Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Canadian War Trophies (Book)

Fieseler Fi 103 Reichenburg IV piloted Buzz Bomb brought to Canada in 1945 by Captain Farley Mowat's Intelligence Collection Team, shown here on display on Air Force Day at RCAF Station Trenton, Ontario, 16 June 1947.  This item is now on display in the Canadian War Museum.  To the right of the RIV is a Junkers Jumo engine taken from one of the two Messerschitt Me 262 jet fighters brought to Canada.  Five of these jet engines survive in the Canada Aviation & Space Museum in Ottawa, but the two jets were destroyed.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584067)

Canadian War Trophies

War Prize Weapons & Equipment in Canada from the Crimean War, the Fenian Raids, the Boer War, the Great War, the Second World War, the Korean War, the Cold War, the Yugoslav Wars and Afghanistan.

FlaKpanzer Mk IV Wirbelwind, CFB Borden, Ontario

Canadian War Trophies is an informative and detailed synopsis of the carefully preserved and restored weapons and equipment of former adversaries on display in Canada.  The war prize items described include 18 Russian cannon taken during the Crimean War and gifted to Canada by Queen Victoria, captured artillery from the Fenian Raids, the Second Boer War, German small arms, guns and aircraft from the Great War, Axis weapons from the Second World War, including tanks, artillery, aircraft, rockets and submarines and a few of the weapons representing the forces of former Warsaw Pact nations of the Cold War era. 

These War Prizes represent some of the difficulties Canadian soldiers, sailors and airmen have had to face in order to protect our nation from the threats posed by numerous adversaries back to the days before Canada’s Confederation.  It has been an honour for those of us who have served in the Canadian Forces, but the task of keeping our nation safe is unlikely to ever be complete.  These weapons of war are preserved to remind us of what may come when opposition to our freedom and way of life stands unopposed.  We must choose to be well prepared to meet potential threats with vigilance, proper training and equipment, sound alliances and an understanding of what the cost may be.

In doing so, it is necessary to remember that the weapons of war are an integral part of what keeps this nation safe, although the examples that have been preserved in Canada to make it so are few and far between.  The descriptions of Canadian war trophies and the places where they can be viewed highlights the importance of the equipment that brought our nation forward at key turning points in history when our own weapons were in use as tools of war at home and overseas.  This guide book will show the interested reader where to find examples of the historical weapons and equipment used by former adversaries that have been preserved in Canada.  These weapons of war should help to serve as a window on how Canada’s military contribution to security in the world has had to evolve in order to meet the difficulties and increasingly dangerous challenges we have had to face both in peace and war.

Dear Harold, "Thanks muchly for the book.  It is a labour of love, and a paragon of all the virtues.  I'm really much impressed, and very grateful to you for reviving old memories.  But that damed old V-2.  Now its ghost lingers in Picton?  I'm beginning to think that damn thing likes masquerading as a one-man sub.  Maybe she's taken the long dive in [the] Lake of Two Mountains?...Thanks again.  You've done a stupendous job of research, and given us a clear (maybe too clear) a picture of what utter imbeciles we human beings are."  Cheers, Farley Mowat, July wunth, 2013.

V-2 rocket on display at the Canadian National Exhibition, ca 1950.  (CNE and Exhibition Place Archives Photo, Alexandra Photo Studio Collection, Negative No.s MG5-28-4 and MG5-28-6.

V-2 Rocket in Canada

While researching the locations of surviving war trophies brought to Canada in 1945, the author spoke with retired Captain Farley M. Mowat about his post war task of collecting German weapons and equipment that was of interest to Canada.  He was very detailed in his response.

When the war ended in Europe in May 1945, Captain Mowat was serving with the Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment in the Netherlands.  He was assigned to Intelligence duties, and eventually succeeded in locating, identifying and collecting over 700 tons of German equipment, documents and material which he then shipped from Antwerp back to Montreal.[1]

Captain Mowat ‘s five-man team gathered up major examples of German armour, artillery, support weapons and equipment from a variety of locations in Western Europe and he arranged for their transport back to Canada on an American Liberty ship, the SS Blommersdyke.  The majority of this shipment was sent to the Canadian Armament Research and Development Establishment (CARDE) based at Valcartier, Québec.  After examination, some of the kit was moved Camp Borden, Ontario, where a few of the larger armour and artillery pieces remain on display, while a number of other pieces were dispersed around the country.

The team collected a significant number of large scale weapons that made it back to Canada which have since disappeared, including Panzer III and Panzer IV tanks.  A Sturmgeschütz III they recovered was used (briefly) as a target on the ranges at CFB Petawawa, but was later salvaged and is now on display in the Canadian War Museum (CWM) in its heavily damaged state.  The Wirbelwind self-propelled four-barrelled Anti-Aircraft (SP AAA) gun system mounted on a Panzer IV chassis currently displayed at the Base Borden Military Museum was included in his list, but the Panther that was on display at CFB Borden (now restored in the CWM) was not.  The Panzer V came up from the USA in time to be placed on display on Parliament hill on Victory in Europe (VE) Day.

Other German equipment brought back by Captain Mowat’s Intelligence Collection Team included one 8.8-cm FlaK 37 AA Gun, now on display in the Canadian War Museum (CWM) in Ottawa, and one 8.8-cm PaK 43 AT Gun, which is now on display on the grounds of the Royal Military College in Kingston, Ontario.  Other Canadian units managed to bring back significant items as well, likely including an 8.8-cm PaK 43/41 AT Gun on display at Lisle, Ontario, and a second 8.8-cm FlaK 37 now on display on the grounds of the Royal Military College and a third on display at CFB Petawawa.

A good number of German artillery pieces captured or collected by Canadian military units overseas can be found on display at CFB Borden, Ontario, CFB Shilo, Manitoba and the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa.  A few pieces may also be found at CFB Petawawa, Ontario, CFB Gagetown, New Brunswick, and CFB Valcartier, Québec.

One of two Sturmgeschütz III tracked self-propelled tank hunters that were on display at Shilo has recently been relocated to England, while another went back to Germany.  One of the most interesting items from Captain Mowat’s SS Blommersdyke shipment that is presently being restored in the CWM is a very rare Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg IV piloted version of the V-1 cruise missile.  In 1945 Captain Mowat visited a firing range near Meppen, Germany, which had been used by the Krupp arms manufacturer as an experimental gun establishment to test new guns, shells and projectiles.  “At least a hundred huge steel tubes were on the firing line, many mounted on railroad carriages.  One...was a 60-cm siege howitzer...estimated to have weighed a hundred tons.”  The Intelligence Collection Team “took samples of everything”, including a 12-cm tank gun meant to arm the gigantic 90-ton German tank nick-named the “Maus” (Mouse).  The gun was brought back towed on a flatbed trailer by a 60-cwt truck.[2]

The 1944 Molch (Newt) one-man submarine as well as two Enigma encryption machines has also survived intact from the SS Blommersdyke shipment.  Not all of the Serial Numbers of the equipment found on Captain Mowat’s list match items with a similar description found in the CWM, so there are likely a number of other sources of origin for some of the items listed here.

Captain Mowat knew he was not responsible for all of the German equipment brought to Canada.  He had apparently arranged for a “14 tanks and self-propelled guns” including a “Royal” Tiger II a Panzer V Panther and a range of Panzer tanks from the Mk II upwards most in running condition.  In his list of items intended for transport, he had “23 special purpose vehicles ranging from an amphibious Volkswagen to a 15-ton armoured half-track personnel carrier.”  Artillery in the collection included 40 types of artillery pieces ranging in size from 2-cm to 21-cm, and embracing an airborne recoilless gun, a “squeeze barrel” anti-tank gun, infantry guns, anti-tank guns from 8.8-cm up to 12.8-cm, field guns, medium guns and heavy guns, all of which were in firing condition.  In his Progress Report to LCol Harrison, OC 1 Canadian Historical Section, HQ First Canadian Army on 10 July 1945, he noted that “Railroad guns up to 32-cm” were available but would “demand some time to move”.[3]

By 22 July 1945, the team had added a 63-ton Jagdtiger tank in operating condition to the collection as well as four 2-ton acoustic sea mines, four 24-inch acoustic torpedoes, a 45-foot long 12-ton V-2 rocket and 18 truckloads of various Wehrmacht equipment. [4]

The King (Royal) Tiger and Panther tanks were to be loaded on tank transporters and brought to the dock for loading on the SS Blommersdyke, but the American flatbed crews brought them to another site and they were subsequently transported to the USA.  One of the significant items he did manage to bring back was a V-2 rocket with a particularly interesting story attached to it.

Captain Mowat had spoken with the leader of the Dutch resistance in his area, Colonel Tyc Michaels, who informed him of the location of the Rheintochter Anti-Aircraft missile factory, which had been bombed out.  During the investigation of the contents of the factory, his team collected some documentation and a few missile parts that made it back to Canada.  He also learned of a trainload of ten V-2 rockets which were sitting on railway cars in a railway siding hidden in Germany.  “The missile was located off the right of way on the north south line running along the Weser River west of Nienburg, Germany.  It was the only one of about ten that had not been shot up or burnt by air attack.  As the V-2 at the time of ‘procurement’ was forbidden by 21 Army Group to Canadians this piece had an interesting several months hiding in woods and being disguised as everything from a privy to a submarine, to keep it from the prying eyes of the British High Command.”[5]

Just before the order forbidding the acquisition of any rocket material was sent down, Capt Mowat had dispatched Lieutenant R. Mike Donovan, a Canadian Intelligence Corps Officer, to see if he could acquire one of these V-2s from the British who occupied the sector.[6]  Lieutenant Donovan set out from the team’s home base at Meppen in the Netherlands and over a three day period drove to a railway siding “somewhere near Hamburg” where ran into a British detachment guarding a number of railway flatcars each carrying a V-2 rocket.  The British were not keen on parting with such important war material to “colonials” and wouldn’t let him get near the site.  After an initial recce of the scene, he noted through his binoculars that “an access roadway ran alongside the rail spur and that the last V-2 in the train was partly concealed in a pine woods through which the trail meandered to join a secondary road not far beyond.”  Lieutenant Donovan drove back to Ouderkerk and joined by Lieutenant Jim Hood set off again with a 12-ton 16-wheel Mack breakdown lorry with a tow-hook, made a brief detour to Bremerhaven where they liberated a German one-man mini-submarine trailer and then drove to a forest within two miles of the V-2 rail-car site, where Lieutenant Hood hid with the rig and himself.  They were also bearing a “30-litre demijohn of DeKuyper’s gin.”

Lieutenant Donovan drove on in a jeep and presented himself again at the guard post.  He offered to share his gin, and while pretending to get loaded himself, proceeded to get the British Infantry guard group drunk.  Just before dusk, he told his drinking partners he had to relieve himself, and went back to his jeep where he used a small Number 38 radio set to tell Lieutenant Hood the coast was clear.  Lieutenant Hood and his work crew quietly as possible eased the Mack and its trailer up close to the railcar with the chosen rocket.  There in the dark, the Canadian soldiers stealthily managed to break the chains and “rolled it off the flatcar and down a bunch of timber skids on the trailer”.[7]  (This could not have been an easy task in the dark, as the rocket is the size of a modern day SCUD missile similar to those the author examined near Policharki, in Afghanistan).

While Lieutenant Hood was crawling cautiously away with the black-painted V-2 rocket prize, Lieutenant Donovan was leading the British guards in a singing session.  When he felt the coast was clear, Mike disengaged himself, but left the still well-filled demijohn with his British choir.  He caught up with his crew on the highway and sped ahead of them, stopping at each checkpoint along the way to warn the barrier guards that a bomb disposal crew was coming through with unexploded ordnance, and as a result  and he and his crew barrelled back the way they came and delivered the rocket to Ouderkerk in Holland.”

On discovering the V-2 outside his window the next morning Captain Mowat had the rocket moved into a large storage hangar.  In order to keep the collected war prize concealed, Captain Mowat had carpenters build a small wooden conning tower, which they installed on top of the rocket, boarded over the fins and installed a wooden propeller.  Once the mock tower and propeller were in place, the team proceeded to paint the complete V-2 rocket in navy blue.  Curious inquirers were told that the device was an experimental submarine.  In this form, the V-2 was kept hidden until it could be loaded on the Liberty Transport Ship SS Blommersdyke which eventually left port carrying over 700 tons of collected German war prizes and steamed across the Atlantic to Montreal.[8]

On arrival, Captain Mowat spoke with the Chief of General Staff (GGS), Major-General Howard Graham, an officer he had served with in the Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment, to explain in detail what they had imported.  Shortly afterwards, a Lieutenant-Colonel arrived from the Canadian Armament Research and Development Establishment (CARDE) based at Valcartier, Québec, along with a work crew which hauled the V-2, trailer and all, back to Valcartier.  There, the V-2 was dismantled.  As the science team was examining the rocket they made the interesting, if somewhat disconcerting discovery that the warhead was still filled with its high explosive material.  The liquid explosive compound inside the rocket’s warhead had hardened and had to be removed by the scientists by carefully drilling a hole in the nose cone and inserting a hose to wash it out.

The V-2 was blueprinted and then disappeared from the story for a few years.  In 1950 it was placed on display on the grounds of the Canadian National Exhibition in Toronto.  After this, it seems to have disappeared again.  It may have gone to the USA (there is one on display in Aberdeen, New Jersey, another in the National Museum of the USAF, and one in the National Air & Space Museum in Washington, D.C., for example).  It is possible that it was buried on the grounds of what is present day Canadian Forces Base Downsview, Toronto, Ontario or, it may have been scrapped.  None of these possibilities has been confirmed.[9]  (The author would be very interested in hearing from any reader who may have information that could lead to the discovery of where this V-2 is presently located).  www.SilverHawkAuthor.com

[1] Author conversation with Captain (Retired) Farley Mowat, 29 June 2006.

[2] Farley M. Mowat, My Father’s Son: Memories of War and Peace, (Houghton Mifflin, the University of Michigan, 1992), p. 296.

[3] Farley M. Mowat, My Father’s Son: Memories of War and Peace, (Houghton Mifflin, the University of Michigan, 1992), p. 297.

[4] As an aside, Captain Mowat mentioned that claims for damages from a number of Dutch towns were “probably perfectly valid” due to the “results of putting an Infantry Captain behind the steering bars of a Royal Tiger.”  Farley M. Mowat, My Father’s Son, p. 299.

[5] Catalogue of Canadian War Museum Equipment Collection, p. 121.

[6] Lt R.M. Donovan and Capt F.M. Mowat are mentioned by Major S.R. Elliot in Scarlet to Green, A History of Intelligence in the Canadian Army, 1903-1963 (Canadian Intelligence and Security Association, Hunter Rose Company, Toronto, 1981), p. 341.

[7] Ibid, p. 301.

[8] Ibid, p. 302.

[9] The author spoke with Dr Charles Rhéaume, PhD, DHH 2-7, who found evidence that the V-2 was displayed at the Canadian National Exhibition in Toronto in 1950.  The date of display was documented through Audrey Borges from the CNE Archives.  The V-2 was made available through the auspices of the Department of National Defence for the 1950 display.

