Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Axis Warplane Survivors, German Aircraft (Part IV), Messerschmitt to Siebel

Axis Warplane Survivors, German Aircraft (Part IV)

Data current to 17 Dec 2018.

Messerschmitt Me 262s collected by the RAF

Messerschmitt Me 262B-1a/U1 (Wk. Nr. 110305), "Red 8", 10./NJG11, 305, two-seat trainer converted into a provisional night fighter version equipped with FuG 218 Neptun radar and Hirschgeweih (stag antler) eight-dipole antenna array.  This aircraft was collected at Schleswig-Jagel, Germany in May 1945.  "Red 8" flew operationally with Kurt Welters 10./NJG11 at Magdeburg. While at this location it was painted with all-black undersurfaces and mostly black engine nacelles.  "'Red 8" was ferried to the UK on 19 May 1945 by Wg Cdr RJ 'Roly' Falk, via Twente, Gilze-Rijen and Melsbroek.   It was then flown by Wg Cdr Gonsalvez from the RAE to RNAS Ford, and used for radar and tactical trials from 6 July 1945.  Designated AM50, it was later given RAF Serial No. VH519.  It was damaged on its first landing at RNAS Ford, but quickly repaired.   "Red 8" is the only genuine night fighter version of the Me262 which has survived to the present day.  It is currently displayed in the Ditsong National Museum of Military History, Saxonwold, Johannesburg, South Africa.  (RAF Photos)

  (NJR ZA Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262B-1a/U1 (Wk. Nr. 110305), "Red 8", 10./NJG11, 305, two-seat trainer converted into a provisional night fighter version equipped with FuG 218 Neptun radar and Hirschgeweih (stag antler) eight-dipole antenna array.  This aircraft was collected at Schleswig-Jagel, Germany in May 1945.  "Red 8" flew operationally with Kurt Welters 10./NJG11 at Magdeburg. While at this location it was painted with all-black undersurfaces and mostly black engine nacelles.  "'Red 8" was ferried to the UK on 19 May 1945 by Wg Cdr RJ 'Roly' Falk, via Twente, Gilze-Rijen and Melsbroek.   It was then flown by Wg Cdr Gonsalvez from the RAE to RNAS Ford, and used for radar and tactical trials from 6 July 1945.  Designated AM50, it was later given RAF Serial No. VH519.  It was damaged on its first landing at RNAS Ford, but quickly repaired.   "Red 8" is the only genuine night fighter version of the Me262 which has survived to the present day.  It is currently displayed in the Ditsong National Museum of Military History, Saxonwold, Johannesburg, South Africa.  (Alan Wilson Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a "Schwalbe" (Wk. Nr. 112372),"Red 2", 10./NJG11, previously JG7, collected at Schleswig-Jagel, Germany.  This aircraft was built in 1945.  Designated AM51, it was flown to Farnborough where it was allocated RAF Serial No. VK893 and evaluated by the Royal Aircraft Establishment Aerodynamics Flight.  AM51 is currently on display at RAF Hendon, England.  (RAF Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a "Schwalbe" (Wk. Nr. 112372),"Red 2", 10./NJG11, previously JG7, collected at Schleswig-Jagel, Germany.  This aircraft was built in 1945.  Designated AM51, it was flown to Farnborough where it was allocated RAF Serial No. VK893 and evaluated by the Royal Aircraft Establishment Aerodynamics Flight.  AM51 is currently on display at RAF Hendon, England.  (Paul Mantz Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a "Schwalbe" (Wk. Nr. 112372),"Red 2", 10./NJG11, previously JG7, collected at Schleswig-Jagel, Germany.  This aircraft was built in 1945.  Designated AM51, it was flown to Farnborough where it was allocated RAF Serial No. VK893 and evaluated by the Royal Aircraft Establishment Aerodynamics Flight.  AM51 is currently on display at RAF Hendon, England, painted as "Yellow 4".  (UniversalNation Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-2a "Sturmvogel" (Wk. Nr. 500210), coded "Red 1", painted "Yellow 17", 1./JG 7, surrendered at Fassberg, near Celle, Germany, and taken over by No. 616 Squadron, RAF.  Designated AM52, it was flown to Lübeck on 29 May 1945, then ferried to Schleswig-Jagel, and then on to Farnborough on 9 June 1945.  It was allocated RAF Serial No. VH509 on 14 June, and made at least one test flight in July at Brize Norton.  AM 52 was shipped to Canada from Ellesmere Port on board the SS Manchester Shipper on 23 August 1946, arriving at Montréal on 1 September.  AM 52 was sold to Cameron Logan of New Scotland, Ontario, about 1947, with 300 other war-surplus RCAF aircraft, and was eventually scrapped by him at New Scotland.  (RAF Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-2a "Sturmvogel" (Wk. Nr. 500210), coded "Red 1", painted "Yellow 17", 1./JG 7, RAF VH509, AM52.  AM 52 shown hee disassembled at Downsview, Ontario after 1 Sep 1945.  AM 52 was sold to Cameron Logan of New Scotland, Ontario, about 1947, with 300 other war-surplus RCAF aircraft, and was eventually scrapped by him at New Scotland.  (Leslie Corness, CANAV Books Collection Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262B-1a/U1 (Wk. Nr. 111980) "Red 12", 10./NJG11, two-seat trainer converted into a provisional night fighter version equipped with FuG 218 Neptun radar and Hirschgeweih (stag antler) eight-dipole antenna array.  "Red 12" was flown by Lt Herbert Altner to Schleswig-Jagel, Germany, on 6 May 1945, where it was collected by the RAF.  This aircraft was taken to England, and designated AM53.  It was destroyed during a storm at Brize Norton in 1947.  The remains were scrapped at Sealand in 1948.  (RAF Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 262B-1a/U1 (Wk. Nr. 111007), coded "Yellow 5", captured at Fassberg.  Designated AM79, this aircraft was scrapped at Fassberg.  (RAF Photos)

 (RAF Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a "Schwalbe" (Wk. Nr. 111690), coded "White 5", 1./JG 7, was built by Messerschmitt at Schwabisch Hall.  It had been flown by Fritz Stehle, who was responsible for the last kill of the war, after arriving there from Melsbroek on 5 August 1945.  It was surrendered at Fassberg and was transferred to Farnborough via Manston on 6 and 7 August.

 (RAF Photo)

 (RAF Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a "Schwalbe" (Wk. Nr. 111690), coded "White 5", 1./JG 7, repainted in RAF markings and designated AM80.  It later appeared in a static display during a German Aircraft Exhibition in the UK in 1945.  AM80 was packed and shipped to Canada on SS Manchester Shipper on 23 August 1946, arriving in Montréal on 1 September 1946.

