Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Axis Warplane Survivors, German Aircraft: Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76, Fi 103R Reichenberg Re I, II, III, IV, V

Axis Warplane Survivors, German Aircraft: 

Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76,

Fi 103R Reichenberg Re I, II, III, IV, V

Axis Warplane Survivors, deutsche Flugzeuge:

Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76,

Fi 103R Reichenberg Re I, II, III, IV, V

Data current to 16 Dec 2020.

The aim of this website is to locate, identify and document Warplanes from the Second World War that have been preserved.  Many contributors have assisted in the hunt for these aircraft to provide and update the data on this website.  Photos are as credited.  Any errors found here are by the author, and any additions, corrections or amendments to this list of Warplane Survivors of the Second World War would be most welcome and may be e-mailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com.

Ziel dieser Website ist es, erhaltene Kampfflugzeuge aus dem Zweiten Weltkrieg zu lokalisieren, zu identifizieren und zu dokumentieren. Viele Mitwirkende haben bei der Suche nach diesen Flugzeugen mitgewirkt, um die Daten auf dieser Website.bereitzustellen und zu aktualisieren. Fotos gelten als gutgeschrieben. Alle hier gefundenen Fehler sind vom Autor und Ergänzungen, Korrekturen oder Ergänzungen zu dieser Liste der Überlebenden des Zweiten Weltkriegs sind sehr willkommen und können per E-Mail an den Autor unter hskaarup@rogers.com gesendet werden.

 (USAAF Photo)

Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, falling on London, 15 June 1944.

  (Bundesarchiv, Bild 146-1975-117-26 / Lysiak / CC-BY-SA 3.0 Photo)

Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, being wheeled into position by its German launch crew, c1944. 

The Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76, was a small, fixed-wing pilotless aircraft powered by a pulsejet engine mounted above the rear fuselage. In effect, it was the world’s first operational cruise missile, and incorporated a simple flight control system to guide it to its target, an air log device to make it dive to the ground after travelling a preset distance and a warhead packed with high explosive. The first of these weapons landed in the London area in the early hours of 13 June 1944.[1]

The V-1 (Vergeltungswaffe Eins, or Vengeance Weapon One), name was given to it by Josef Goebbels’ Propaganda Ministry, but the original Air Ministry designation was Fieseler Fi 103, after its airframe designer, the Fieseler company. The missile also had the cover names of Kirschkern (Cherry Stone) and Flakzielgerät (Flak Target Device) 76 (FZG 76).  Powered by a simple but noisy pulsejet, thousands were launched on British and continental European targets from June 1944 to March 1945. [2]

Because of its limited range, the thousands of V-1 missiles launched into England were fired from launch facilities along the French (Pas-de-Calais) and Dutch coasts.  The Wehrmacht first launched the V-1s against London on 13 June 1944, one week after (and prompted by) the successful Allied landings in France. At peak, more than one hundred V-1s a day were fired at south-east England, 9,521 in total.  The number of launches decreased as sites were overrun until October 1944, when the last V-1 site in range of Britain was overrun by Allied forces.  After this, the Germans directed V-1s at the port of Antwerp and at other targets in Belgium, launching a further 2,448 V-1s.  The attacks stopped only a month before the war in Europe ended, when the last launch site in the Low Countries was overrun on 29 March 1945.

There are at least 54 Fi 103 Flying bombs on display in museums around the world.

 (NMUSAF Photo)

Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb cutaway diagram.

 (UBundesarchiv, Bild 183-1985-0123-027 / CC-BY-SA Photo)

Nordhause, the Mittelwerk in the Hartz Mountains.  These V-1s and a number of stored V-2 rockets were found at this site when it was captured by the US Third Armoured Division in April 1945.

 (Bundesarchiv, Bild 146-1975-117-28 / Lysiak / CC-BY-SA 3.0 Photo)

Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, being wheeled out its bunker in preparation for launch, c1944.

 (AWM Photo)

Australia.  Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, Laverton, RAAF base, Victoria, Australia ca 1945. 

 (Nick-D Photo 2)

Australia.  Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, currently on display in The Australian War Memorial in Canberra, Australia. 

 (SWAG Photo)

Belgium.  Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, (two), are with the Stampe et Vertongen Museum at Antwerp International Airport.  One is complete (Wk. Nr. 256978), that had been used as instructional material by the Germans, and one is in partial condition because it had been shot down but did not explode. 