V-2 Update by Andrew KingTheTimeWinders@gmail.com (22 Nov 2014)

A retired Air Canada pilot, David Savage, who lived in Picton, Ontario, in the 1960s, provides some clues as to the rocket’s potential resting place.

On the outskirts of the small town, there are the remains of a once-sprawling Forces base full of assorted military equipment and buildings from its role as a Second World War RCAF training facility.

In the 1960s, the base was used for storing surplus aircraft and artillery training. Surplus P-51 Mustangs, B-25 Mitchell bombers and other aircraft were stowed to be sold off for scrap or to collectors. In his recent book Camp Picton, author Ian Robertson mentions the V2 rocket in great detail, and he spoke with Savage, who managed to photograph a few things around the airbase in 1961.

One of Savage’s photos shows what appears to be the lost V2 rocket sitting on its side, apparently on the same trailer used to transport it at the 1950 CNE, weathered and missing its nose cone. The unmistakable shape and size is clearly that of a V2 rocket. It seems logical that it was brought to the Picton airbase for storage with all the other unwanted old DND equipment.

Savage left Picton in 1962, never knowing what happened to the rocket he captured on camera. The base closed in 1969, and the whereabouts of the V2 are unknown with no further information about what happened to the stored rocket available.

Locals in Picton who grew up during the 1960s recall the V2 and other old equipment being bulldozed into the base landfill site. If this is the case, a very significant piece of world history lies under the surface, waiting to be discovered, perhaps preserved and exhibited in a museum along with the fascinating story of how it got there.

The airport property, including the landfill area, is owned by Loch-Sloy Holdings Ltd., which has reported that the landfill area that may contain the remnants of the rocket is a “contaminated” zone, hindering further investigation.

With the possibility that Canada’s lost Nazi rocket sits buried beneath a layer of dirt in Picton, one wonders if it remains there, or perhaps sits in pieces at some forgotten scrapyard. With only 20 remaining examples out of the original 6,000 rockets made, it might be worthwhile to find out, once and for all, whether Mowat’s captured rocket is really there, waiting to become a new part of our collection of great Canadian war stories.  Andrew King.  TheTimeWinders@gmail.com

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For German First and Second World War Artillery on display in Canada see "Artillery - Canada" and "Armoured Fighting Vehicles and Tanks - Canada" on this website.

War Trophies from the First World War on display in Canada

Canadian with captured German kit, ca 1919.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3401252)

German Great War guns captured East of Arras, Aug 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397928)

Canadian Expeditionary Force War Trophies brought to Canada

Lieutenant Colonel William A.  Smy, OMM, CD

Following the Armistice in November 1918, individual Canadian soldiers and Canadian units began planning to send some type of war trophy back to Canada.  In most cases the “trophy” being considered was a weapon captured on the battlefield.  Lieutenant Graham Thomson Lyall, for example, wrote the Commanding Officer of the 19th “Lincoln” Regiment, his old Canadian Militia regiment that he had, “great pleasure in sending this gun to my initial regiment, where I first learnt the rudiments of soldiering”.  The gun was one of the guns captured in September 1918 during the deed which won him the Victoria Cross

This type of “ad hoc” initiative was quickly put to a stop.  The government of Canada established a “Commission on War Records and Trophies” with B.E. Walker as Chairman and A.D. Doughty and E.A. Cruickshank as Members.  One mandate of the Commission was to recommend “the proper policy to be pursued for the distribution of such trophies” and it submitted its report on 18 May 1920.[1

The Commissioners noted that:

a. Only trophies which were of a durable nature should be distributed to municipalities, public institutions, and military units

b. Before any distribution, special provision should be made for a National War Museum and for Provincial War Museums; and that,

c. War trophies were the exclusive property of the Crown, and the receiving institution was responsible for keeping them in good repair and had no authority to dispose of them.

At the time of the report there were 516 captured German guns and Howitzers, 304 trench mortars, 2500 heavy and light machine-guns and 3000 rifles available for distribution.[2]  From these totals it was proposed that rare specimens such as two 37-mm and 75-mm mountain guns, 77-mm and 80-mm Anti-Aircraft Guns, three 88-mm Field Guns, a 90-mm Field Gun, a 99-mm Howitzer, a 120-mm Gun, a 126-mm Gun, four 150-mm Naval Guns, a 150-mm Russian Howitzer and four specimens of the other calibres, four specimens of each calibre of trench mortars, 100 machine-guns and 1,000 rifles be reserved for National and Provincial War Museums.

It was recommended that a significant number of guns of each calibre available, four trench mortars, twelve machine-guns and 100 rifles, should be allocated to each Provincial capital city.  In addition eleven guns awarded by competition in raising the Victory Loan of 1919 were to be distributed to each province with Ontario receiving two.

It was then proposed that the remaining trophies available were to be distributed by province based on wartime enlistments in the CEF, and the Department of Militia and Defence provided the following breakdown: 

NUMBER OF ENLISTMENTS IN EACH PROVINCE

PROVINCE               TOTAL           PER CENT

Ontario                        245,677           41.6 nearly
Québec                          82,793           14.0
Manitoba                       66,319           12.2
British Columbia           61,438           10.4
Alberta                          45,145             7.6
Saskatchewan               37,666             6.4 nearly
Nova Scotia and PEI     33,342            5.6
New Brunswick            25,864             4.4 nearly
Yukon                             2,327               .4 nearly

Using the figures of enlistment provided by the Department of Militia and Defence, the general distribution was to be in accord with an appropriate share of trophies to each province.

Province          Guns and Howitzers     Trench Mortars               Machine-guns 

Ontario                        166                              101                              941
Québec                          56                                34                              321
Manitoba                       45                                27                              259
British Columbia           35                                22                              203
Alberta                          30                                19                              174
Saskatchewan               26                                15                              146
Nova Scotia & PEI       22                                14                              126
New Brunswick            17                                11                              100
Yukon                             1                                  1                                  8
_
Totals                          398                              244                           2,280

The provincial share according to enlistment was then broken down to municipalities, organizations and institutions, and military units.

The Public Archives of Canada was assigned the responsibility of distributing the war trophies, and it kept detailed records of its work: for example, the City of St. Catharines received a 7.7-cm gun captured by the 4th Battalion on 27 September 1918, on the Arras-Cambrai Road, south-east of Marquion.  Schools like Ridley College, Bishops College School and Upper Canada College received a share of the trophies, as did organizations like the Great War Veterans’ Association and the 91st Highlanders of Hamilton.  The distribution even went to unlikely recipients like the College of Agriculture in Truro, Nova Scotia, the Bank of Commerce in Montréal, the Anglican Missionary School in Elkhorn Saskatchewan, and the Public Library in Kitchener, Ontario.

In most of the listings, guns and mortars are only described by their muzzle size, i.e. 7.7-cm or 15-cm, but there are some instances where there are reasons significant enough to warrant a further description.  Both the 18th and 4th Battalions captured 7.7-cm guns which had their listings annotated “Naval”; the 49th Battalion captured a “Russian” 161-mm gun; and there were a few “Austrian” guns captured.

One of the more interesting of the trophies was a machine-gun “brought down in enemy aeroplane in the 1st Battalion area near Mont St Eloy.  Handed over with plane to 5th Squadron RAF.  Not claimed by 1st Bn” on 9 April 1918.  The gun was allocated to the Great War Veterans’ Association, Lambton Branch, West Toronto.[3]

Another machine-gun has its entry annotated that it had been captured on 8 August 1918 by Lance Corporal Harry Garnet Bedford Miner, VC, of the 58th Battalion who died later that day.  The citation for the award of the Victoria Cross states that he singled-handed rushed an enemy machine-gun post, killed all the crew and then turned the gun on the enemy.  The gun went to Arthur, Ontario.

Some of the captured guns were turned on their previous owners.  A gun captured by the 60th battalion on 13 April 1917 near Petit Vimy was described as “Gas Shell-Gun used against enemy”, and another captured the next day by the same battalion on Vimy Ridge and one captured nearby by the 43rd Battalion again were “used against enemy.”

Two 7.7-cm guns and a trench Mortar were sent to the British Embassy in Paris.  The records also record the weapons destroyed in Europe.

Unfortunately over the last eighty years or so, many of these war trophies which once had been sources of great pride have disappeared and their whereabouts long forgotten.  Even some, like the gun sent to Queenston which once stood proudly in front of the village war memorial, are lost to future generations. 

Some of the war trophies sent to Canadian communities and organizations have survived.  They are in various stages of physical condition: some have been excellently maintained; others are in a despicable state of disrepair.  Some of the war trophies have a well documented history, others do not.  Record Group 37 in the National Archives contains the details of the allocations.

The government agency responsible for the distribution of Great War trophies was the Public Archives, and there is a ledger book in their records listing the trophies by serial number and the community or organization to which the trophy was allocated. 

According to the records, the trophies were to remain the property of the Crown, and the recipients were to be responsible for their maintenance and safe keeping.  Parks Canada is involved because it is the Crown agency responsible for the gun as it sits on Parks Canada property, and because they have expertise in restorations of this type.

Captured German guns, Sep 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397944)

Lost War Trophies

The loss of so many of Canada’s Great War Trophy guns may not have been entirely by community choice.  As an example, in 1942, the Galt City Council in Ontario received a letter from the Department of Munitions and Supply requesting that “every available piece of scrap metal” was to be salvaged and made available to the Department in an effort to keep war industries operating at peak production.  The letter specifically requested the donation of the German Great War 10.5-cm gun, which had been positioned on the front lawn of the Galt Soldiers Memorial Home since the end of the war.  Also requested were any “war trophies you may have stationed in your parks, square or public places”.  In response, the City Council dutifully sent out a letter requiring “all war relics owned by the City of Galt, be turned over to the Department of Munitions and Supply”. 

Local sentiment for retention of the guns would have been up against the call for an “All Out” war effort that had resulted in the rationing of gasoline and sugar and in the regular salvage collections which were gathering copper wire, piping and tubing, roofing, boiler bottoms, Brass valves, aluminum wire and cables and even type writer ribbon spools and the metal ends on light bulbs for the war effort.  At a time when housewives who hoarded sugar were thought unpatriotic, it cannot be doubted that similar condemnation would fall upon a Council that refuzed to transfer an old cannon merely for sentimental reasons.  Since the letter from the Department of Munitions and Supply mentioned war trophies of the Great War vintage, only those trophies and not the older ones like the Crimean War cannon were needed.[4] 

The City of Saint John, New Brunswick, provided every gun it could find, including many of the 18th and 19th century guns mounted in various locations throughout the historic Bay of Fundy port.  Very few of the Great War Trophies “escaped the scrap pile” making the handful of survivors very rare indeed.  Of the 532 guns and Howitzers listed in the original records as distributed throughout Canada in 1919-1920, roughly 84 have been accounted for in this guidebook.  Of the 304 Trench Mortars sent out, less than 40 appear to have survived.

Many of the War trophies allocated to Canadian communities have rusted away or were deemed not worthy of preservation when they deteriorated beyond economical repair.  Author Jon Vance wrote, “In 1939, the era of deterioration came to an abrupt end and the war trophies again began to serve a vital national purpose.  That purpose, though, was very different from the didacticism of the 1920s.  In the legendary scrap drives to collect surplus metal for the war effort, attention inevitably turned to the trophies of the previous war.  Indeed, there was a certain amount of poetic justice in using a Field Gun captured from the Kaiser’s army to forge an artillery shell to use against Hitler’s troops.  As a result, many trophies met an ignominious but patriotic end.”

“Most of Saskatchewan’s collection, including the big guns on the grounds of the Legislature, was melted down for the war effort.  A total of $278.21 was raised through the sale of the scrap.  The guns in West Lome and Guelph met a similar fate; in all, roughly 20 per cent of the trophies were designated as salvage and scrapped during the Second World War...  The greatest obstacle to their survival can be well-intentioned but misplaced local sentiment.  In this regard, it is wise to recall Doughty’s original instructions to the recipients of the trophies, that they belonged to the people of Canada and that the communities that received them were only acting as custodians.”[5]

Photos and data concerning captured guns may be found on the webpages listing artillery preserved in Canada by province on this website.  Surviving German Great War Trophy Guns currently accounted for on display in Canada include:

7.7-cm FK 96 n.A. (38),

Esquimalt, BC, (Serial Nr. 595)

Kelowna, BC, (Serial Nr. 2577)

Calgary, AB, (Serial Nr. 1571)

CFB Edmonton, AB, (Serial Nr. 929)

CFB Edmonton, AB, (Serial Nr. 4945)

Estavan, SK, (Serial Nr. 8601)

Fort Qu'appelle, SK (Serial Nr. 8482)

Fort Saskatchewan, SK, (Serial Nr. 1251)

CFB Shilo, MB, (Serial Nr. 3316)

CFB Shilo, MB, (Serial Nr. 3734)

Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, ON, (Serial Nr. 204)

Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, ON, (Serial Nr. 13224)

Brockville, ON, (Serial Nr. 2267)

Collingwood, ON, (Serial Nr. 3263)

Kars, ON, (Serial Nr. 13224)

Kingston, ON, (Serial Nr. 8368)

L'Original, ON, (Serial Nr. 5255)

Lunenburg, ON, (Serial Nr. 6959)

Mount Forest, ON, (Serial Nr. 268)

Morrisburg, ON, (Serial Nr. 2542)

Morrisburg, ON, (Serial Nr. 1323)

Shelburne, ON, (Serial Nr. 435)

Thunder Bay, ON, (Serial Nr. 69)

Windsor, ON, (Serial Nr. 4451)

Lévis, PQ, (Serial Nr. 1022)

Quebec City, PQ, (Serial Nr. 9742)

Knowlton, PQ, (Serial Nr. 8382)

Lac Megantic, PQ, (Serial Nr. 6502)

Saint-Jérôme, PQ, (Serial Nr. 3743)

Campbelltown, NB, (Serial Nr. 2402)

Grand Falls, NB, (Serial Nr. 8283)

Hopewell Cape, NB, (Serial Nr. 784)

Perth-Andover, NB, (Serial Nr. 4095)

Woodstock, NB, (Serial Nr. 2398)

Shelburne, NS, (Serial Nr. 18251)

Bonavista, NL, (Serial Nr. TBC)

Placentia, NL, (Serial Nr. TBC)

Trinity, NL, (Serial Nr. 7661)

7.7-cm NK (1),

Esquimalt, BC, (Serial Nr. 9739)

7.7-cm FK 16 (28),

Cranbrook, BC, (Serial Nr. 19241)

Brooks, AB, (Serial Nr. TBC)

Lethbridge, AB, (Serial Nr. 12706)

Regina, SK, (Serial Nr. 60)

Regina, SK, (Serial Nr. 2666)

Carman, SK, (Serial Nr. 10726)

Carman, SK, (Serial Nr. 15207)

Brantford, ON, (Serial Nr. 22990)

Guelph, ON, (Serial Nr. 101433)

Innisfil, ON, (Serial Nr. TBC)

Kars, ON, (Serial Nr. TBC)

Milton, ON, (Serial Nr. 9563)

Petrolia, ON, (Serial Nr. 11761)

Port Hope, ON, (Serial Nr. 291)

