Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Artillery preserved in Canada, German First World War Trophies

German First World War Artillery preserved in Canada. 

This list is a condensed version of the list of German guns found within the lists of preserved Artillery found in the individual provinces of Canada listed on this website. 

Photos are by the author unless otherwise credited. 

Data current to 12 Sep 2016.

Cranbrook, British Columbia

 (Dave Humphrey Photos)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. 19241).  This gun was captured by the 7th Battalion on 27 Sep 1918 near Marquion.  It is presently on display behind the Heritage Inn on Cranbrook Street, close to the entrance to the Canadian Legion.

The 7.7 cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7 cm FK 16) was a German field gun with a longer range than the FK 96 n.A.  The barrel is longer and the gun has a box carriage to allow for greater elevation, which increased the range.  It also has separate-loading ammunition to reduce powder consumption and barrel wear at short ranges, although this had the drawback of reducing the rate of fire compared to the older gun.  It was prematurely rushed into production in 1916 and early guns suffered from a number of defects, mainly stemming from the German use of substitute materials to reduce consumption of strategic metals.  It also suffered from a large number of premature detonations of its shells during 1916.

Esquimalt, British Columbia

 (John Eckersley Photo) (Colin Wyatt Photo)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.) (Serial Nr. 595), with large wheels  This gun was captured by the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles at Cambrai, West of Neuville St. Remy, France on 29 September 1918.  It is on display in a city park in the Municipality of Esquimalt.

The 7.7 cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7 cm FK 96 n.A.) is a German field gun.  The gun combined the barrel of the earlier 7.7 cm FK 96 with a recoil system, a new breech and a new carriage. Existing FK 96s were upgraded over time.  The FK 96 n.A. was shorter-ranged, but lighter than the French Canon de 75 modèle 1897 or the British Ordnance QF 18 pounder gun; the Germans placed a premium on mobility, which served them well during the early stages of the First World War.  However, once the front had become static, the greater rate of fire of the French gun and the heavier shells fired by the British gun put the Germans at a disadvantage. The Germans remedied this by developing the longer-ranged, but heavier 7.7 cm FK 16.  As with most guns of its era, the FK 96 n.A. had seats for two crewmen mounted on its splinter shield.

 (Colin Wyatt Photo)

 (John Eckersley Photo)

German First World War 7.7-cm Nahkampfkanone (7.7-cm NK) close support gun.  These guns were minimal modifications of the standard gun to make it more suitable  as an infantry support gun.  They were often used as "silent" guns - heavily camouflaged guns which only went into action if the front line was breached during an attack. About the only changes made to the standard gun was to drop the lower part of the gun shield and the footrests of the axle tree seats as well as the smaller wheels.  Charlie Clelland.  This gun was captured by the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles at Vimy Ridge, La Folie Farm, France on 9 Oct 1917.  It was initially allocated to Cranbrook but is now on display in a city park in the Municipality of Esquimalt.  They were made an official part of the war memorial in 1941.

 (Richard Laughton Photo)

Outstanding restoration of the two German First World War trophy guns at Esquimalt in 2015.

Kelowna, British Columbia

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), possibly (Serial Nr. 2577), TBC, captured by the 7th Battalion on 2 Sep 1918, West of Vilers-lez-Cagnicourt, France.   Brigadier Angle Armoury, 720 Lawrence Ave.

Brooks, Alberta

 (Streetview Photo)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16) Field Gun (Serial Nr. unknown), in front of the Royal Canadian Legion at 235 3rd Street West. 

Calgary, The Military Museums of Calgary, 4520 Crowchild Trail SW, Alberta

 (Terry Honour Photo)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 1571), originally allocated to the town of Gleichen.

Edmonton, Land Forces Western Area Headquarters, CFB Edmonton, Alberta

 (Author Photo)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 929), M.3706 Kp, carriage 2361. This gun was captured by the 49th Battalion near Marquion, France on 27 September 1918.  No. 1 in front of LFWA HQ.