 (RCAF Photo)

  (RCAF Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a "Schwalbe" (Wk. Nr. 111690), coded "White 5", 1./JG 7, repainted in RAF markings and designated AM80, shown after its arrival in Canada, alongside an RCAF de Havilland Mosquito

 (Cameron Logan Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a "Schwalbe" (Wk. Nr. 111690), coded "White 5", 1./JG 7, AM80, eventually came into the hands of Mr. Logan of Aylmer, Ontario as shown in this photo.  He kept it behind his home until at least 1953.  Eventually it was destroyed and the remains were buried on his property.

Messerschmitt Me 262A-2a  "Sturmvogel" (Wk. Nr. 500200), "Black X", coded 9K+XK, 2./KG 51, built at Regensburg in March 1945.  Flown by Fahnenjunker Oberfeldwebel Fröhlich and surrendered at Fassberg.  "Black X" was flown to Marston, via Melsbroek on 28 August 1945.  Nine days later it was test flown to the Royal Aircraft Establishment in Farnborough, where it was designated AM81.  It was allocated RAF Serial No. VP554, and subjected to tests and investigation, flown by Squadron Leader Martindale.  While in British hands, the Luftwaffe camouflage was over-painted with English wording and RAF roundels.  The airframe and flight systems were not modified, although the original German electronics were removed and replaced by British equipment.  This meant that the FuG.25 Loop Antenna was removed.  It was flown in an airshow at Farnborough on 4 November 1945.  It was shipped to Australia.  Restoration was completed in 1985 and the aircraft is currently on display in the Australian War Memorial, Canberra, Australia.  (Universal Nation Photo)


Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a "Schwalbe" (Wk. Nr. 500443), "Yellow 5", 7./JG7, this aircraft was flown by Unterofficier Anton Schoppler from his base at Saaz  and surrendered at Schleswig-Jagel, Germany on 8 May 1945.  Designated USA 1, this aircraft was brought to England. and was repainted "Yellow 6" at some point.  USA 1 was shipped from Birkenhead, England to Capetown, South Africa on the SS Perthshire on 20 Oct 1946, arriving on 6 Nov.  After acceptance by the SAAF it was stored at 15 Air Depot, Snake Valley and during 1950 it was  sold to the Benoni Technical College as an instructional airframe.  It was scrapped in 1953.  (RAF Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 262B-1a (there are at least six possible Wk. Nrs. 110779, 110979, 111053, 111471 and 111980), 10./NJGJ11, two-seat trainer surrendered to the RAF at Schleswig-Jagel, Germany, in May 1945, designated USA 2 by the RAF.  Fate unknown.  Note: Wk. Nr. 110639, became Watson's Whizzers No. 555.  (RAF Photo)

 

Messerschmitt Me 262B-1a/U1 (Wk. Nr.  110306), "Red 6", 10./NJGJ11, two-seat trainer converted into a provisional night fighter version equipped with FuG 218 Neptun radar and Hirschgeweih (stag antler) eight-dipole antenna array.  Seven of these aircraft were used by 10/NJG.II in the defence of Berlin in April 1945.  "Red 6" was surrendered to the RAF at Schleswig-Jagel, Germany.  It was transferred to the USAAF and became Watson's Whizzers 999.  It was shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper and then allocated FE-610, later T2-610.  Later named "Ole Fruit Cake", and "der Schwalbe".  FE-610 was scrapped at Freeman Field, Indiana, circa 1950.  (RAF Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 262B-1a/U1 (Wk. Nr. 110165), uncoded, possibly 10./NJG11, two-seat trainer surrendered to the RAF at Schleswig-Jagel, Germany, in May 1945, designated USA 3 by the RAF, "What was it?".  Transferred to the USAAF, Watson's Whizzers 101.  Shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper, where it was allocated Foreign Equipment number FE-109.  This aircraft went to the USN Armament Test Division at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland in Dec 1945 where it was designated USN BuNo. 121441 and test flown.  It was scrapped at NAS Anacostia, Nov 1946.  (RAF Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 262B-1a/U1 (Wk. Nr. 110635), "Red 10", 10./NJG11, two-seat trainer converted into a provisional night fighter version equipped with FuG 218 Neptun radar and Hirschgeweih (stag antler) eight-dipole antenna array.  "Red 10" was one of three night fighters captured at Schleswig-Jagel, Germany.  Designated USA 4, this aircraft may have been brought to England, where it was likely used as a ballistics target at Oxfordness.  It was reportedly scrapped at No. 6 Maintenance Unit (MU) at Brize Norton in 1947.  (RAF Photos)

Czech Avia S-92s

 (AlfvanBeem Photo)

Avia S-92, Aviation Museum Kbely, Prague, Czech Republic.  (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Avia CS-92, Aviation Museum Kbely, Prague, Czech Republic.  The Avia CS-92 was a license built Messerschmitt Me262B-1A. This sole remaining example has been painted in Luftwaffe markings.  Czech AF (Serial No. V-35 msn 51104).  (Netopyr Photo)

French Me 262s

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a, (Wk. Nr. unknown), No. 1, brought by rail to France and rebuilt, test flown, fate unknown.

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a, (Wk. Nr. 113332), No. 2, “Feudin 54th A.D. Sq”, "Julie", before being transferred to the French Air Force (Armée de l'Air), test flown, crashed on during a test flight, fate unknown.  (USAAF Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a, (Wk. Nr. 113332), No. 2, “Feudin 54th A.D. Sq”, "Julie", after being transferred to the French Air Force (Armée de l'Air), shortly after crashing during a test flight, fate unknown.  (Armée de l'Air Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a, (Wk. Nr. unknown), No. 3, brought by rail to France and rebuilt, test flown, fate unknown.

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a, (Wk. Nr. unknown), No. 4, brought by rail to France and rebuilt.  Ready to fly but not test flown, fate unknown.

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a, (Wk. Nr. unknown), No. 5, brought by rail to France and used for spare parts, fate unknown.

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a, (Wk. Nr. unknown), No. 6, brought by rail to France and partially rebuilt, fate unknown.

Messerschmitt Me 262B-1a/U1, (Wk. Nr. unknown), No. 7, dual control two-seat trainer, brought by rail to France and rebuilt.  Ready to fly but not test flown, fate unknown.