St. Catherines, ON, (Serial Nr. 7981)

Trenton, ON, (Serial Nr. 12490)

Wingham, ON, (Serial Nr. 12602)

Woodbridge, ON, (Serial Nr. 5803)

CFB Petawawa, ON, (Serial Nr. 24717)

Lac Megantic, PQ, (Serial Nr. TBC)

Lac Megantic, PQ, (Serial Nr. TBC)

New Carlisle, PQ, (Serial Nr. 17391)

Quebec City, PQ, (Serial Nr. 12323)

Quebec City, PQ, (Serial Nr. 8899)

Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, PQ, (Serial Nr. 14585)

Summerside, PEI, (Serial Nr. 13820)

Black River, NS, (Serial Nr. 376)

Whitehorse, YT, (Serial Nr. 7414)

7.7-cm IG L/27 (3)

Peace River, AB (Serial Nr. 9366)

Taber, AB, (Serial Nr. 9383)

Vermilion, AB, (Serial No. 9406)

10.5-cm leFH 98/09 (7), 

Frank, AB, (Serial Nr. 3392)

Brandon, MB, (Serial Nr. 2637)

Sault Ste Marie, ON, (Serial Nr. 46)

Quebec City, PQ, (Serial Nr. 5051)

Sayabec, PQ, (Serial Nr. 2908)

Lennox Island, PEI, (Serial Nr. 223)

Mount Stewart, PEI, (Serial Nr. 438)

10-cm K 14 (3),

Lethbridge, AB, (Serial Nr. 160)

Niagara-on-the-Lake (Serial Nr. 201)

Hopewell Cape, NB, (Serial Nr. 590)

10-cm K 17 (4),

Niagara Falls, ON, (Serial Nr. 39)

Quebec Sity, PQ, (Serial Nr. 10)

St. John's, NL, (Serial Nr. TBC)

St. John's, NL, (Serial Nr. TBC)

10.5-cm leFH 16 (7),

Redcliffe, AB, (Serial Nr. 12626)

Battleford, SK, (Serial Nr. 16660)

Saltcoats, SK, (Serial Nr. 4306)

Sturgeon Falls, ON, (Serial Nr. 3264)

Summerside, PEI, (Serial Nr. 7419)

Bridgewater, NS, (Serial Nr. 1638)

Dawson City, YT, (Serial Nr. 6562)

15-cm K 16 (1),

Saskatoon, SK, (Serial Nr. 1034)

15-cm sFH 02 (9),

Lethbridge, AB, (Serial Nr. 1101)

Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, ON, (Serial Nr. 877)

Brantford, ON, (Serial Nr. 871)

Lucan, ON, (Serial Nr. 9)

Uxbridge, ON, (Serial Nr. 911)

Lévis, PQ, (Serial Nr. 360)

Quebec City, PQ, (Serial Nr. 473)

Kensington, PEI, (Serial Nr. 86)

Dawson City, YT, (Serial Nr. 1169)

15-cm sFH 13 (5),

Neepawa, MB, (Serial Nr. 2790)

Brantford, ON, (Serial Nr. 373)

Windsor, ON, (Serial Nr. 125)

CFB Valcartier, PQ, (Serial Nr. 1098)

St. John's, NL, (Serial Nr. TBC)

15-cm FH 17 (1)

Brockville, ON, (Serial Nr. 2914)

21-cm Mrs 10 (1), 

Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, ON (Serial Nr. 679)

Quebec City, PQ, (Serial Nr. 85)

21-cm Mrs 16 (2), 

Quebec City, la Citadel, PQ, (Serial Nr. 826)

15-cm L/40 (1),

Woodbridge, ON, (Serial Nr. 4826)

15-cm L/45 (1)

Woodbridge, ON, (Serial Nr. 4693) 

This is a total of 110 (including guns in Newfoundland that were not on the original list of guns sent to Canada) of the 532 recorded.  One record shows 305 guns were destroyed in 1942, leaving 227 that should be on display.  This leaves 117 unaccounted for.

8.8-cm L/30C U-boat Deck Gun

Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, ON, from U-91, (Serial Nr. 1972).  Not included in the official war record.

Surviving German Great War trench mortar war trophies currently accounted for on display in Canada include:

leGrW 16 spigot mortar (2)

Knowlton, PQ, (Serial Nr. TBC)

Saint John, NB, (Serial Nr. TBC)

5-cm leGrW 36 (1),

CFB Borden, ON, (Serial Nr. 7310)

9.15-cm Lantz (2),

Darlingford, MB, (Serial Nr. TBC)

Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, ON, (Serial Nr. 4785JP)

7.58-cm leMW n.A. (28),

Battleford, SK, (Serial Nr. 9194)

Meota, SK, (Serial Nr. 31310)

Saskatoon, SK, (Serial Nr. 16676)

Pilot Mound, MB, (Serial Nr. 18043)

CFB Shilo, MB, (Serial Nr. 32258)

Chapleau, ON, (Serial Nr. 33025)

Coe Hill, ON, (Serial Nr. 7594)

Cookstown, ON, (Serial Nr. 16214)

Cornwall, ON, (Serial Nr. 33750)

Flesherton, ON, (Serial Nr. 4449)

Fordwich, ON, (Serial Nr. 33912)

Grand Bend, ON, (Serial Nr. 6170)

Kettleby, ON, (Serial Nr. 13278)

Omemee, ON, (Serial Nr. 15867)

Pelham, ON, (Serial Nr. 7862)

St. Catherines, ON, (Serial Nr. 1916)

Khanawake, PQ, (Serial Nr. TBC)

Knowlton, PQ, (Serial Nr. 5001)

Knowlton, PQ, (Serial Nr. TBC)

Knowlton, PQ, (Serial Nr. TBC)

Lachute, PQ, (Serial Nr. 46643)

Terrebonne, PQ, (Serial Nr. 305)

Charlottetown, PEI, (Serial Nr. 16634)

Carbonear, NL, (Serial Nr. TBC)

St. Georges, NL, (Serial Nr. TBC)

St. John's, NL, (Serial Nr. TBC)

St. John's, NL, (Serial Nr. TBC)

Spaniard's Bay, NL, (Serial Nr. TBC)

17-cm mMW (13),

Stavely, AB (Serial Nr. 1972)

Durham, ON, (Serial Nr. 1682)

Haliburton, ON, (Serial Nr. 6839)

Madoc, ON, (Serial Nr. 1157)

Knowlton, PQ, (Serial Nr. 6043)

Montréal, PQ, (Serial Nr. 6219)

Chipman, NB, (Serial Nr. 7095)

Charlottetown, PEI, (Serial Nr. 848)

Sydney, NS, (Serial Nr. 1078)

Botwood, NS, (Serial Nr. TBC)

Catalina, NL, (Serial Nr. TBC)

Harbour Buffet, NL, (Serial Nr. TBC)

Whitehorse, YT, (Serial Nr. 5270)

24-cm Iko (4),

CFB Shilo, MB, (Serial Nr. 339), iron.

Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, ON, (Serial Nr. TBC), wood.

Finch, ON, (Serial Nr. 2715), iron.

Saint-Agathe-des-Monts, PQ, (Serial Nr. 1351), iron.

25-cm sMW (6),

Norfolk, ON, (Serial Nr. TBC)

Tavistock, ON, (Serial Nr. 1846)

Waterford, ON, (Serial Nr. 1930)

Knowlton, PQ, (Serial Nr. 1524)

Mont Saint Hilaire, PQ, (Serial Nr. 571)

Stephenville Crossing, NL, (Serial Nr. TBC)

This is a total of 56 out of 289 on the original list.  111 were destroyed in 1942, leaving 178 that should be on display.  This leaves 122 unaccounted for.

Further information leading to the confirmation of survivors would be appreciated by the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery and the author.  The list that follows is a record of guns confirmed to be in place.  Except for the items contained in the Canadian War Museum which are illustrated here, technical data and illustrations for the individual guns mentioned in this book follow at the end of this list.

Library and Archives Canada Photos of German Guns captured by Canadians in the First World War

German Great War guns captured East of Arras, Aug 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397926)

German Great War guns captured East of Arras, Aug 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397927)

German Great War guns captured East of Arras, Aug 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397933)

A large German trench mortar captured by Canadians, Sep 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397870)

German Lantz trench mortar captured by Canadians, May 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397826)

German MG 08 machine-guns in a wagon towing a wheeled 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.) trench mortar captured by Canadians during the advance east of Arras, France, Sep 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397938)

Captured German trench mortars being examined by Canadians, Apr 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3521829)

German trench mortars captured by Canadians, Canal du Nord, Oct 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3194349)

German 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfers (17-cm mMW), captured by Canadians, Apr 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3521845)

German trench mortars captured by Canadians, Apr 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3521871)

German trench mortars captured by Canadians, May 1917, LGen Julian Bing.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3213518)

German trench mortars captured by Canadians, Oct 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397962)

Captured German trench mortars and AA Guns, Amiens, Aug 1918.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397922)

Captured German AA Gun, Amiens, Aug 1918.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397916)

Captured German AA Gun, Amiens, Aug 1918.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397921)

Canadian soldier examining a German First World War 7.58-cm trench mortar as German prisoners carrying their wounded pass by him during the advance East of Arras, France, Aug 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3403179)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.) captured by Canadians near Amiens, France, Aug 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397896)

Canadian and French soldiers with German ammunition wagon, Amiens, Aug 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397396)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.) captured by Canadians near Farbus, France, Feb 1918.   (Library and Archives Canada, MIKAN No. 3397885)

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.) damaged by shellfire, being examined by a Canadian Officer, Arras, Sep 1918.   (Library and Archives Canada, MIKAN No. 3397939)

Captured German Gun, (unidentified type) Gun, Amiens, Aug 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397890)

Captured German Gun, (unidentified type) Gun, Amiens, Aug 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 35222222)

 

German First World War 10.5-cm Feldhaubitze 98/09 (10.5-cm FH 98/09), captured by Canadians near Vis en Artois, France, Sep 1918.  (Library & Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN 3397953)

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/15 machine-gun being examined by Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade Officers, March 1918.   (Library and Archives Canada, MIKAN No. 3522120)

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 13 (15-cm sFH 13) Heavy Field Howitzer, captured by Canadians, Farbus Village, France, Apr 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3521832)

German long range gun captured, Amiens, Aug 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397894)

German First World War 8-inch Naval Gun captured at Farbus, France, Apr 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3521837)

German Great War 8-inch Naval Gun, captured at Farbus, Apr 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3521833)

Captured German guns being towed to a Gun Park, Amiens, Aug 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397920)

Captured German 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02) Heavy Field Howitzer, Amiens, Aug 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397897)

Captured German 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02) Heavy Field Howitzer,  Amiens, Aug 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397887)

(Photos courtesy of Bridget, Ladysmith Historical Society)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16),  possibly (Serial No.7065), on display from 1921 until removed in 1941 by rail, and sent to the smelter to aid in the war effort.

German First World War 21-cm Mörser gun being examined by a Canadian Officer, Arras, Aug 1918.  CANADA scratched on the barrel.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397899)

German Great War 21cm Morser, captured by 13th Bn, Amiens, Aug 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397825)

German Great War 21cm Morser, captured by Canadians, 27 Battalion at Vimy Ridge, Aug 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397850)

German Great War 21cm Morser, captured by Canadians at Vimy Ridge, Aug 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397851)

 

German Great War 21cm Morser, captured by Canadians during the advance East of Arras, Oct 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397957)

German Great War 21cm Morsers captured by Canadians  at Vimy Ridge, May 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397817)

 

German Great War 21cm Morsers captured by Canadians  at Vimy Ridge, May 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397819)

General Currie inspecting captured German Great War 21-cm Morsers.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397919)

German First World War 21-cm Mörser Heavy Mortar damaged by shellfire, being examined by a Canadian Officer, May 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397820)

German First World War 21-cm Mörser blown on its side from an explosion of a nearby ammunition dump destroyed by Canadian Artillery fire, Arras, Oct 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397960)

Canadian troops with captured German Great War 21-cm Morser.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3406014)

Captured German Great War 21-cm Morser.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397895)

German First World War 21-cm Mörser captured by Canadians, 1918.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3395091)

General Currie inspecting captured German Great War Naval Guns.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397923)

General Currie inspecting captured German Great War Naval Guns close in.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397915)

General Currie inspecting captured German Great War Naval Guns close in 2.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397914

German First World War Artillery currently on display in Canada

British Columbia

Cranbrook, British Columbia

 (Photo courtesy of Dave Humphrey)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16)  (Serial No. 19241).  This gun was captured by the 7th Battalion on 27 Sep 1918 near Marquion.  It is presently on display behind the Heritage Inn on Cranbrook Street, close to the entrance to the Canadian Legion.

Esquimalt, British Columbia

 (Photo courtesy of Colin Wyatt)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 595).  This gun was captured by the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles at Cambrai, West of Neuville St. Remy, France on 29 September 1918.  It is on display in a city park.

 (Photo courtesy of Colin Wyatt)

German First World War 7.7-cm Infanteriegeschütz (Infantry Gun) L/27 (Serial No. 9739).  This gun is a lighter version of the Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.) with smaller wheels and with the bottom section of the gun shield and the footrests of the axle tree seats removed.  This gun was captured by the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles at Vimy Ridge, La Folie Farm, France on 9 Oct 1917.  It was initially allocated to Cranbrook but is now on display in a city park in the Municipality of Esquimalt.

Kelowna, British Columbia

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 2577), TBC, captured by the 7th Battalion on 2 Sep 1918, West of Villers-lez-Cagnicourt, France.  It is on display in front of the Brigadier Angle Armoury, 720 Lawrence Ave.

Naramata, British Columbia

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/15 heavy machine-gun, (Serial No. 7784) was captured by the 52nd Battalion on 28 August 1918 at Boiry, France. This machine-gun was officially allocated to Naramata.

 (Photo courtesy of the Naramata Museum)

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/15 heavy machine-gun, (Serial No. 3720), 1917.  This machine-gun was captured by the 19th Battalion.

Alberta

Bellevue, Crowsnest Pass, Alberta

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/15 heavy machine-gun, (Serial No. 5194), captured by the 2nd Division, originally allocated to Blairmore, Alberta.

Calgary, Alberta

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/15 heavy machine-gun.[6]

Edmonton, Alberta

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 929), M.3706 Kp, carriage 2361.  This gun was captured by the 49th Battalion near Marquion, France on 27 September 1918.  It sits on the left side of the flagpole in front of LFWA HQ, Griesbach. 

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 4945), carriage No. 8246.  This gun was also captured by the 49th Battalion near Marquion, France on 27 September 1918.  It sits on the right side of the flagpole in front of LFWA HQ, Griesbach.

Frank, Alberta

  (Photo courtesy of Ian McKenzie)

German First World War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 98/09 (10.5-cm leFH 98/09) Light Field Howitzer, (Serial No. 3392), no data, 1916.  This gun is part of a War Memorial located on the Crowsnest Highway, Route 3, Alberta, a few miles east of the divide in the small community of Frank.  The gun is flanked by two German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 machine-guns, (Serial No. 5203) captured by the 2nd Canadian Division and possibly (Serial No. 5307) captured by the 27th Battalion at Passchendaele, or (Serial No. 44996), no data.

