Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Axis Warplane Survivors, German Aircraft (Part II)

Axis Warplane Survivors, German Aircraft (Part II)

Data current to 24 Sep 2018.

Focke-Wulf Fw 190 Würger fighter in Luftwaffe service.  Roughly 28 original Fw 190s survive in museums or in the hands of private collectors around the world.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

 

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-1, (Wk. Nr. 067), coded T1+DQ.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 1190A-3, (Wk. Nr. 35348).  (Luftwaffe Photo) 

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-4 being serviced.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8 (Wk. Nr. 739136), White 15.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190F-8 Würger fighter, White 40, May 1945.  Roughly 28 original Fw 190s survive in museums or in the hands of private collectors around the world.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-4/U4 from 2.(F)/123, part of NAGr 13 aufklarer unit France Summer of 1944.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-5 with underwing cannon pods.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190 hybrid A-6/A-8, 31+ ~ Red, near Linz, Austria.  (USAAF Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-3 Würger, (Wk. Nr. 313), single chevron, Stab III./JG2, flown by Oblt Arnim Faber.  This aircraft landed in error at RAF Pembrey in South Wales on 23 June 1942.  The Fw 190 was designated RAF MP499.  It was the first of its type to fall into Allied hands, and after its capture it was taken by road to Farnborough and flown extensively in comparative trials with Allied fighters.  It was struck off charge (SOC) in Sep 1943.  (RAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-3 Würger, (Wk. Nr. 313), repainted as RAF MP499.  It was SOC in Sep 1943.  (RAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-4/U8, (Wk. Nr. 7155), H+ from II./SKG10.  Designated RAF PE882, this aircraft crashed in Oct 1944.  (RAF Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-4/U8, (Wk. Nr. 7155), repainted as RAF PE822, this aircraft crashed in Oct 1944.  (RAF Photos)  

Mistel S3A, Focke-Wulf Fw 190A, (Wk. Nr. 733682), designated RAF AM75 combined with Junkers Ju 88A-6, (Wk. Nr. 2492), designated AM77.  The Focke-Wulf Fw 190A is preserved in the Imperial War Museum, London, England, while the Junkers Ju 88A-6 was scrapped at Farnborough.  (RAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8/R6, (Wk. Nr. 733682), RAF AM75 on display in the Imperial War Museum, London, England.  This aircraft was captured at Tirstrup, Denmark where it was found mounted on top of a Junkers Ju 88A-6 bomber, (Wk. Nr. 2492), RAF AM77, as part of a Mistel S3B combination.  This aircraft has faired-over gun ports and a belly-mounted ETC-501 bomb rack.  The Ju 88 was scrapped at Farnborough.  (Gustav Gullberg Photo)

Mistel S3A designated RAF AM75 combined Fw 190A-8, (Wk. Nr. unknown) with Ju 88H-1, (Wk. Nr. unknown). Both aircraft were scrapped at Schleswig.  One of three Mistel combinations captured at Tirstrup.  (RAF Photos)

Mistel S3A designated RAF AM76 combined Fw 190A-8, (Wk. Nr. unknown) with Ju 88H-1, (Wk. Nr. unknown).  Both aircraft were scrapped at Schleswig.

Focke-Wulf Fw 190. 11./JG 1, 1+-, captured at Skrydstrup, Denmark, May 1945.  (RAF Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-4/U8, (Wk. Nr. 5843), "Red 9" from 1.SKG 10, landed in error at Manston, Kent in the UK on 20 May 1943.  Designated RAF PM679, this aircraft crashed on 25 June 1944 and the remains were used for spare parts.  (RAF Photos)

 

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-5/U8, (Wk. Nr. 2596), "White 6" from 1.SKG 10, flown by Unteroffizier Werner Ohne operating from St. Omer, France.  Ohne landed accidentally at the RAF airbase at Manston on the night of 21 May 1943 and was quickly taken into custody.  After capture, the aircraft was designated RAF PN999.  This aircraft had a temporary black finish which was removed and British roundels added.  PN999 was probably scrapped after July 1946.  (RAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A, (Wk. Nr. unknown), RAF NF754 and Fw 190A, (Wk. Nr. unknown), RAF NF755 were used in England for spare parts.  Both were later scrapped at Tangmere.

Focke-Wulf Fw 190F-8/U1, (Wk. Nr. 580058), captured at Kastrup.  Designated RAF AM36, this aircraft was likely scrapped at Kastrup.

Focke-Wulf Fw 190S-1, (Wk. Nr. 582044), captured at Kastrup.  Designated RAF AM37, this aircraft crashed at Sonning, England on 30 Nov 1945.

Focke-Wulf Fw 190F-8/U1, (Wk. Nr. 580392), captured at Kastrup.  Designated AM40, this aircraft was scrapped at Schlesweg.

Focke-Wulf Fw 190F-8, RCAF JFE.  (RCAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190F-F8/R15, (Wk. Nr. 871), coded TD+SI.   The aircraft had an enlarged fin and lengthened tailwheel leg.  Gun armament was restricted to wing-root mounted MG 151s.  It carried the LTF 5b torpedo on an adapted ETC 501 rack.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190F-8/R15, (Wk. Nr. unknown), captured at Travemunde where it had been flown by the Luftwaffe Torpedowaffen Versuchsanstalt (TVA) on operational trials.  Flown to Farnborough on 19 July 1945 this aircraft was designated RAF AM111.  It was scrapped at Cranfield, England, ca. 1950.  (RAF Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8, (Wk. Nr. 171747).  Designated RAF AM230, this aircraft was crashed in England on 30 Aug 1944. The remains were scrapped at Little Rissington, England.

Focke-Wulf Fw 190 fighter, view from the deadly business end.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190 fighter captured by British forces having RAF roundels painted on it by German prisoners post war.  (RAF Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190 with freshly painted RAF roundels in a German hangar, post war.  (RAF Photo)

French-built NC.900 (Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8) in Armée de l’Air markings.  In the immediate postwar period, the French Armée de l’Air operated a number of Fw 190 fighters (designated NC.900).  65 NC.900s were built in 1945 and 1946 by the Société Nationale de Constructions Aéronautiques du Centre (S.N.C.A.C.) at Cravant, France.  (Armée de l’Air Photos)

  (Pine Photo)

 (Turner Photo)

NC.900 (Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8), (Wk. Nr. 730923) preserved at the Musée de l'Air et de l'Espace, Le Bourget, France.  The NC.900 No. 62 on display in the Musée de l'Air at Le Bourget is a Focke-Wulf 190A-8 made to represent an A-7.   It is painted in the colours of Oberst Josef Priller, Luftwaffe Kommodore of JG 26, who accumulted 101 victories, many of them in Fw 190s.

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8, (Wk. Nr. 173056), coded "White 14", I./JG11, Reg. No. N91169 (53116656), was originally built at the Focke-Wulf factory in Marienburg in 1944,.  White 14 ended its service in Rheims, France, where it was buried at the train yards after being stripped of parts.  It was restored by Don Hansen, Piping Analysis Inc., Baton Rouge, Louisiana.  Its first flight with a Russian-sourced radial engine took place on 9 October 2011. 

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-4, (Wk. Nr. TBC).  This composite aircraft is being restored to Fw 190A-8 configuration with all original parts including an original BMW801S radial engine in the Militarhistorisches Museum (MHM) Flugplatz-Gatow (previously known as the Luftwaffenmuseum der Bundeswehr), Berlin-Gatow.  It is armed with MG 131 cannon.  Painted in RLM mottle camouflage.

Focke-Wulf Fw-190s at the end of the Second World War, April-May 1945.  (USAAF Photos)

 (Clemens Vasters Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-5, Red 10, at the Auto & Technik Museum, Sinsheim, Germany.   (Valder137 Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8, (Wk. Nr. 170393), "Yellow 11", coded 6./JG1 is preserved in the Luftfahrtmuseum, Laatzen, Lower Saxony, Hannover, Germany.  This aircraft is a new built Flug Werk airframe (c/n 990000).  The largest original part is the tailplane from Fw 190F-8, (Wk. Nr. 583958).  The original Yellow 11 was flown by Feldwebel Alfred Bindseil in April 1944.

Focke-Wulf 190 A-3, (Wk. Nr. 122219), IV./JG 5.  This aircraft was recovered from an underwater location and is currently being rebuilt for the Norwegian Air Force Museum, Oslo, Norway.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Nolween Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-6/R6, (Wk. Nr. 550214), PN+LU, possibly flown by III./NJG 11 as it was fitted with a FuG 217 Neptun radar system, designated RAF AM10.  This aircraft was built by the Ago factory in mid-1943.  Initially displayed in the UK, this aircraft was shipped from Birkenhead, England to Capetown, South Africa on the SS Perthshire on 20 Oct 1946, arriving on 6 Nov.  It is now on display at the South African National Museum of Military History, Saxonwold, Johannesburg, South Africa.  (Colin Dodds Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190G-3, (Wk. Nr. 160043), coded DP+HQ, III.-SKG 10A-5, DP, captured in Italy.  (USAAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190s, Bad Aibling, Germany, 5 May 1945.  (USAAF Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8, (Wk. Nr. 681497), coded 11+-, White 11 of 5./JG 4 at St. Trond airfield, Belgium, circa 1 January 1945. This aircraft was flown during on 1 January 1945 during Operation Bodenplatte by Corporal Walter Wagner who was hit by flak during the attack over St. Trond airfield.  The engine died and he had to make an emergency landing.  The weapons have obviously been removed.  The photo was taken by the resident USAAF 404th Fighter Group.  (USAAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8, (Wk. Nr. 681497), coded 11+-, White 11 of 5./JG 4 at St. Trond airfield after being taken over by the USAAF 404th Fighter Group.  This aircraft had force-landed during Operation Bodenplatte, a Luftwaffe attack on Allied airfields in France and Belgium on 1 Jan 1945.  It was then painted red, but was not flown.   (USAAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8, (Wk. Nr. 681497), coded 11+-, White 11 of 5./JG 4.  It had been piloted by Gefreiter Walter Wagner, of 5. II/JG4 was slightly damaged by Allied anti-aircraft fire and was forced to land at the airport of St-Trond on 1 January 1945.  Wagner had taken part in an attack on 404 Fighter Group 508 Squadron’s airfield at St-Trond, Belgium during Operation Bodenplatte, a front wide attack to destroy allied aircraft on the ground.  This aircraft was captured and painted overall bright orange-red to distinguish it from enemy Focke-Wulf Fw 190s. The aircraft’s code, 00–L, is likely related to the Belgian national code for aircraft registration purposes. The L may have been for its intended pilot, Leo Moon, the Squadron’s CO.  It appears the aircraft was never flown and was left behind when the 404th left St-Trond.  (USAAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A that was captured at Gerbini and then flown by the 85th Fighter Squadron, 79th Fighter Group of 12th Air Force. The 79th FG is the same unit that captured and flew the Messerschmitt Bf 109 Irmgard.  To avoid any possibility of the aircraft being taken to be the enemy, the aircraft was painted overall red with yellow wings and red wingtips as well as a yellow fuselage band and horizontal stabilizer.  It carries USAAF markings as well as the flying skull emblem of the 85th FS.   (USAAF Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-5, (Wk. Nr. unknown), captured in Sicily by the USAAF.  This aircraft was painted by the 325 Fighter Squadron (FS) with a bright red cowling and red, white and blue stripes on the tail fin and an American star over an orange square on the fuselage.  It was flown by 1st Lt. Jack Shafton of 317 FS from Lesinia airbase near Foggia.  The plane was immediately grounded by Colonel Chester L. Sluder (commander of the unit between 1 April 1944 and 11 September 1944) due to worn out tires.  After Sluder's departure from command, several pilots tried to start the aircraft, but during taxiing the canopy fell off and the plane was eventually abandoned.  (USAAF Photo)