 (Ad Meskens Photos)

Belgium.  Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, Musée Royal de l’Armée et d’Histoire Militaire, Brussels.  

 (Author Photos)

Canada.  Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in the Atlantic Canada Aviation Museum in Halifax, Nova Scotia. 

Canada.   Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, preserved in the Canada Air and Space Museum, Ottawa, Ontario.

 (Kim Bach Photo)

Denmark.  Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in The Danish War Museum Tøjhusmuseet, Copenhagen, Denmark.  Previously named the Danish Arsenal Museum, Tøjhuset was built from 1593-1604 as an arsenal, part of a new naval harbour constructed by King Christian IV.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3239436)

France.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, wreckage being examined by a Canadian soldier and a member of the French Resistance (F.F.I.), Foucarmont, France, 5 September 1944. 

 (Musée de la Reddition, G. Garitan Photo)

France.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display at Place de la mairie exposition de V-1, 22 Sep 1945.  

 (Pline Photo)

France.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in the Museum of Air and Space Paris, Le Bourget, France.

 (Clemens Vasters Photo)

France.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in the Museum of Air and Space Paris, Le Bourget, France.

 (Ben pccs Photo)

France.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in the Musée de l’Armée, les Invalides Museum, Paris. 

France.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in The Grand Bunker Museum in Ouistreham, Caen, near Sword Beach, Normandy.

 (Zairon Photo)

France.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 Flying bomb, inside the Dome of Helfaut, Helfaut, Département of Pas-de-Calais, Region of Upper France.

 (Alan Darles Photo)

France.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display beside the Blockhaus d'Éperlecques, near Saint-Omer.  Although this was intended as a V2 launch site the museum on the site has a display devoted to the V1, including a V1 cruise missile and an entire launch ramp. 

 (Nilfanion  Photo)

France.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display beside the Blockhaus d'Éperlecques, near Saint-Omer.  80 launch sites and 16 support sites were located from Normandy to Calais.

 (????? Photo)

France.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb replica, on display in Val-Ygot at Ardouval, north of Saint-Saëns.  This site was disabled by Allied bombing in December 1943, before completion.  There are remains of blockhouses, with a recreated launch ramp and mock V1.

France.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in La Coupole, near Saint-Omer.  This V-1 is on loan from the Science Museum in London, United Kingdom.  

 (Ricardo Reis Photo)

Germany.  Rheintochter Anti-Aircraft Missile, Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, and Henschel Hs 293 air to surface missile, on display in the German Museum of Technology Berlin, Germany.

 (Softeis Photo)

Germany.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in the Deutsches Museum, Munich.

 (Dirk1981 Photo)

Germany.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, being restored in the Militarhistorisches Museum (MHM) Flugplatz-Gatow (previously known as the Luftwaffenmuseum der Bundeswehr), Berlin-Gatow.

 (Lothar Hakelberg Photo)

Germany.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, Historisch-technisches Informationszentrum Peenemünde.

 (Jan Rehschuh Photo)

Germany.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, preserved on the wall inside the Militärhistorisches Museum der Bundeswehr (MHMBw), (the Bundeswehr Military History Museum), located in a former military arsenal in the Alberstadt which is part of the city of Dresedn. 

 (Clemens Vasters Photo)

The Netherlands.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in the Overloon War Museum in Overloon.

 (Alf van Beem Photo) 

The Netherlands.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in the Nationaal Militair Museum (National Military Museum), Soesterberg.

 (Mhoutgraaf Photo)

The Netherlands.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in the Museum Vliegbasis Deelen in Schaarsbergen. 

 (Wouter Hagens Photo)

The Netherlands.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in the Museum Bevrijdende Vleugels in Best.

 (Nick-D Photo)

New Zealand.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in the Auckland War Memorial Museum, Auckland. 

New Zealand.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in the Museum of Transport and Technology, Auckland.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

Norway.   Fieseler Fi 103 V-1 mock-up on display inside the Norsk Luftfartsmuseum (Norwegian Aviation Museum). Bodø, Northern Norway.

Sweden.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in the Arboga Missile Museum.

 (SMF Photo)

Switzerland.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in the Schweizerisches Militärmuseum Full; Aargau, Switzerland. 