Me 262s preserved in Germany

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a, (Wk. Nr. 500071) coded "White 3", III/JG7.  This aircraft made an emergency landing due to lack of fuel at Dübendorf, Switzerland on 25 April 1945.  Flown by Hans Guido Mutke while a pilot of 9. Staffel/JG 7, "White 3" was confiscated by Swiss authorities on 25 April 1945 after Mutke made an emergency landing in Switzerland due to lack of fuel.  Although it was taken over by the Swiss, it was not flown by them.  After many years of storage at Dübendorf, the aircraft was given to the Deutsches Museum at Munich on 30 August 1957, where it is currently on display.  (Swiss Air Force Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a, (Wk. Nr. 500071) coded "White 3", III/JG7 made an emergency landing due to lack of fuel at Dübendorf, Switzerland on 25 April 1945.  This aircraft, flown by Hans Guido Mutke while a pilot of 9. Staffel/JG 7, was confiscated by Swiss authorities on 25 April 1945 after Mutke made an emergency landing in Switzerland due to lack of fuel.  Although it was taken over by the Swiss, it was not flown by them.  After many years of storage at Dübendorf, the aircraft was given to the Deutsches Museum at Munich on 30 August 1957, where it is currently on display.  (Softeis Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a (multiple Wk. Nrs.), reconstructed from parts of crashed and uncompleted Me 262s, is on display in the Militärhistorisches Museum der Bundeswehr - Flugplatz Berlin-Gatow (Bundeswehr Museum of Military History - Berlin-Gatow Airfield), Germany.

Messerschmitt Me 262 Schwalbe, (Wk. Nr. unknown), with R4M underwing rockets on display at the Technikmuseum Speyer, Germany.  (MisterBee1966 Photo)

Me 262s captured by the USAAF

Messerschmitt Me 262A-2a Schwalbe, (Wk. Nr. 112385), "Yellow 8", captured at Stendal, fate unknown.  (US Army Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a, (Wk. Nr. 110604), Lechfeld, 1945.  (USAAF Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a, (Wk. Nr. 110956), IIIEJG2, "White 17", Franz-Holzinger, Lechfeld 29 Apr 1945.  This aircraft may have been flown by Heinz Bar.  (USAAF Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a Schwalbe, (Wk. Nr. 500079) captured by the USAAF, May 1945.  (USAAF Photo)

Me 262s, USA

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a "Schwalbe" (Wk. Nr. 111711).  This new airframe had been surrendered on 31 March 1945 by Messerschmitt test pilot Hans Fay who defected during a functional check flight rather than fly it to an operational unit, landing at Rhein-Main, Frankfurt.  It was the first Me 262 to fall into Allied hands.  The Me 262 was taken to Thornville, France, and shipped separately to USA on the Manawaska Victory.  It was not one of Watson's Whizzers.  The Me 262 was allocated Foreign Equipment number FE-107, and later T2-711.  It was test flown by Russell E. Schleeh shortly after its capture.  This aircraft was flown by Test Pilot Walter J. McAuley Jr. of the Flight Performance Section, Flight Test Division, Wright Field, Ohio, in a test flight for comparison with a Lockheed P-80.  During the flight both engines of the Me 262 caught fire.  McAuley, Jr., successfully parachuted to safety, surviving as the aircraft crashed on 20 Aug 1945 ~two miles South of Xenia, Ohio near Route 68.  (USAAF Photos)

Watson's Whizzers

Throughout the war in Europe, the US Army Air Force (USAAF) Intelligence Service sent teams to Europe to gain access to enemy aircraft, technical and scientific reports, research facilities, and weapons for study in the US.  The Air Technical Intelligence (ATI) teams trained at the Technical Intelligence School at Wright Field, Ohio, and then collected enemy equipment to learn about Germany’s technical developments. The ATI teams competed with 32 allied technical intelligence groups to gain information and equipment recovered from crash sites.  As the war concluded, the various intelligence teams, including the ATI, shifted from tactical intelligence to post hostilities investigations. Exploitation intelligence increased dramatically.

Captured Luftwaffe airfields rewarded the Allies with many aircraft that were technologically advanced and of great interest to intelligence agencies.  In November 1944, General H.H. “Hap” Arnold directed that items of captured enemy equipment be collected methodically so technical experts could study the equipment.  At Wright Field, the Technical Data Laboratory worked with the other laboratories to develop a “wish list” of German equipment they would like to have for technological study and exploitation.  Colonel Donald L. Putt was in charge of the overall collection effort known as Project Lusty, and General Carl “Tooey” Spaatz, the Commanding General of U.S. Strategic Air Forces in Europe, picked Colonel Harold E Watson for the assignment.  Colonel Watson had previously served at Wright Field as a test pilot as well as 9th Air Force Service Command in France.

On 22 April 1945, the USAAF combined technical and post-hostilities intelligence objectives under the Exploitation Division with the aim of exploiting captured German scientific documents, research facilities, and aircraft.  The code name of the operation was Project “Lusty (from Luftwaffe Secret Technology).  The Operation had two teams.  One, under the leadership of Colonel Watson, collected enemy aircraft and weapons for further examination in the US.  The other recruited scientists, collected documents, and investigated facilities.  Having been part of ATI in 1944, Colonel Watson eagerly accepted the Operation Lusty assignment. 

General Watson’s official travel orders allowed him to examine or remove any captured aircraft or equipment; carry a camera and photograph any captured equipment; and travel anywhere in the Allied Forces occupied zone.  His pass was printed in English, French, and German.

Colonel Watson and his crew, nicknamed “Watson’s Whizzers,” which was comprised of 9th Air Force pilots, engineers, and maintenance men he had selected to join him, developed “Black Lists” which they used to collect aircraft.  He organized his “Whizzers” into two sections, one collected jet aircraft and the other procured piston engine aircraft and non-flyable jet and rocket equipment.  Their first catch was a Heinkel He 177 bomber.  In April 1945, Lechfeld airfield, near the Messerschmitt factory, fell into American hands, and the collection of Luftwaffe aircraft grew dramatically.

After the war, the “Whizzers” added a crew of 25 former Luftwaffe test pilots and mechanics to their team, including Hauptman Heinz Braun.  Hauptman Braun had flown 70 women, children, and wounded troops to Munich-Riem airport on 8 May 1945.  After he landed, Braun was approached by one of Watson’s men who gave him the choice of either going to a prison camp or flying with the “Whizzers.”  Braun decided flying would be more preferable.  Three Messerschmitt employees also joined the “Whizzers,” with Karl Baur, the Chief Test Pilot of Experimental Aircraft; test pilot Ludwig “Willie” Huffman; and engineering superintendent, Gerhard Coulis.  Test pilot Herman Kersting joined later.  When the “Whizzers” located nine Me 262 jet aircraft at Lechfeld airfield, these Luftwaffe test pilots had the expertise to fly them.

Watson’s men traveled far and wide over Europe by jeep and occasionally by air to find the aircraft on the “Black Lists.”  Some of the aircraft were found in flyable condition.  Others had to be reconstructed from remnants of other aircraft.  Many aircraft were shipped to the United States aboard the British carrier HMS Reaper.  The most viable harbour for docking the carrier and loading the various aircraft was at Cherbourg, France.  The “Whizzers” flew the Me 262s and other aircraft from Lechfeld to St. Dizier, to Melun, and then to Cherbourg.  All the aircraft were cocooned against the salt air and weather, loaded onto HMS Reaper, and brought to the US where they were studied by the Air Intelligence groups of both the USAAF and US Navy.

