Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Canadian Warplanes 1: The Biplane Era Fighters, Bombers and Patrol Aircraft

Canadian Military Aircraft of the Biplane Era Fighters, Bombers and Patrol Aircraft

Data Current to 5 Jan 2019.

 

This aviation handbook provides a quick general reference to identify and briefly describe military aircraft flown by Canadians during WWI and in the post-war Canadian Air Force, the Royal Canadian Air Force, the Royal Canadian Navy, and the Canadian Army during the biplane era. The handbooks in this series include a general description and a photograph from the Canadian Forces Archives of at least one of the key variants or marks of each aircraft that has been in Canadian service or used by Canadian servicemen overseas.Each aircraft is listed alphabetically by manufacturer, number and type. General details describing the aircrafts engines, service ceiling, speed, armament and weapons load are included, along with a brief description of the Canadian squadrons which flew the aircraft.This is the first volume in the series. It describes the fighters, bombers and patrol aircraft flown by Canadian servicemen during the biplane era. A list of museums, private aircraft collections and other locations where a number of the survivors might be found is also included. The handbook is not a definitive list of all Canadian-manufactured or operated aircraft, but should serve as a quick reminder for anyone with an enthusiastic interest in Canadian military aviation.

Order book: http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000011078/Canadian-Warbirds-of-the-Biplane-Era.aspx

Order book in Canada: http://www.chapters.indigo.ca/books/Canadian-Warbirds-Biplane-Era-Fighters-Harold-A-A-Skaarup/9780595183630-item.html?ikwid=harold+skaarup&ikwsec=Books

http://www.amazon.ca/Canadian-Warbirds-Biplane-Fighters-Aircraft/dp/0595183638/ref=sr_1_17?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1322339874&sr=1-17

Nook book: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/canadian-warbirds-of-the-biplane-era-harold-a-skaarup/1004803364?ean=9781462067411&itm=26&USRI=Harold+Skaarup

For an update on military aircraft preserved in Canada, see "Canadian Warplanes".

Canadian Air Force cap badge.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3643715)

The RCAF traces its history to the Canadian Air Force which was formed in 1920.  The Canadian Air Force was incorporated in 1923 and granted royal sanction in 1924 by King George V.  

Canadian Warplanes of the Biplane Era, Fighters, Bombers and Patrol Aircraft

Armstrong-Whitworth F.K.8.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN 3387943)  None are preserved in Canada.  

While flying an F.K. 8, 2Lt Alan A. McLeod won the Victoria Cross for an action fought by him and his observer, Lt A.W. Hammond, MC, on 27 March 1918.  2Lt Alan A. McLeod VC grew up in Stonewall, Manitoba.  During an air battle at an altitude of 5,000', 2Lt McLeod and his Observer, Lt A.W. Hammond MC, were attacked by eight German Fokker DR.1 Triplane fighters.  2Lt McLeod skilfully manoeuvred to enable his observer to engage and shoot down three of the attackers.  Wounded five times and with his aircraft on fire, 2Lt McLeod climbed out onto the left bottom-plane of his aircraft and proceeded to control his machine from the side of the fuselage.  By steeply side-slipping the aircraft he was able to keep the flames to one side, thus enabling the observer to continue firing until the ground was reached.  The observer had by now been wounded six times when the machine crashed in "no man's land," and 2Lt McLeod, not withstanding his own wounds, dragged him away from the burning wreckage at great personal risk from heavy machine-gun fire from enemy lines.  Wounded again by a bomb while engaged in this rescue, he persevered until he had placed Lt Hammond in comparative safety before falling himself from exhaustion and lack of blood.  He later died of influenza on 6 November 1919.  He was Canada's youngest VC winner, and the youngest winner of a VC for an air action.  Internet: http://www.cbrnp.com/profiles/quarter1/F.K.8.htm.

Armstrong Whitworth Atlas aircraft flown by the RCAF are listed on a separate page on this web site.

Armstrong Whitworth Atlas Mk. I (5), (Serial Nos. 16 (later 401), 17 (later 402), 18, (later 403), 19 (later 404), 111, Mk. I dual (1), (Serial No. 112), (later 405), Mk. I AC (10), (Serial Nos. 406-415), for a total of 16 aircraft.

Armstrong Whitworth Siskin aircraft flown by the RCAF are listed on a separate page on this web site.