 (Author Photo)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 4945), carriage No. 8246.  This gun was also captured by the 49th Battalion near Marquion, France on 27 September 1918.  No. 2 in front of LFWA HQ.

Frank, Alberta

   (Ian McKenzie Photos)

German First World War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 98/09 (10.5-cm leFH 98/09) Light Field Howitzer, (Serial Nr. 3392), no data, 1916.  This gun is part of a War Memorial located on the Crowsnest Highway, Route 3, Alberta, a few miles east of the divide in the small community of Frank.  The gun is flanked by two German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG08 Machineguns.

Lethbridge, Alberta

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 12706), M.495, S.3588 no data.  Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 4, 324 Mayor MaGrath Drive South.

 (Kevin McLean Photo)

German First World War 10-cm Kanone 17 (10-cm K 17), (Serial Nr. 160), Spandau 1909, 1346 kg.m.V., missing its carriage.  This gun was captured by the 50th Battalion near the Marquion-Cambrai road Northwest of Raillencourt, France on 28 September 1918.  This gun stands at the east end of Henderson Lake on Oakside Drive South.

 (Kevin McLean Photo)

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02), (Serial Nr. 1101), no data.  This gun also stands at the east end of Henderson Lake on Oakside Dr S in Lethbridge.

The 15 cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15 cm sFH 02) was a German heavy field howitzer introduced in 1903.  It was the first artillery piece to use a modern recoil system in the German Army. Some 416 were in service at the beginning of the war.  Its mobility, which allowed it to be deployed as medium artillery, and fairly heavy shell gave the German army a firepower advantage in the early battles in Belgium and France in 1914 as the French and British armies lacked an equivalent.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/15_cm_sFH_02.

 (Laura Gloor Photos)

German First World War 7.7-cm Infantriegeshutz L/27 (7.7-cm IG L/27), (Serial Nr. 9366), no data, mounted on an iron wheeled carriage.  This gun stands beside the Memorial Cairn.

The 7.7cm IG (Infanteriegeschutz) L/27 was Krupp's third attempt at building an infantry support gun which could closely follow the infantry in attack and provide close support and anti-tank fire in defence.  The gun was extensively modified compared to the standard field gun.  From observation some of the changes are: 1. the wheel diameter was reduced to about 1m.  2. the wheel track was reduced by about 30cm.  3. the axle was moved back about 30cm.  4. no axle tree seats were fitted.  5. the gun shield was designed so it could be removed easily and was narrower.  6. the cover over the recuperator spring adjuster was enlarged and hinged (the barrel could be removed by unlocking the spur under the barrel from the recoil assembly).  7. the gunner's and loader's seat brackets were a different design so they could be quickly removed.  8. there are brackets at the end of trail which originally held a counterweight required because the gun unbalanced because the axle had been moved back.  9. the spade is a different profile (TBC).  Charlie Clelland.

Redcliffe, Alberta

 (Clive Prothero-Brooks Photo)

German First World War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 16 (10.5-cm leFH 16), (Serial Nr. 12626).  This gun is located beside the Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 6 at 302 Broadway St E.

Stavely, Alberta

 (Clayton Gillespie Photo)

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), (Serial Nr. 1972).  This trench mortar was captured by the 46th Battalion at Vimy Ridge on 9 April 1917.

Taber, Alberta

 (Kerry Van Ham Photos)

German First World War 7.7-cm Infantriegeshutz L/27 (7.7-cm IG L/27), (Serial Nr. 9383), no data.  This gun stands beside the town cenotaph, opposite the Royal Hotel. 

The 7.7cm IG (Infanteriegeschutz) L/27 was Krupp's third attempt at building an infantry support gun which could closely follow the infantry in attack and provide close support and anti-tank fire in defence.  The gun was extensively modified compared to the standard field gun.  From observation some of the changes are: 1. the wheel diameter was reduced to about 1m.  2. the wheel track was reduced by about 30cm.  3. the axle was moved back about 30cm.  4. no axle tree seats were fitted.  5. the gun shield was designed so it could be removed easily and was narrower.  6. the cover over the recuperator spring adjuster was enlarged and hinged (the barrel could be removed by unlocking the spur under the barrel from the recoil assembly).  7. the gunner's and loader's seat brackets were a different design so they could be quickly removed.  8. there are brackets at the end of trail which originally held a counterweight required because the gun unbalanced because the axle had been moved back.  9. the spade is a different profile (TBC).  Charlie Clelland.