 

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-5, (Wk. Nr. unknown), captured and flown by the 85th fighter squadron, 79th fighter group of 12th USAAF in Mediterranean Theatre of Operations (MTO).  The aircraft is painted red overall with yellow wings with red wingtips and yellow horizontal stabilizers with red tips. It has USAAF markings (white star in blue roundel) in a broad yellow fuselage band. The plane also bears the squadron insignia of the 85th fighter squadron (flying skulls), "Jones Flying Circus".  (USAAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190G-3, (Wk. Nr. 160057), one of two captured by ground crews of the 85th Fighter Squadron, 79th Fighter Group at Gerbini Airfield on the Island of Sicily, in September 1943.  It was painted in a striking white scheme with red spinner, cowling, fuselage band and USN striped tail.  It was shipped to the United States in January 1944, where repairs were made.  Later, in 1945 while in the USA, this aircraft was repainted in a standard USN 3-tone non-specular, intermediate blue and insignia white scheme.  It was test flown by the Technical Air Intelligence Unit (TAIU) at NAS Anacostia, then moved to NAS Patuxent River in February 1945.  (USN Photo)

 

Focke-Wulf Fw 190, (Wk. Nr. 181550), B, captured in North Africa, was flown by the USAAF 85th FS, 79th FG.  (USAAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-3, (Wk. Nr. unknown), USAAF EB-101 test flown in the USA in 1944.  This aircraft was later renumbered USA FE-497, later T2-497.  It was scrapped at Wright Field in 1946.  (USAAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190, possibly captured in Italy, USAAF markings ca 1943.  (USAAF Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190F-8, Germany, ca 1945.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190G-3, (Wk. Nr. 160016), DN+FP, EB-104, later renumbered USA FE-104, later FE-125 and then T2-125, in flight over Wright Field, Ohio, and on the ground at Freeman Field, Indiana, May 1945.  (USAAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190F, White 10, USA FE-113, being flight tested by the U.S. Navy Naval Air Test Center Patuxent River, Maryland (USA), circa in March 1944.  The aircraft received U.S. markings and a standard U.S. Navy camouflage, with the armament apparently removed.   It was damaged beyond repair 12 Sep 1945 after a crash at Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania en route to Freeman Field, Indiana.  (USAAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190F, (Wk. Nr. unknown) USA FE-114, tested at Freeman Field, Indiana post-war, fate unknown.

Focke-Wulf Fw 190F, (Wk. Nr.unknown), USA FE-115, tested at Freeman Field, Indiana post-war, fate unknown.

Focke-Wulf Fw 190F-8, (Wk. Nr. unknown), factory No. 12053, USA FE-116, later T2-116 in the USA.  This aircraft went to Park Ridge, Pennsylvania where it was scrapped in 1946.  (USAAF Photos)

 (Kogo Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190F-8/R1, (Wk. Nr. 931884), initially coded "Yellow 10" from I./SG2.  This aircraft was shipped to the USA and designated FE-117.  It is restored and currently painted as "White 7", on display in the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Chantilly, Virginia.  (Nick-D Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8, (Wk. Nr. 739447), Reg. No. N447FW, on display in the Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum, McMinnville, Oregon. (airforcefe Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8 (Wk. Nr. 732183), from 12./JG 5 as flown by Ltn Rudi Linz, a German ace with 70 victories.  This aircraft was shot down over Norway by a British Mustang during the 'Black Friday' raid on 9 February 1945.  The aircraft is displayed in the Cottbus Hangar of the Military Aviation Museum in Pungo, Virginia.  (Joanna Poe Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-9, (Wk. Nr. 980574), Reg. No. NX190RF, on display in the Planes of Fame Museum, Chino, California.  (Patrick Mack Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-2, (Wk. Nr. 5476), JG 5, owned by Wade S. Hayes and currently located in Texas.  It is thought to be one of the oldest Fw 190s still in existence.

 Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-5, (Wk. Nr. 151227), from IV/JG 54.  This aircraft crashed in Voibakala forest, near Saint Petersburg in 1943.  It was discovered in 1989.  Now airworthy, with the Flying Heritage Collection, Paine Field, Everett, Washington.  (Goshimini Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-6, (Wk. Nr. 550470), from I./JG 26.  Owned by Malcolm Laing and located in Lubbock Texas.

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8, (Wk. Nr. 173889), from 7./JG 1.  This aircraft is owned by Mark Timken, currently under restoration.

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8, (Wk. Nr. 350177), from 12./JG 5.  This aircraft is located at the Texas Air Museum in Rio Hondo, Texas.

 Focke Wulf 190A-4, (Wk. Nr. 142310), "Black 2" flown by Unteroffizier Helmut Brandt of the I./JG54 "Grunherz" was captured by the Soviets on 13 January 1943 after air combat and a forced landing on the ice of Lake Ladoga in the USSR. Helmut Brandt shot off his propeller blades with a cannon round, thanks to a synchronizer failure, and he was unable to get his aircraft to his side of the front line.  After lending on the ice of Lake Ladoga he tried to escape on skis, but was caught by Russian patrols.  (Soviet Air Force Photo)

Focke Wulf 190A-4, (Wk. Nr. 142310), repainted in Soviet Air Force markings as it appeared while being tested at the Soviet Air Force Scientific Research unit.  It was also placed on display at a "BNT exhibition in TsAGI".  Its subsequent fate is unknown.  (Soviet Air Force Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 109A-4, (Wk. Nr. 2362), IV/JG51 Group, 6+1, early 1944.  This aircraft was captured near Newel in the USSR in Oct 1943 and flown by many Soviet Flight Research Institute pilots.

Focke-Wulf Fw 190A-8, (Wk. Nr. 580967) captured by the Soviet Union in Feb 1945 and test flown at NII-VVS in the USSR.

During special trials conducted by the Soviet Air Forces Scientific Research Institute captured Fw 190A-8, (Wk. Nr. 682011) and Fw 190A-8, (Wk. Nr. 580967), were flown against Yak-3, Yak-9u and La-7 fighters.  The engagements demonstrated that new tactical procedures were needed to counter German aircraft flying at low levels. The Focke-Wulfs usually ingressed at low altitudes and regressed at treetop level at maximum speed, making it hard to counter-attack in time. The pursuit became more complicated, because the gray matte paint concealed the German aircraft against the background of the landscape.  In addition, German pilots employed engine reheat at low altitudes. It was determined that the Focke-Wulf could deliver 582 km/h, i. e. neither the Yak-3 (the aircraft at the Air Forces Scientific Research Institute developed 567 km/h) nor the Yak-9U (575 km/h) could overtake them.  Only the La-5 reached 612 km/h in augmented mode, but the speed margin was insufficient to reduce the range between the two aircraft to a distance permitting aimed fire.  Based on test results, the institute leadership issued recommendations: it is necessary to echelon the fighters in patrols at different altitudes. The mission of the pilots on the higher tiers would be to disrupt the bombing and to attack the enemy fighter escort, while the lower patrol aircraft, having the capability to overtake in a shallow dive, probably would be able to intercept the ground-attack aircraft themselves.  (Soviet Air Force Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw190A-8, new-build aircraft privately owned, "White 11", JP7645827.  In 1997, a German company, Flug Werk GmbH, began manufacturing new Fw 190 models as reproductions.  By 2012 almost 20 had been produced, most flyable, a few as static display models, with airworthy examples usually powered by Chinese-manufactured Shvetsov ASh-82 radial powerplants, which have a displacement of 41.2 litres, close to the BMW 801's 41.8 litres.  (Aldo Bidini Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190S8 two-seat training version of the Fw 190F-8/U1, White 30, in Luftwaffe service.  The aircraft was used as a high-speed transport for senior officers or for conversion training.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190F-8/U1 (Fw 190S8) two-seat training and high speed transport (Wk. Nr. 584219), Black 38, RAF AM29.  This aircraft was built by Arado at the Warnemünde factory, and was an FW 190 F-8 converted to two-seat standard.  Captured in Grove, Denmark, North of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany by British forces in May 1945.  It is shown here shortly after it was flown to Farnborough in the UK on 2 Sep 1945 and repainted with RAF markings.  In Luftwaffe service, it operated with training units, and carried the letters HRZ.  It was exhibited at various locations, and now resides in the RAF Museum at Hendon, England. (RAF Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190S8 two-seat training version of the Fw 190F-8/U1 (Wk. Nr. 680430), RAF AM29, shown here as "Black 38" on display in the RAF Museum, Hendon, England.  (Les Chatfield Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190S8 two-seat training version of the Fw 190F-8/U1, (Wk. Nr. 584219), Black 38, designated RAF AM29, on display in the RAF Museum, Hendon, England.  (RuthAS Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190 D-9 appears to be a late production aircraft built by Fieseler at Kassel.  It has a late style canopy; the horizontal black stripe with white outline shows that this was a II. Gruppe aircraft.  (USAAF Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190D-9 in Luftwaffe service.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190D-9, JG26, (Wk. Nr. 600651) captured at Straubing, Germany, May 1945.  (USAAF Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190D-9, (Wk. Nr. 500618) captured at Flensburg was designated RAF USA 15.  This aircraft was likely scrapped at Flensberg.