Armstrong Whitworth Siskin Mk. III (2), (Serial Nos. J7758), 10, (later 301), Mk. IIIA (8), (Serial Nos. 20), (later 302), 21 (later 303), 22 (later 304), 23, 59 (later 305), 60 (later 306), 61, 210, (later 309), Mk. IIIDC dual control (2), (Serial Nos. 62), (later 307), and 63 (later 308), for a total of 12 aircraft.  None are preserved in Canada.

Blackburn Lincock Mk. II  (Canadian Forces Photo)

In 1928 Blackburn designed and built a private venture lightweight biplane fighter powered by an Armstrong Siddeley Lynx IVC engine.  The Blackburn F.2 Lincock was of wooden construction and first appeared in May 1928.  It performed well in demonstrations but failed to gain any orders.  The canadian government showed an interest in the design, and a metal construction variant (the Lincock II) was built.  It was tested in Canada at Camp Borden in 1930 where there was interest in using the Lincock as an advanced trainer, but the type was not ordered.  It was later used to perform public aerobatic displays in 1933 and 1934.  One survives in the Streetlife Museum Hull in the UK.

Boeing Aircraft of Canada (Blackburn) Shark Mk. II (7), (Serial Nos. 501-507); and Shark Mk. III (19), (Serial Nos. 514-526, 545-550), for a total of 26 aircraft.  Sharks flown by the RCAF are listed on a separate page on this web site.

Bristol F.2B Fighters flown by Canadian pilots are listed on a separate page on this web site.

Burgess-Dunne floatplane in flight in US service, 18 March 1914.  (Bain News Service Photo)

Burgess-Dunne in flight, ca. 1913.  (RCAF Photo)

Burgess-Dunne floatplane, Canada's first military aircraft.  (DND Photo)

Burgess-Dunne floatplane, Canada's first military aircraft.  (Comox Air Force Museum Photo)

 (RCAF Photo)

One Burgess-Dunne seaplane was bought by the Canadian government for the Canadian Aviation Corps and was their first military aircraft.  When Canadian troops left for Europe on 30 Sep 1914, the aircraft was loaded onto the S.S. Athenia and shipped to England.  On the trip the aircraft was was seriously damaged in transit and not used. 

 

Burgess-Dunne floatplane, replica, National Air Force Museum of Canada, CFB Trenton, Ontario.

Canadian Vickers aircraft flown by the RCAF are listed on a separate page on this website.

Canadian Vickers Vanessa (1) Registration G-CYZJ.

Canadian Vickers Varuna Mk. I (1), (Registration G-CYGV), Mk. II (7), (Registration No’s G-CYZP - G-CYZV), for a total of 8 aircraft.

Canadian Vickers Vancouver Mk. I (1), (Registration G-CYXS), Mk. II (5), (Reg. Nos. G-CYVK), (later 902), G-GYVR – G-CYVU (later 903-906), for a total of 6 aircraft.

Canadian Vickers Vedette Mk. I (1), (Reg. No. G-CYFS), Mk. II (18), (Reg. Nos. G-CYGA, GW-GZ, XZ, YA-YF, ZK, (later 11), ZL-ZO, 108), Mk. V (13), (Reg. Nos. G-CYVP, WR, WS, YZ, ZA-ZF, 109, 110, 116), (later 803), Mk. VA (11), (Reg. Nos. G-CYWJ (later 808), WK, WL-WQ (later 809-814), 115, 123, 124), Mk. VI (1), (Reg. No. G-CYWI (later 817), for a total of 44 aircraft.

Canadian Vickers Velos (1), RCAF (Serial No. G-CYZX)

Canadian Vickers Vigil (1), RCAF (Serial No. G-CYZW).

Canadian Vickers Vista (1), RCAF (Serial No. G-CYZZ).

Canadian Vickers Viking Mk. IV (8), RCAF (Serial Nos. G-CYEX, G-CYET, G-CYEU, G-CYEZ, G-CYEV, G-CYEX plus two)

Canadian Car & Foundry G-23 Goblins flown by the RCAF are listed on a separate page on this web site. 

Canadian Car & Foundry G-23 Goblin I (15), (Serial Nos. 334-348).