 (Chriusha Photo)

Switzerland.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in the Schweizerisches Militärmuseum Full; Aargau, Switzerland.

 (ECM Photo)

United Kingdom.  Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display at Eden Camp Museum, Malton. 

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

United Kingdom Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, (Wk. Nr. 442795), is on display at the Science Museum, London.  It was presented to the museum in 1945 by the War Office. 

 (Florestan Photo)

United Kingdom Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in the Imperial War Museum, London. 

 (Peter Trimming Photo)

United Kingdom Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in the Imperial War Museum, London. 

 (NH53-V1 Photo)

United Kingdom Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, mounted on a partial ramp section, at the Imperial War Museum Duxford. 

 (Dave Merrett Photo)

 (Mark HarkinPhoto)

Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb mockup, mounted on a partially recreated launch ramp. IWM.

 (Martin Richards Photo)

United Kingdom.  Fieseler Fi 103, V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb mockup, mounted on a partially recreated launch ramp. IWM.

 (IWM Photo BU 406)

The lightly damaged launching ramp of the modified V-1 launching site No. 157, La Chaussée-Tirancourt, France, c1944.  This ramp is currently on display at the IWM Duxford.

(Nimbus227 Photo)

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

United Kingdom Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in addition to a V2 rocket at the RAF Museum Hendon, north London.  

 (Rept0n1x Photo)

United Kingdom Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display in front of a V2 rocket in the RAF Museum Cosford.  

United Kingdom Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display at the Aeropark at East Midlands Airport.

 (Tony Hisgett Photo)

United Kingdom Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, replica on display at the RAF Manston History Museum.

 (Stavros1 Photo)

United Kingdom.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb replica with a section of the original Peenemünde launch ramp, on display with the Muckleburgh Collection, a military museum sited on a former military camp at Weybourne, on the North Norfolk coast. 

 (USAAF Photos)

United States.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display at Freeman Field, Indiana, late in 1945. 

 (duggar11 Photo)

United States.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display at the US Army Air Defense Artillery Museum, Fort Sill, Oklahoma. 

 (Tomás Del Coro Photo)

United States.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display at the Military Aviation Museum Virginia Beach Airport, Virginia.

 (Daderot Photo)

United States.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display at the Collings Foundation, Stow, Massachusetts.

 (NMUSAF Photo)

United States.  Republic-Ford JB-2 Loon, on display at the National Museum of the United States Air Force in Dayton, Ohio.  It was donated by the Continental Motors Corporation in 1957. 

 (elliottwolf Photo)

United States.  Republic-Ford JB-2 Loon, on display at the NASM's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. 

 (Maj J Photo)

United States.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display outside at the southwest corner of the Putnam County Courthouse in Greencastle Indiana. 

 (Cliff Photo)

United States.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb and a V2 rocket are on display in The Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

  (???? Photo)

United States.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, c/n 7433, on display in the Yanks Air Museum, Chino, California.

 (Alan Wilson Photo)

United States.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, c/n 7433, on display in the Yanks Air Museum, Chino, California.

United States. Republic-Ford JB-2 Loon engine is on display in The Planes of Fame air museum at Chino Airport in Chino, California.  The JB-2 engine has been restored to fully function.

United States. Republic-Ford JB-2 Loon, on open-air display at the Museum of Alaska Transportation and Industry in Wasilla, Alaska.

 (Patrick Pelletier Photo)

United States. Republic-Ford JB-2 Loon, also on open-air display at the Point Mugu Missile Park at Naval Air Station Point Mugu in California. 

 (Michael Barera Photo)

United States.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, on display at the Air Zoo in Portage, Michigan.

 (Patrick Pelletier Photo)

United States.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, and a V2 rocket are on display in the Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center in Hutchinson, Kansas. 

 (Author Photo)

United States.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, mock-up on display at the Fantasy of Flight aviation museum in Polk City, Florida. 

United States.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, mock-up on display in The U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama in their Rocket Park.

 (Josh Hallett Photo)

United States.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, (Wk. Nr. 121536), is on display at the Pima Air and Space Museum, in Tucson, Arizona.

  (kitmasterbloke Photo)

United States.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, (Wk. Nr. 121536), is on display at the Pima Air and Space Museum, in Tucson, Arizona. 

 

 (Goshimini Photo)

United States.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, and one Fieseler Fi 103 Re IV Reichenberg are on display at the Flying Heritage Collection, Paine Field, Everett, Washington.