Focke-Wulf Fw 190D-13/R11, (Wk. Nr. 836017), coded "Yellow 10" from I./JG26, captured at Flensburg.  Designated RAF USA 14, this aircraft was shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper, where it was designated USA FE-118, later T2-118.  This aircraft was with the Champlin Collection in Arizona, and then the Museum of Flight in Seattle, Washington.  It is now with the Flying Heritage Collection, Paine Field, Everett, Washington.  (USAAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190D-13/R11, (Wk. Nr. 836017) ,"Yellow 10," from 1./JG 26 as flown by Major Franz Götz.  Captured at Flensberg in May 1945, this aircraft was designated RAF USA 14, and shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper.   It was then numbered USA FE-118, later T2-118.  Previously with the Champlin Air Museum in Arizona, this aircraft has been restored and is on display in the Flying Heritage Collection, Paine Field, Everett, Washington.  (Goshimini Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190D-13/R11, (Wk. Nr. 836017) ,"Yellow 10," from 1./JG 26 as flown by Major Franz Götz.  USA FE-118.  Previously with the Champlin Air Museum in Arizona, this aircraft is on display in the Flying Heritage Collection, Paine Field, Everett, Washington.  (PanGalacticGargleBlasterr Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190D-9, (Wk. Nr. 211018), "White 14" from II./JG26, shipped to the USA.  This aircraft was designated USA FE-119, later T2-119.  It was destroyed in a crash at Freeman Field, Indiana, on 22 Sep 1945.  (USAAF Photo) 

Focke-Wulf Fw 190D-9, (Wk. Nr. 210079), 12+, "Black 12", flown by Leutnant Theo Nibel in the 10. / JG 54, and lost due to a bird strike on the morning of 1 Jan 1945 during Operation Bodenplatte.  Remains shown here at Farnborough, England, late 1945.  (RAF Photos)

 

Focke-Wulf Fw 190D-9, (Wk. Nr. 601088), JG 26, captured by the RAF at Flensburg.  Designated RAF USA 12, this aircraft was shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper.  It was alloted USA FE-120, later T2-120.  It was restored by the NASM and is now on display at the National Museum of the USAF, Dayton, Ohio.  (NMUSAF Photos)

 Focke-Wulf Fw 190D-9, (Wk. Nr. 401392), "Black 5", JG26, captured at Flensburg.  Designated RAF USA 13, this aircraft was shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper and allotted USA FE-121, later T2-121.  In the first photo taken at Newark, the number 31 is visible just forward  and above the horizontal stabilizer referring to its loading position on HMS Reaper.  The third photo shows Ken Chilstrom Wright Field test pilot, sitting in the cockpit with Bob Baird standing near the wing.  This aircraft was scrapped at Freeman Field, Indiana, ca. 1946.  (USAAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190D-9, (Wk. Nr. 401392), "Black 5", JG26, captured at Flensburg.  Designated RAF USA 13, this aircraft was shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper and allotted USA FE-121, later T2-121.  It was scrapped at Freeman Field, Indiana, ca. 1946.   (USAAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190D-9, (Wk. Nr. 210968), from 2./JG 26.  Captured at Flensburg, this aircraft is under restoration for the Luftwaffe Museum in Berlin, Germany.

Focke-Wulf Fw 190D-9, (Wk. Nr. 210596), captured at Flensburg.  Designated RAF AM98, this aircraft was shipped from Birkenhead, England to Capetown, South Africa on the SS Perthshire on 20 Oct 1946, arriving on 6 Nov.  After acceptance by the SAAF it was stored at 15 Air Depot, Snake Valley and during 1950 it was  sold to the Benoni Technical College as an instructional airframe.  It was scrapped in 1953.

Focke-Wulf Fw-190D-12, CS+IA, 1945.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190D-9 flown by Soviet Baltic Fleet Air Force pilots in June 1945. The war was already over when this aircraft arrived for testing in the USSR.  The flight tests suggested the Soviet La-5 was superior to the Dora in many respects.  (Soviet Air Force Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 190D-9, (Wk. Nr. 211028), coded Black 8, 14/JG26 was preserved in England after being recovered from Germany in 1996.  This aircraft was registered on 21 May 2003, by Glenn R. Lacey of Epsom, Surrey, as G-DORA.  (Wk. Nr. 211028) is currently with the Fighter Factory at Virginia Beach, USA, as the Lacey collection no longer exists.

Focke-Wulf Fw 190F-3, (Wk. Nr. 670071), from 1./SchG 1. This aircraft is being restored for the Flugplatz Museum of Cottbus, Germany.

Focke-Wulf Fw 190F-8, (Wk. Nr. 5415), aunder restoration in New Zealand and owned by the Old Flying Machine Company.

Focke-Wulf Fw 190F-8, (Wk. Nr. 930838), a Fw 190 F-8, currently in storage at the Yugoslav Aeronautical Museum in Belgrade.

Focke-Wulf Fw 190F-8, (Wk. Nr. 931862), from 9./JG 5, the "White 1+0" as flown by Unteroffizier Heinz Orlowski.  It was built by Norddeutsche Dornier at Wismar in June 1944, and transferred to the Luftwaffe on 13 July 1944. This aircraft was shot down by North American P-51D Mustangs over Norway in the "Black Friday" engagement.  It was recovered in the early 1980s from a Norwegian fjord.  Originally under restoration in Kissimmee, Florida, USA by The White 1 Foundation, it was transferred to The Collings Foundation in 2012, and is expected to be returned to airworthy status.

Focke-Wulf Ta 152H, high altitude fighter, CI+XM, in Luftwaffe service.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Focke-Wulf Ta 152H-1 high-altitude fighter, (Wk. Nr. 150168), captured at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.  This aircraft was designated RAF AM11. It was scrapped at Farnborough, England in 1946.  Four of these aircraft were found by the RAF in Germany and one in Denmark.  Four were reported as destroyed, with AM11 being the only one sent to the UK, but Ta 152H-0/R-11 (Wk. Nr. 1500010), coded CW+CJ, "Green 4", JG301 now with the NASM in the USA came from the RAF collection.  (RAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Ta 152H-0/R-11 (Wk. Nr. 1500010), coded CW+CJ, "Green 4", JG301, USA 11, Reg. No. 32, T2/FE-112, with the NASM.  This Ta 152 is the only existing example of this fighter in the world today.  Definitive information about the NASM Ta 152 has always been lacking but research conducted late in 1998 may have revealed the airplane’s true identity as Werk-Nummer 150010, not 150003 or ‘020 as has been widely reported. This places the airframe toward the end of the range of pre-production H-0 models, a variant marking the transition from the Ta 152 prototypes to full production Ta 152H-1 airplanes.  It was probably built at Focke-Wulf’s production facility at Cottbus, Germany, in December 1944, and delivered to Erprobungskommando Ta 152 at Rechlin, Germany, for service testing.  As with most Ta 152s produced, ‘020’ was apparently transferred to Jagdgeswader (fighter squadron) JG 301 in early 1945.  A green ‘4’ was painted on the fuselage and this may have been the squadron identification and radio call sign “Green 4” but much remains unknown about this aircraft.  The initial information suggesting the aircraft was (Wk. Nr. 150020), was based on a type plate in the fuselage, which only designated a component.  The aircraft has a wooden tail and only (Wk. Nr. 150003) and (Wk. Nr. 150010) were fitted with this and on historical photos the overpainted remains of the code CW+CJ is visible which belongs to (Wk. Nr. 150010).  (Wk. Nr. 150020). was coded CW+CT.  Data courtesy of Peter W. Cohausz.  National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.  (USAAF Photos)

As the Soviets rolled over eastern Germany, many Luftwaffe pilots took off and steered their mounts west.  They preferred to be captured by the West.  The British recovered “Green 4” in Aalborg, Denmark, at the end of hostilities.  They turned the airplane over to “Watson’s Whizzer’s, the American unit charged with collecting Luftwaffe aircraft for further study. Lt Harold McIntosh flew ‘020 to Melun, France, where it was loaded aboard the British aircraft carrier HMS Reaper and shipped Newark Army Airfield, New Jersey. From Newark, McIntosh flew this Ta 152 to Freeman Field, Indiana. The airplane was later transferred to Wright Field, Ohio, to undergo extensive flight testing as Foreign Equipment number FE-112 (later changed to T2-112). After testing, the Army stored the aircraft and then turned it over to the National Air Museum in 1960.

In 1998 Museum restoration staff were treating deteriorated sections of the wooden aft fuselage, fin, rudder, and right elevator when they discovered several interesting items that offered tantalizing glimpses into the airplane’s shadowy past.  Extensive wood rot was found in where the horizontal stabilizer joins the vertical fin. The restoration staff speculated that during testing at Wright Field, pilots and engineers became concerned that the wooden tail may have been weakened by defective glues or sabotage.  They strengthened the entire area with steel plate.  However, this work may have compromised flight safety because it required moving the horizontal stabilizer forward several inches, exacerbating a tail-heavy condition already known to the Germans.  The restoration specialist removed the steel plate and rebuilt the tail to the original German configuration.

After comparing photographs with the aircraft, the staff determined the British painted over some of the original Luftwaffe markings. The US Army Air Force then stripped and repainted part of the airplane but NASM technicians carefully sanded through the layers of Allied paint to reveal previous markings and much of the original German paint.  They found the old Foreign Equipment number, RAF markings, the Reich Defence tail bands of JG 301 (fighter wing 301), and the original Nazi swastika.  The staff also found 20-mm MG 151 gun mounts and fittings in the upper cowling.  However, these were not normally found in H-0 models, suggesting this airframe may have been destined to become a C-1 variant.

Focke-Wulf Ta 154, Moskito night-fighter in Luftwaffe service.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

One slightly damaged Ta 154 is known to have been captured at Lage, Germany, by the 54th Air Disarmament Squadron and is reported to have been shipped to the USA on board the SS Richard Gatling.  No FE number was assigned, its fate is unknown.  (USAAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 189 Uhu tactical reconnaissance aircraft in Luftwaffe service.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 189 Uhu tactical reconnaissance aircraft found by American troops near Salzburg, Austria. (USAAF Photo)

Focke-Wulf Fw 189A-3 Uhu, (Wk. Nr. 0173), 3X+AA, captured at Grove, Denmark.  This aircraft was designated RAF AM27.  It was scrapped at Gosport, England, in 1947.  (RAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 189 Uhu in Soviet markings.  (Soviet Air Force Photo)

The Soviet Union evaluated captured Fw 189s and made copies post war.  The Focke-Wulf Fw 189 was called the "frame" by Red Army and was assessed to have excellent all-round visibility, good stability and responsiveness, and the ability to maintain steady flight on one engine.  Despite its low speed (300 km/h) this aircraft performed its combat duties until the end of the war. Soviet examiners noted "The aircraft's excellent visibility cuts down on the possibility of surprise fighter attacks.  Its high maneuverability allows gunners to prepare to beat off an attack only if the attacking aircraft is detected in time. In combat turns, the fighter will always be in the field of fire of its rear guns. The Fw 189 can bank at speeds of 180-200 km/h. The maneuver Fw 189 crews commonly use to break off combat is to descend in a spiral to low altitudes and remain there, hedge-hopping."6" Engineer-Major M. S. Dmitriyev, who examined the Fw 189 in detail, also noted the crew comforts provided: carefully thought-out arrangement of navigational equipment and radios; side-by-side seating of navigator and pilot, making their work easier without intercom; and efficient cockpit heating.  The aircraft could also perform light bombing missions. It turned out to be very easy to put onto a target.