The Canadian Car & Foundry Company acquired a manufacturing licence for the Grumman G-23, and improved FF-1, of which it completed a total of 52, some of which were assembled from US-built components.  Although initially rejected as a fighter by the RCAF as outdated and too slow, with the advent of war, the last 15 of the CC&F production batch were taken on strength as the Goblin I.  The aircraft type served with the RCAF from 17 September 1940 until 21 April 1942.  "A" Flight of No. 118 RCAF Sqn was equipped with Goblins at Rockcliffe in Ottawa, and subsequently became No. 118 (Fighter) Sqn., later stationed at Dartmouth, Nova Scotia where the Goblins for a time constituted the sole fighter force on the east coast.  One CCF-built G-23 was sold to the Nicaraguan government where is saw limited service before being relegated to a scrap yard at Zololtan Air Field in 1942, destined to remain there until 1961 when it was purchased and shipped to the USA.  In 1966, Grumman restored the aircraft before passing it to the US Navy where it is currently on display at the National Museum of Naval Aviation at Pensacola, Florida.

Curtiss biplanes flown by the CAF and RCAF are listed on a separate page on this web site.

de Havilland biplanes flown by the Canadian Air Force and the RCAF are listed on a separate page on this web site.

 

Douglas MO-2B Seaplane.  (RCAF Photos)

Douglas MO-2B Seaplane (1), (Reg. No. G-CYZG).

  (RCAF Photo)

Fairey IIIC (Mod) Transatlantic Floatplane (1) Registration G-CYCF,

 (Author Photos)

Fairey IIID floatplane on display in the Marine Museum, Lisbon, Portugal.

 

Fairey IIIF, HMS Furious, ca. early 1930s.  (USN Photo)

Fairey IIIF Mk. IV G.P. floatplane (1), RCAF (Serial No. J9172), Jericho Beach, BC ca 1930.  This is the sole British-built Fairley III F to serve in Canada.  It was used for trials October 1929 to September 1930.  (City of Vancouver Archives Photo, AM1535-: CVA 99-2155)

 

Fairey Albacore flown by RCN and RCNVR pilots in service with the Fleet Air Arm, Royal Navy.  None are preserved in Canada. (RN Photo)

Fairey Albacore Mk. I (6), (Serial Nos. N4191, N4315, T9244, T9246, X8947, X8952).

  

Fairey Seafox flown by RCN and RCNVR pilots in service with the Fleet Air Arm, Royal Navy.  None are preserved in Canada. (RN Photo)

Fairey Swordfish are listed on a separate page on this web site.

Fairey Swordfish Mk. I, Mk. II (99), (Serial Nos. W5856, DK698, DK699, DK752, DK774, HS168, HS171, HS196, HS209, HS220, HS260, HS261, HS263- HS266, HS268, HS275, HS288, HS320, HS322- HS325, HS335- HS337, HS339, HS343, HS381, HS383, HS396-HS405, HS455, HS464- HS471, HS484-HS501, HS503, HS507, HS509- HS515, HS517- HS519, HS533, HS534, HS553- HS555, HS560, HS582, HS663, LS193, LS229, NE926, NE927, NE929, NE937, NE938, NE940, NE952, NE953, NF136, NF161), Mk. III (6), (Serial Nos. NR944, NR948, NR953, NS122, NS129, NS171), for a total of 105 aircraft.

Felixstowe F.3 Flying Boats flown by Canadian aircrew are listed on a separate page on this web site.

Felixstowe F.3 (11) Reg. Nos. G-CYBT, DH-DJ, DQ, EN, EO, N4012, 13, N4178, 79.

Fokker D.VII War prizes in RCAF service are listed on a separate page on this web site.

 (RAF Photo)

 (RAF Photo)

Handley Page 0/100 (Serial No. 1459), Le Tigre, of No. 3 Wing, RNAS.  This type of bomber was flown by Canadians serving in the RFC during the First World War.  None have been preserved in Canada.  (Library & Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3194166)

 

Handley Page 0/400 (Serial No. 1459), similar to those flown by Canadians serving in the RFC during the First World War.  None have been preserved in Canada.  (Library & Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 33390617)

Handley Page 0/400), ca 1918.  (Library & Archives Canada Photo,  MIKAN No. 3390611)

Handley Page V.1500, ca 1918.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3390612)

Handley Page V-1500, preparing for an Atlantic crossing, June 1919, Harbour Grace, Newfoundland.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3574032)

Hawker Fury, Hawker Hart, Hawker Audax and Hawker Hind aircraft flown by Canadian pilots are listed on a separate page on this web site. 