Many of the “Whizzers” named aircraft after family and friends.  General Watson named one of the captured Me 262s the “Happy Hunter” after his son.  MSgt Freiburger named three of the planes, including “Dennis,” for his son; “Wilma Jeanne,” after his wife; and “Vera,” for a sister-in-law.  Me 262A-1a/U4 Schwalbe, (Wk. Nr. 170083) had  “Wilma Jeanne” on the port side of the aircraft.  All of these refurbished Me 262s had “Feudin 54th A.D. Sq” painted on the starboard side by MSgt Eugene Freiburger.  This aircraft crashed at Tilleul-Dame-Agnes, Eure in France on 18 June 1945 (the pilot survived) and therefore never came to the USA.

40 German and one American aircraft were transported on board HMS Reaper, including ten Messerschmitt Me 262,(including nine Messerschmitt Me 262 (three standard fighters, two two-seat pilot training aircraft, one two-seat night fighter, and three photographic reconnaissance aircraft), five Focke-Wulf Fw 190F, four Focke-Wulf Fw 190D, one Focke-Wulf Ta 152H, four Arado Ar 234B, three Heinkel He 219, three Messerschmitt Bf 109, two Dornier Do 335A, two Bücker Bü 181, one Doblhoff WNF 342 helicopter, two Flettner Fl 282 helicopters, one Junkers Ju 88G, one Junkers Ju 388, one Messerschmitt Bf 108, and one North American F-6 (the photo reconnaissance version of the P-51).  The balance of about ten aircraft may have included examples of the Heinkel He 162A, Messerschmitt Me 163B-1a, and the Bachem Ba 349 Natter, which were later transported to the US aboard merchant ships.  A Junkers Ju 290A four-engine transport, nicknamed “Alles Kaput,” was flown on its own across the Atlantic.

In 1945, the enemy aircraft shipped to the US were divided between the Navy and the Army Air Forces.  For historical purposes, General Hap Arnold ordered the preservation of one of every type of aircraft used by the enemy forces.  The Air Force brought their aircraft to Wright Field, and when the field could no longer handle additional aircraft, many were sent to Freeman Field, Seymour, Indiana.

 

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a/U4 Schwalbe, (Wk. Nr. 170083), "V083", "Pulkzerstörer", armed with one 50-mm Mauser Mk. 214 cannon.   USAAF "Feudin 54" A.D Sq was painted on the port side of the nose of all the refurbished Me 262s, later painted over before leaving Lager Lechfeld Flugplatz and being shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper.  This aircraft became Watson's Whizzers No. 000, with the name "Wilma Jeanne" on the starboard side of the nose, later the "Happy Hunter II".  This aircraft crashed on a flight from Lechfield, Germany to Cherbourg.  (Andrew T. Hill Photo 1, before being painted with Feudin 54th artwork, USAAF Photo 2)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a/U4 Schwalbe, (Wk. Nr. 170083), "V083", "Pulkzerstörer", armed with one 50-mm Mauser Mk. 214 cannon.   USAAF "Feudin 54" A.D Sq was painted on the port side of the nose of all the refurbished Me 262s, later painted over before leaving Lager Lechfeld Flugplatz and being shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper.  This aircraft became Watson's Whizzers No. 000, with the name "Wilma Jeanne" on the starboard side of the nose, later the "Happy Hunter II".  This aircraft crashed on a flight from Lechfield, Germany to Cherbourg.  (USAAF Photos)

 

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a/U4 Schwalbe, (Wk. Nr. 170083), "V083", "Pulkzerstörer", armed with one 50-mm Mauser Mk. 214 cannon.   USAAF "Feudin 54" A.D Sq was painted on the port side of the nose of all the refurbished Me 262s, later painted over before leaving Lager Lechfeld Flugplatz and being shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper.  This aircraft became Watson's Whizzers No. 000, with the name "Wilma Jeanne" on the starboard side of the nose, later the "Happy Hunter II".  This aircraft crashed on a flight from Lechfield, Germany to Cherbourg.  (USAAF Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a/U4, (Wk. Nr. unknown), "Pulkzerstörer", bomber destroyer version armed with one 50-mm Mauser Mk. 214 cannon.   USAAF "Feudin 54 A.D Sq".  Possibly shipped to the USA, fate unknown.  (USAAF Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a "Schwalbe" (Wk. Nr. 501232), "Yellow 5", 3./KG(J)6, with homeland defence checkerboard pattern on the rear fuselage.  This aircraft was designated Watson's Whizzers No. 111, and was painted as "Beverly Anne", later "Screamin Meemie".  "Yellow 5" was shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper, with inventory control No. 20.  This aircraft was sent to the USN Armament Test Division at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland in Dec 1945 where it was designated USN BuNo. 121442 and test flown.  It is now on display in the National Museum of the USAF.  (USAAF Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a "Schwalbe" (Wk. Nr. 501232), "Yellow 5", 3./KG(J)6.  This aircraft was designated Watson's Whizzers No. 111, and was painted as "Beverly Anne", later "Screamin Meemie".  "Yellow 5" was shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper,  with inventory control No. 20.  This aircraft was sent to the USN Armament Test Division at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland in Dec 1945 where it was designated USN BuNo. 121442 and test flown.  It is now on display in the National Museum of the USAF.  (USAAF Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a "Schwalbe" (Wk. Nr. 501232), coded "Yellow 5", 3./KG(J)6, designated Watson's Whizzers No. 111, on display in the National Museum of the USAF.  (National Museum of the USAF Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a/U3 (Wk. Nr. unknown), "White 30", reconnaissance version modified with bulges on the nose to accommodate film magazines for two Rb 20/30 cameras.  U3 (Umrüst-Bausatz 3, Factory Modification Kit No. 3).  Watson's Whizzers 222, "Marge", later "Lady Jess IV".  It was flown by Capt Kenneth Dahlstrom.  Artwork was painted on the nose with a picture of Donald Duck circling the globe on a jet engine, with "Watson’s Whizzers" in print.  "White 30" was shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper.  It was allocated FE-108, then transferred to the USN where it was allocated BuNo. 121443.   It was written off at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland on its first test flight on 7 Nov 1945.  (USAAF Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a "Schwalbe" (Wk. Nr. 111367), Watson's Whizzers 333, "Feuding 54th", later "Pauline", and "Deelovely".  This aircraft went to the USN A&T Division, Flight Test Division, NAS Patuxent River, Maryland in Dec 1945, where it was allocated USN BuNo. 121444 and test flown.  It was transferred to Naval Proving Ground, Dahlgren Junction  on 11 Oct 1946.  This Me 262 was displayed at NAS Anacostia, then left outside the Naval Laboratory in Washington, D.C., where it stood derelict until it was apparently scrapped sometime after 27 Jan 1957.  (USAAF Photos)