Focke-Wulf Fw 191, Bomber B design competitor (prototype).  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 200 Condor, transport and maritime patrol bomber in Luftwaffe Service.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 200C Condor FuG 200 Hohentwiel radar.  (Luftwaffe Photos) 

Focke-Wulf Fw 200C-4/U1 Condor, (Wk. Nr. 0137), coded GC+AE.  This Condor was the personal aircraft of Heinrich Himmler and later Grand Admiral Doenitz.  The aircraft was found intact at Achmer in 1945 and flown to Farnborough on 3 July 1945.  Designated RAF AM94, this aircraft was flown in the UK.  It was scrapped at Farnborough in 1946.  (RAF Photos)

Focke-Wulf Fw 200C Condor, (Wk. Nr. 0240), captured at Flensburg.  Designated RAF AM95, this aircraft was scrapped at Schleswig.

Focke-Wulf Fw 200A-02 Condor, (Wk. Nr. 2984), OY-DAM and G-AGAY, RAF DX177, flown in the UK until scrapped in Jan 1942.

Focke-Wulf Fw 200C, (Wk. Nr. 081), captured at Flensburg.  Designated RAF AM97, this aircraft crashed at Schleswig on 28 Feb 1946.

Focke-Wulf Fw 200C-3 Condor, (Wk. Nr. 0034), F8+OW.  The globe-circle symbol is for KG 40l.  This aircraft landed at Chkalovskaya near Leningrad, Russia in April 1943.  The aircraft was test flown by Soviet Engineer-Major Gribakin and Colonel Kabanov in the USSR.  It was later put on display in Moscow.  (Luftwaffe Photo) 

Focke-Wulf Fw 200C-3 Condor, (Wk. Nr. 0063), F8+CL of 3/KG40, later transferred to 7/KG40 and coded F8+BR ditched near Trondheim, Norway on 22 Feb 1942.  Recovered in 1999, this aircraft is being restored in the Deutsches Technikmuseum, Berlin, Germany.

Focke-Wulf Fw 300, proposed version of Fw 200 (project).

Focke-Wulf Ta 400 (project), intended for long range bombardment of strategic objects in the  marine war in the Atlantic.

Gotha Go 145 biplane, RP+NR.  (Edgar Diegan Photo)

Gotha Go 145B, (Wk. Nr. 1115), trainer, SM+NQ from Stab/JG27.  Originally assigned to Stab/JG 27 as SM+NQ, this aircraft was being flown by Uffz. Leonhard Buckle when it force-landed, after getting lost and running out of fuel, during a mail delivery flight from Cherbourg-Ouest to Strasbourg on 28 August 1940.  Three days later, 1115 was flown to the Royal Aircraft Establishment, receiving RAF markings, including it's new serial of RAF BV207.  Flown to Ashton Down in January 1941, the aircraft ended it's career as maintenance airframe 2682M with 20 MU.  RAF BV207 was struck off charge (SoC) in April 1942, and was presumably scrapped.  (RAF Photos)

Gotha Go 242 transport glider in Luftwaffe service.   (Luftwaffe Photos)

Gotha Go 242, (Wk. Nr. unknown), designated RAF SL538 was brought to the UK but not flown and was scrapped.

Gotha Go 242B-4, (Wk. Nr. unknown), troop-carrying transport glider rebuilt from the remains of a badly damaged example captured in Italy with parts of other Go 242s.  Shipped to the USA, it was reassembled at Clinton County Army Air Field near Wright Field, Ohio.  Named "The Fabric Fortress", it was rebuilt in Texas and then returned to Wright Field where it was flight tested in July 1946 as USA FE-2700, later T2-2700.  It was likely scrapped at Park Ridge.  (USAAF Photos)

Gotha Go 244, transport glider in Luftwaffe service.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Gotha Go 345, assault glider (prototype).

 (USAAF Photo)

Gotha Ka 430, transport glider (prototype).  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Heinkel He 100, fighter (prototype). At least one of these aircraft was provided to the Soviet Union by Germany for evaluation in 1940.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Heinkel He 112, fighter.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Heinkel He 113, (propaganda designation for He 100).  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Heinkel He 111.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

  (IWM Photo MH31314)

Heinkel He 111H-1, (Wk. Nr. 6853), RAF AW177, coded 1H+EN of II/KG26, that made a forced landing with only minor damage in an open field in at North Berwick, East Lothian, Scotland, after combat with a Spitfire of No. 602 Squadron on 9 February 1940.  AW177 is shown here being test flown in England. This aircraft crashed at RAF Polebrook on 10 November 1943 while carrying a number of 1426 Flight ground crew as passengers. The pilot, F/O Barr, and six others were killed, four were injured.  (RAF Photos)

Heinkel He 111H, (Wk. Nr. unknown), previously` 5J + CR' of III / KG4, captured in Libya in 1942.  Designated HS-? by the RAF, it was named "Delta Lily" and flown by No. 260 Squadron.  It was reported as being on a scrap dump at Fanara in the Suez Canal Zone, Egypt in April 1947 (RAF Photos)

Heinkel He 111H, (Wk. Nr. unknown).  One aircraft was captured was captured in Syria in 1942 and used by the French to transport diplomats around the Middle East.  Another He 111, (Wk. Nr. unknown) was captured in France ca. 1944-1945 by the French Armee de l'Air and flown by GB I/31 Aunis alongside that unit's Junkers Ju 88's. flown by the French Armee de l'Air post war.

Heinkel He 111H-20, (Wk. Nr. 701152), NT+SL captured in the Munich area of Germany this aircraft was flown by Watsons Whizzers and then by the 56th FG, 8th USAAF before being handed over to the British.  It is painted black and has an RAF roundel painted over the USAAF star and bar markings.  The peculiar logo on the fuselage is the letter W inside a C inside an O from the initials of Major J. Carter of the 61st FS, Major Williamson of the 62nd FS and Captain Ordway, Engineer Officer of the 61stFS.  This aircraft is preserved in the RAF Museum at Hendon in England.  (USAAF Photos)

Heinkel He 111H-20, (Wk. Nr. 701152), coded NT+SL.  This aircraft was built in 1944 and modified to drop Fallschirmjäger (paratroops).  It is on display in the RAF Museum, Hendon, England.  (Dapi89 Photo)

Heinkel He 111 P-2 (5J+CN), (Wk. Nr. 1526) 5.Staffel/Kampfgeschwader 54 (KG 54 - Bomber Wing 54), on display at the Royal Norwegian Air Force (RNAF) Museum at Gardermoen, part of the Norwegian Armed Forces Aircraft Collection.  The 5J Geschwaderkennung code on the aircraft is usually documented as being that of either I. Gruppe/KG 4 or KG 100, with B3 being KG 54's equivalent code throughout the war.   (Clemens Vasters Photo)

Heinkel He 111 E-3.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Heinkel He 111 E-3 (25+82), (Wk. Nr. 2940). with the "conventional" cockpit is on display at the Museo del Aire, Madrid, Spain, having served in the Condor Legion.  (Hugh Lleweln Photo)

Heinkel He 111H-16, (Wk. Nr. 8433), 2B+DC, "Red 4", surrendered in Italy by a defecting Hungarian pilot in Dec 1944.  This aircraft was shipped to the the USA where it was designated USA FE-1600, later T2-1600.  It was probably scrapped at Freeman Field, Indiana in 1946.  (USAAF Photos)

 Heinkel He 111H-11, (Wk. Nr. unknown), KG27 captured by the USSR in Jan 1943.  It was sent to the NII-VVS (Soviet Air Forces Scientific Research Institute), where it was flown in May 1943.  (Soviet Air Force Photo)

Heinkel He 111H-6 from I/KG28 was shot down on 27 November 1941 near Dmitrov in the Soviet Union by Senior Lieutenant I.N.Kalabushkin of the Soviet of 56th Wing.

CASA-2.111B, Auto & Technic museum Sinsheim.  (AlfvanBeem Photo)

 (Dirk1981 Photo)

 (C1d2wiki Photo)

CASA-2.111B (Serial No. Bl-2117), flown by the Spanish Air Force until 1972, was renumbered as Luftwaffe G1+AD and flown to Gatow slung under a Sikorsky CH-53 helicopter in 1995.  This aircraft was restored and is now on display in the Luftwaffenmuseum Berlin-Gatow in Germany. 

Heinkel He 115, general-purpose floatplane in Luftwaffe service.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Heinkel He 115A-2, (Wk. Nr. 3039), No. 52 of Marinens Flyvevaesens.   Five RNAF Heinkel He 115s escaped to Scotland after the fall of Norway, and were were used by the RAF and the RNAF.  Designated RAF BV184, on 10 April 1940, aircraft No. 5 carried out an attack on the German cruisers Koln and Lonigsberg.  RNAF officer Lieut. Offerdal flew this aircraft to Meikle ferry, then on to Invergordon.  It is shown here being examined by Flt. Lt. Middleton and Flying Officer Fleming of RAF No. 201 Squadron.  It was struck off charge on 31 May 1941.  (RAF Photo)

Heinkel He 115A-2, (Wk. Nr. 3041), No. 56 of Marinens Flyvevaesns, RAF BV185, destroyed/22 Sep 1941.  The aircraft is possibly No. 56, RAF BV185.  (RAF Photo)

Heinkel He 115A-2, (Wk. Nr. 3042), No. 58 of Marinens Flyvevaesens, flown to Tromsø in northern Norway and then at last to Shetland, where this picture is taken.  Designated RAF BV186 this aircraft was scrapped in Dec 1942.  (RNAF Photo)

Heinkel He 115B-1, (Wk. Nr. 2400), former Luftwaffe and No. 64 of Marinens Flyvevaesens, RAF BV187. destroyed in Dec 1942. 

Heinkel He 115A-2, (Wk. Nr. 3043) (TBC).  This aircraft has been recovered from Russia, and is now in storage with a private owner in France.

Heinkel He 115 B-1, (Wk. Nr. 3896), 1 Staffel, Kustenfliegergruppe 906, Luftflotte 5.  This aircraft was recovered from Hafrsfjord in Norway on 2 June 2012.  The aircraft is currently in storage awaiting restoration at the Flyhistorisk Museum, Sola near Stavanger, Norway.