Vermilion, Alberta

 (Terry Honour Photo)

German First World War 7.7-cm Infantriegeshutz L/27 (7.7-cm IG L/27), (Serial Nr. 9406), beside Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 11 at 5144 Railway Ave.

Battleford, Saskatchewan

(Photo courtesy of Maxwell Toms)

German First World  War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 16 (10.5-cm leFH 16), (Serial Nr. 16660), TBC.  Battleford cenotaph.

(Photo courtesy of Terry Honour)

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), (Serial Nr. 9194), Fred Light Museum.

The 7.58 cm Minenwerfer a.A. (alter Art or old model) (7.58 cm leMW).  The Germans fielded a whole series of mortars before the beginning of the First World War.  Their term for them was Minenwerfer, literally mine-thrower; they were initially assigned to engineer units in their siege warfare role.  By the Winter of 1916-17, they were transferred to infantry units where the leMW's light weight permitted them to accompany the foot-soldiers in the advance.  In common with Rheinmetall's other Minenwerfer designs, the leMW was a rifled muzzle-loader that had hydraulic cylinders on each side of the tube to absorb the recoil forces and spring recuperators to return the tube to the firing position.  It had a rectangular firing platform with limited traverse and elevation.  Wheels could be added to ease transportation or it could be carried by at least six men.  In 1916, a new version, designated as the n.A. or neuer Art, was fielded that included a circular firing platform, giving a turntable effect, which permitted a full 360 degree traverse.  It also had a longer 16 inches (410 mm) barrel and could be used for direct fire between 0° and 27° elevation if the new 90 kg (200 lb) trail was fitted to absorb the recoil forces.  In this mode it was pressed into service as an anti-tank gun.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/7.58_cm_Minenwerfer

Estevan, Saskatchewan       

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 8601), no data.

Fort Saskatchewan, Saskatchewan

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 1251) (TBC), captured by the 2nd Division.  This gun stands beside the Royal Canadian Legion, Branch 9964 93rd Ave.

Meota, Saskatchewan

 (DHH Photo)

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), (Serial Nr. 31310).  This trench mortar was captured by the 1st Bn on 8 Aug 1918, ½ km NW of Beaufort, France.  It is located next to the cenotaph at 3rd Ave E and Beach St in Meota Regional Park.

Regina, Saskatchewan

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), possibly (Serial Nr. 60), TBC, captured by the 46th Battalion on 1 Nov 1918 between Aulnoy and Valenciennes, France.  This gun sits on the left flank of the Soldier’s Cemetery cenotaph. 

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), possibly (Serial Nr. 2666), TBC, captured by the 46th Battalion on 1 Nov 1918 Northeast of Mount Houy, North of the Famars -Valenciennes Road, France.  This gun sits on the right flank of the Soldier’s Cemetery cenotaph.

Saltcoats, Saskatchewan

  (Photo courtesy of Floyd Davies)

German First World War 10.5-cm leichte Feldhaubitze 16 (10.5-cm leFH 16), (Serial Nr. 4306), no data.  This gun is missing its wheels and is mounted on a concrete stand at the cenotaph.

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

 (Photo courtesy of Terry Honour)

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art (7.58-cm leMW), Trench Mortar, (Serial Nr. 16676), captured by the 2nd Division in France ca. 1918.  It is preserved on its base plate in front of the Royal Canadian Legion, Branch No. 362, 3021 Louise Street.  This gun was originally allocated to Davidson, Saskatchewan.

(Photos courtesy of Col Larry Wong)

German First World War 15-cm Kanone 16 (15-cm K 16), (Serial Nr. 1034), no data.  This gun is missing its wheel carriage.  It is mounted on a barrel transporter carriage, and located in front of the Sgt Hugh Cairns VC Armoury, Idyllwild Avenue.