 

 

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a/U3 (Wk. Nr. 500453), coded "White 25", reconnaissance version modified with bulges on the nose to accommodate film magazines for two Rb 20/30 cameras.  U3 (Umrüst-Bausatz 3, Factory Modification Kit No. 3).  Prior to the arrival of Watson's team, Master Sergeant Preston of the 54th Air Disarmament Squadron named this plane "Connie ...My Sharp Article" (after his wife).  "White 5" became Watson's Whizzers 444, and was ferried to Melun, France by Lt Roy Brown, who renamed it "Pick II" (after a nickname derived from his wife's maiden name).   Brown ferried the jet to the port of Cherbourg, where it was loaded onto the British escort carrier HMS Reaper.  While on the deck of the HMS Reaper, it was allocated inventory control No. 19.  After arrival at Newark, Watson ferried 444 to Freeman Field, Indiana on 19 August, 1945.  There, the Army Air Force assigned "White 5" a Foreign Equipment number, FE-4012.  This was later changed to T2-4012.  This aircraft was selected to participate in classified tests against the Lockheed P-80, and underwent a nose section changeup with Watson's Whizzers 888, later FE-111.  The machine was given an overall reconditioning for the tests.  "White 5" was with the Planes of Fame Museum in California before being transferred to Paul Allen's Flying Heritage & Combat Armor Museum in Washington State.  There are plans to restore this aircraft to flying status, and it is registered as N9450, painted as "White 9".  (USAAF Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a/U3 (Wk. Nr. 500453), "White 25", reconnaissance version modified with bulges on the nose to accommodate film magazines for two Rb 20/30 cameras.  U3 (Umrüst-Bausatz 3, Factory Modification Kit No. 3).  Prior to the arrival of Watson's team, Master Sergeant Preston of the 54th Air Disarmament Squadron named this plane "Connie ...My Sharp Article" (after his wife).  "White 5" became Watson's Whizzers 444, and was ferried to Melun, France by Lt Roy Brown, who renamed it "Pick II" (after a nickname derived from his wife's maiden name).   Brown ferried the jet to the port of Cherbourg, where it was loaded onto the British escort carrier HMS Reaper.  While on the deck of the HMS Reaper, it was allocated inventory control No. 19.  After arrival at Newark, Watson ferried 444 to Freeman Field, Indiana on 19 August, 1945.  There, the Army Air Force assigned "White 5" a Foreign Equipment number, FE-4012.  This was later changed to T2-4012.  This aircraft was selected to participate in classified tests against the Lockheed P-80, and underwent a nose section changeup with Watson's Whizzers 888, later FE-111.  The machine was given an overall reconditioning for the tests.  "White 5" was with the Planes of Fame Museum in California before being transferred to Paul Allen's Flying Heritage & Combat Armor Museum in Washington State.  There are plans to restore this aircraft to flying status, and it is registered as N9450, painted as "White 9".   (USAAF Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 262B-1a (Wk. Nr. 110639), "White 35", one of 15 aircraft modified under contract by Blohm and Voss for use as a dual-control two seat trainer.   Watson's Whizzers 555, "Vera", and later "Willie" flown from Germany to Cherbourg in 1945.  Shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper, this aircraft went to the USN Armament Test Division at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland in Dec 1945 where it was designated USN (Bu No. 121448).  After evaluation, it went to NART Willow Grove in  Dec 1946.  This aircraft has been restored and has returned to Naval Air Station Willow Grove, Pennsylvania.  "White 35" appears to have had an operational history in Luftwaffe service, and was one of the few Stormbirds known to have been captured completely intact.  Captured by American forces in May, 1945, it was the first jet the Americans brought into the hangar for restoration.  Soon thereafter, it was named Vera, after Staff Sergeant Eugene Freiburger's sister-in-law.  Vera was test flown by German test pilot Ludwig Hofmann on the 14th or 15th of May, accompanied by an American operations officer, Captain Ward, making him the first American to fly the Me 262.  On the 30th of May, Hofmann's counterpart, Karl Baur, took Colonel Watson on a familiarization flight in this aircraft.  "Vera" was used a few days later to train most of the American pilots who were tasked to fly the captured aircraft to Cherbourg.  Hofmann ferried the aircraft to Melun, France with the team, where it was renamed "Willie" in his honor.  At this time, the control number 555 was also assigned. The plane was loaded aboard the HMS Reaper with other captured aircraft, and transported to Newark, New Jersey.  At Newark, it was transferred to the USN for flight testing.  In 1993 the USN loaned 555 to the Me 262 Project for use as a pattern aircraft.  555 was returned to the USN in late 2001, and it is now back on permanent static display at Willow Grove NAS in eastern Pennsylvania.  (USAAF and USN Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 262B-1a (Wk. Nr. 110639), "White 35", one of 15 aircraft modified under contract by Blohm and Voss for use as a dual-control two seat trainer.   Watson's Whizzers 555, "Vera", and later "Willie" flown from Germany to Cherbourg in 1945.  Shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper, this aircraft went to the USN Armament Test Division at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland in Dec 1945 where it was designated USN (Bu No. 121448).  After evaluation, it went to NART Willow Grove in  Dec 1946.  This aircraft has been restored and has returned to Naval Air Station Willow Grove, Pennsylvania.  "White 35" appears to have had an operational history in Luftwaffe service, and was one of the few Stormbirds known to have been captured completely intact.  Captured by American forces in May, 1945, it was the first jet the Americans brought into the hangar for restoration.  Soon thereafter, it was named Vera, after Staff Sergeant Eugene Freiburger's sister-in-law.  Vera was test flown by German test pilot Ludwig Hofmann on the 14th or 15th of May, accompanied by an American operations officer, Captain Ward, making him the first American to fly the Me 262.  On the 30th of May, Hofmann's counterpart, Karl Baur, took Colonel Watson on a familiarization flight in this aircraft.  "Vera" was used a few days later to train most of the American pilots who were tasked to fly the captured aircraft to Cherbourg.  Hofmann ferried the aircraft to Melun, France with the team, where it was renamed "Willie" in his honor.  At this time, the control number 555 was also assigned. The plane was loaded aboard the HMS Reaper with other captured aircraft, and transported to Newark, New Jersey.  At Newark, it was transferred to the USN for flight testing.  In 1993 the USN loaned 555 to the Me 262 Project for use as a pattern aircraft.  555 was returned to the USN in late 2001, and it is now back on permanent static display at Willow Grove NAS in eastern Pennsylvania.  (USN Photo)