Heinkel He 115, (Wk. Nr. unknown).  The wreck of this He 115 was located at the bottom of Lake Limingen in Nord- Trøndelag, Norway in 2013.

 

Heinkel He 162 Volksjäger, (Wk. Nr. 200001), left and another, right, in their factory finish paint schemes.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Heinkel He 162 aircraft in a large underground factory at Hinterbruhl, Germany in April 1945.  United States Ninth Army troops found these nearly completed aircraft in a former salt mine near Engels.  Built 300 metres underground, a large elevator was used to bring the aircraft to the surface.  (USAAF Photo)

Heinkel He 162A-2, White 3, Erproungskommando 162.  The He 162A-2 Volksjäger or “People’s Fighter” was also known as Salamander, which was the code name of its construction program, and Spatz (“Sparrow”), which was the name given to the aircraft by the Heinkel company.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120221) captured at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. Designated RAF AM58, this aircraft was scrapped at Farnborough in 1946.

 (Author Photo)

 (CA&SM Photo)

 (Ra Boe Photos)

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120076), "Yellow 4", captured at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.  Designated RAF AM59, later RAF Serial No. VH523, this aircraft was held by the Canada Air and Space Museum in Ottawa.  It was traded to Aero Vintage in the UK for a Bristol Fighter (G-AANM, D-7889) in December 2006.  Wk. Nr. 120076 is now on display at the Deutsches Technikmuseum Berlin, Germany.

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120074), White 11, 20, captured at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.  Designated RAF AM60, this aircraft was scrapped at Brize Norton in 1947.  (RAF Photo)

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120072), captured at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.  Designated RAF AM61, this aircraft crashed at Farnborough on 9 Nov 1945. (RAF Photos)

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120086), Yellow 2, JG1, captured at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.  Designated RAF AM62, this aircraft was on display in Hyde Park, London, England post war.  This aircraft was later shipped to Canada and is on display in the Canada Aviation and Space Museum. (RAF Photo)

Heinkel He 162A-2 Volksjäger, (Wk. Nr. 120086), coded "Yellow 2", JG1, designated RAF AM62, currently on display in the Canada Air and Space Museum, Ottawa, Ontario.  This aircraft surrendered at Leck, and was moved to Farnborough by surface transport on 22 August 1945.  AM 62 was allocated to No. 47 MU, Sealand, on 29 May 1946 for packing and shipping to Canada.  It also left Salford Docks on 26 August aboard SS Manchester Commerce, arriving at Montréal on 9 September 1946.  It has been in the CASM since 1964.  (Author Photos)

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120095), captured at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.  Designated RAF AM63, this aircraft is shown here on display in the UK post war.  It was scrapped at Brize Norton in 1947. (AWM Photos)

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120097), captured at Leck.  Designated RAF AM64, this aircraft was scrapped at Farnborough in 1947.

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120227) of JG 1, captured at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.  Designated RAF AM65, later VN629 this aircraft was brought to Farnborough by surface transport on 31 July 1945.  It was not flown by the RAF.  (RAF Photo)

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120227) of JG 1, captured at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.  Designated RAF AM65, later VN629 this aircraft was brought to Farnborough by surface transport on 31 July 1945.  It was not flown by the RAF.  It is currently on display in the RAF Museum, Hendon, England.  (Dapi99 Photo)

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120091), captured at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.  Designated RAF AM66, this aircraft was possibly scrapped at South Cerney, England.

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120098), captured at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.  designated RAF AM67, Later VH513, this aircraft was scrapped at Farnborough in 1946.

Heinkel He 162A-1, (Wk. Nr. 120235), originally coded Red 6, now painted coded Yellow 6, JG1, was captured at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.  This aircraft was not initially allocated an Air Ministry number, likely because it was intended for use as a ballistics target.  It has reportedly later designated RAF AM68.  Initially on display at RAF Cranwell it was transferred to the Imperial War Museum, Lambeth in London, but is now on display at Duxford, Cambridgeshire, England.  (Tony Hisgett Photo)

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120015) formerly of III./JG1.  This aircraft is being restored by the Memorial Flight Association at the Musée de l'Air et de l'Espace near Paris, France.  This aircraft was one of 27 He 162s captured by the RAF at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany on 15 May 1945.  Five of these aircraft were turned over to the French Air Force in February 1946, and these included two He 162A-1s, (Wk. Nr. 310012) "Red 7" and (Wk. Nr. 310003) "Yellow 5"; three He 162A-2s (Wk. Nr. 120093), "White 2", (Wk. Nr. 120223) "Yellow 1", and (Wk. Nr. 120015).  The He 162A-2s were flown by the French Air Force from April 1947 to July 1948.  No. 1, (Wk. Nr. 120015) was painted in a single colour of grey/beige and bore the fuselage No. 2.  It was flown for most of the tests totalling nearly 14 hours on a total amount of 18 hours of flight tests; each flight lasting approximately 20 to 30 mn ; this enabled about 30 French Air Force pilots to get a glimpse of jet flying, pending the arrival of British Vampires in 1949.  Grounded after the death of Capt. Schienger on aircraft No. 1, (Wk. Nr. 120015) was sent to the Rochefort-Sur- Mer Air Force mechanics school.  It was then repainted "bordeaux-red" and sent to the Musée de l'Air et de l'Espace in 1952.  Its colour changed again to dark green which it wore until 1975 when it was given an approximate camouflage paint with (Wk. Nr. 120223).  (Armée de l'Air Photos)

Heinkel He 162, 27, damaged at the end of the war, captured by American forces in May 1945.  (USAAF Photo)

Heinkel He 162 A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120077), "Red 1" being test flown as USA FE-489, later T2-489.  This aircraft is now with the Planes of Fame Museum, Chino, California.  (USAAF Photos)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

 (Goshimini Photo)

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120077) "Nervenklau" is currently owned by the Planes of Fame Museum and is on static display at Chino, California.  This aircraft was sent to the United States in 1945 where it was given the designation USA FE-489 (Foreign Equipment No. 489) and later T2-489.

Heinkel He 162A-1, fuselage (Wk. Nr. 120222), coded White 4, later repainted Yellow 7, USA FE-493, later T2-493, at USAAF Depot Y76 Kassel, Germany before shipment to the USA.  (USAAF Photos)

Heinkel He 162A-1, fuselage (Wk. Nr. 120222), originally coded White 4, repainted Yellow 7, USA FE-493, later T2-493, with a wing from He 162A-1 (Wk. Nr. 120067), at Freeman Field, Seymour, Indiana Ohio post-war.  (USAAF Photo)

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120230), coded White 23, 1/JG1, captured by the British at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany in May 1945. Transferred by the RAF to the USA, coded USA FE-504, later T2-504, this aircraft is now with the NASM. (RAF Photo)

Heinkel He 162A-2 Spatz (Sparrow),Volksjager (Wk. Nr. 120230), coded White 23, 1/JG1, painted (Wk. Nr. 120222), USA FE-504, later T2-504, with the tail of (Wk. Nr. 120222).  This aircraft is stored with the National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia.  This aircraft was one of thirty-one JG 1 aircraft manufactured by Heinkel at Rostock-Marienehe and captured by the British at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany on 8 May 1945.  It was painted with the number White 23, and its red-white-black nose bands were in reverse order from the usual paint scheme, which may indicate that the wing commander and high-scoring ace, Col Herbert Ihlefeld, flew this particular aircraft.  After transfer to Britain, the US Army Air Forces accepted the airplane and shipped it to Wright Field, Ohio, for evaluation. It received the foreign equipment number FE-504, later T2-504, and was later moved to Freeman Field, Indiana.  For unknown reasons, mechanics replaced the tail unit at Wright Field with the tail unit of aircraft Wk. Nr. 120222.  FE-504/T2-504 was apparently never flown.  Its flying days ended permanently when someone at Freeman Field neatly sawed through the outer wing panels sometime before September 1946.  The wings were reattached with door hinges and the jet was shipped to air shows and military displays around the country.  The US Air Force transferred the aircraft to the Smithsonian Institution in 1949 but it remained in storage at Park Ridge, Illinois, until transfer to the Garber Facility in January 1955. National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, Washington Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia. (USAAF Photos)

Heinkel He 162A-2, (Wk. Nr. 120017), possibly "Yellow 6", JG1, USA FE-494, later T2-494, was used as a source of spare parts for T2-489.  This aircraft was scrapped at Park Ridge, Pennsylvania in 1950.

Heinkel He 162A-2, No. 2 of two captured by Soviet troops at Hinterbruhl in Austria in May 1945, shown here in USSR service being flight tested at the Soviet Research Institute in the spring of 1946.  This aircraft was flight tested in Russia, while He 162A-2 No. 1 was used for aerodynamic research.  Using a stock of components and aggregates, German workers monitored by Soviet specialists assembled them soon after the war at a plant in Rostock.  Large volumes of technical and design documentation reached the USSR later on.  Heinkel No. 2 underwent testing in the spring of 1946 at the Soviet Flight Research Institute.  Soviet specialists treated the aircraft cautiously and, before its first sortie, a technical commission established several speed, overload, and flight weight restrictions.  On 8 May 1945, G.M. Shiyanov took to the air in the Heinkel with red stars on the fuselage and tail.  The test pilot flew two more He 162 sorties, which demonstrated that the German designers had not succeeded in eliminating the main handling shortcomings.  The Flight Research Institute report contained this notation: "According to the pilot, the aircraft has a low longitudinal stability margin; lateral stability is close to neutral. The aircraft is unpleasant to fly thanks to negative stability and the extra efficiency of the rudders. The long takeoff roll of 1350 meters (with a flight weight 9.6 percent below normal) indicates a very low takeoff lift coefficient.  Further tests have ceased, because the takeoff roll is too long".  After that, one He 162A-2 was transferred to TsAGI for testing in wind tunnel T-101 and the second was dismantled at the TsAGI New Equipment Bureau.  (Soviet Air Force Photos)

Heinkel He 177A-5/R6 Greif (Griffon) long-range heavy bomber.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Heinkel He 177A-5/R6 Greif (Griffon) long-range heavy bomber, (Wk. Nr. 550062), coded F8+AP of II./KG40, RAF TS439.  This aircraft was captured by the French Resistance at Toulouse-Blagnac, France in Sep 1944.  It wore French markings including the title “Prise de Guerra”, until it was allocated to the RAF and flown to Farnborough on 10 September 1944.  This aircraft was shipped to the USA where it was designated USA FE-2100, later T2-2100.  It was not flown in the USA, and was scrapped at Park Ridge ca. 1950.  55 He 177s found in Germany by the RAF were collected  and destroyed.  (RAF Photos)

Heinkel He 177A-5/R6 Greif (Griffon) long-range heavy bombers, captured by the French Resistance at Toulouse-Blagnac, France in Sep 1944.  They wore French markings including the title “Prise de Guerra”,  (Armée de l'Air Photos)

Heinkel He 177A-7 Grief, (Wk. Nr. 550256), coded GP+RY, captured at Toulouse-Blagnac, France in Sep 1944.  It wore French markings including the title “Prise de Guerra”, until it was allocated to the USA.  It had the star and bar insignia added and was marked 56 under the nose section.  This aircraft crashed at Paris-Orly airport at the start of its intended ferry flight to the USA on 28 Feb 1945.  (USAAF Photos)

Heinkel He 178.  This aircraft flew for the first time in August 1939, marking the first flight of a jet powered aircraft in history. The He 178 had a top speed of 380mph, but the jets rapid consumption of fuel kept its range short at 200km.  Preliminary plans were in place to weaponize the design, but it was never progressed to the production stage.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Heinkel He 219A-7 Uhu night fighter in Luftwaffe service.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Heinkel He 219A-7 Uhu, (Wk. Nr. 290126), captured at Grove.  This aircraft was designated RAF AM20.  It has a night camouflage paint scheme.  It was scrapped at Brize Norton in 1948.  (RAF Photos)

Heinkel He 219A-7 Uhu, (Wk. Nr. 310109), captured at Grove.  This aircraft was designated RAF AM21.  It was scrapped at Sleap in 1948. 