Henry Farman biplane, ca 1919.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3390702)

Martinsyde F.4.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3390817)

Nieuport Bebe, Nieuport 12 and Nieuport 17 fighters flown by Canadian pilots are listed on a separate page on this web site.

Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.2c, F.E.2b, R.E.8 and S.E.5a fighters flown by Canadian pilots are listed on a separate page on this web site.

R-100 Airship visiting, St Hubert, Quebec, Sep 1930.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3349142)

Sopwith fighters flown by Canadian pilots are listed on a separate page on this web site.

 

S.P.A.D. S.VII Scout flown by Captain William S. Stephenson, ca. 1917.  (RAF Photo)

S.P.A.D. S.VII Scout (Serial No. A8798).  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3390913)

S.P.A.D. S.VII Scout (Serial No. B9913), (103), CF-RFC.  The Museum's SPAD was built in England in 1917 by Mann Egerton and Company Limited.  Its British service history is unknown, but in 1918 it was transferred to the United States for use in the Army Air Service. Colonel J. B. Jarret, who operated a museum at the Steel Pier in Atlantic City, obtained the SPAD in 1932 from aviation junk dealer Arrigo Balboni of California.  Balboni claimed that the aircraft had been featured in the motion picture Wings (1927).  From 1949 until 1964, the Spad passed between the hands of several private owners.  From 1964 onward, it was displayed and flown at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, until this Museum purchased it in 1965.  The Museum has restored the Spad on numerous occasions: little of the original woodwork remains.  (CA&SM)

Supermarine Stranraers flown by the RCAF are listed on a separate page on this web site.

Supermarine 304 Stranraer (40), (Serial Nos. 907-916, 918-923, 927-938, 947-957).

 

Supermarine Walrus, RN.  (IWM Photo A9272)

 (City of Vancouver Archives Photo, AM54-S4-2-: CVA 371-356)

Supermarine Walrus (Serial No. K8343), coded 769, suspended from a crane, Vancouver, British Columbia, ca 1940.

 (City of Vancouver Archives Photo, AM640-S1-: CVA 260-694)

Supermarine Walrus (Serial No. K8343), coded 769,  Vancouver, British Columbia, ca 1940.

 (City of Vancouver Archives Photo, AM640-S1-: CVA 260-696)

Supermarine Walrus (Serial No. K8343), coded 769,  Vancouver, British Columbia, ca 1940.

Supermarine Walrus pair, visiting an RCAF Station.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3581292)

Supermarine Walrus, RN (Serial No. Z1768), No. 1 Naval Gunnery School, RN, Oct 1944.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo,  MIKAN No. 3651070)

Supermarine Walrus Mk. I (2), (Serial Nos. L2330, W3089), Mk. II (6), (Serial Nos. Z1768, Z1771, Z1775, Z1781, Z1814, HD909), for a total of 8 aircraft.

The collection of Intelligence on the U-boat threat off Canada’s East coast during the Second World War became an absolute necessity early in the war.  Because of sightings and Direction Finding (DF) reports of submarines in the vicinity of Sable Island off the Nova Scotia Coast, a Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm (RN FAA) detachment with radar-equipped Supermarine Walrus amphibious aircraft was sent to the island in May 1942.  The RCAF provided a work party to build the station and later an observer for the aircraft.  Under the orders of a controller in Dartmouth, the Walrus flew daily patrols from a small lake on the island whenever the weather permitted, until 20 August when it was lost.  The patrol was abandoned for the rest of the 1942 season and the detachment was withdrawn.  (W.A.B. Douglas, “Creation of a National Airforce, Vol.  II, RCAF Official History)

 

Vickers Gun Bus flown by Canadians in the RFC during the Great War, ca 1918.  None are preserved in Canada.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3391051)

Vickers Vimy.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3391075)

 

Vickers Wellesley Mk. Is, flown by RCAF pilots serving in the RAF early in the Second World War.  None are preserved in Canada.  (RAF Photos)

Westland Wapitis flown by the RCAF are listed on a separate page on this web site.

Westland Wapiti Mk. II (1), (Serial No. J9237), Mk. IIA (24), (Serial Nos. 508-513, 527-544), for a total of 25 aircraft.