Brandon, Manitoba

 (Photo courtesy of Dr Gordon Goldsborough)

German First World War 10.5-cm Feldhaubitze 98/09 (10.5-cm FH 98/09), (Serial Nr. 2637), 1915, captured by the 42nd Battalion on 8 August 1918 South of Demuin, France.  This gun was moved from Birnie, Manitoba, to the 26th Field Artillery Museum.

The 10.5-cm Feldhaubitze 98/09 (10.5 cm FH 98/09), a short barreled (1625-mm) 105-mm howitzer, also referred to as the 10.5-cm leichte Feldhaubitze (light field howitzer) 98/09, was used by Germany in the First World War and after.  It had a maximum range of 6,300 metres (20,700 ft).   It was originally built by Rheinmetall as the 10.5-cm Feldhaubitze 98, an old-fashioned, fixed-recoil weapon delivered to the German army in 1898; between 1902 and 1904, it was redesigned, by Krupp, with a new recoil mechanism and a new carriage.  However, it wasn't accepted for service until 1909, hence the ending designation 98/09. Existing weapons were rebuilt to the new standard.  As usual, two seats were attached to the gun shield.  There were 1,260 in service at the beginning of the First World War.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/10.5_cm_Feldhaubitze_98/09.

Carman, Manitoba

 (Photo courtesy of Cheryl Young)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. 10726), captured by the 10th Battalion, 2 September 1918 near Villers-lez-Cagnicourt, France.  The gun was then put into action against the enemy.  No. 1 on the West side of the Great War Memorial Hall.

 (Photo courtesy of Cheryl Young)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. 15207), captured by the 13th Battalion at Cagnicourt Wood, France, 2 September 1918.  No. 2 on the East side of the Great War Memorial Hall.

The 7.7 cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7 cm FK 16) was a German field gun with a longer range than the FK 96 n.A.  The barrel is longer and the gun has a box carriage to allow for greater elevation, which increased the range.  It also has separate-loading ammunition to reduce powder consumption and barrel wear at short ranges, although this had the drawback of reducing the rate of fire compared to the older gun.  It was prematurely rushed into production in 1916 and early guns suffered from a number of defects, mainly stemming from the German use of substitute materials to reduce consumption of strategic metals. It also suffered from a large number of premature detonations of its shells during 1916.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/7.7_cm_FK_16.

Darlingford, Manitoba

German First World War 9.15-cm leichtes Minenwerfer System Lanz (9.15-cm leMW System Lanz), (Serial Nr. TBC), on the right side of the town War Memorial.  A German First World War 7.92-mm Spandau MG 08 heavy machine-gun (Serial Nr. TBC), stands on the left side of the War Memorial.

The 9.15 cm leichtes Minenwerfer System Lanz (Trench mortar) was a light mortar used by Germany and Austria-Hungary in the First World War.  It was a smooth-bore, breech-loading design that used smokeless propellant.  It was chosen by the Austrians as an interim replacement for their 9 cm Minenwerfer M 14, pending development of a superior domestic design, which eventually turned out to be the 9 cm Minenwerfer M 17.  The older Austrian design had a prominent firing signature, a less effective bomb and shorter range than the Lanz.  Over 500 were ordered with deliveries beginning in April 1917.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/9.15_cm_leichtes_Minenwerfer_System_Lanz.

Neepawa, Manitoba

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 13 (15-cm sFH 13), (Serial Nr. 2790), Fried. Krupp.  This gun was captured by the 10th and 14th Battalions at Cagnicourt, France, on 2 September 1918.  It is on display in front of Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 23. 