Heinkel He 219A-7 Uhu, (Wk. Nr. 310189), D5+CL of I/NJG 3 night fighter captured at Grove, Denmark.  This aircraft was designated RAF AM22.  It was scrapped at Farnborough in 1946.  RCAF Squadron Leaders Joe McCarthy and Ian Somerville both flew these aircraft.  (RAF Photos)

Heinkel He 219A-7 Uhu, (Wk. Nr. 310200), captured at Grove, Denmark.  This aircraft was designated RAF AM23.  It crashed at Grove on 21 July 1945.

Heinkel He 219A Uhu, (Wk. Nr. 310215), or (Wk. Nr. 310114) captured at Sylt.  Designated RAF AM43, this aircraft may have had the vertical tail fins from two different aircraft.  It was likely scrapped at Ford, England.

Heinkel He 219A Uhu, (Wk. Nr. 310106), captured at Sylt.  Designated RAF AM44, this aircraft was scrapped at Brize Norton.

Heinkel He 219A Uhu in Luftwaffe service.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Heinkel He 219A-0 Uhu, (Wk. Nr. 210903), captured at Grove, Denmark.  Designated RAF USA 8, this aircraft was shipped to the USA on HMS Reaper, and re-designated USA FE-612 at Freeman Field, Indiana post war.  This aircraft was scrapped about 1950.   (USAAF Photos)

Heinkel He 219A-5 Uhu, (Wk. Nr. 290060), CS+QG, captured at Grove, Denmark.  Designated RAF USA 9, marked on the rear fuselage in this photo, USA FE-613, later T2-613.  This aircraft was scrapped at Freeman Field, Indiana in 1946.  (USAAF Photo)

Heinkel He 219 Uhu (Wk. Nr. 290202), captured at Grove, Denmark.  Designated RAF USA 10, USA FE-614, later T2-614, Freeman Field Indiana fall 1945.  This aircraft is preserved in the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Centre, Chantilly, Virginia.  (USAAF Photo)

Heinkel He 219 Uhu (Wk. Nr. 290202), captured at Grove, Denmark.  Designated RAF USA 10, USA FE-614, preserved in the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Centre, Chantilly, Virginia.  (Mark Pellegrini Photo)

Heinkel He 219 Uhu (Wk. Nr. 290202), captured at Grove, Denmark.  Designated RAF USA 10, USA FE-614, preserved in the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Centre, Chantilly, Virginia.  (Kogo Photos)

Heinkel He 274, (Wk. Nr. unknown) high-altitude bomber.  Two prototypes were completed by the French post-war and put into service with the Armée de l'Air.  (Armée de l'Air Photos)

Heinkel He 277 Amerika Bomber, heavy bomber (project).  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Heinkel He 280, jet fighter (prototype), DL+AS.  At the end of the war the Soviet Union collected three damaged twin-engine He 280 fighters with Heinkel S 8a engines at Vienna, Austria.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Henschel Hs 126B-1 OK, reconaissance aircraft.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

 (RAAF Photo)

 (Lou Kemp Photo)

Henschel Hs 126B-1 OK, reconaissance aircraft captured by the RAAF and flown by No. 450 Squadron, Libya, ca.1942.  (Mike Mirkovic Photo)

Henschel Hs 129B-1 ground attack aircraft in Luftwaffe service.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Henschel Hs 129B-1 ground attack aircraft, 5PzSG1, captured at Tunis, being examined by USAAF personnel, May 1943.  (USAAF Photo)

Henschel Hs 129B-1, (Wk. Nr. 0297), captured in North Africa where it had served with I./SG2.  Designated RAF NF756, this aircraft was flown at RAF Collyweston on 13 May 1944.  It was struck off charged and was scrapped in August 1947.  (RAF Photos)

 (USAAF Photos)

Henschel Hs 129B-1/R2, (Wk. Nr. 0385), 8.(Pz)1Sch.G2, captured at El Aouina, Tunisia, in May 1943.  This aircraft was brought to the USA where it was designated EB-105, then USA FE-103, later FE-4600 and then T2-4600, at Freeman Field, Indiana in 1945.  The aircraft was cut up for scrap in 1946, but the cockpit was purchased and is on display in Der Adler Luftwaffe Museum, Sidney, Australia.  Another Hs 129, was reported to have been at Freeman Field, fate unknown.

 

Henschel Hs 132, jet dive bomber (prototype).  (Luftwaffe Illustration/Photos)

Horton Ho V, propeller powered flying wing (project).  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Horten Ho 229V-3, (aka Go 299V-3) advanced flying wing twin-jet fighter (project) captured in Germany.  This aircraft was shipped to the USA where it was designated USA FE-490, later T2-490.  It is stored with the NASM.  (USAAF Photo)

Horten Ho 229 (Horten H. IX V3), (aka Go 229V-3) experimental flying wing twin-jet fighter (project).  Because of the limited resources of the Horten organization, this aircraft was being produced by the Gothaer Waggonfabrik organization where it was captured at Freidrichsroda, Germany.   Brought to the USA, it was designated USA FE-490, later T2-490.  This aircraft is preserved with the NASM.  (Michael Katzmann Photos)

Horten Flying-wing-gliders, Ho II, Ho III, and Ho IV.  Ho II, USA FE-5042 is with the NASM.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Horten Ho IIIh, this aircraft was shipped to America where it was designated USA FE-7, later T2-7 and then either FE-5039 or FE-5041. This aircraft may be in storage with the NASM.  (Michael Katzmann Photo)

Horten H.IIIh flying wing sailplane, (Wk. Nr. 31) built at Göttingen in 1944, USA FE-5041, center section, on display at the National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar Hazy Center, Chantilly, Virginia.  This glider was built with a prone-position cockpit and modified control systems. Three were built including this one which was captured by the British Combined Intelligence Objectives Subcommittee in 1945 at Rottweil, moved to Freeman Field, Indiana in the USA.  By 1946 it had been transferred to Northrop Corporation at Hawthorne, California along with a Horten H.IIIf and the Horten Ho VI V2 in 1947.  (Elliott Wolf Photo)

Horten Ho IIIf all wing sailplane, (Wk. Nr. 32), prone pilot version built in 1944.  This aircraft was captured in damaged condition at Rottweil, Germany in 1945.  It was shipped to American and given the designation USA FE-5039, later T2-5039.  This aircraft is on display in the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Centre.  (Mike Peel Photo)

Horten Ho IV, (Wk. Nr. unknown), on display in the Deutsches Museum, Munich, Germany.  (John McCullagh Photo)

Horten Ho IV, LA-AC, (Wk. Nr. unknown).  This aircraft was displayed at Farnborough in Nov 1945.  Sold in the USA it is on display in the Planes of Fame Museum, Chino, California.  (Alan Wilson Photo)

Horten Ho VI, (Wk. Nr. 34), all wing sailplane.  USA FE-5040, later T2-5040 is on display in the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Centre.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Junkers Ju 52 Tante Ju, transport bomber KGrzbV400, (H4+CH), ex-1.LLG1 ferrying supplies to North Africa 1942.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Junkers Ju 52 Tante Ju, transport bombers.  (Bundesarchiv_Bild_101I-317-0053-18)

Junkers Ju 52 Tante Ju, transport bomber, floatplane.  Nine of these aircraft went to France after the war.   (Luftwaffe Photo)

Junkers Ju 52/3m, (Wk. Nr. 6840), captured at Flensburg.  Designated RAF AM102, this aircraft was scrapped at Brize Norton in 1948.

Junkers Ju 52/3m, (Wk. Nr. 6567), captured at Flensburg.  Designated RAF AM103, this aircraft was scrapped at Brize Norton in 1948.

Junkers Ju52/3m, (Wk. Nr. 641038), Tante Ju, transport bomber, captured at Flensburg where it had been flown by Deutsche Luft Hansa (DLH) as D-AUAV.  The Ju 52 was flown to Farnborough on 18 July 1945.  Designated RAF AM104, this aircraft was scrapped at Woodley in 1948.  (RAF Photo)

Junkers Ju 52/3m, (Wk. Nr. unknown), Tante Ju, transport bomber, SAAF CQ-HH, captured in the Mediterranean Theatre and put into service with the SAAF.  (SAAF Photo)

Junkers Ju 52/3m captured intact by the Australian forces at Ain-El Gazala, Libya.  It was repainted with the Royal Australian Air Force’s roundels and nicknamed "Libyan Clipper", ca. 1943.  (AWM Photos)

Junkers Ju 52, (Wk. Nr. J5283), "Tante Ju", transport bomber aka Junkers C-79, D-AENF, (Ju 52/3mGE), USAAF (Serial No. 42-52883), with American airmen.  (USAAF Photo)

  (Ra Boe Photo)

Junkers Ju 52/3m, (Wk. Nr. unknown), D-AZAW, Deutsches Technikmuseum Berlin.  (Leif Orss Photo)

Junkers Ju 52/3m, (Wk. Nr. unknown), built in 1936, initially registered as D-AQUI, later D-CDLH until 1984, known as "Iron Annie N52JU", re-painted as D-AQUI in historic 1936 colours as "Queen of the Skies",  Deutsche Lufthansa Berlin-Stiftung's fleet.  From 1932, the Junkers works and various licensees built almost 5000 airplanes that were to serve 30 airlines in 25 countries across the globe.  Built at the Junkers works in Dessau, this Ju 52 embarked on her maiden flight in 1936.  Initially in service with Lufthansa, she then spent almost 20 years alternating between Germany and Norway.  1955 saw her taken out of service in Norway.  Too large for a museum in Oslo, she was sold to South America where she was flown in Ecuador from 1957 to 1963.  Retired at Quito Airport, she was exposed to the elements, until an American flying enthusiast rescued her in 1969. Later on, spectators were able to admire "Aunt Ju", now known as "Iron Annie", at air shows across the States before it was purchased by Lufthansa in 1984 and painstakingly restored.  D-CDLH has P&W engines with three-bladed propellers.  (Lufthansa Photo)

Junkers Ju 86K-4 Fv 155, (Wk. Nr. 0860412), bomber reconnaissance, Swedish Air Force B3, preserved in the Flygvapenmuseum Malmen, Swedish Air Force Museum, Linkoping, Sweden.  (Towpilot Photo)

Junkers Ju 86 in Luftwaffe service.  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Junkers Ju 86R-1, (Wk. Nr. 5132) was captured at Fassberg.  Designated RAF AM82, this aircraft crashed at Schleswig on 27 Aug 1945.