(Photo courtesy of Ian McKenzie)

High Prairie, Alberta

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02) Heavy Field Howitzer, (Serial No. 223), or (Serial No. 14306), TBC.  This gun was reported to have been located in a park beside the Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 37, 4721, 51st Ave.   The gun has been moved and its present location is unknown.

Lethbridge, Alberta

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 12706), M.495, S.3588 no data.  Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 4, 324 Mayor Magrath Drive South.

 (Photo courtesy of Kevin McLean)

German First World War 10-cm Kanone 17 (10-cm K 17), (Serial No. 160), Spandau 1909, 1346 kg.m.V., missing its carriage.  This gun was captured by the 50th Battalion near the Marquion-Cambrai road Northwest of Raillencourt, France on 28 September 1918.  Henderson Lake.

 (Photo courtesy of Kevin McLean)

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02) Heavy Field Howitzer, (Serial No. 1101), no data.  Henderson Lake.

Peace River, Alberta

 (Photo courtesy of Laura Gloor)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 9366), no data, mounted on an iron wheeled carriage.  On the right side of the Memorial Cairn.

Stavely, Alberta

 (Photo courtesy of Clayton Gillespie)

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), (Serial No. 1972).  This trench mortar was captured by the 46th Battalion at Vimy Ridge on 9 April 1917.  This mortar is listed in the official record as a 7.58-cm.

Taber, Alberta

(Photo courtesy of Sgt Ed Martin, Sgt at Arms, RCL Branch 20)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 9383), no data.  Beside the town cenotaph.

 (Photos courtesy of Sgt Ed Martin, Sgt at Arms, RCL Branch 20)

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 heavy machine-gun, No. 1, (Serial No. 21584), DWM 1917.  Beside the town cenotaph.

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 heavy machine-gun, No. 2, (Serial No. 42354), DWM 1918, no data.  Beside the town cenotaph.

Saskatchewan

Battleford, Saskatchewan

 (Photo courtesy of Maxwell Toms)

German Great War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 16 (10.5-cm leFH 16), (Serial No. 16660), TBC, Battleford cenotaph.

 (Photos courtesy of Terry Honour)

German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG08 machine-gun.

 (Photo courtesy of Terry Honour)

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), (Serial No. 9194), Fred Light Museum.

Estevan, Saskatchewan       

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 8601), no data.

Regina, Saskatchewan

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), possibly (Serial No. 60), TBC, captured by the 46th Battalion on 1 Nov 1918 between Aulnoy and Valenciennes, France.  This gun sits on the left flank of the Soldier’s Cemetery cenotaph.

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), possibly (Serial No. 2666), TBC, captured by the 46th Battalion on 1 Nov 1918 Northeast of Mount Houy, North of the Famars -Valenciennes Road, France.  This gun sits on the right flank of the Soldier’s Cemetery cenotaph.

Saltcoats, Saskatchewan

(Photo courtesy of Floyd Davies)

German Great War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 16 (10.5-cm leFH 16), (Serial No. 4306), no data.  This gun is missing its wheels and is mounted on a concrete stand at the cenotaph.

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

 (Photo courtesy of Terry Honour)

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art (7.58-cm leMW), Trench Mortar, (Serial No. 16676), captured by the 2nd Division in France ca. 1918.  It is preserved on its base plate in front of the Royal Canadian Legion, Branch No. 362, 3021 Louise Street.  This gun was originally allocated to Davidson, Saskatchewan. 

 (Photos courtesy of Col Larry Wong)

German Great War 15-cm Kanone 16 (15-cm K 16), (Serial No. 1034), no data.  This gun is missing its wheel carriage.  It is mounted on a barrel transporter carriage, and located in front of the Sgt Hugh Cairns VC Armoury, Idyllwild Avenue.

 

German Great War Naval Guns being inspected by General Currie and his staff, 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397923)

Manitoba

Brandon, Manitoba

 (Photos courtesy of Dr Gordon Goldsborough)

German Great War 10.5-cm Feldhaubitze 98/09 (10-cm FH 98/09), (Serial No. 2637), 1915, captured by the 42nd Battalion on 8 August 1918 South of Demuin, France.  26th Field Artillery Museum.

German Great War 7.92-mm Spandau MG 08 machine-gun.  This weapon has been moved from Birnie to the 26th Field Artillery Museum.

Carman, Manitoba

 (Photo courtesy of Cheryl Young)

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial No. 10726), captured by the 10th Battalion, 2 September 1918 near Villers-lez-Cagnicourt, France.  The gun was then put into action against the enemy.  It stands on the East side of the First World War Memorial Hall.  No. 1.

 (Photo courtesy of Cheryl Young)

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial No. 10726), captured by the 10th Battalion, 2 September 1918 near Villers-lez-Cagnicourt, France.  The gun was then put into action against the enemy.  West side of the Great War Memorial Hall.  No. 2.

Darlingford, Manitoba

German Great War 9.15-cm leichtes Minenwerfer System Lanz (9.15-cm leMW System Lanz), Canadian War Museum, on the right side of the town War Memorial.

German Great War 7.92-mm Spandau MG 08 heavy machine-gun, on the left side of the War Memorial.

Douglas, Manitoba

German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 heavy machine-gun, (Serial No. 5821), no data, mounted on a stone cairn war memorial next to the Douglas Community Hall.

Neepawa, Manitoba

German Great War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 13 (15-cm sFH 13) Heavy Field Howitzer, (Serial No. 2790), Fried. Krupp.  This gun was captured by the 10th and 14th Battalions at Cagnicourt, France, on 2 September 1918.  It is on display in front of Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 23. 

Pilot Mound, Manitoba

 (Photos courtesy of Jeannette Greaves, Flickr)

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), Trench Mortar, (Serial No. 18043), no data.  Royal Canadian Legion, Branch No. 62.

Royal Canadian Artillery Museum, The National Artillery Museum of Canada, CFB Shilo, Manitoba

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), Trench Mortar, (Serial No.  32258), mounted on a heavy metal base with ramp, handle intact, painted dark grey, mounted on a wheeled carriage.  New wheels and trail in 1988.  Originally allocated to Maillardville, Fraser Mills, British Columbia.  This trench mortar was on display in the Canadian Military Engineer Museum at CFB Gagetown, New Brunswick until transferred to CFB Shilo in January 2013

German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 machine-gun (Serial No. 1133), captured by the RCR, 3rd Canadian Division on 26 August 1918 at Faction Trench N.E. of Monchy-le-Preux, France.  Originally allocated to the town of Binscarth, Manitoba.

German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 machine-gun (Serial No. 1870), captured by the 27th Battalion, late 1918.  Also originally allocated to the town of Binscarth, Manitoba.

German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 machine-gun (Serial No. 4882), no data, originally allocated to Lockport, West Selkirk, Manitoba.

German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 machine-gun (Serial No. 4900), captured by the 20th Battalion on 5 August 1917 at the Cité St Emile, N. of Lens, France.  Originally allocated to Brandon College, Brandon, Manitoba.

German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 machine-gun (Serial No. 7109), no data, originally allocated to Lockport, West Selkirk, Manitoba.

German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 machine-gun (Serial No. 40553), captured by the 3rd Canadian Division in October 1918 in the vicinity of Cambrai, France.  Originally allocated to Carman, Manitoba.

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial No. 32258), no data, on heavy metal base with ramp, handle intact, painted dark grey, mounted on a wheeled carriage.  New wheels and trail in 1988, weight in action 550 lbs.  Sent to CFB Shilo from the CME Museum, CFB Gagetown, New Brunswick in January 2013.  Originally allocated to Maillardville, Fraser Mills, British Columbia.

(Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German Great War 24-cm Flügelminenwerfer ‘Iko’, Albrecht (finned smoothbore wooden Trench Mortar), (Serial No. 339), no data.  This mortar was originally allocated to Lockport, West Selkirk, Manitoba.

(Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 3316), no data, originally allocated to Gleichen, Alberta.

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 3734), no data, originally allocated to Rockwood, Ontario.

Ontario

Bath, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of Terry Honour)

German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 machine-gun.

Beamsville, Ontario

German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 machine-gun, (Serial No. 7931), captured by the 2nd Division on 28 August 1918.  No official allocation in the record.  East side of the cenotaph, Jacob Beam Public School Park.

Belleville, Ontario

German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 machine-gun.

Brantford, Ontario

German Great War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 13 (15-cm sFH 13) Heavy Field Howitzer, (Serial No. 373), TBC.  This gun was captured by the 116th Battalion near Demuin, France on 8 August 1918.  It is on display in Jubilee Park beside the Boer War Memorial. 

German Great War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02) Heavy Field Howitzer, (Serial No. 871), no data.  Canadian Military Heritage Museum (CMHM).  This gun was originally allocated to Simcoe, Ontario.

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial No. 22990).  This gun was captured by the 18th Battalion, 2nd Canadian Division near Villers-lez-Cagnicourt, France, on 27 August 1918.  CMHM.

Base Borden Military Museum, CFB Borden, Ontario

German Great War Granatenwerfer 16, Grenade Thrower Model F 1916.

German Great War 5-cm leichtes Granatwerfer 36 (5-cm leGrW 36).

Brockville, Ontario

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 2267).  This gun was captured by the 2nd Battalion on 27 September 1918 on the Arras-Cambrai Road NorthWest of Raillencourt, France.  Brockville Armoury.

German Great War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1913 (15-cm sFH 13) Heavy Field Howitzer, (Serial No. 2914), 1030, 22671 stamped on breech, serious battle damage on the barrel.  Fried. Krupp A.G.  This gun was also captured by the 2nd Battalion on 27 September 1918 on the Arras-Cambrai Road NorthWest of Raillencourt, France.  Brockville Armoury.

Chapleau, Ontario

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), Trench Mortar, (Serial No. 33025), no data, AEG M1916 mounted on an iron wheeled carriage.

Coe Hill, Ontario

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), Trench Mortar, (Serial No. 7495), no data.  This trench mortar is mounted on a round iron stand at the cenotaph.

Collingwood, Ontario

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No.  3263), no data.

Cookstown, Ontario

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), (Serial No. 16214).  This trench mortar was captured by the 102nd Battalion near Beaucourt Wood, NW of Les Quesnel on 8 August 1918.  It is mounted on a round iron stand at the cenotaph.

Durham, Ontario

German Great War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), (Serial No. 1682), mounted on iron wheels.  This trench mortar was captured by the 13th Battalion.

Flesherton, Ontario

German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 machinegun, (Serial No. 22278), captured by 50th Battalion near Dury, France, 2 Sep 1918.  Left side of the cenotaph.

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), Trench Mortar, (Serial No. 4449), AEG M1916.  This trench mortar was captured by the 54th Battalion at Vimy on 9 April 1917.  It is mounted on the right side of the cenotaph.

Grand Bend, Ontario

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), Trench Mortar, (Serial No. 6170), TBC, mounted on wheels on a concrete stand in the centre of town.

Guelph, Ontario

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), possibly (Serial No. 12724), reported to be (Serial No. 101433) TBC.  (Serial No. 12724) was captured by the 50th Battalion on 28 Sep 1918 North of Raillencourt, France and allocated to Guelph.  The gun is displayed next to the Guelph Armoury.

Kars, Ontario

Swords and Ploughshares Museum, 7500 Reeve Craig North (Rural Route #1), K0A2E0. Curator: Major Mike T.A. Calnan.

German First World War 24-cm Flügelminenwerfer ‘Iko’, Albrecht, (no markings).

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art Field Gun, (Serial No. 13224), no wheels, missing parts.  This gun was captured by the 3rd Battalion on 27 Sep 1918 near the Arras-Cambrai Road, North of Bourlon Wood, France.  It was originally allocated to the Toronto Yacht Club.

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 neuer Art Field Gun, (Serial No. unknown).

Italian Second World War 100-mm Obice da 100/17 modello 16 Field Gun, (Serial No. 020801).  This gun is also stamped 100.17.14, 10cm M14FII, 20805, 1917, 390 kg.

The Italian Second World War 100-mm Obice da 100/17 modello 16 Field Gun was a dual-purpose field and mountain gun used by Austria-Hungary during the First World War as the 10 cm M. 14 Feldhaubitze.  Between the wars it was used by Austria, Italy, and Poland. Captured weapons were used by Nazi Germany under the designations 10 cm leFH 14(ö) and 10 cm leFH 315(i).  It served as the standard Italian medium howitzer as the Obice da 100/17 modello 14.  This gun was shipped from the Mediterranean theatre to Halifax, then Ottawa and then CFB Gagetown.

Austro-Hungarian Skoda 100-mm M1916 Mountain Gun, (Serial No. unknown).

Soviet 37-mm M1939 AA Gun (modified Swedish Bofors M-1938 40-mm Gun).

Soviet 57-mm M1941 (Zis-2) AT Gun.

Soviet 76.2-mm M1942 (Zis-3) Field Gun (Serial No. A6732), 1945.

Soviet 76.2-mm M1927 Field Gun.

Soviet 76.2-mm M1936 (F22) AT Gun.

German Second World War 3.7-cm PaK 36 AT Gun.

Kingston, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of PDA)

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 8368), mounted on a pedestal.  This is a German Krupp gun that was captured by the 21st Battalion on 9 October 1917 at Vimy near the Les Tilleuls Crossroads.  Later, it was taken to the Royal Gun Factory in Woolwich, London.  There it was mounted on a Pedestal Mark I and sent back out into the field, where it was used by the 22nd Howitzer Battery.  A number of merchant ships were armed with these guns, but this one may have been used for static defence at a coastal installation, or it may even have been mounted on a train car or back of a lorry.  It is located in Clarence Street Park on the grounds adjacent to St. George’s Cathedral in downtown Kingston.  It is listed as an Ordnance QF 77-mm Gun Mk. 1, 1917, No. 34, with King George V RI cypher.

L’Orignal, Ontario

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial No. 5255).  Captured by the 3rd Battalion on 27 Sep 1919 near the Arras-Cambrai Road, North of Bourlon Wood.

Lunenburg, Ontario

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 6959), no data, Lunenburg Cemetery, just north of Long Sault.

Madoc, Ontario

German Great War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), (Serial No. 1157), TBC.  Thomas Thompson Memorial Park, St Lawrence Ave E.

Milton, Ontario

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 9563), L-7586, 1917.  This gun was captured by the 3rd Canadian Infantry Battalion, 1st Brigade of the 1st Canadian Division when the Canadian Corps crossed the Canal du Nord to take Bourlon Wood at Cambrai on 27 September 1918.  Canadian Military Heritage Museum. 

Mount Forest, Ontario

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 268).  There is no official record of this gun.  It is stamped R.268.  L.393. AWDr.  On the right side below the breech, and gef. 1898. Fr. Kp. abg. 1907. F.F.E. under the breech.

Morrisburg, Ontario

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 2542), captured by the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles on 26 August 1918 near Monchy, France.  It was put back into action by the 66th Battery CFA, NW of Monchy-le-Preux.  It stands beside the Great War Memorial in front of the South Dundas Justice Building.