The 15 cm schwere Feldhaubitze 13 (15 cm sFH 13), was a German heavy field howitzer.  The gun was a development of the previous standard howitzer, the 15 cm sFH 02.  Improvements included a longer barrel resulting in better range and a gun shield to protect the crew.  Variants were: the original "kurz" (L/14 – 14 calibre short barrel version), the lg. sFH13 with a longer barrel; and lg. sFH13/02 with minor modifications to simplify wartime manufacture of the lg. sFH weapons. Initially there were serious issues of weak recoil spring mechanisms that would break, and gun barrel explosions.  The problems were solved with the upgrades.  The British referred to these and their shells as "5 point 9"s or "5 9"s as the bore was 5.9 inches (150 mm).  The ability of these guns to deliver mobile heavy firepower close to the frontline gave the Germans a major firepower advantage on the Western Front early in the First World War, as the French and British lacked an equivalent.  It was not until late 1915 that the British began to deploy their own 6 inch 26 cwt howitzer.  About 3,500 of these guns were produced from 1913 to 1918.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/15_cm_sFH_13.

Pilot Mound, Manitoba

 (Photo courtesy of Jeannette Greaves)

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.).  (Serial Nr. 18043), no data.

The 7.58 cm Minenwerfer a.A. (alter Art or old model) (7.58 cm leMW).  The Germans fielded a whole series of mortars before the beginning of the First World War.  Their term for them was Minenwerfer, literally mine-thrower; they were initially assigned to engineer units in their siege warfare role.  By the Winter of 1916-17, they were transferred to infantry units where the leMW's light weight permitted them to accompany the foot-soldiers in the advance.  In common with Rheinmetall's other Minenwerfer designs, the leMW was a rifled muzzle-loader that had hydraulic cylinders on each side of the tube to absorb the recoil forces and spring recuperators to return the tube to the firing position.  It had a rectangular firing platform with limited traverse and elevation.  Wheels could be added to ease transportation or it could be carried by at least six men.  In 1916, a new version, designated as the n.A. or neuer Art, was fielded that included a circular firing platform, giving a turntable effect, which permitted a full 360 degree traverse.  It also had a longer 16 inches (410 mm) barrel and could be used for direct fire between 0° and 27° elevation if the new 90 kg (200 lb) trail was fitted to absorb the recoil forces.  In this mode it was pressed into service as an anti-tank gun.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/7.58_cm_Minenwerfer.

Shilo, Royal Canadian Artillery Museum, The National Artillery Museum of Canada, CFB Shilo, Manitoba

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), Trench Mortar, (Serial Nr.  32258), mounted on a heavy metal base with ramp, handle intact, painted dark grey, mounted on a wheeled carriage.  New wheels and trail in 1988.  Originally allocated to Maillardville, Fraser Mills, British Columbia.  This trench mortar was on display in the Canadian Military Engineer Museum at CFB Gagetown, New Brunswick until transferred to CFB Shilo in January 2013

(Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German First World   War 24-cm Flügelminenwerfer ‘Iko’, Albrecht (finned smoothbore Trench Mortar), (Serial Nr. 339), no data.  This mortar was originally allocated to Lockport, West Selkirk, Manitoba.

(Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 3316), no data, originally allocated to Gleichen, Alberta.

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 3734), no data, originally allocated to Rockwood, Ontario.

CFB Borden, Base Borden Military Museum, Ontario

German First World War Granatenwerfer 16, Grenade Thrower Model F 1916, (Serial Nr. TBC).

German First World War 5-cm leichtes Granatwerfer 36 (5-cm leGrW 36), possibly (Serial Nr. 7310), TBC.

Brantford, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of Balcer)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. 22990), captured by the 18th Battalion, 2ndCanadian Division near Villers-lez-Cagnicourt, France, on 27 August 1918.

The 7.7 cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7 cm FK 16) was a German field gun with a longer range than the FK 96 n.A.  The barrel is longer and the gun has a box carriage to allow for greater elevation, which increased the range.  It also has separate-loading ammunition to reduce powder consumption and barrel wear at short ranges, although this had the drawback of reducing the rate of fire compared to the older gun.  It was prematurely rushed into production in 1916 and early guns suffered from a number of defects, mainly stemming from the German use of substitute materials to reduce consumption of strategic metals. It also suffered from a large number of premature detonations of its shells during 1916.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/7.7_cm_FK_16.

