Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Canadian Warplanes 1: The Biplane Era, Nieuport Bebe, Nieuport 12 and Nieuport 17 fighters

Canadian Warplanes of the Biplane Era, Nieuport Bebe, Nieuport 12 and

Nieuport 17 fighters

Data current to 30 Dec 2018.

 

Nieuport Bebe.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3390834)

Nieuport Bebe.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3390835)

Nieuport 12, (Serial No. A154).  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3585188)

 (Author Photos)

Nieuport 12 (Serial No. N-11504), (A4737).  Built in 1915, this Nieuport 12 was a gift to Canada from the Government of France.  Transported from France to Halifax by steamship in February 1917, the War Trophies Board exhibited the aircraft across North America as a war relic, to raise public support for the war effort.  This Nieuport was the first aircraft that the Canadian government retained for its historical significance, and is one of only two known to exist worldwide.  It was transferred to the Canadian War Museum in the 1930s and to this Museum in 1965.  In the 1990s, the Museum's skilled conservation team restored it to appear as it would have during its 1917 exhibition tour.  (CA&SM)

Nieuport 17 unskinned, Air Force Day, RCAF Station Rockcliffe, Ontario, 9 Jun 1951.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584524)

Capt Billy Bishop VC, with Nieuport 17 Scout, No 60 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps,  Filescamp, France, ca 1918.  (RAF Photo)

Capt Billy Bishop with Lewis Gun, Nieuport Aircraft, 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, PA-122515)

Nieuport 17, CA&SM.  (CF Photo)

 (RCAF Photo)

Nieuport 17 replica (Serial No. B1556), CF-DDK.  This Nieuport 17 was built by American amateur airplane-maker Carl R. Swanson in 1961, as a flying replica.  A generous donor purchased the aircraft for the Museum in 1963.  It was refinished to match the airplane in which the famous Canadian ace William Avery "Billy" Bishop earned the Victoria Cross.  Wing Commander Paul A. Hartman took the aircraft on its first flight in May 1967, at Rockcliffe airport.  It was flown in several air shows across Canada, including a flight demonstration during the visit of HRH Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, in April 1975. Unfortunately, it crashed at the Abbotsford International Air Show in 1989.  The Museum's skilled restoration team rebuilt the aircraft to its current state.  (CA&SM)