Junkers Ju 86P, (Wk. Nr. 0860291) was captured at Fassberg.  Designated RAF AM118, this aircraft was scrapped at Schleswig.

Junkers Ju 87 Stuka, dive-bomber formerly in Italian service in North Africa.  Its pilot was forced to land behind British lines after running out of fuel.  Of the ten aircraft forced to land only this one remained airworthy.  (RAF Photo)

Captured Junkers Ju 87 Stuka in RAF markings, VZ-?.  (RAF Photo)

Junkers Ju 87 Stuka factory.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Junkers Ju 87G-2 Stuka, (Wk. Nr. 494083) painted as W8+A, on display in the RAF Museum, Cosford in 1970.  This aircraft was captured at Eggebek in Schleswig-Hostein, Germany in May 1945.  No Air Ministry number was allocated.   (RuthAS Photo)

Junkers Ju 87G-2 Stuka, (Wk. Nr. 494083) on display in the RAF Museum, Cosford, painted as +JK.  This aircraft was captured at Eggebek in Schleswig-Hostein, Germany in May 1945.  No Air Ministry number was allocated.  (Kogo Photos)

The Junkers Ju 87 Stuka, dive-bomber displayed at the Royal Air Force Museum was captured by British troops in Germany in 1945  It is thought to have been built in 1943–1944 as a D-5 before being rebuilt as a G-2 variant, possibly by fitting G-2 outer wings to a D-5 airframe.  After the war, it was one of 12 captured German aircraft selected by the British for museum preservation.  In 1967, permission was given to use the aircraft in the film Battle of Britain and it was repainted and modified to resemble a 1940 variant of the Ju 87.  The engine was found to be in excellent condition and there was little difficulty in starting it, but returning the aircraft to airworthiness was considered too costly for the filmmakers, and ultimately, models were used in the film to represent Stukas.  In 1998, the film modifications were removed, and the aircraft returned to the original G-2 configuration.  This aircraft has also been reported as Junkers Ju 87B, (Wk. Nr. 5763), RAF HK827.  Junkers Ju 87B-1, (Wk. Nr. 087/5600), S2+LM from II./StG77 was reported as being on the scrap area at Farnborough in Dec 1946.

 Junkers Ju 87 Stuka dive-bomber, coded S7+EP, captured in North Africa, 1943.  (USAAF Photo)

Junkers Ju 87 Stuka dive-bomber (Wk. Nr. unknown), captured in North Africa, 1943.   (USAAF Photo)

Captured Junkers Ju 87G with flame concealing exhaust, 3.7mm cannon, Salzburg, Austria, 1945.  (USAAF Photo)

 (Author Photos)

Junkers Ju 87R2/Trop Stuka, dive-bomber, (Wk. Nr. 5954), on display in the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry, Illinois.  This aircraft was abandoned in North Africa and found by British forces in 1941.  The Ju 87 was donated by the British government and sent to the USA during the war.  It was fully restored in 1974 by the EAA of Wisconsin.

Other Ju 87 survivors include a Junkers Ju 87 R-2, (Wk. Nr. 0875709) owned by the Flying Heritage Collection, Paine Field, Everett, Washington under a long-term restoration to fly.  It served bearing theStammkennzeichen of LI+KU with 1./St.G.5, and was recovered to the United Kingdom in 1998 before being sold to the FHC.  It is likely to be the best candidate for an airworthy restoration.  Other Ju 87 aircraft survive as wreckage, recovered from crash sites.

Junkers Ju 87 Stuka, dive-bomber, (Wk. Nr. unknown), one of two wrecks on display in the Deutsches Technikmuseum in Berlin.  These two complete aircraft wrecks were recovered from separate crash sites near Murmansk, Russia, in 1990 and 1994.  The wrecks were purchased from New Zealand collector Tim Wallis, who originally planned for the remains to be restored to airworthy condition, in 1996.  (Ra Boe Photos)

 

Junkers Ju 87 Stuka, dive-bomber, (Wk. Nr. unknown), wreckage preserved in the Sinsheim Auto & Technik Museum in Germany.  This aircraft crashed near Saint-Tropez in 1944 and was raised from the seabed in 1989.  (LSDSL Photo)

In October 2006, a Ju 87 D-3/Trop. was recovered underwater, near Rhodes.  Junkers Ju 87 B-2 9801, (Wk. Nr. 0406) is under reconstruction at Yugoslav Aeronautical Museum.

Junkers Ju 88, coded 3Z+H, in Luftwaffe service.  (Bundesarchiv Bild 101I-417-1766-03A)

Junkers Ju 88A-6, (Wk. Nr. 6073), M2+MK of 2/KuFlGr. 106.  RAF HM509, of No. 1426 (Enemy Aircraft Circus) Flight based at Collyweston, Northamptonshire, parked in front of the hangars at Bassingbourn, Cambridgeshire, during the unit's 11th tour of operational stations giving flying demonstrations. Formerly of Kustenflieger 106, this aircraft fell into British hands on 26 November 1941 when its crew became disorientated following an abortive anti-shipping sortie in the Irish Sea and landed by mistake at Chivenor, Devon.  HM509 joined No. 1426 Flight, then at Duxford, Cambridgeshire, on 11 December 1941, remaining with them until 26 July 1944, when it was struck off charge after being damaged in a ground loop at RAF Thorny Island on 19 May 1944.  Though not seriously damaged, it was cannibalized for spares for other Ju 88s operated by the unit.  It may have been painted yellow on its underside.  (RAF Photos)

Junkers Ju 88A-1, (Wk. Nr. 7036), coded 9K+HL of 1/KG51, force-landed at Buckholt Farm on 28 July 1940 after running out of fuel.  This aircraft was test flown in England as RAF AX919.  (RAF Photo)

Junkers Ju 88A-5, (Wk. Nr. 3457), 4D+DL, from I./KG30,  This aircraft landed in error at RAF Lulsgate Bottom on 23 July 1941.  Designated RAF EE205, it was scrapped in early 1948.  (RAF Photo)

Junkers Ju 88R-1, (Wk. Nr. 360043), D5+EV from IV./NJG3.  Originally built as a Ju 88A-1 bomber in 1942, it was converted to R-1 standard early in 1943 for the night fighter role.  In May 1943, a three-man crew was ordered to intercept an unarmed BOAC Mosquito courier flight from Leuchars, Scotland flying to Stockholm, Sweden.  Two hours after their take-off, the aircrew of this aircraft defected to England, sending a fake message to their home base that they had a fire in the starboard engine.  The bomber descended to sea level and dropped three life rafts to make the search parties think the aircraft had ditched at sea.  The crew then few on to Scotland.  The aircraft was a significant acquisition for the RAF as this aircraft was fitted with the most up to date FuG 202 Lichtenstein B/C radar installation.  This aircraft was designated RAF PJ876 and underwent trials with the RAF Wireless and Electrical Flight section of No. 1426 (Enemy Aircraft) Flight.  It was acquired by the RAF Museum in 1978.  (RAF Photo)

Junkers Ju 88R-1, (Wk. Nr. 360043), D5+EV from IV./NJG3.  Acquired by the RAF Museum in 1978.  The antenna of the on this aircraft are replicas, as the entire radar system was removed from the aircraft for evaluation during the war.  It had been preserved in the Royal Air Force Museum Hendon, London, but is currently located at Cosford while the Hendon location is being upgraded.   (Dapi89 Photo)

Junkers Ju 88A-5, (Wk. Nr. 6214), V4+GS from III./KG1, designated RAF HX360 was only used for spare parts.

Junkers Ju 88G-1, (Wk. Nr. 712273), 4R+UR from III./NJG2, landed in error at RAF Woodbridge when it became lost on a flight and ran out of fuel on 13 July 1944.  This aircraft was equipped with FuG220, FuG227 and FuG350 radars, making it an important intelligence find.  Designated RAF TP190, later AM231, this aircraft was flown 33 flights before it was scrapped at Farnborough after Oct 1945.  (RAF Photos)

Junkers Ju 88S-1, (Wk. Nr. 140604), RF+MT, designated RAF TS472.  This aircraft is shown here with No. 1426 (Enemy Aircraft) Flight at Collyweston, Northamptonshire, England, undergoing maintenance; Focke Wulf Fw 190A-3, RAF PN999, is undergoing an engine service while airmen re-paint the wings of TS472.  This aircraft was scrapped post war.  (RAF Photo)

Junkers Ju 88G-6, (Wk. Nr. 622983), 4R+RB, I/NJG2, captured at Schleswig.  Designated RAF AM1, this aircraft crashed at Foulsham on 12 Sep 1945.

Junkers Ju 88G-6, (Wk. Nr. 620560) was captured at Schleswig.  Designated RAF AM2, this aircraft was struck off charge on 30 Apr 1946.

Junkers Ju 88G-6, (Wk. Nr. 620838) was captured at Flensburg.  Designated RAF AM3, later VK884, this aircraft was scrapped at Farnborough in 1945.  (RAF Photos)

Junkers Ju 88G-6, (Wk. Nr. 621965) captured at captured at Leck, Nordfriesland, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.  Designated RAF AM9, later VL991, this aircraft was sent to Shoeburyness for ballistic trials.

Junkers Ju 88G-6, (Wk. Nr. 620788) captured at Eggebek.  Designated RAF AM14.  This aircraft crashed at Tangmere on 18 July 1945.