  (Chris Light Photos)

United States.  Fieseler Fi 103 V-1, FZG 76 flying bomb, Museum of Flight, Seattle, Washington.

Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg Re III

Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg Re III, trainer version.  (USAAF Photos)

The Reichenberg Fi 103A-1/RE-III was the trainer version of the RIV. The front position was for the flight instructor. Two fuselages were found by the allied forces at the end of the War, at Tramm, near Dannenbergbut, Germany. Length: 8 m (26.24 ft) Wingspan: 5.72 m (18.76 ft) Loaded weight: 2,250 kg (4,960 lb) Power plant: 1 × Argus As 014 pulse jet, 350 kgf (770 lbf). Performance: Max speed: 800 km/h (500 mph (in diving flight) Cruise speed: 650 km/h (400 mph). Range: 330 km (205 miles).

The idea of putting a pilot in the Fi 103 V1 for special operations was proposed by Hanna Skorzeny, Otto Skorzeny and Heinrich Lange. Lange sought to form a special group of pilots who if need be would sacrifice themselves. At the same time the DFS were looking into such a idea since 1943, because tests using the Me P.1079 (Me 328) had found it was unsuitable. In 1944 the DFS was given the go ahead to develop such a weapon, given the code name "Reichenberg". With in fourteen days the DFS had designed, built, and tested the five different models needed to convert the volunteer pilots.  By October 1944 about 175 R-IVs were ready for action.

Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg Re I: Two man unpowered trainer

Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg Re II: Two man powered trainer

Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg Re III: One man powered trainer

Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg Re IV: Operational model

Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg Re V: Powered trainer for the He 162 with a shorter nose

The Re I was towed in to the air by a Henschel Hs 126, all the rest were air launched from the Heinkel He 111 H-22.  Volunteers were trained in ordinary gliders in order to give them the feel of unpowered flight.  The pilots then progressed to special gliders with shortened wings which could dive at speeds of up to 300 kilometres per hour (190 mph).  After this, they progressed to the dual-control Re II.

Training began on the Re I and Re II and although landing the aircraft on a skid was difficult, it handled well, and it was anticipated that the Leonidas Squadron would soon be using the machines.  Albert Speer wrote to Hitler on 28 July 1944 to say that he opposed wasting the men and machines on the Allies in France and suggested it would be better to deploy them against Russian power stations.

The first real flight was performed in September 1944 at the Erprobungsstelle Rechlin, the Reichenberg being dropped from a He 111. However, it subsequently crashed after the pilot lost control when he accidentally jettisoned the canopy.  A second flight the next day also ended in a crash, and subsequent test flights were carried out by test pilots Heinz Kensche and Hanna Reitsch.  Reitsch herself experienced several crashes from which she survived unscathed.  On 5 November 1944 during the second test flight of the Re III, a wing fell off due to vibrations, but Heinz Kensche managed to parachute to safety, albeit with some difficulty due to the cramped cockpit.

By October 1944 about 175 Fi 103 Reichenberg Re IV's were ready for combat with some 60 Luftwaffe personnel and 30 personnel from Skorzeny's commando unit, who joined Leonidas Staffel 5.II/KG 200(Heinrich Lange's special unit led by himself) to fly the aircraft in to combat.  Werner Baumbach assumed command of KG 200 in October 1944, however, the whole operation was shelved in favour of the "Mistel" program.  Baumbach and Speer eventually met with Hitler on 15 March 1945 and managed to convince him that suicide missions were not part of the German warrior tradition, and later that day Baumbach ordered the Reichenberg unit to be disbanded.  (Wikipedia)

Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg Re IV

(RAF Photo)

Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg Re IV with British troops in 1945. 

The Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg IV was basically a manned version of the Fieseler Fi 103, V-1 flying bomb.  The Fi 103R-IV had simple flight instruments in the cockpit and the canopy had guidelines for calculating the correct dive angle for attacks. The Reichenberg was powered by one 772-lb thrust Argus 109 014 pulse-jet engine. It had a maximum speed of 404-mph. Its wing span was 18’9”, and its length was 26’3”.[4]   It was armed with an 850 kg warhead

In theory, this wasn’t a Kamikaze-style suicide weapon, since the pilot was intended to bail out after aiming the aircraft/missile at its target.   In practice, this would have presented certain difficulties, since the cockpit was placed directly underneath the jet intake.   Attacks were to be carried out by the “Leonidas Squadron”, Group V of the Luftwaffe’s Kampfgeschwader 200.

