Asisbiz Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. XIV, coded DB-D, No. 411 Squadron, RCAF, British Air Forces of Occupation (BAFO), post-war, 1945.

 (IWM Photo, CM 3658)

Flight-Sergeant George. F. Beurling, DSO, DFC, DFM and Bar, of No. 249 Squadron RAF, standing by a sandbag revetment at Ta Kali, Malta, with the rudder and unit emblem cut from a crash-landed Macchi MC.202 of 378ª Squadriglia/51º Stormo CT, Regia Aeronautica, one of four enemy aircraft which he shot down over Gozo on 27 July 1942.  George Beurling joined the RAF in September 1940 and was posted to No. 41 Squadron RAF a year later.  On 9 June 1942, he flew into Malta from HMS Eagle and joined No. 249 Squadron RAF, with whom he became the top-scoring Allied fighter pilot on the island, achieving 26 victories between 12 June and 14 October 1942.  He was sent home to Canada for publicity purposes in November 1942, but returned to the United Kingdom to join No. 61 Operational Training Unit as a flying instructor in July 1943.  He transferred to the RCAF on 1 September 1943 and achieved the last of his 32 confirmed victories with Nos. 403 and 412 Squadrons before returning to Canada in April 1944 and retiring from the Air Force the following October.   He died in a flying accident, (possibly due to sabotage), on 20 May 1948, while ferrying an aircraft to Israel after having volunteered for service with the nascent Israeli Air Force.

Other Spitfires that flew in Canada

 (Len Moer Photo, Aerial Visuals)

Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. XXIV (Serial No. VN332)Reg. No. N7929A.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. VN332), included the following data: built at Vickers-Armstrong, High Post (VAHP), powered by a Griffon 61 engine, armed with short-barreled Hispano Mk. V 20-mm cannon, test flown by W.J.G. Morgan for 15-min at South Marston, 25 Mar 1947, 47 Maintenance Unit (MU), RAF Sealand for storage.  28 May 1947, Task 322, for cold weather storage and cocoon testing.

Prepared for shipping to Canada, VN332 was embarked aboard the new Canadian Pacific liner SS Beaverlake during June and became the only Spitfire F.24 to enter North America.  Offloaded at the Port of Quebec, VN332 was shipped by truck to the RCAF Winter Experimental Establishment (WEE) in Alberta, 28 Aug 1947.   VN332 was late for its schedule of being made airworthy and the report indicates that, because of onset of winter, instrument or engine operation was left untested.  Erected and cocooned with products from the H.M. Hollingshead Company of New Jersey, USA, the Spitfire was coated in Hollingshead No. 1381 Cocooning Lacquer over their Insulmastic webbing agent, and an Aluminum Lacquer. After a few weeks for the process to be done, VN332 was presented to the elements in October 1947 and monitored until May 1948 when a heavy rain over the period of a week caused the covering to be removed and evaluated.  Again entombed in a protective solid coating, the second test ran from 16 August 1948 to 20 March 1950, encompassing two long winters.  Checked daily, the coating was evaluated assiduously and aided the RCAF in evaluating the viability of storing aircraft in an Arctic environment.  The experiment was a success with the report closing. 

 (Len Moer Photo, Aerial Visuals)

Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. XXIV (Serial No. VN332), Reg. No. N7929A.

M.W. Lee Fairbrother, an ex-RCAF/RAF pilot, purchased the Spitfire, 21 Mar 1951.  Lee flew it to Wold Chamberlin Field in 1952 and the aircraft was painted in an attractive overall cream with emerald green stripe and registration with bare silver spinner scheme by DePonti Aviation, also based at the field. Lee was actually thinking about entering the plane in the Great Race and some work was done on the machine, Reg. No. N7929A.

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. IA, (Serial No. R7193).

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. R7193), included the following data: Construction No. 1493, built at Eastleigh (EA), powered by a Merlin III engine, first flew (FF) 2 Mar 1941, 37 Maintenance Unit (MU), 4 Mar 1941, No. 313 Squadron, 4 Jul 1941, No. 57 Operational Training Unit (OTU), 27 Aug 1941, Flying Accident Category A (FAAC) damage, 24 Dec 1941 repaired on site (ros), Royal Navy Deposit Account (RNDA) Yeovilton, 10 Sep 1942, No. 761 Squadron, Henstridge, Oct 1942, No. 759 Squadron, Yeovilton, coded Y1-M, Jan  to Jun 1943. Shipped to Canada, in service with the RCAF Feb - Sep 1944, telephoto camera installed, Jul 1943.  R7193 was returned to the UK, 30 Dec 1944. 

Supermarine Spitfire LR Mk. Vc (Serial No. AR614).

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. AR614), included the following data: built at Westland Aircraft Limited (WAL), powered by a Rolls-Royce Merlin 46 engine, 39 Maintenance Unit (MU), 24 Aug 1942, No. 312 (Czech) Squadron, Harrowbeer, damaged by flak, 11 Nov 1942, repaired on site (ros), Category C (CAC) damage on operations 14 May 1943, AST, No. 610 Squadron, 20 Nov 1943.  No. 130 Squadron, coded PJ-E, 30 Jan 1944, No. 222 Squadron, 16 Feb 1944, FAAC, 21 Feb 1944, repaired on site (ros), 530 Training Unit (TU), 2 Sep 1944, FAAC, 16 Sep 1944, ros, 5378M, 13 Jul 1945, later 6371 M and 7555 M. 