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 1323), TBC, no data.  This gun stands beside the Great War Memorial in front of the South Dundas Justice Building.

Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario

German Great War 10-cm Kanone 14 (10-cm K 14), (Serial No. 201), 1050 kg, 1916.  This gun was captured by the 7th Battalion, CEF, at Vimy on 13 April 1917.  It was initially allocated to Queenston, Ontario.

Niagara Falls, Ontario

German Great War 10-cm Kanone 17 (10-cm K 17), (this gun has also been reported as being10.5-cm), (Serial No. 39).  It was captured by the 3rd Battalion on 27 Sep 1918 near the Arras-Cambrai Road between Marquion and Raillencourt, France.  It is located with D Company, Lincoln & Welland Regiment (Victoria Street) Armoury, 5049 Victoria Ave.

Norfolk, Ontario

German Great War 25-cm schwerer Minenwerfer alt Art (25-cm sMW), (Serial No. unknown).

Omemee, Ontario

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), Trench Mortar, (Serial No. 15867).  This trench mortar was captured by the 7th Battalion near Villers-lez-Cagnicourt, France, on 2 September 1918.  It is mounted on a round stand with spoked wheels.

The Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, Ontario

German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 machine-gun, (Serial No. G6091), CWM (Artifact No. 20020045-221); CWM (Artifact No. 20020045-245); (Serial No. 4943), CWM (Artifact No. 19390002-108); CWM (Artifact No. 19390002-327); (Serial No. 7081G), CWM (Artifact No. 197901110-087); CWM (Artifact No. 19720124-007); CWM (Artifact No. 19720124-060); Trophy No. 422, 2nd Cdn Div, CWM (Artifact No. 20020045-217).

German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/15 Luft Maschinen Gewehr air-cooled machine-gun, (Serial No. 9167), CWM (Artifact No. 19390002-339); (Serial No. 7064), CWM (Artifact No. 19390002-338); (Serial No. 1226), CWM (Artifact No. 19390002-272); (Serial No. 5606a), CWM (Artifact No. 19390002-335); CWM (Artifact No. 19390002-341); (Serial No. 2319), CWM (Artifact No. 19790374-005); (Serial No. 6349), CWM (Artifact No. 19390002-211); (Serial No. 9012a), S-F; 12, German Air Force, CWM (Artifact No. 19680170-005); (Serial No. 2740), CWM (Artifact No. 19880212-027); and CWM (Artifact No. 20020045-215).

German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/18 machine-gun, Königliche Gewehrfabrik Erfurt, 1918, (Serial No. 293), CWM (Artifact No. 19790478-001).

German Great War 7.92-mm Waffenfabrik Heinrich Krieghoff, Rheinmetall MG 15 air-cooled light machine-gun, German Air Force, CWM (Artifact No. 19680170-009).

 

German Great War German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 machine-gun (Serial No. 4943), 1917.

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial No. 18328), AEG M1916, mounted on an iron carriage.  12 Can MG Coy on the box trail.

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial No. 5160), AEG M1916, rifled, stamped 2108625, jk, 2660, 5169, mounted on wooden carriage wheels.  Captured by the 20th Battalion at the Cité St. Emile, North of Lens, France, on 15 August 1917.  This leMW n.A. is marked “captured and claimed by the 3rd Can TM” on the rotator/base plate (most likely the 3rd Canadian Trench Mortar Battery).

German Great War 5-cm leichtes Granatwerfer 36 (5-cm lGrW 36) (Serial No. unknown).

German Great War 5-cm leichtes Granatwerfer 36 (5-cm lGrW 36) (Serial No. unknown).

German Great War 9.15-cm leichtes Minenwerfer System Lanz, (Serial No. 4785JP).  Captured by the 18th Battalion at Vimy on 9 April 1917.

German Great War 24-cm Flügelminenwerfer ‘Iko’, Albrecht, (Serial No. Unknown), no markings.

 (Photos courtesy of Doug Knight)

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial No. 204).  Captured by the 72nd Battalion on 9 Oct 1917 near Vimy on the Sunken Road 250 yards SW of Givenchy, France.  This gun has a blown barrel.

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art Field Gun, (Serial No. 204), 1918, mounted on a British Naval/Coast Defence Mounting (captured gun).

German Great War Beobachtungwagen für feldartillerie, Artillery Observation Wagen.

German Great War 8.8-cm L/30C U-boat Deck Gun from U-91, (Serial No. 1972), Fried. Krupp AG 1916, 488KG stamped on the breech, 1972L on the trunnion, 510 F.N. 532, 1972.0 on the barrel.  SM U-91 was a German First World War Type Mittel U submarine launched in 1917.  SM U-91 was one of the 329 submarines serving in the Imperial German Navy (Kaiserliche Marine) during the First World War.  U-91 served with III Flotilla from 13 December 1917 to 11 November 1918.  During its service, this submarine conducted eight patrols and sank 37 ships and damaged two.  U-91 took part in the First Battle of the Atlantic and remained in service until it was surrendered to France on 26 November 1918.  U-91’s deck gun likely came to Canada before the submarine was broken up at Brest, France in July 1921.  Internet, http://www.uboat.net/wwi/boats/index.html?boat=91.

German Great War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02) Heavy Field Howitzer, (Serial No. 877), no data, Fried Krupp AG, 1916.  1182 on the carriage.  This gun was originally allocated to Hamilton, Ontario.

General Currie inspecting captured German Great War 21-cm Morsers.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397919)

German Great War 21-cm Mörser Heavy Mortar damaged by shellfire, being examined by a Canadian Officer, May 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397820)

German Great War 21-cm Mörser 1910 neuer Art Heavy Mortar, (Serial No. 679), Krupp AG, Essen, 1916.  Captured by the 18th Battalion.  Originally allocated to Hamilton, Ontario.

CFB Petawawa, Ontario

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), possibly (Serial No. 24714), no data.  Apparently found on the Menin Road in France.  This gun is not listed in the official records.

Port Hope, Ontario

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), Field Gun, (Serial No. 291).  This gun was captured by the 116th Battalion North of Cambrai, France, on 29 September 1918.

Sault Ste Marie, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of LCol Leon Jenkins)

German Great War 10.5-cm Feldhaubitze 98/09 (10.5-cm FH 98/09), (Serial No. 46).  This gun was captured by the 3rd Battalion near Raillencourt, France on 27 September 1918.  Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 25.

Shelburne, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of Balcer)

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 435), originally allocated to Dufferin County, Ontario, now in a public park.

Ridley College, St. Catherine’s, Ontario

 (Photos courtesy of Carrie Houston, Ridely College)

German Great War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 16 (10.5-cm leFH 16), (Serial No. 7981), no data.  This gun was received by Ridley College on 7 February 1923.

Sturgeon Falls, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of LCol Leon Jensen)

German Great War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 16 (10.5-cm leFH 16), (Serial No. 3264).  This gun was captured by the 102nd Battalion and 10th Battalion West of Bourlon Wood, France, on 27 September 1918.

Thunder Bay, Ontario

 (Photos courtesy of Terry Honour)

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 69), TBC, Mountain View Cemetery.

Trenton, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of PDA)

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial No. 12490), no data.

Waterford, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of JustSomePics)

German Great War 25-cm schwerer Minenwerfer alt Art (25-cm sMW), (Serial No. 1930), TBC.  This trench mortar was captured by the 9th Field Company, Canadian Engineers at Vimy Ridge on 9 April 1917.  Listed in the records as a 17-cm, it is on display as a High School Monument.

Windsor, Ontario

 (Photos courtesy of Kevin Hodson)

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), possibly (Serial No. 4451), captured by the 1st Battalion on 27 September 1918, East of Sainz-lez-Marquion.  Curently being restored at St Clair College.

 (Photos courtesy of Kevin Hodson)

German Great War 15-cm schwerer Feldhaubitze 13 (15-cm sFH 13) Heavy Field Howitzer, (Serial No. 125), TBC, salvaged by the 2nd Division Southeast of Bois de Bouche, near Cagnicourt by No. 2 Section, 1 CDAC.  It is now on display with the Essex-Kent Scottish Regiment at Sandwich Street. 

The record on this sFH 13 states ‘salvaged’ rather than captured.  Likely damaged in counter-battery fire, Kevin Hodson guided the restoration and notes the breech block is severely jammed half-way and the firing pin still present, possibly indicating the crew didn’t have time to remove it before capture.  The gun crew was either incapacitated or already deceased.  The restorers at St Clair College tried extreme measures to free-up the block including heating the breech ring and applying an 18-ton hydraulic jack – to no avail.  Kevin concludes the crew simply abandoned it since it could no longer be fired.  It may have backfired and distorted the block; therefore the only way to remove it would have been to saw through the breech ring. 

This gun has been left it as is since it can tell history to other theorists. The gun was most likely involved in the 1st Battle of Cambrai, since that was a rather fierce exchange of fire, and the first one using tanks. There is evidence of battle damage on this piece that was taken care of by field repairs. These have been left intact for their historical significance – the trail frame had been bent and broken and then partially straightened and fixed by ‘scab’ plates with over 60 rivets.  The recoil mechanism cradle also was patched by in-field riveting.[8]

Woodbridge, Ontario

 (Photos courtesy of Balcer)

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial No. 5803), captured by the 10th Battalion, 2nd Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Division at Cagnicourt Wood, France, 2 September 1918.  Woodbridge Tower Memorial, Canadian Military Heritage Museum.

 (Photo courtesy of the City of Vaughn Recreation and Culture Department, Cultural Services Division)

German Great War 15-cm Feldkanone L/40 in Räderlafette Naval Gun on Field carriage, (Serial No. 84), no data.  Originally allocated to Vaughn Township, Vellore.  Woodbridge Tower Memorial, Canadian Military Heritage Museum.

 (Photos courtesy of the City of Vaughn Recreation and Culture Department, Cultural Services Division)

German Great War 15-cm Feldkanone L/45 in Räderlafette Naval Gun on Field carriage, Woodbridge Tower Memorial, Canadian Military Heritage Museum.

Québec

Brome County Historical Society Museum, Knowlton, Québec

German Great War Granatenwerfer 16.

 

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW), possibly (Serial No. 5001), TBC, captured by the 3rd Canadian Division.  On base, no wheels.

 

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial No. 5001), no base, no wheels.  352, G3298 (with an upside down 20 above).  Marked “captured by the 25th Battalion on 18 August 1917”.

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial No. unknown), marked H516, 2.0 MR, mounted on wheels.

German Great War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), (Serial No. 6043), 1917 M, captured by the 102nd Battalion (the War record lists it as the 10th Bn).

German Great War 25-cm schwerer Minenwerfer alt Art (25-cm sMW), damaged, no markings visible, possibly (Serial No. 1524), captured by the 102nd Battalion at Vimy Ridge, 9 April 1917.

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial No. 8382), captured by the 5th Canadian Mounted Rifles, Cambrai, France, 9 October 1918.

German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 Machinegun, (Serial No. 7920).

German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/15 machine-gun, (Serial No.).

German Great War 7.92-mm Schwarzlose M07.12 MG machine-gun, (Serial No.).

German Great War 7.92-mm Spandau Maxim Luft Maschinen Gewehr 08/18 (LMG 08/18) air-cooled machine-guns (two) (Serial Nos. unknown), mounted on an original Fokker D.VII.

German Great War Fokker D.VII A1b (Serial No. 6810/18).

Lac Megantic, Québec

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial No. 6502), no data.  This gun stands in a park facing the lake.

Lévis, Québec

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial No. 1022), captured captured by the 13th Battalion North of Aubercourt, France on 8 August, 1918. 10 rue de l’Arsenal Lévis.

German Great War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02) Heavy Field Howitzer, (Serial No. 360), this gun was also captured by the 13th Battalion North of Aubercourt, France on 8 August 1918.  10 rue de l’Arsenal.

Côte-des-Neiges Armoury, Montréal

German Great War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), (Serial No. 6219), letter P under the number and LK.  This trench mortar was captured by the 16th Battalion on 8 August 1918 near Aubercourt, France.  This mMW is outside the armoury at 4185 Chemin de la Côte des Neiges.

La Citadelle, Québec City, Québec

German Great War 21-cm Mörser captured by Canadians, 1918.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3395091) 

  (Photos courtesy of James Simmonds)

German Great War 21-cm Mörser 16 (21-cm Mrs 16), (Serial No. 825), TBC, captured on 3 Sep 1918 on a road North-East of Villers-lez-Cagnicourt, France.

Plains of Abraham Park, Québec City, Québec

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial No. 12326), also stamped M.1352, S.4276, Fr.  Kp.  1917.  Captured 2 September 1918 Cagnicourt Wood, France.  A cannon ball is cemented in the muzzle.

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial No. 8899), Fr.  Kp.  1916.  Captured  by the 87th Battalion near Bourlon, France, 27 September 1918.  A cannon ball is cemented in the muzzle.

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial No. 9742), captured by the 87th Battalion, near Bourlon, France, 27 September 1918.  A cannon ball is cemented in the muzzle.

German Great War 10.5-cm Feldhaubitze 98/09 (10.5-cm FH 98/09), (Serial No. 5051), Fr.  Kp. 1917.  Captured by the 22nd Battalion.  A cannonball is cemented in the muzzle.

 

German Great War 10.5-cm Feldhaubitze 98/09 (10.5-cm FH 98/09), captured by Canadians near Vis en Artois, France, Sep 1918.  (Library & Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN 3397953).

German Great War 21-cm Mörser gun being examined by a Canadian Officer, Arras, Aug 1918.  CANADA scratched on the barrel.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397899)

German Great War 21-cm Mörser 1910 neuer Art (21-cm Mrs 10 n.A.) Heavy Mortar, (Serial No. 85).  This gun was captured by the 42nd Battalion on 8 Aug 1918 SE of Demuin, France.  This gun has its barrel elevated and is locked in the recoil position facing a large tree.  A cannonball is cemented in the muzzle.  The gun is located East of the Musée nationale des beaux-arts on the behind trees South of Avenue George VI on the Parcs des Champs-de-Bataille facing the river.

German Great War 10-cm Kanone 17 (10-cm K 17), (Serial No. 10), Kp, 1918 with a blown barrel (listed in the records as a 10.5-cm).  This gun was captured by the 42nd Battalion on 28 August 1918.  The gun is located on Ontario Avenue below the Parcs des Champs-de-Bataille facing the river

German Great War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02) Heavy Field Howitzer, (Serial No. 473), TBC.  The gun is located on Ontario Avenue below the Parcs des Champs-de-Bataille facing the river.

Sayabec, Québec

 (Photo courtesy of Amqui)

German Great War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 98/09 Light Field Howitzer, (Serial No. 2908). This gun was captured by the 27th Battalion on 9 Oct 1917 near the edge of Farbus Wood at Vimy. The gun was taken over by the 4th Howitzer Battery and used in action against the Germans. It was on display in a park at Tournant-de-la-Rivière de Sayabec. The gun was relocated to the Municipal Park in 1977.

Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Collège militaire royal de Saint-Jean, Musée du Fort Saint-Jean Museum, Québec

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial No. 14585), TBC.  This gun was captured by the 87th Battalion, on the sunken road SW of Bourlon, France on 27 September 1918.