The engine was the same one used on the V-1, one 2.94 kN As 109-014 pulse-jet.  Versions planned were the Fi 103R-I and R-II training gliders, R-III powered trainer, and R-IV operational version. About 175 were built, and a few test flights were made by the R-III, but none flew operationally.[5]

The Leonidas Squadron, part of KG 200, had been set up as a suicide squadron. Volunteers were required to sign a declaration which said, “I hereby voluntarily apply to be enrolled in the suicide group as part of a human glider-bomb. I fully understand that employment in this capacity will entail my own death.” Initially, both the Messerschmitt Me 328 and the Fieseler Fi 103 (better known as the V-1 flying bomb) were considered as suitable aircraft, but the Fi 103 was passed over in favour of the Me 328 equipped with a 900 kilograms (2,000 lb) bomb.

However, problems were experienced in converting the Me 328 and Heinrich Himmler wanted to cancel the project. Otto Skorzeny, who had been investigating the possibility of using manned torpedoes against Allied shipping, was briefed by Hitler to revive the project, and he contacted famous test pilot Hanna Reitsch. The Fi 103 was reappraised and since it seemed to offer the pilot a slim chance of surviving, it was adopted for the project.

The project was given the codename “Reichenberg” after the capital of the former Czechoslovakian territory “Reichsgau Sudetenland” (present-day Liberec), while the aircraft themselves were referred to as “Reichenberg-Geräte” (Reichenberg apparatus).

In the summer of 1944 the DFS (German Research Institute for Sailplane Flight) at Ainring took on the task of developing a manned version of the Fi 103, and an example was made ready for testing within days and a production line was established at Dannenberg.

The V-1 was transformed into the Reichenberg by adding a small, cramped cockpit at the point of the fuselage that was immediately ahead of the pulsejet’s intake, where the standard V-1’s compressed-air cylinders were fitted. The cockpit had basic flight instruments and a plywood bucket seat. The single-piece canopy incorporated an armoured front panel and opened to the side to allow entry. The two displaced compressed-air cylinders were replaced by a single one, fitted in the rear in the space which normally accommodated the V-1’s autopilot. The wings were fitted with hardened edges to cut the cables of barrage balloons.

It was proposed that a He 111 bomber would carry either one or two Reichenbergs beneath its wings, releasing them close to the target. The pilots would then steer their aircraft towards the target, jettisoning the cockpit canopy shortly before impact and bailing out. It was estimated that the chances of a pilot surviving such a bailout were less than 1% due to the proximity of the pulsejet’s intake to the cockpit.[6]

 (Bundesarchiv, Bild 141-2733)

US troops inspect Fieseler Fi 103R at Neu Tramm, Germany, 1945.

 (US Army Photo)

Fieseler Fi 103R-4, found in sheds at the V-bomb assembly plant, waiting for shipment to launching sites, 1945.

 (RAF Photo)

Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg Re IV (Wk. Nr. 6/2080), BACP91, on display at Farnborough, United Kingdom, Nov 1945. 

United Kingdom Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg Re IV (Wk. Nr. 6/2080), BACP91, is currently display at the Lashenden Air Warfare Museum, Headcorn, Kent, UK,  This Fi 103R-4 was captured at the Danneburg V1 factory in the American zone & returned to the UK in 1945.  It was displayed at the German Aircraft Exhibition at the Royal Aircraft Establishment at Farnborough from 29 Oct to 9 Nov 1945.

The Fi 103R-4 then passed through a number of army Bomb Disposal units until discovered by the museum in 1970 stored outside in a very poor condition.  The bottom of the cockpit had rusted through & the back of the V1 was broken and it was due to be scrapped.  It was acquired by the museum & moved to Headcorn.  The museum carried out temporary repairs & did a cosmetic paint job to buy time until the funds & expertise were available to carry out a proper restoration.