 (Gregg Heilmann Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262B-1a (Wk. Nr. 110639), "White 35", currently on display at Willow Grove NAS in eastern Pennsylvania.  (PearlJamNoCode Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a/U3 (Wk. Nr. 500098), "White 27",  reconnaissance version modified with bulges on the nose to accommodate film magazines for two Rb 20/30 cameras.  U3 (Umrüst-Bausatz 3, Factory Modification Kit No. 3).  "White 27" was collected at Lechfeld by the "Feudin 54th A.D. Sq", as painted on the starboard side by MSgt Eugene Freiburger, USAAF.  Watson's Whizzers No. 666, painted as "Joanne", later "Cookie VII".  "White 27" was flown to Melun, then Cherbourg, France.  Shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper, this aircraft was allocated Foreign Equipment number FE-4011.  "White 27" crashed at Pittsburgh on 19 Aug 1945.  (USAAF Photos)

Fred Hillis named six of his Republic P-47 Thunderbolts "Cookie" from a nickname he gave his baby daughter Cynthia.  Five of these P-47s were lost in combat, one was flown on one mission. Of the seven "Cookies", none of their pilots was injured or killed - good luck, and therefore, a good reason to keep the name.  During  Operation Iraqi Freedom in the spring of 2003, an assault helicopter flown by the 2-501st Aviation Regiment, 1st Armored Division (US Army), was christened "Cookie VIII" by her crew in honor of Hillis legacy.

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a "Schwalbe" (Wk. Nr. 110836).  Watson's Whizzers No. 777, this aircraft was initially named "Doris" and later "Jabo Bait".  Shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper, it was designated FE-110, later T2-110.  (USAAF Photos).  

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1b (Wk. Nr. 500491), "Yellow 7", 11./JG 7, surrendered to Allied forces on 8 May 1945 at Lechfeld.  In service with Jagdgeschwader 7, the victory markings found on this aircraft included one P-51, one P-47 and five B-17s.  The aircraft has original under wing racks for 24 R4M unguided rockets.  Karl Baur test flew this aircraft for some 20 minutes on the 12th of May; well before the arrival of Watson's team.  Watsons Whizzers No. 888, Staff Sergeant Eugene Freiburger of the 54th Air Disarmament Squadron named the plane "Dennis", after his son.  These markings remained on the jet until it arrived in Melun, France, where Lt James (Ken) Holt re-christened it "Ginny H".  named "Dennis", and then "Ginny H", it was flown by Lt James K. Holt.  "Yellow 7" was shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper, with inventory control No. 29.  "Yellow 7" arrived at Wright Field in August 1945, and was subsequently moved to Freeman Field, Indiana, where it remained until May 1946.  At Freeman Field it was allocated Foreign Equipment number FE-111, and later T-2-111.  As Watson's Whizzers No. 444 was being prepared for a series of classified flight tests, it's reconnaissance-modified nose section was exchanged for No. 888's more streamlined fighter version.  This modification took place before the plane was moved to the 803rd Special Depot storage facility at Park Ridge, Illinois in July 1946, when the jet entered long-term storage.  In 1950, it was moved again, this time to the National Air Museum facility (now the Garber Facility) at Silver Hill, Maryland.  In 1978, the plane was brought out of storage and fully restored, with the modified nose section returned to its original A-1 fighter configuration.  "Yellow 7" is now on display in the National Air & Space Museum (NASM), on the Mall in Washington, D.C.  (USAAF Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1b (Wk. Nr. 500491), "Yellow 7", 11./JG 7, on display in the National Air & Space Museum (NASM), on the Mall in Washington, D.C.  (Author Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262B-1a/U1 (Wk. Nr.  110306), "Red 6", 10./NJGJ11, two-seat trainer converted into a provisional night fighter version equipped with FuG 218 Neptun radar and Hirschgeweih (stag antler) eight-dipole antenna array.  Seven of these aircraft were used by 10/NJG.II in the defence of Berlin in April 1945.  "Red 6" was surrendered to the RAF at Schleswig-Jagel, Germany.  It was transferred to the USAAF and became Watson's Whizzers 999.  It was shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper and then allocated FE-610, later T2-610.  Later named "Ole Fruit Cake", and "der Schwalbe".  FE-610 was scrapped at Freeman Field, Indiana, circa 1950.  (USAAF Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 262B-1a/U1 (Wk. Nr.  110306), "Red 6", 10./NJGJ11, two-seat trainer converted into a provisional night fighter version equipped with FuG 218 Neptun radar and Hirschgeweih (stag antler) eight-dipole antenna array.  Seven of these aircraft were used by 10/NJG.II in the defence of Berlin in April 1945.  "Red 6" was surrendered to the RAF at Schleswig-Jagel, Germany.  It was transferred to the USAAF and became Watson's Whizzers 999.  It was shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper and then allocated FE-610, later T2-610.  Later named "Ole Fruit Cake", and "der Schwalbe".  FE-610 was scrapped at Freeman Field, Indiana, circa 1950.  (USAAF Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 262B-1a/U1 (Wk. Nr. 110165), uncoded, possibly 10./NJG11, two-seat trainer surrendered to the RAF at Schleswig-Jagel, Germany, in May 1945, designated USA 3 by the RAF, "What was it?".  Transferred to the USAAF, Watson's Whizzers 101.  Shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper, where it was allocated Foreign Equipment number FE-109.  This aircraft went to the USN Armament Test Division at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland in Dec 1945 where it was designated USN BuNo. 121441 and test flown.  It was scrapped at NAS Anacostia, Nov 1946.  (RAF Photos)

Me 262s in Russia

At the end of the war the Soviet Union sent forces to an airdrome outside Prague, Czechoslovakia where they discovered two undamaged Me 262 jet fighters along with four more half-dismantled aircraft of the same type.