Terrebonne, Québec

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), Trench Mortar, (Serial No.  305), no data.

CFB Valcartier, Québec

 (Photos courtesy of James Simmonds)

German Great War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 13 (15-cm sFH 13) Heavy Field Howitzer, (Serial No. 1098), 1916, 788 M.V.  This gun was captured by the R22eR near Cherisy, France, on 27 August 1918.  It is on display beside the Garrison Officer’s Mess.

New Brunswick

Campbellton, New Brunswick.

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 2402), no data.

Chipman, New Brunswick

German Great War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), (Serial No. 7095), H, 2, 1918.  This trench mortar was captured by the 13th Battalion near Aubercourt, France, on 8 August 1918.  It is mounted on an iron-wheeled carriage in the Community Park on Main Street.

Hopewell Cape, New Brunswick

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 784), no data.  1906 Fr.  Kp. Gg. over crown 29.   Restored by CFB Gagetown.

German Great War 10-cm Kanone 14 (10-cm K 14), (Serial No. 590), 1917.  This gun was captured by the 27th Battalion at Farbus near Vimy on 9 April 1917.  A plaque fixed to the gun states, “This German Gun No. 590 captured in the World War by the 26th Battalion recruited in this province was won by the citizens of Albert County, New Brunswick in the Victory Loan competition of 1919.  Henry L.  Drayton, Minister of Finance.”

Grand Falls, New Brunswick

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 8283).  This gun was captured by the 25th Battalion at Moon Quarry near Cherisy, France, on 27 August 1918.  It is on the Main Street in a small centre island park.

Perth-Andover, New Brunswick

 

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 4095), no data, r.Kp, 5012.  M.  Kp., 4598.  S. BNA 18.  The gun sits on a hill overlooking Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 36.

New Brunswick Museum, Saint John, New Brunswick

German Great War Granatenwerfer 16 spigot mortar with 2 kg fin-stabilized grenade mounted on the spigot.  The sheet metal stabilizing fins caused a tell-tale whirring sound and could be fired out to 300 metres.  The grenade had a very sensitive fuze which caused it to detonate on the surface causing more damage than it would by penetrating into the ground in a crater.

Woodstock, New Brunswick

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 2398), no data.  The gun is inside the 89th Field Battery Armoury in Woodstock, undergoing restoration.

Prince Edward Island

Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 machine-gun, (Serial No.), mounted on the wall inside the museum.

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), Trench Mortar, (Serial No. 16634), 2047, 1733, 799, 111, and 1686, mounted on iron wheels inside the Armoury.  This trench mortar came to PEI in 1920 as part of the War Trophies Act.  It stood in the Mount Stewart Cemetery until it was donated to Prince Edward Island Regiment Museum, Queen Charlotte Armoury in 2008.

German Great War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), (Serial No. 848), stamped Rh.M.F. 1916.  This trench mortar was captured by the 16th Battalion near Aubercourt, France, 8 August 1918.  It was originally allocated to the town of Stamford, Ontario.  Brought to CFB Gagetown from Ontario by Thomas Skelding, it was donated in 2013 to the Prince Edward Island Regiment and is being restored in their armoury in Charlottetown.

Kensington, Prince Edward Island

German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 machine-gun, (Serial No.), mounted on its Schlitten stand inside the museum.

 

German Great War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02) Heavy Field Howitzer, (Serial Nr. 86).  This gun was originally allocated to Charlottetown.  Kensington Veteran’s Memorial Military Museum, next to Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 9.

Lennox Island, Prince Edward Island

German Great War 10.5-cm Feldhaubitze 98/09 (10.5-cm FH 98/09), (Serial Nr. 223), Rh MF, 1911.  This gun was originally allocated to Grand River.

Mount Stewart, Prince Edward Island

German Great War 10.5-cm Feldhaubitze 98.09, (Serial Nr. 438).  This gun was captured by the 11th Division Imperials operating with Canadians on 27 Sep 1918 SW of Epinoy, France.  Originally allocated to Charlotteown, it is now located beside the cenotaph at Mt Stewart, PEI, missing its wheels. The Gunner's shield shows evidence of penetration.

Summerside, Prince Edward Island

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. 13820).  This gun was captured by the 25th Battalion on 29 September 1918 at Moon Quarry near Cherisy, France.  No. 1.  Memorial Park.

 

 German Great War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 16 (10.5-cm leFH 16), (Serial Nr. 7419), no data.

Bridgewater, Nova Scotia

German Great War 7.7-cm leichte Feldhaubitze 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), possibly (Serial No. 1638), TBC, no data.

Nova Scotia

Army Museum, Halifax, Nova Scotia

German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 machine-gun.

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. 18351), 213.  Captured by the 19th Battalion on 26 August 1918 at Guemappe, France.

Officer's Mess, Royal Artillery Park, Halifax

German Great War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/15 machine-gun (Nr. 8411) Gwf Erfurt 1917, on display inside the Officers Mess at Royal Artillery Park.

Sydney, Nova Scotia

German Great War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), (Serial No. 1078), TBC, captured by the 43rd Battalion on 8 August 1918 at Dodo Wood SW of Demuin, France.

Fort Edward, Windsor, Nova Scotia

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. 376), TBC, current location unknown.

Newfoundland

Bonavista, Newfoundland

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. TBC).

Catalina, Newfoundland

(photo courtesy of Joyce Sherren)

German Great War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW).

Carbonear, Newfoundland

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), Trench Mortar, (Serial Nr.  TBC), Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 23.

Harbour Buffet, Newfoundland

German Great War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW).

Stephenville Crossing, Newfoundland

German Great War 25-cm schwerer Minenwerfer alt Art (25-cm sMW).  Flat Bay, Stephenville Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 38.

Placentia, Newfoundland

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. TBC).

Pleasantville, St. John’s, Newfoundland

 (Author photos ca. 1971)

 (Photo courtesy of Steve Cooney)

German Great War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 13 (15-cm sFH 13) Heavy Field Howitzer, Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 56.

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), Trench Mortar, (Serial No. TBC).  Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 56.

Spaniard’s Bay, Bay Roberts, Newfoundland

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), Trench Mortar, (Serial No. TBC), Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 32.

St. Georges, Newfoundland

German Great War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), Trench Mortar, (Serial No. TBC), Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 38.

St. John’s, Newfoundland

 (Author photo ca 1970)

German Great War 10-cm Kanone 17 (10-cm K 17), Victoria Park.  The trail has been cut off and the forward part of the gun now rests on a concrete stand with a plaque in the park.

(Author photo ca. 1971)

German First World War 10-cm Kanone 17 Field Gun, City Park.  This Gun has had its wheels replaced and has been restored four times by Nelson Sherren.

Trinity, Newfoundland

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial No. TBC).

Dawson City, Yukon Territory

German Great War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 16 (10.5-cm leFH 16), possibly (Serial No. 6562), no data.  The gun is apparently equipped with the shield from an sFH13.  Facing the cenotaph, the gun is on the right side of the memorial at Victory Gardens.

German Great War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02) Heavy Field Howitzer, (Serial No. 1169).  This gun was captured by the 16th Battalion on 8 August 1918 near Aubercourt, France.  It stands facing the cenotaph on the left side of the memorial.

Footnotes:


[1] Ledger RG 37, “Report of the Award of War Trophies, 1920.”  Internet, http://www.cefresearch.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=5576.

[2] The combined figures for Guns and Howitzers add up to 820.  Strome Galloway reported the figures for guns distributed in Canada as: “By December 1920 Canada had secured 532 Field Guns, 2,822 machine-guns and 289 mortars (total of 821).  Howitzers, huge guns found in the bigger cities, were apparently included under the title of Field Guns...But by December 1942 the Public Archives recorded that 305 Field Guns, 111 trench mortars, 217 machine-guns as well as 85 19th-Century cannons had been returned for scrap.”  Internet, http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_6972/is_4_6/ai_n28723620/.

[3] This was most likely a lightened air-cooled version of the MG 08/15 machine-gun, the 7.92-mm LMG 08/18.

[4] Internet, www.geocities.com.

[5] Jonathan F.  Vance, Tangible Demonstrations of a Great Victory: War Trophies in Canada, Material History Review 42 (Fall 1995).

[6] This machine-gun may have been one of seven presented to the city after the war, including Serial No. 1435, captured by the 54th Battalion at Beaucourt en Santerre, France on 8 August 1918; Serial No. 3554, was captured by the 46th Battalion West of Lens, France on 28 August 1917;  Serial No. 3724a was captured by the 5th Battalion, Western Calvary at Vimy on 9 April 1917; Serial No. 3727 was captured by the 14th Battalion at Sains-les-Marquion, France on 27 September 1918; Serial No. 4370 captured by the 87th Battalion North of Quesnel, France on 9 August 1918; Serial No. 4976 no data; Serial No. 5844a, no data; Serial No. 9479, also captured by the 14th Battalion at Sains-les-Marquion, France on 27 September 1918.  The MG 08 is on display in the Junior Ranks Mess, Calgary Highlanders and is part of a trophy, given out to the top candidate on regimentally run machine-gun courses.

[7] The Canadian War Museum Artifact Numbers, i.e. (19930039-001), break down into Acquisition numbers with the first number being the year of acquisition, in this case 1993, followed by the group number of the artifacts received, in this case 0039, followed by the item number in the group, in this case 001.  The group can be as large or small as necessary, and there can be up to 9999 groups in a year.   If an object is later related to an existing acquisition, its number will be changed.  Doug Knight.

[8] E-mails to author from Kevin Hodson, Feb 2013.

 (Photos courtesy of Bridget, Ladysmith Historical Society)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16),  possibly (Serial No.7065), on display from 1921 until removed in 1941 by rail, and sent to the smelter to aid in the war effort.

German, Italian and Japanese Second World War Trophy Armour and Artillery in Canada
A fair number of captured guns returned to Canada, many accompanying the units that captured them in addition to the guns brought back by Captain Mowat‘s Intelligence Collection Team.  The types and locations of these guns are listed below, followed by additional technical data and photos of the major artillery pieces on display in Canada.

CFB Edmonton, 1 CMBG, Alberta

German Second World War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 18/40 Howitzer (10.5-cm leFH 18/40 (Serial No. R351), Barrel (Serial No. Fl 905), dxk, Breech Block (Serial No. Fl 539), mrf, SB dxk, Trail FL 697 bwl.  This howitzer is on display in a Memorial Park South of the Officer’s Mess, Edmonton Garrison, Alberta .

German artillery examined by Canadians in France, ca June 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4233166) 

German Second World War 10.5-cm LeFH 18/40 Howitzer being examined by a Canadian soldier, June 1944.   (Library and Archives Canada, MIKAN No. 4233112)

German Second World War 10.5-cm LeFH 18/40 Howitzer, Barrel (Serial No. R351) Fl 905, dxk, Breech Block (Serial No. Fl 539) mrf, SB dxk, Trail (Serial No. Fl 697) bwl, Memorial Park South of the Officer’s Mess, Edmonton Garrison.

CFB Wainwright, Alberta

 (Photo courtesy of MCpl Peter Simpson)

Italian Fiat-Ansaldo M14/41 light tank.

Royal Canadian Artillery Museum, CFB Shilo, Manitoba

German Second World War 2.8-cm schwere Panzerbüchse 41 Anti-Tank Gun (2.8-cm sPzB 41) Anti-Tank Gun (Serial No. 2556).  The barrel has a separate number, (Serial No. 52536)  This gun is on loan to the Base Museum, CFB Petawawa, Ontario.

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German Second World War 3.7-mm Czech Škoda (PaK 36 (t)) AT Gun.  The gun is marked 1937, AKC SPOL, 93 kg, d?. Škodovy Závody v Plzni, tov ?ís. 21532, E1 37, 3.7 cm k vz.37, ?ís. 7, VL0217!

(Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German Second World War 7.5-cm leichtes Infanteriegeschütz 18 Light Infantry Gun (7.5-cm leIG 18) (Serial No. R191).

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German Second World War5-cm PaK 38 (L/60) Anti-Tank Gun (Serial No. R4024).  This Gun was collected in Northwest Europe before 12 Oct 1944 and shipped to Canada from CMHQ in the UK after 7 Nov 1944.

German Second World War5-cm PaK 38 (L/60) Anti-Tank Gun (Serial No. R5709).  This gun is currently loaned out to Melita, Alberta.

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German Second World War 7.5-cm PaK 40 Anti-Tank Gun (Serial No. R807).

Canadian soldiers examining a captured German Second World War 7.5-cm PaK 40 Anti-Tank Gun marked with 15 kill rings, ca. 1945.  (Library & Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3208583)

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German Second World War 10.5-cm schwere Kanone 18 (10-cm sK 18) Field Gun, (Serial No. R856).

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German Second World War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 16 (10.5-cm leFH 16), (Serial No. R341).

German Second World War artillery being examined by Canadians in France, ca. June 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4233165)

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German Second World War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 18/40 (10.5-cm leFH 18/40) Howitzer (Serial No. R158).  (Brought to Canada by Captain Farley M. Mowat).

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German Second World War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 18/40 (10.5-cm leFH 18/40) Howitzer (Serial No. R284).

German Second World War15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 18 (15-cm sFH 18) Heavy Field Howitzer (Serial No. R856).  (Captain F.M. Mowat).

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German Second World War17-cm Kanone 18 (17-cm K 18) in Mörserlafette Field Gun, (Serial No. 58).  (Captain F.M. Mowat).

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German Second World War 30-cm Raketenwerfer 56, (no Serial Number visible).

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German Second World War 10.5-cm Leichtgeschütz 42 (10.5-cm LG 42 Recoilless Gun), (Serial No. R121).  (Captain F.M. Mowat). 

2 PPCLI, CFB Shilo, Manitoba

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German Second World War 5-cm PaK 38 (L/60) Anti-Tank Gun (Serial No. R10087).

 (Bundesarchiv Photo)

German Second World War Flavierling 38 (FlakV 38) four-barreled 2-cm anti-aircraft gun, brought to Canada by Captain Farley Mowat.  This gun was de-accessioned by Shilo in the 1970s, with the remaining pieces going to an American collector.

 (Bundesarchiv Photo)

German Second World War  Flugabwehrkanone 38 (Flak 38) 2-cm anti-aircraft gunbrought to Canada by Captain Farley Mowat.  This gun was also de-accessioned by Shilo in the 1970s, with the remaining pieces going to an American collector.

Fort Garry Horse Museum and Archive, McGregor Armoury, Winnipeg, Manitoba

 (Photos courtesy of the Fort Garry Horse Museum)

German Second World War 8.8-cm Raketenwerfer 43 “Puppchen” (hollow charge rocket launcher), (Serial No. RW2491), Fort Garry Horse Museum, McGregor Armoury, 551 Machray Ave. 

Goliath tracked mine.

Goliath being examined by Canadian soldiers, Apeldoorn, Netherlands, 12 June 1945.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3204123)

CFB Borden, Ontario

German Second World War 5-cm leichtes Granatwerfer 36 (5-cm leGrW 36), (Serial No. 7310), BBMM (Artifact No. 2588).