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584067)

Fieseler Fi-103R Reichenburg Re IV flying bomb on display on Air Force Day at RCAF Rockcliffe, Ontario, 16 June 1947.  This piloted version of the "Buzz Bomb" was brought to Canada in 1945 by Captain Farley Mowat's Intelligence Collection Team.  This Re IV is currently preserved in the Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, Ontario.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584067)

" .. the Fi 103 R was a piloted FZG -76 V 1 flying bomb test flown by Hanna Reitsch. Modifications include the addition of a four foot (1.2m) belly skid and basic eight-instrument cockpit containing a backless wooden seat and crude headrest. A stick controls the elevators and ailerons, the throttle was made of wood and a button controlled fuel flow. Frightening to fly, surely...."  Michael Bowyer on the RAE German aircraft and Equipment Exhibition, Farnborough, United Kingdom, October 1945.

(Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3584520)

Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg Re IV piloted flying bomb at RCAF Station Trenton, Ontario, 9 June 1951.  This piloted version of the "Buzz Bomb" was brought to Canada in 1945 by Captain Farley Mowat's Intelligence Collection Team, shown here on display on Air Force Day, 16 June 1947.  This aircraft has recently been put on display in the Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, Ontario. 

(Author Photos)

Canada.  Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg Re IV piloted flying bomb in the Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, Ontario.  This is the same R4 as the one shown at RCAF Station Trenton, Ontario in 1949. 

 (Criusha Photo)

France.  Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg Re IV in the museum La Coupole at Helfaut-Wizernes; Pas-de-Calais, France.  The Re IV is on loan from the city of Antwerp, Belgium, and is on display in the entrance hall. 

The Netherlands.  Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg Re IV, (Object Nr. 007606), on display in the Nationaal Militair Museum,Verlengde Paltzerweg 1  3768 MX Soest.  Property of the Leger en Wapen Museum, Delft. Netherlands.

 (Timurtrupp Photo)

Switzerland.  Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg Re IV in the Schweizerisches Militärmuseum, Full, Switzerland. 

 (USAAF Photo)

Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg Re IV piloted version of the V1 flying bomb, being handled by American  troops. 

 (USAAF Photo)

Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg Re IV piloted version of the V1 flying bomb, examined by American troops. 

 (USAAF Photo)

Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg Re IV piloted version of the V1 flying bomb, USA FE-082, on display at Freeman Field, Indiana, post war.

 (USAAF Photo)

Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg Re IV piloted version of the V1 flying bomb.

[1] David Donald, Warplanes of the Luftwaffe, Aerospace Publishing London, 1994, p. 54.

[2] Internet: http://www.nasm.si.edu/research/aero/aircraft.

[3] Internet: http://www.thomasgenth.de/indexeng.html.

[4] David Donald, Warplanes of the Luftwaffe, Aerospace Publishing London, 1994, p. 54.

[5] Phil H. Butler, War Prizes, and Carl-Fredrik Guest, Under the Red Star – Luftwaffe aircraft in the Soviet Air Force (Airlife Ltd., 1993), pp. 106-109.

[6] Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fieseler_Fi_103R_Reichenberg.

[7] Internet: www.preservedaxisaircraft.com.

 (Articseahorse Photo)

United States.  Fieseler Fi 103R Reichenberg Re 1V flying bomb is on display in the Flying Heritage Collection, Paine Field, Everett, Washington. 

Towards the end of 1943 consideration was given in Germany to possible use of piloted missiles for precision attacks on targets such as warships & other high profile targets like Buckingham Palace & the Houses of Parliament.

Design work was carried out by Deutsches Forschungsinstitut fur Segelfug (German Gliding Research Institute) & the modification of standard V1’s for testing purposes was carried out by the aircraft manufacturer Henschel, under the code name of Reichenberg. Initial test flights were carried out at Larz where the first two aircraft crashed killing the pilots. Test flying was thereafter carried out by Hanna Reitsch & Heinz Kensche.

Two factories were set up to manufacture piloted V1’s, one at Dannenberg & the other at Pulverhof both using slave labour. They produced approximately 175 piloted Fieseler Fi 103R-4’s before production ceased. 70 pilots were under training when the project ceased in October 1944 owing to a shortage of fuel for training & political differences within the German High Command. The operational Fi 103R-4’s were to have been operated by 5/KG200 & was to be known as the Leonidas staffel.

 (USAAF Photo)

Heinkel He 111 H-22, carrying a Fieseler Fi 103, FZG 76 (V-1) flying bomb, c1944.  Some were used by bomb wing KG 3.