In July 1945, AR614 was allocated to RAF St Athan in South Wales, as an instructional airframe for maintenance personnel.   During the late 1940s and early 1950s it was on display at RAF Padgate in West Kirby and was eventually sold by the Ministry of Defence, in 1963, to the Air Museum in Calgary, Canada.  It was in open storage in a shipping crate at Calgary, 1964-1970.  Sold to Donald Campbell, Kapuskasing, Ontario, 1970-1992, Reg. No. C-FDUY, 1986.  Its intended long-term restoration to airworthy status was not completed.  Shipped to the Old Flying Machine Co., Duxford, UK, 1992.  

Ray G. Hanna/Old Flying Machine Co, Duxford, UK, March 19, 1993-1994, Reg. No. G-BUWA.  Alpine Fighter Collection, 
Audley End, Essex, UK, 1994-1998.
Rebuilt by Historic Flying, Audley End, UK, 1994-1996. First flight, 5 Oct 1996, coded
DU-Z.
Historic Flying Ltd, Audley End, UK, 25 June 1996-1998. Paul Allen, Flying Heritage Collection, WA, 1999-2000.
Flying Heritage Collection, Bellevue, WA, 10 Feb 2000-2001. Reg. No. N614VC. Flying Heritage Inc, Bellevue,
WA, 25 Apr 2001-2002.
Vulcan Warbirds Inc, Seattle, WA, 2004-2016. Currently in the UK, it is fitted with a Merlin 35
engine and Dowty Rotol propeller.  Hawker Restorations, UK. 
Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VB (Serial No. EP150), built at Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF), powered by a Merlin 46 engine, 
37 Maintenance Unit (MU),
14 June 1942, 76 MU 6 Jul 1942, Canada, 3 Dec 1942, USSR, 1 Mar 1943.
Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VB (Serial No. EP184), built at Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF), powered by a Merlin 46 engine, 
38 Maintenance Unit (MU), 1 June 1942, 76 MU, 6 Jul 1942, Canada, 2 Dec 1942, USSR, 1 Mar 1943.
Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VB (Serial No. EP311), built at Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF), powered by a Merlin 46 engine, 
33 Maintenance Unit (MU),
20 June 1942, 82 MU, 6 Jul 1942, Canada, 3 Dec 1942, USSR, 1 Mar 1943.
Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VB (Serial No. EP363), built at Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF), powered by a Merlin 46 engine, 
6 Maintenance Unit (MU),
20 June 1942, 76 MU, 7 Jul 1942, Canada, 3 Dec 1942, USSR, 1 Mar 1943.
Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VB (Serial No. EP431), built at Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF), powered by a Merlin 46 engine, 
M46 (Maintenance), 33 Maintenance Unit (MU),
24 Jun 1942, 76 MU, 3 Jul 1942, Canada, 3 Dec 1942, USSR, 1 Mar 1943.
Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VB (Serial No. EP450), built at Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF), powered by a Merlin 46 engine, 
M46 (Maintenance), 38 Maintenance Unit (MU),
28 Jun 1942, 82 MU, 5 Jul 1942, Canada, 3 Dec 1942, USSR, 1 Mar 1943.
Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VB (Serial No. EP462), built at Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF), powered by a Merlin 46 engine, 
M46 (Maintenance), 33 Maintenance Unit (MU),
27 Jun 1942, 82 MU, 7 Sep 1942, Canada, 3 Dec 1942, USSR, 1 Mar 1943.
Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VB (Serial No. EP468), built at Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF), powered by a Merlin 46 engine, 
M46 (Maintenance), 38 Maintenance Unit (MU),
28 Jun 1942, 76 MU, 6 Jul 1942, Canada, 3 Dec 1942, USSR, 1 Mar 1943.
Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VB (Serial No. EP540), built at Castle Bromwich Aircraft Factory (CBAF), powered by a Merlin 46 engine, 
M46 (Maintenance), 45 Maintenance Unit (MU),
1 Jul 1942, 82 MU, 8 Jul 1942, Canada, 3 Dec 1942, USSR, 1 Mar 1943.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Supermarine Spitfire HF Mk. IXe (Serial No. TD314), Reg. No. G-CGYJ, FX-P, 234 Squadron, Biggin Hill Heritage Hangar, Biggin Hill, Kent. Airworthy.

The Form 78 for RAF (Serial No. TD314), included the following data: built at Castle Bromwich in late 1944 and fitted with 
a Merlin 70 as a High Level Fighter. She was one of the last high back Spitfires built as the production line switched to low
back aircraft in February of 1945. 33 Maintenance Unit (MU) at Lyneham, 30 Mar 1945, transferring later that month to 30 MU
before a further move to 6 MU where she was prepared for service with 183 (Gold Coast) Squadron at Chilbolton on 24 Jun 1945.
TD314 moved to 234 (Madras Presidency) Squadron at Bentwaters on 26 Jul 1945. TD314 was transferred to 29 MU at
High Ercall for disposal on 27 Feb 1946.
In early 1948 TD314 was selected as one of the 136 Spitfire IXs to be sold to the
South African Air Force and she was sent to 47 MU RAF Sealand where she was packed for shipment, leaving Birkenhead on the
SS Clan Chattan 23 Apr 1948 and arriving at Cape Town on 12 May 1948. Details of her use with the SAAF are not known but
she was sold for scrapping to the South African Metal & Machinery CO, Salt River, Cape Town, sometime during 1954. She
remained in the scrap yard until recovered by Larry Barnett of Johannesburg in 1969. From there she passed through the hands
of several owners before arriving in the UK via Canada in 2009.
Acquired by Aero Legends in 2011, restoration commenced
at Biggin Hill culminating in a first flight on 7 Dec 2013. TD314 has been named “St. George” which is prominently
displayed on the fuselage.