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1 Schwalbe, (Wk. Nr. 110426) was dismantled and brought to the Soviet Air Forces Scientific Research Institute from the town of Schweidemuehle on 30 March 1945.  Evidently the aircraft had made a gear-up forced landing judging from the damage it sustained.  It was reconditioned at the experimental plant in Chkalovskaya and test flown on 15 August 1945.  It became unserviceable the next day and testing had to be stopped for almost a month and a half, because the port engine malfunctioned and had to be replaced.  During 12 sorties, Kochetkov managed to gather the main flight characteristics of the aircraft.  Those sorties did not come easily.  The last was the most difficult for Kochetkov.  At the cost of tremendous physical tension and self-control, he managed to pull the aircraft out of a dive at a high altitude.  In a similar situation on 17 September 1947 while flying another Me 262, test pilot F. F. Demida was killed, thus becoming one of the first victims of jet technology.  General P. M. Stefanovskiy also flew the Schwalbe.  (Soviet Air Force Photos)

Me 262 Reproductions

In January 2003, the American Me 262 Project, based in Everett, Washington, completed flight testing to allow the delivery of near-exact reproductions of several versions of the Me 262 including at least two B-1c two-seater variants, one A-1c single seater and two "convertibles" that could be switched between the A-1c and B-1c configurations. All are powered by General Electric J85 engines and feature additional safety features, such as upgraded brakes and strengthened landing gear. The "c" suffix refers to the new J85 powerplant and has been informally assigned with the approval of the Messerschmitt Foundation in Germany (the Werk Number of the reproductions picked up where the last wartime produced Me 262 left off – a continuous airframe serial number run with a 50-year production break).

Flight testing of the first newly manufactured Me 262 A-1c (single-seat) variant (Wk. Nr. 501244) was completed in August 2005.  The first of these machines, Me 262B-1c, (Wk. Nr. 501241) was delivered to the Collings Foundation based at Stowe, Massachustetts, as White 1 of JG 7; this aircraft offered ride-along flights starting in 2008.  The second Me 262A-1c, (Wk. Nr. 501244) was delivered to the Messerschmitt Foundation at Manching, Germany. This aircraft conducted a private test flight in late April 2006, and made its public debut in May at the ILA 2006. The new Me 262 flew during the public flight demonstrations.  The third replica, a non-flyable Me 262 A-1c, "Yellow 5", was delivered to the Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum at McMinnville, Oregon, in May 2010.  Me 262A/B-1c, (Wk. Nr. 501243), "White 8", (TBC).  Me 262B-1c "White 3+1" has gone to an Air Museum in Virginia.

Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a Schwalbe, "White 10", 3./ EG2, flown by Kurt Bell over Germany, ca 1945.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 262A/B-1c Schwalbe, (Wk. Nr. 501244), new-build replica, "Red 13", Reg. No. D-IMTT, Messerschmitt Foundation at Manching, Berlin, Germany.  (Noop1958 Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262B-1c Schwalbe, (Wk. Nr. 501241), new-build replica, Reg. No. N262AZ, Collings Foundation, Stow, Massachusetts.  (Tascam3458 Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 262 Schwalbe, jet fighter/bomber, new-build (non-flying) replica, on display in the Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum, McMinnville, Oregon.  It’s marked as "Yellow 5", an aircraft of Jadgeshwader 7 (11/JG-7)  based at Brandenburg-Briest,  flown by Leutnant Alfred Ambs in early 1945.  (Clemens Vasters Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 410A-3 Hornisse in Luftwaffe service.  (Luftwaffe photos)

Messerschmitt Me 410A-3 Hornisse, (Wk. Nr. 10259), F6+OK from 2(F)./122, RAF TF209, being checked by mechanics at No. 1426 (Enemy Aircraft) Flight at Collyweston, Northamptonshire (UK).  The crew, Fw. Hans Beyer and Uffz. Helmut Hein, got lost on the return leg to Perugia and landed by mistake at Monte Corvino, Italy, on 27 November 1943.  It arrived for testing at the Royal Aircraft Establishment, Farnborough, England, on 14 April 1944, and was also evaluated by the Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establishment, Boscombe Down.  TF209 flew with the Fighter Interception Unit at Wittering from August 1944 until March 1946 when it was transferred to No. 6 Maintenance Unit at Brize Norton.  It was scrapped post war.  (RAF Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 410A-3 Hornisse, (Wk. Nr. 10259), F6+OK from 2(F)./122, RAF TF209, in flight escorted by an RAF de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito.  TF209 had landed intact and was captured at Monte Corvino, Italy when the crew had become lost during a photo–reconnaissance mission in the Naples area.  This aircraft wears the P for Prototype roundels showing she was at RAF Boscombe Down for testing.  (RAF Photo)

 (RAFM Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 410A-1/U2 Hornisse, (Wk. Nr. 420430), captured at Vaerlose.  Designated RAF AM72, this aircraft is on display at RAF Cosford, England.  (Dapi99 Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 410A-1/U2 Hornisse, (Wk. Nr. 420439) captured at Kastrup.  Designated RAF AM39, this aircraft was likely scrapped at Kastrup.

Messerschmitt Me 410A-1/U2 Hornisse, (Wk. Nr 420430), captured at Vaerlose.  Designated RAF AM72, this aircraft is in the RAF Museum at Cosford, England.  (RAF Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 410A-1 Hornisse, (Wk. Nr. 130360), captured at Vaerlose.  Designated RAF AM73, this aircraft was scrapped at Brize Norton in 1947.

Messerschmitt Me 410B-6 Hornisse, (Wk. Nr. 410208), captured at Vaerlose.  Designated RAF AM74, this aircraft was scrapped at Farnborough in 1946.

Messerschmitt Me 410A Hornisse, (Wk. Nr. 263), 2N+HTfrom ZG76 was taken over by No. 601 Squadron.  This aircraft crashed in Oct 1943.

Four Messerschmitt Me 410 Hornisse were surrendered at Sylt and were initially designated by RAF as USA 16, USA 17, USA 18 and USA 19.  They were likely scrapped at Sylt.

Messerschmitt Me 410 Hornisse cannon-armed fighter diving away after an attack on a USAAF Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress.   (USAAF Photo)

Messerschmitt Me 410A-2/U1 Hornisse, (Wk. Nr. 10018), F6+WK from 2(F)./122, USAAF EB-103, later FE-102, then FE-499, and then T2-499, on display at Freeman Field, Indiana post war.  (USAAF Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 410A-2/U1 Hornisse , (Wk. Nr. 10018), USA EB-103, later FE-102, then FE-499 and then T2-499, Freeman Field, Indiana, post war.  This aircraft is in storage with the NASM.  (USAAF Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 410B2/U4 Hornisse, (Wk. Nr. 130379), heavy fighter/reconnaissance aircraft from II/ZG26 Group was captured after the war by the Soviets and extensively tested.  Although the Soviets concluded their fighters were superior to the twin-engine ciarcraft, they confirmed it was a threat to all types of Soviet series-produced bombers, the Tu-2 included, due to its high capabilities. It had a maximum speed of 600 km/h at 6750 meters, could climb to 5000 meters in 8.6 minutes, and carried powerful offensive armament comprising two standard 20mm MG-151 cannon and the semiautomatic VK-5 cannon that could deliver a 1-second salvo weighing 4.65 kg.  The Soviets found the German designers had worked out the best methods of employing the Me 410B-2's fire power. The Me 410B-2 was fitted with a combined gun sight comprising a four-power telescope with collimator.  This made it possible to deliver precision fire from a range of 1000 meters and more, where the 50-mm high-explosive fragmentation ammunition could destroy Petlyakov, Il'yushin, Boston, and other aircraft.  In theory, a German pilot could shoot down enemy aircraft while out of defensive fire range.  (Soviet Air Force Photos)

Messerschmitt Me 609, heavy fighter/bomber (project).