Junkers Ju 88G-6, (Wk. Nr. 622311) captured at Eggebek.  Designated RAF AM16.  This aircraft was scrapped in 1946.  (RAF Photo)

Junkers Ju 88G-6, (Wk. Nr. 623193), with FuG 240 Berlin cavity magnetron radar in the nose, captured at Grove, Denmark in may 1945.  This aircraft was designated RAF AM31, and is shown here at Farnborough in 1945.  It was scrapped at Skellingthorpe in 1947.  (RAF Photos)

Junkers Ju 88G-6, (Wk. Nr. 622960), captured at Grove, Denmark.  Designated RAF AM32.  This aircraft crashed at Heston, England on 15 Oct 1945.

Junkers Ju 88G-6, (Wk. Nr. 622186), captured at Grove, Denmark.  Designated RAF AM33.  This aircraft was scrapped at Brize Norton in 1947.

Junkers Ju 88G-6, (Wk. Nr. 622461), captured at Kastrup.  DesignatedRAF AM41.  This aircraft was scrapped at Brize Norton in 1947.

Junkers Ju 88G-6, (Wk. Nr. 620968), captured at Flensburg.  Designated RAF AM47, this aircraft was scrapped at Brize Norton in 1947.

Junkers Ju 88G-6, (Wk. Nr. 628811), captured at Flensburg.  Designated RAF AM48, this aircraft was scrapoed at Brize Norton in 1947.

Junkers Ju 88G-6/U, (Wk. Nr. 0660), captured at Lubeck, Germany.  Designated RAF AM112, later VN874, this aircraft was scrapped at Gosport in 1947.

Junkers Ju 88G, (Wk. Nr. 620852), 4R+MB captured and flown by the RAF at Fassberg, but not allocated an Air Ministry number.  (RAF Photo)

Junkers Ju 88G, (Wk. Nr. 622138), captured and flown by the RAF at Fassberg, but not allocated an Air Ministry number.  This aircraft was ferried to England, where it was likely scrapped.

Junkers Ju 88H-1, (Wk. Nr. unknown), captured and flown by RCAF No. 411 Squadron, marked DB.  This aircraft was taken over post war and flown until it was likely grounded in 1946.

Junkers Ju 88A-4, (Wk. Nr. 4300227), captured at Foggia, Italy, in 1943.  It was repaired by the men of the 86th Fighter Squadron and flown from Italy to Wright Field on 5 Nov 1943 by 86th Fighter Squadron Comanche pilots.  USA FE-106, later FE-1599.  It appeared in war bond drives, and was finally returned to Wright Field in the summer of 1945 after being superficially damaged in Los Angeles.  It finally went to Freeman Field, Indiana, where it was used for spare parts until it was scrapped in 1946.  (USAAF Photos)


Junkers Ju 88G-6, (Wk. Nr. 620116), NJG3, designated RAF USA 21, transferred by the British to the USA.  Shipped to the USA it was designated USA FE-611, later T2-611.  This aircraft was scrapped at Freeman Field, Indiana in 1946.  (Edgar Deigan Photos)

Junkers Ju 88G-6, (Wk. Nr. 620116), NJG3, designated RAF USA 21, transferred by the British to the USA.  Shipped to the USA it was designated USA FE-611, later T2-611.  Shown here with radar installation.  This aircraft was scrapped at Freeman Field, Indiana in 1946.  (USAAF Photos)

Junkers Ju 88D-1/Trop, (Wk. Nr. 430650) initially came to the RAF via a defecting Romanian pilot who landed in Cyprus on 22 July 1943.  RAF HK959 was flown to Egypt and transferred to the USAAF and flown to Wright Field,  over the South Atlantic route on 14 Oct 1943.  This aircraft was designated USA FE-105 and later FE-1598, and briefly USAAF (Serial No. 43-0650).  This aircraft is now preserved in the National Museum of the USAF, Dayton, Ohio.  (USAAF Photos)

Junkers Ju 88D-1/Trop, (Wk. Nr. 430650), USA FE-1598, with Fritz X bomb, preserved in the National Museum of the USAF, Dayton, Ohio.  (Goshimini Photo)

USS Savannah (CL-42), hit by a German Fritz X guided bomb off the coast of Salerno, Italy on 11 Sep 1943.  (USN Photo)

Junkers Ju 90, bomber (prototype).  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Junkers Ju 187, dive bomber (prototype)

Junkers Ju 188E-1.  (Luftwaffe Photo)

Junkers Ju 188 Rächer, bomber, in RAF markings, Italy, 1944/45.  (RAF Photo)

Junkers Ju 188 and Bf 109, captured near Erfurt, Germany in May 1945.  A total of 110 Ju 188s were collected by the RAF, with 51 found in Germany, 19 in Denmark and 40 in Norway.  106 were destroyed and four were sent to England.   (Luftwaffe Photo)

Junkers Ju 188D-2, (Wk. Nr. 150245), captured at Grove, Denmark in May 1945.  Designated RAF AM35, this aircraft was allocated by the British  to the USAAF.  It was shipped to the USA where it was designated USA FE-1597, later T2-1597.  This aircraft was scrapped at Park Ridge ca. 1950.

Junkers Ju 188A-2, (Wk. Nr. 180485), captured at Sylt.  Designated RAF AM45, this aircraft was scrapped at Brize Norton in 1947.

Junkers Ju 188A-2, (Wk. Nr. 190327), captured at Lubeck. Designated RAF AM113, later VN143, this aircraft was scrapped at Gosport, England in 1947.  (RAF Photo)

 

Junkers Ju 188A-1, possibly (Wk. Nr. 230776), captured at Beldringe, Denmark.  Designated RAF AM108, this aircraft was scrapped at Sealand in 1948.  (RAF Photos)

Junkers Ju 188A-2, (Wk. Nr. 190327), captured at Lubeck, Germany.  Designated RAF AM113, later VN143, this aircraft was scrapped at Gosport in 1947.

Junkers Ju 188, (Wk. Nr. 280032), F2+UN, captured and flown by the RAF at Fassberg, but not allocated an Air Ministry number.  This aircraft was ferried to England, where it was likely scrapped.

 

Junkers Ju 287, heavy jet bomber (prototype).  (Luftwaffe Photos)

Elements of the Ju 287 prototype were captured by the Soviet Union and a number of their aviation technicians were tasked to  develop this aircraft from designs which included  Ju 131 and 132 bombers, Ju 126 ground-attack aircraft (in documents they often were designated EF-131, EF-132, and EF-126, from Entwicklungs Flugzeug-"Experimental Aircraft"), Jumo 004 and Jumo 01 jet engines, and the Jumo 224 aircraft diesel engine. To fulfill these tasks, two large sections were set up at OKB-1-aircraft and engine. The aircraft section comprised 433 employees, including 276 designers and 157 people working in scientific research laboratories. There were 402 specialists in the engine section, 235 at the design bureau, and 167 at scientific research laboratories. In all, 2992 employees worked at the Dessau plant in May 1946, including 20 representatives of the USSR Ministry of the Aviation Industry.   The unfinished Ju 287V-2 also became the foundation for the EF-131 prototype jet bomber.  Since no drawings or test materials were found in Dessau, all the documentation had to be reconstituted.  This delayed production somewhat but by January 1946 preparations for the assembly of a prototype example began.  Some components (wing sections, in particular) were taken from the original Ju-287V-2 but most had to be redone.  The work was labour intensive and therefore the decision was made to stop after the manufacture of three examples: two (V-l, V-3) for flight testing and one (V-2) for strength tests.  In May wind tunnel tests of the airplane model began.  Simultaneously, the operation of the power plant was tested on a specially made bench.  By August 1946 the first EF-131 (V-l) was ready.

Development of the EF-140 began in 1947 as Baade's initiative and, after a mockup was inspected in 1948, the government approved the work.  The second EF-131 flying prototype was used in building the aircraft and it sped up manufacturing. In September 1948 the machine was completely ready to fly.  On 5 October during the second flight, some defects in engine operation were discovered.  The so-called "automatic fuel flow meter" mounted on the AM-TKRD-01 engine was unsatisfactory and it proved very difficult to control engine thrust manually.  The engine was spontaneously changing rpm and the aircraft jerked and rocked in flight.  After the seventh sortie, flight-testing had to be stopped.   In 1949 the engines were replaced and flights went on.  On 24 May plant testing was completed.  The aircraft reached a speed of 904 km/h and range of 2000 km.  For some reason (possibly in connection with successful testing of the Tu-14 tactical bomber), no official testing of the EF-140 was conducted.  Instead, in May 1948 OKB-1 was tasked to convert the plane into a long-range reconnaissance aircraft.  This version was designated "140-R".

To obtain the required range (3600 km) and altitude (14,100 m), the aircraft was fitted with new more fuel-efficient VK-1 engines that V. Ya. Klimov designed (a modification of British Nene-1 turbojet engine).  In addition, the wingspan was increased from 19.4 to 21.9 m and external fuel tanks were mounted on the wing tips, thus increasing total fuel capacity to 14,000 liters.  The aircraft was armed with two remotely operated gun turrets with 23mm paired cannon.  Targeting was carried out with the aid of periscope gun sights and the gun turrets were electrically operated.  In case the upper gunner was killed or wounded, his turret could be connected with the lower turret gun sight and fire control system.  The "140-R" was fitted with equipment for performing day and night reconnaissance (photo cameras, illuminating bombs, and so on) placed in the forward part of the cargo bay and aft fuselage.

The first flight of the "140-R" was made on 12 October 1949.  On 20 October the aircraft took off for the second time. Both flights were interrupted due to excessive wing vibration and the aircraft was returned to the plant.  Test flights resumed the next spring, after structural changes were made.  The testing was stopped after the second flight on 24 March because the wing buffeting continued. TsAGI specialists were brought in to solve the problem.  It was assumed that the flutter was caused by the wing-tip fuel tanks.  On 18 July 1950 all work on the 140-R aircraft was stopped by government decree.   The same decree canceled testing of the "140-B/R" variant that could be employed both as a reconnaissance aircraft and bomber. Baade's OKB had been tasked with developing it in August 1948.   The aircraft differed from the "140-R" mainly in its having a different "filling". The fire control system was improved and the crew reduced to three.  The plane was estimated to have a range of 3000 km, maximum speed of 866 km/h, ceiling of 12,000 m with a bomb load of 1500 kg, and a fuel capacity of 9400 liters.  By the time the decree was issued, the aircraft had been built and partially ground tested.  That was the last aircraft with a sweepforward wing in the USSR.  After unsuccessful testing of the "140-R" reconnaissance aircraft, TsAGI specialists concluded that it was undesirable to use such a wing in aircraft manufacturing.  Internet: http://www.airpages.ru/eng/ru/ju287.shtml.

Junkers Ju 288, Bomber B design competitor (prototype).  (Luftwaffe Photos)