German Second World War 3.7-cm PaK 36 AT Gun, rear of Museum hangar, (Serial No. R17355), shipping weight 0-18-0.  This gun was consigned to Canada from England on 20 Feb 1945, dispatched from CMHQ in the UK, 3 Ap 1945.

German Second World War 7.5cm Kampfwagenkanone 40 (7.5-cm KwK 40), vehicle mounted gun on a wall-mounted display.

 German Second World War 7.5-cm PaK 97/38 AT Gun, (Serial No. 9108), 1916, A.B.S.

 

French Second World War 47-mm Mle 1937 (G47 Mle 1937), captured and used by the Germans as the German Second World War 47-mm PaK 181(f), APX Anti-Tank Gun.

German Second World War 3.7-cm PaK 36 Anti-Tank Gun (R17355), rear of Museum hangar.

German Second World War 7.62-cm PaK 36(r) Anti-Tank Gun (Serial No. 1230), 1939.  Air Force side of the Base.

German Second World War 5-cm PaK 38 AT Gun (Serial No. R860), 1942, Bhh, rear of Museum hangar.

German Second World War 7.5-cm PaK 40 AT Gun (Serial No. R1761), 1942, bwo, Rheinmetall Borsig (Düsseldorf), rear of Museum hangar.  This Gun was collected in Northwest Europe before 12 Oct 1944 and shipped to Canada from CMHQ in the UK after 7 Nov 1944.

German Second World War 7.5-cm PaK 40 AT Gun, (Serial No. R2900), bwo, Rheinmetall Borsig (Düsseldorf), South Parade Square.

German Second World War 7.5-cm PaK 40 Anti-Tank Gun, (Serial No. R4969), 1942, hhg, Rheinmetall Borsig (Tegel), Worthington Park.

German Second World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 18 (15-cm sFH 18) Heavy Field Howitzer, (Serial No. R2746), 1940, WaA 34, barrel in the recoil position, South Parade Square. 

German Second World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 18 (15-cm sFH 18) Heavy Field Howitzer, (Serial No. R3176), 1941, COC (TBC), CHM, barrel extended, Southeast of North gate.  This Gun was collected in Northwest Europe before 12 Oct 1944 and shipped to Canada from CMHQ in the UK after 7 Nov 1944.

Captured German Second World War quadruple AA FlakPanzer IV Wirbelwinds being examined by US troops, Belgium, 30 Jan 1945.  (US Army Photo)

German Second World War quadruple AA FlakPanzer IV Wirbelwind (Whirlwind AA Gun), Worthington Memorial Park.

Jagdpanzer 38t, Hetzer, ca 1944.  (Kreuger Horst Photo)

Jagdpanzer 38t, Hetzer, ca 1945.  (US Army Photo)

German Second World War Jagdpanzer 38(t) Hetzer Light Tank Destroyer, MGen Worthington Memorial Park.  The Jagdpanzer 38(t) (Sd.Kfz. 138/2), later known as Hetzer ("chaser"), was a German light tank destroyer of the Second World War based on a modified Czechoslovakian Panzer 38(t) chassis.

German Second World War 7.5-cm Gun mounted on a Panzerkampfwagen III, shipped from 21 Army Group in the UK to Camp Borden on 2 Dec 1944.  This equipment is believed to have been lost in a hanger fire at Camp Borden in 1951, and may be buried somewhere on the present day CFB Borden ranges.  The search continues.

Italian First World War 149-mm 149/12 modelo 16.  The gun is marked Gio. Ansaldo & C., Genova 1918, F. 479G, (Serial No. 8847), Peso Con Ott. KC 870, possibly (Serial No. 4796), TBC.   (This gun was listed in the war records as a 100-mm Obice da 100/17 modelo 14)

Italian First World War 149-mm 149/12 modelo 16.  The gun is marked Gio. Ansaldo & C., Genova 1918, F. 479G, (Serial No. 8847), Peso Con Ott. KC 870, possibly (Serial No. 4796), TBC.   (This gun is listed as a 100-mm Obice da 100/17 modelo 14).  The Italian First World War 149-mm 149/12 modelo 16 was a heavy howitzer which served with Austria-Hungary as the 15 cm schwere Feldhaubitze M 14.  It had two crew seats mounted on the gun shield.  It broke down into two loads for transport. The M 14 was modified to improve elevation and range as well as to strengthen the carriage as the M 14/16.  Postwar war modifications were common to make it suitable for motor traction and to address other issues.  M 14 and M14/16 howitzers were captured by Italy during the war and received as reparations after the war, when they were put into service with the designation of Obice da 149/13.  Some 490 were on hand in 1939 and weapons captured by the Germans after the Italians changed sides in 1943 were used as the 15 cm sFH 400(i).  Surviving weapons were impressed into German service after 1943 as the 15 cm sFH 401(i).  Czech and Slovak weapons were known as the 15 cm hrubá houfnice vz. 14 and 14/16.

Italian Second World War 47-mm Cannone da 47/32 M35, (Serial No. 646), outside the Museum hangar.

The Italian Second World War 47-mm Cannone da 47/32 M35 was an Austrian artillery piece which served as the Cannone da 47/32 M35 produced under license in Italy during the war.  It was used both as an infantry gun and an anti-tank gun which it proved to be successful at, especially when equipped with HEAT (Italian: "Effetto Pronto") rounds.  In the 1930s Italy bought some of these guns from Böhler, and then began to produce the weapon under license, continuing its development. The Cannone da 47/32 M35 was the main armament in the M13/40 medium tank, the M14/41 medium tank, and the 47/32 self-propelled gun.  Due to its shape, the 47/32 was commonly called "elefantino" (little elephant) by the troops.

Italian Second World War Fiat-Ansaldo M13/40 light tank, knocked out in North Africa, 17 July 1942.  (IWM Photo)

Italian Second World War Fiat-Ansaldo M13/40 light tank, Museum Hangar, MGen Worthington Memorial Park, CFB Borden Military Museum, Ontario.

Italian Fiat Ansaldo CV-33 light tank, left behind after a battle with British armoured cars on the Libyan frontier, 26 July 1940.  (No. 1 Army Film & Photo Unit, IWM Photo)

Italian Second World War Fiat-Ansaldo CV-33 light tank, Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, Ontario.

 (Base Borden Military Museum Photos) (Photo courtesy of Andre Blanchard)

Japanese 10-cm Model 92 Field Gun, Blackburn Park Army Cadet Cam.

The Japanese Type 92 10-cm was a field gun used by the Imperial Japanese Army during the Second Sino-Japanese War and the Second World War.  The Type 92 number was designated for the year the gun was accepted, 2592 in the Japanese imperial year calendar, or 1932 in the Gregorian calendar.  The Type 92 cannon was intended to supersede the Type 14 10cm Cannon in front line combat service.  It has all the standard features of the 1930-36 period of Japanese gun design, including a long barrel, short cradle, long trails, and a relatively low silhouette.  In traveling position the tube is retracted by means of a winch and locked to the cradle.  The gun achieves a considerable range with a 35-pound shell in proportion to its unusually low weight.  The Model 92 is stabilized by three spade plates for each trail.  Both spade plates and trail blocks are demountable. Readily recognized by its long slender gun barrel and split carriage trail, the Type 92 10 cm Cannon was designed particularly for long-range fire. The recoil system was hydropneumatic and it had a distinctive three-step interrupted thread breechblock. It fired a 35 pounds (16 kg) shell up to14,200 yards (13,000 m) with standard high-explosive shells, and also had provision for special long-range shells that could reach 20,000 yards (18,000 m) 20,000 yards, as well as chemical, armor-piercing, smoke and incendiary shells.  The gun barrel was extremely long, making field transport very cumbersome.  The gun was normally tractor drawn using its large wooden wheels with solid rubber tires, but could also be pulled by a 5-ton truck. Its greatest drawback was that it had spade plates on each trail leg that had to be pounded into the ground to anchor the gun in place.  The Type 92 10 cm Cannon was very successful and was used for long-range counter-battery and bombardment roles.

 

 (Photo courtesy of Andre Blanchard)

 

Japanese 75-mm Type 38 Field Gun No. 67, (Serial No. 1725), with Limber. 

 

The Type 38 75 mm Field Gun was a 1905 German design which was purchased by the Empire of Japan as the standard field gun of the Imperial Japanese Army at the end of the Russo-Japanese War.  The Type 38 designation was given to this gun as it was accepted in the 38th year of Emperor Meiji's reign (1905).

 

Royal Military College, Kingston, Ontario

German Second World War 8.8-cm FlaK 37 AA Gun captured near near Bayeux, France, 26 Aug 1944, being examined by Canadian soldiers.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3396244)

German Second World War 8.8-cm Flak 37 Anti-Aircraft Gun, (Serial Nr. R5456) 1042 CXX (120), Crerar Crescent.

German Second World War 8.8-cm Panzerabwehrkanone 43 (8.8-cm Pak 43) Anti-Tank Gun, Breeching Ring (Serial Nr. R1243), Crerar Crescent.

A Canadian infantryman examining an earth-emplaced German Second World War 8.8-cm anti-tank gun in the Hitler Line near Aquino, Italy, 25 May 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3394420)

Lisle, Ontario

 (Photos courtesy of Sgt R.J. Cosgrove)

German Second World War 8.8-cm PaK 43/41 Anti-Tank Gun, Royal Canadian Legion Branch 559, 8439 Main Street West, County Road No. 12, just outside the West Gate of CFB Borden.  Possibly (Serial No. R252) shipped to Canada ca. Mar 1945 (TBC).

Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, Ontario

 

German Second World War 7.5-cm leichtes Infanteriegeschütz 18 Light Infantry Gun (7.5-cm leIG 18)short-barrelled Field Gun stamped with German emblem, 2682, (Serial No. R1285), 1927

German Second World War 8.1-cm Schwerer Granatwerfer 34 (s.Gr.W.34) Mortar.

German Second World War 7.92-mm MG 42 machine-gun.

German Second World War 2-cm FlaK 30 AA Gun AA Gun 1936, (Serial No. 466).

German Second World War 2-cm Flakvierling 38, FlaK 38 AA Gun, Rheinmetall (Serial No. 10660), W646, W648, mounted on a wheeled trailer.

German Second World War 8.8-cm FlaK 37 Anti-Aircraft Gun, (Serial No. R534), Gallery 3.

German Second World War Rheintochter Surface to Air Missile.

German Second World War Rheintochter Surface to Air Missile, on display at RCAF Station Clinton, Ontario, 1962.  (Photo courtesy of Wayne Vail)

German Second World War Rheintochter Surface to Air Missile, ca 1972.

German Second World War 2.8-cm schwere Panzerbüchse 41 AT Gun sPzB 41 AT Gun, (Serial No. BpK 1333), stamped 9/277, MEL 600.  This Gun was collected in Northwest Europe before 12 Oct 1944 and shipped to Canada from CMHQ in the UK after 7 Nov 1944.

German/Austrian Second World War 4.7-cm Böhler Da 44/32 M35 AT Gun, (Serial No. 35447).

German Second World War 3.7-cm PaK 36 AT Gun , Rheinmetall, (Serial No. 1937), RMB 14182.

German Second World War 5-cm PaK 38 (L/60) AT Gun., Rheinmetall Borsig, (Serial No.  R8435), 1942.

German Second World War 5-cm Nebelwerfer 41, six-barrelled Multiple Rocket Launcher, captured by Canadian troops near Fleury-sur-Orne, France, 20 July 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3394488)

German Second World War 5-cm Nebelwerfer 41, six-barrelled Multiple Rocket Launcher.

German Second World War 21-cm Nebelwerfer 42 five-barrelled Multiple Rocket Launcher, 1944, BEQ 43, 988, FeH 43.

German Second World War 7.5-cm Leichtgeschütz 40, (LG 40) Recoilless Rifle, Airborne Forces, stamped FL 390, BWO, Eagle and swastika, (Serial No. 4116/R287JT/F1390).

German Second World War 8.8-cm Raketenwerfer 43 “Puppchen” (hollow charge rocket launcher), 1943, (Serial No.  RW 3935).

German Schwimmwagen captured by the South Saskatchewan Regiment, Rocquancoourt, France, 11 Aug 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3396197)

German Schwimmwagen.

German undapp KS 750 motorcycle with side-car.

German Kettenrad tracked motorcycle.

German Second World War Panzer Kampwagen Mk IA light tank, Fahrgestell Nr. 9857, Vak TZ 617-9857 armed with two Model 34 tank MGs mounted in the turret.  This tank was found in a dump of obsolete German AFV's near the Krupp Ranges at Bremen where it had been used in comparative tests with more modern tanks.  Nr. 9857 was collected by Capt Farley Mowat and his DHH Intelligence Collection Team in 1945.  The AFV was complete except for the guns, magneto and some turret control equipment.  According to Farley's documents it was a "probable runner" and was on display on 15 March 1946 in front of Building A33 at Camp Borden, Ontario.  Nr. 9857 was later sent to the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa, where it was traded to Jacques Littlefield in California for six pieces of armour that were significant to Canada.  The Panzer I is very rare, but not very relevant to Canada as it was obsolete by the time the majority of the Canadian Army came into contact with the German Army.  In exchznge, the CWM acquired a Staghound Armoured Car, (Type used by Canada), a Churchill tank (Type used by Canada), a Lee M3 tank (Type used by Canada), a Stuart M5A1 tank (Type used by Canada), a Grizzly M4A1 tank (Made in Canada), and thus a "repatriation".  A Ram armoured recovery vehicle (ARV) hulk was to be part of the tradel but there was a problem and another vehicle was provided.  (Colin MacGregor Stevens)

Panzer II and Panzer I, May 1940.  (Bundesarchiv, Bild 101I-382-0248-33A / Böcker / CC-BY-SA)

The Panzer II is the common name used for a family of German tanks used in the Second World War.  The official German designation was Panzerkampfwagen II (abbreviated PzKpfw II).  Although the vehicle had originally been designed as a stopgap while larger, more advanced tanks were developed, it nonetheless went on to play an important role in the early years of the Second World War, during the Polish and French campaigns.  The Panzer II was the most numerous tank in the German Panzer divisions beginning with the invasion of France.  It was used in both North Africa against the British and on the Eastern Front against the Soviet Union.  The Panzer II was supplemented by the Panzer III and IV by 1940/1941.  Thereafter, it was used to great effect as a reconnaissance tank. By the end of 1942 it had been largely removed from front line service and it was used for training and on secondary fronts.  Production of the tank itself ceased by 1943 but its chassis remained in use as the basis of several other armored vehicles, chiefly self-propelled artillery and tank destroyers such as the Wespe and Marder II.

German Second World War Panzer II Light Tank, Call sign 112, 19, G, Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, Ontario.

German Sturmgeschütz III Ausf. G assault guns knocked out by the U.S. 9th Air Force at Mödrath, Northrhine-Wespthalia.  (US Army Photo)

German Second World War Sturmgeschütz 40 Ausf G Assault Gun.  This AFV was brought to Canada by Captain Farley Mowat and his Intelligence Collection Team in 1945.  It was later placed an artillery range where is served as a range target until recovered for the Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, Ontario.