Messerschmitt Me P.1101-V1 experimental swing-wing jet fighter.  This project did not fly.   (USAAF Photos)

Messerschmitt P.1101

The Messerschmitt P.1101 was a single-seat, single-jet fighter project developed in response to the 15 July 1944 Emergency Fighter Program, which sought the second generation of jet fighters for the Third Reich.  A characteristic feature of the P.1101 prototype was that the sweep of the wings could be changed before flight.

The Me P.1101 V1 was about 80% complete when the Oberammergau complex was discovered by American troops on 29 April 1945, a few days before the war's end.  The fuselage was constructed out of duralumin, with space providedbeneath the cockpit for the air duct. Located behind the cockpit and above the engine was the fuel supply of 1000 liters (220 gallons).   The rear fuselage tapered down to a cone, where the radio equipment, oxygen equipment, directional control and master compass were mounted.  The underside of the rear fuselage was covered over with sheet steel, for protection from the heat of the jet exhaust.  Although a Jumo 004B jet engine was planned for the first prototype, the more powerful  He S 011 could be added on later versions with a minimum of fuss.  The wing was basically the same as the Messerschmitt Me 262 wing from the engine (rib 7) to the end cap (rib 21), including the Me 262's aileron and leading edge slats. A second wing assembly was delivered in February 1945, in which the leading edge slots had been enlarged from 13% to 20% of the wing chord. The wing covered in plywood, and could be adjusted on the ground at 35, 40 or 45 degrees of sweepback. Both the vertical and horizontal tails were constructed of wood, and the rudder could be deflected 20 degrees. Also under design was a T-tail unit and a V-tail also. The undercarriage was of a tricycle arrangement. The nose wheel retracted to the rear and was steerable. The main gear retracted to the front, and included brakes. The cockpit was located in the nose, with a bubble canopy giving good vision all around. The canopy was kept clear by warm air which could be drawn from the engine. Cockpit pressurization was to be incorporated in the production model, as was either two or four MK 108 30mm cannon. The production model was also to fitted with cockpit armour, and up to four underwing X-4 air-to-air missiles could be carried.

The V1 prototype was approximately 80% complete.  A few days before the Allied Army was expected to appear, Messerschmitt had all the engineering drawings, calculations and design work placed on microfilm and packed in watertight containers. These containers were then hidden in four locations in surrounding villages. On Sunday, 29 April 1945, an American infantry unit entered the Oberammergau complex, seized a few documents, and destroyed much of what remained with axes.  The Me P.1101 V1 incomplete prototype was also found, and pulled out of a nearby tunnel where it was hidden.  The wings had not yet been attached and it would appear they had never had skinning applied to their undersides.  Within a few days of the German capitulation, American specialists had arrived to assess the significance of the seized Messerschmitt complex. After questioning some of the Messerschmitt employees, it was learned of the missing documents.  When the American team tried to recover these hidden microfilmed documents, they found that the French Army had already recovered some of the documents.

  After the aircraft had been shipped to the USA, there was some lobbying by Messerschmitt Chief Designer Woldemar Voigt and Robert J. Woods of Bell aircraft to have the P.1101 V1 completed by June 1945.  This was precluded by the destruction of some critical documents and the refusal of the French to release the remaining majority of the design documents (microfilmed and buried by the Germans), which they had obtained prior to the arrival of American units to the area.  The airframe meanwhile became a favorite prop for GI souvenir photos.

Messerschmitt Me P.1101 V1, post war USO Troupe, Oberammergau, Germany.   (Green4life80 Photo)

Shipped to USA, the aircraft was stored at Wright Field until it was repaired and fitted with an American Allison J-35 engine.  Unfortunately it was damaged in the only attempt to take off.   Further tests were abandoned in August 1948, and the prototype went to the Bell Company.  The P.1101 was used as ground test-bed for the Bell X-5, but damage ruled out any possibility for repair although some of the Me P.1101's design features were subsequently used by Bell.  Bell used the Me P.1101 as the basis for the X-5, during which individual parts of the P.1101 were used for static testing.  The Bell X-5 was the first aircraft capable of varying its wing geometry while in flight.  Sometime in the early 1950s, the remainder of the Messerschmitt Me P.1101 V1 was scrapped.  Internet: http://www.luft46.com/mess/mep1101.html.

Siebel Si 204 in Luftwaffe service.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Siebel Si 204D-1, (Wk. Nr. 322127), captured at Flensburg.  Designated RAF AM4, this aircraft was likely scrapped in 1945.  (RAF Photo)

Siebel Si 204D-1, (Wk. Nr. 321523), captured at Flensburg.  Designated RAF AM5, this aircraft was scrapped at Woodley ca. 1948.

Siebel Si 204D-3, (Wk. Nr. 321547), captured at Leck.  Designated RAF AM12, this aircraft was scrapped at Brize Norton in 1947.

Siebel Si 204D-1, (Wk. Nr. 251922), captured at Leck.  Designated RAF AM13, this aircraft was scrapped at RAF Newton in 1947.

Siebel Si 204D-1, (Wk. Nr. 221558), captured at Grove, Denmark.  This aircraft was designated RAF AM28.  It was scrapped at Brize Norton in 1947.

Siebel Si 204D-1, (Wk. Nr. 251147) captured at Kastrup.  This aircraft was scrapped at Woodley, England in 1948.

Siebel Si 204D-1, (Wk. Nr. unknown).  Designated RAF AM46, this aircraft was scrapped at Brize Norton in 1947.

Siebel Si 204D-1, (Wk. Nr. 251104), captured at Lutenholm.  Designated RAF AM49, this aircraft was scrapped at Brize Norton in 1947.

Siebel Si 204D-1, (Wk. Nr. 321288), RAF AM55 was scrapped at brize Norton in 1947.

Siebel Si 204D-1, (Wk. Nr. 321308), RAF AM56 was scrapped at Schleswig-Jagel, Germany.

Siebel Si 204D, (Wk. Nr. 251190), RAF AM56A was likely scrapped at Schleswig-Jagel, Germany.

Siebel Si 204A (originally a Nord NC.702), (Wk. Nr. 350), fuselage has been used by the Vojenske Muzeum to build up a complete Si 204 D (Aero C-3A) in Czech markings.

Siebel Si 204D captured by the USSR in Soviet Air Force service.  (Soviet Air Force Photo)