German Second World War Jagdpanzer IV/70 Assault Gu, ca 1944.  (Bundesarchiv Photo)

The Jagdpanzer IV, Sd.Kfz. 162, was a tank destroyer based on the Panzer IV chassis built in three main variants.  As one of the casemate-style turretless Jagdpanzer (tank destroyer, literally "hunting tank") designs, it was developed as a replacement for the Sturmgeschütz III (StuG III).  The L/70-armed vehicle was named Panzer IV/70.

German Second World War Jagdpanzer IV/70 Assault Gun, Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, Ontario.

German Panther V tank knocked out by Canadians, 8 June 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3405774).  Panther is the common name of a medium tank deployed by Nazi Germany in the Second World War from mid-1943 to the end of the European war in 1945.  It was intended as a counter to the Soviet T-34, and as a replacement for the Panzer III and Panzer IV.  While never replacing the latter, it served alongside it and the heavier Tiger tanks until the end of the war. The Panther's excellent combination of firepower, mobility, and protection served as a benchmark for other nations' late war and post-war tank designs, and it is regarded as one of the best tanks of the Second World War.

German Second World War Panzer V Panther Ausf A Main Battle Tank.  This tank was previously on display at CFB Borden, Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, Ontario

Privates M. Voske and H. Browne of the Calgary Highlanders examining a captured German radio-controlled Goliath tracked mine, Goes, Netherlands, 30 October 1944.  (Capt Ken Bell Photo, Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 321598)

German Second World War Goliath Tracked Mine.

German Second World War Mercedes Staff Car.

Italian Second World War 45-mm 45/5 Modello 35 Brixia Light Trench Mortar.

Italian Second World War 81-mm Mortaio da 81/14 Modello 35  Mortar.

Japanese Second World War 20-mm Type 98 AA machine-gun/cannon, (Serial No. 177/836) (1).

Japanese Second World War 75-mm Type 41 Mountain Gun, 1908, (Serial No. 10441), 799.

CFB Petawawa, Ontario

German Second World War 2.8-cm schwere Panzerbüchse 41 Anti-Tank Gun (2.8-cm sPzB 41) Anti-Tank Gun (Serial No. 2556).  The barrel has a separate number, (Serial No. 52536)  This gun is on loan from the RCA Museum CFB Shilo, Manitoba.

German Second World War 5-cm PaK 38 (L/60) AT Gun (Serial Nr. TBC), corroded, Menin Road.

German Second World War 7.5-cm PaK 40 AT Gun, (Serial Nr. R2595), 1942 beg, stamped BS:Fl1736fqv, Vr:FL200bej, Menin Road.

German Second World War 8.8-cm FlaK 37 AA Gun, (Serial Nr. R3864), stamped BS: Sg563492 RL1084bxe F1318beb, M:F1317beb, S:F1317beb on the breeching ring, North of the Main Gate.

German Second World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 18 Heavy Field Howitzer, (Serial Nr. R3079), shell strike on the remaining numbers on the breeching ring, Menin Road.

CFB Valcartier, Québec

 (Photo courtesy of Chadley Wagar) (Photo courtesy of James Simmonds)

German Second World War 7.5-cm PaK 40 Anti-Tank Gun, in front of the Warrant Officer’s and Sgt’s Mess.

CFB Gagetown, New Brunswick

German Second World War 17-ton 17-cm Kanone 18 (K 18) in Mörserlafette (on a big gun carriage), (Serial No. R320), sent from Europe to Aberdeen, and then to Canada in 1945.  This gun was shipped from Aberdeen in the USA on 3 Mar 1945, along with a new spare barrel.  It was located in the Munitions Experimental Test Centre (CEEM), until it was transferred to the NBMHM, CFB Gagetown, on 4 Dec 2012.  Once it has been restored, it will be displayed at the New Brunswick Military History Museum (NBMHM) on Base.  These guns were of the same type used against gunners from Saint John, New Brunswick in the battles in Italy in 1943.  The bye marking on the gun is the manufacturers code for HANOMAG-Hannover'sche Maschinenbau AG vorm. Georg Egestorff, Hannover.  This company manufactured approximately 300 of these guns from 1941 onwards (before then, they were built by the Krupp firm).

Italian 75-mm Cannone da 75/27 modello 06 Field Gun, Gio. Ansaldo & C., Genova 1916, FCA 1099, MLA 3432, KG 345.  This gun is on display in the Museum's outdoor park.

The Cannone da 75/27 modello 06 was a field gun used by Italy during both World Wars.  It was a license-built copy of the Krupp Kanone M 1906 gun.  It had seats for two crewmen attached to the gunshield as was common practice for the period.  Captured weapons were designated by the Wehrmacht during the Second World War as the 7.5 cm Feldkanone 237(i).  Many guns were modernized for tractor-towing with pressed-steel wheels and rubber rims.  These weighed some 65 kilograms (143 lb) more than the original version with spoked wooden wheels.  The gun is reported to have had a 10 km range.

Japanese 70-mm Type 92 Battalion Gun, inside museum.  On loan from the RCA Museum, CFB Shilo, Manitoba.

The Type 92 Battalion Gun was a light howitzer used by the Imperial Japanese Army during the Second Sino-Japanese War and the Second World War.  The Type 92 number was designated for the year the gun was accepted, 2592 in the Japanese imperial year calendar, or 1932 in the Gregorian calendar.  Each infantry battalion included two Type 92 guns; therefore, the Type 92 was referred to as Battalion Artillery.  This gun was probably found in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska that had been occupied by the Japanese and retaken by a combined Canadian – American force in 1943.

German Second World War coastal artillery gun examined by a Canadian soldier from the North Shore Regiment, Boulogne, France, 21 Sep 1944.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3229663

Captured Italian Second World War Trophies

Italian Second World War Breda machine-gun examined by Canadians, Syracuse, Italy, 11 Aug 1943.  (Library and Archives Canada photo, MIKAN No. 3509521

First Special Service Force Commandos with captured Italian Second World War weapons, Anzio, Italy, 20 Apr 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3396063)

Captured German Second World War Aircraft Trophies
German Second World War Fieseler FZG-76/Fi-103 V-1 Flying Bomb, RCAF Station Clinton, Ontario, 1962.  (Photo courtesy of Wayne Vail)

 

German Second World War Fieseler FZG-76/Fi-103 V-1 Flying Bomb War Prize in the Atlantic Canada Aviation Museum, near the airport for Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Captain Mowat’s Intelligence Collection Team brought back two V-1s.  On was found on a freight car which was almost intact among a string of burnt and shelled trains about 15 miles south-west of Nienburg, Germany, having been apparently shot up by the Allied Tactical Air Force (TAF).  It was very slightly burnt, and missing its war-head and air log.  It was sent to Valcartier for evaluation.  The second V-1 was found in the V works at Dannenberg, Germany.  It was complete with a mock war-head and spare parts, and was also sent to Valcartier.

German Second World War Fieseler FZG-76/Fi-103 V-1 Reichenburg IV piloted Buzz Bomb brought to Canada in 1945 by Captain Farley Mowat's Intelligence Collection Team, shown here on display on Air Force Day, (possibly Trenton), Ontario, 16 June 1947.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584067)
 
German Second World War Fieseler FZG-76/Fi 103 V-1 Reichenburg IV and Messerschmitt Me 262 jet engine, Air Force Day, (possibly Rockcliffe), Ontario, 9 June 1951.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584520)

German Second World War Fieseler FZG-76/Fi-103 V-1 Reichenburg IV piloted Flying Bomb aka "Buzz Bomb", War Prize in the Canadian War Museum, Ottawa.

 (Photo courtesy of Kogo)

Fritz X was the most common name for a German guided anti-ship glide bomb used during the Second World War.  Fritz X was a nickname used both by Allied and Luftwaffe personnel.  Alternate names include Ruhrstahl SD 1400 X, Kramer X-1, PC 1400X or FX 1400 (the latter is also the origin for the name “Fritz X”).  It is one of the precursors of today’s anti-ship missiles and precision-guided weapons.  The Canadian War Museum has one Ruhrstahl SD 1400 X, CWM (Artifact No. 19390002-150) marked Einbauahmen Reb 30B on an identification plate, Garat Nr. 124-909C, Anferordez. LN 29 066, (Werk Nr. 91921), Herstaller KSH, and G.5088, 6 over 2, N26357 on the body.

USS Savannah (CL-42) is hit by a German radio-controlled glide bomb, while supporting Allied forces ashore during the Salerno operation, 11 September 1943.  The bomb hit the top of the ship's number three 6”/47 gun turret and penetrated deep into her hull before exploding.  The photograph shows the explosion venting through the top of the turret and also through Savannah's hull below the waterline.  A motor torpedo boat (PT) is passing by in the foreground.  (USN Photo)

Hugh Dundas, a distinguished fighter pilot of the Second World War (he was a Squadron Leader at age 21 and ended the war as a Group Captain) took part in the invasion of Italy when his Wing moved to the north coast of Sicily to cover the landing at Salerno.  During this operation, he observed the use of a German radio-controlled bomb during the Invasion of Italy on 3 Sep 1943.  “On 11 September the American battle-cruiser USS Savannah was critically damaged by a new German weapon - a radio-controlled ‘flying bomb’ which was launched from a distance and guided electronically onto its target.  Five days later the mighty British battleship HMS Warspite suffered the same fate.  I saw this great ship, surrounded by a huddle of destroyers which had to be withdrawn from support of the landings, creeping wounded through the Messina Straits on its way to Malta, where it remained disabled for many months.  This sensational revelation of a successful secret weapon probably did not have much real effect on the conduct of the Salerno campaign as a whole; but its psychological effect was considerable, coming at a time when the whole enterprise, launched with such confidence, was in jeopardy.”  Dundas, Hugh.  Flying Start A Fighter Pilot’s War Years, (New York, St. Martin’s Press, 1989), page 131.

Heinkel He 162, 120222.

Heinkel He 162, 120086.

Heinkel He 162, RAF markings, 1945.

German Second World War Heinkel He 162A-1 Volksjager (Wk Nr. 120076), War Prize, in the Canada Air & Space Museum, Ottawa.

German Second World War Messerschmitt Bf 109F in RAF markings, 1945.

German Second World War Messerschmitt Bf 109F-4 (Wk Nr. 10132).  Canada Air & Space Museum, Ottawa.

German Second World War Messerschmitt Me 163.

German Second World War Messerschmitt Me 163 in RAF markings, 1945.

German Second World War Messerschmitt Me 163B-1a Komet (Wk Nr. 191914), War Prize.  Canada Air & Space Museum, Ottawa.

 

German combat equipment engaged by Canadians during the Second World War

Captured Sturmpanzer IV Brummbär infantry-support gun, France 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3401811).  The Sturmpanzer IV Brummbär 150-millimetre (5.91 in) infantry-support self-propelled gun was based on the Panzer IV chassis.  These vehicles were primarily issued to four Sturmpanzer units (Numbers 216, 217, 218 and 219) and used during the battle of Kursk and in Italy in 1943.  The Wirbelwind (Whirlwin") was a Flakpanzer designed, with enough armour to protect the gun's crew and a rotating turret, armed with the quadruple 20-mm Flakvierling anti-aircraft cannon system; at least 100 were manufactured

Corporal C. Robichaud of Le Régiment de Maisonneuve examining a disabled German Sturmhaubitz 42 105mm. self-propelled gun, Woensdrecht, Netherlands, 27 October 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3205117).  The StuH 42 was a variant of the StuG III Ausf. F designed in 1942.  It was armed with a 105-mm (4.1 in) howitzer instead of the 7.5-cm StuK 40 L/43 cannon.  These vehicles, designated Sturmhaubitze 42, Sd.Kfz 142/2, were designed to provide infantry support with the increased number of StuG III Ausf. F/8 and Ausf. Gs being used in the anti-tank role.  The StuH 42 mounted a variant of the 10.5 cm leFH 18 howitzer, modified to be electrically fired and fitted with a muzzle brake.  Production models were built on StuG III Ausf. G chassis.  The muzzle brake was often omitted due to the scarcity of resources later in the war.  Roughly 1,299 StuH 42 were produced by Alkett from March 1943 to 1945.

German Panzer Mk. IV knocked out near Pontecorvo, Italy, being examined by RCA soldiers, 5th Canadian Armoured Division, 26 May 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3405800).  The Panzerkampfwagen IV (Pz.Kpfw. IV), commonly known as the Panzer IV, was a German medium tank developed in the late 1930s and used extensively during the Second World War.  Its ordnance inventory designation was Sd.Kfz. 161.  Designed as an infantry-support tank, the Panzer IV was not originally intended to engage enemy armor—that function was performed by the lighter Panzer III.  However, with the flaws of pre-war doctrine becoming apparent and in the face of Soviet T-34 tanks, the Panzer IV soon assumed the tank-fighting role of its increasingly obsolete cousin.  The most widely manufactured and deployed German tank of the Second World War, the Panzer IV was used as the base for many other fighting vehicles, including the Sturmgeschütz IV assault gun, Jagdpanzer IV tank destroyer, the Wirbelwind self-propelled anti-aircraft weapon, and the Brummbär self-propelled gun.  Robust and reliable, it saw service in all combat theaters involving Germany and has the distinction of being the only German tank to remain in continuous production throughout the war, with over 8800 produced between 1936 and 1945.  Upgrades and design modifications, often made in response to the appearance of new Allied tanks, extended its service life. Generally, these involved increasing the Panzer IV's armour protection or upgrading its weapons, although during the last months of the war with Germany's pressing need for rapid replacement of losses, design changes also included retrograde measures to simplify and speed manufacture.

Canadian soldiers examining a disabled German Panzer Mk. IV tank, Gruchy, France, 9 Jul 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3226723) 

Trooper M.E. Lucy of The South Alberta Regiment examining a German 75mm. self-propelled gun near Xanten, Germany, 7 March 1945.  (Ken Bell, Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3401784)

Captured German Sd.Kfz. 164 Hornisse/Nashorn mounting the formidable 8.8 cm PAK 43/1 L60, knocked out by Canadian troops of the Westminster Regiment, 5th Canadian Armoured Brigade armed with a portable Infantry anti-tank launcher (PIAT) at Pontecorvo, Italy, 26 May 1946.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3391742).  The Hornisse (Hornet) was a self-propelled artillery gun used by the German Wehrmacht during the Second World War from early 1943 until the end of the war.

Lance-Corporal J.A. Thrasher of The Westminster Regiment (Motor), who holds the PIAT anti-tank weapon with which he disabled the German Sd.Kfz. 164 Hornisse/Nashorn mounting the formidable 8.8 cm PAK 43/1 L60, on which he is sitting, near Pontecorvo, Italy, 26 May 1944. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3231053)

Canadian soldiers with German halftrack, Norderney, Germany, 8 May 1945.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3230904)

German Kubelwagen staff car, 5 May 1945, Wageningen, Netherlands.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3204056)

Canadian War Trophies

War Prize Weapons & Equipment in Canada from the Crimean War, the Fenian Raids, the Boer War, the Great War, the Second World War, the Korean War, the Cold War, the Yugoslav Wars and Afghanistan.                                            

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