 (Photo courtesy of Balcer) (Photo courtesy of JustSomePics)

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 13 (15-cm sFH 13), (Serial Nr. 373), TBC, captured by the 116thBattalion near Demuin, France, 8 August 1918.  Jubilee Park beside Boer War Memorial.

The 15 cm schwere Feldhaubitze 13 (15 cm sFH 13), was a German heavy field howitzer.  The gun was a development of the previous standard howitzer, the 15 cm sFH 02.  Improvements included a longer barrel resulting in better range and a gun shield to protect the crew.  Variants were: the original "kurz" (L/14 – 14 calibre short barrel version), the lg. sFH13 with a longer barrel; and lg. sFH13/02 with minor modifications to simplify wartime manufacture of the lg. sFH weapons. Initially there were serious issues of weak recoil spring mechanisms that would break, and gun barrel explosions.  The problems were solved with the upgrades.  The British referred to these and their shells as "5 point 9"s or "5 9"s as the bore was 5.9 inches (150 mm).  The ability of these guns to deliver mobile heavy firepower close to the frontline gave the Germans a major firepower advantage on the Western Front early in the First World War, as the French and British lacked an equivalent.  It was not until late 1915 that the British began to deploy their own 6 inch 26 cwt howitzer.  About 3,500 of these guns were produced from 1913 to 1918.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/15_cm_sFH_13.

 (Photos courtesy of Balcer)

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02), (Serial Nr. 871), no data.  CMHM, originally allocated to Simcoe, Ontario.

The 15 cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15 cm sFH 02) was a German heavy field howitzer introduced in 1903.  It was the first artillery piece to use a modern recoil system in the German Army. Some 416 were in service at the beginning of the war.  Its mobility, which allowed it to be deployed as medium artillery, and fairly heavy shell gave the German army a firepower advantage in the early battles in Belgium and France in 1914 as the French and British armies lacked an equivalent.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/15_cm_sFH_02.

Brockville, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of Terry Honour)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 2267), Kaiser Wilhelm I cypher, 1898 and 1907.  This gun was captured by the 2ndBattalion on 27 September 1918 on the Arras-Cambrai Road NorthWest of Raillencourt, France.  Brockville Armoury. 

The 7.7 cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7 cm FK 96 n.A.) is a German field gun.  The gun combined the barrel of the earlier 7.7 cm FK 96 with a recoil system, a new breech and a new carriage. Existing FK 96s were upgraded over time.  The FK 96 n.A. was shorter-ranged, but lighter than the French Canon de 75 modèle 1897 or the British Ordnance QF 18 pounder gun; the Germans placed a premium on mobility, which served them well during the early stages of the First World War. However, once the front had become static, the greater rate of fire of the French gun and the heavier shells fired by the British gun put the Germans at a disadvantage. The Germans remedied this by developing the longer-ranged, but heavier 7.7 cm FK 16.  As with most guns of its era, the FK 96 n.A. had seats for two crewmen mounted on its splinter shield.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/7.7_cm_FK_96_n.A.

 (Photo courtesy of Terry Honour)

German First World War 15-cm Feldhaubitze 17 (15-cm FH 17), (Serial Nr. 2914), 1030, 22671 stamped on breech, serious battle damage on the barrel.  Kaiser Wilhelm I cypher, Fried. Krupp A.G, 1918.  This gun was also captured by the 2nd Battalion on 27 September 1918 on the Arras-Cambrai Road NorthWest of Raillencourt, France.  Brockville Armoury.

Chapleau, Ontario

 (Photos courtesy of Tim Laye)

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), Trench Mortar, (Serial Nr. 33025), no data, AEG M1916 mounted on an iron wheeled carriage.

Coe Hill, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of Terry Honour)

 German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (Serial Nr. 7594), mounted on a round iron stand.  This trench mortar was captured at Vimy Ridge by the 78th Battalion on 9 Oct 1917.  It is located near the cenotaph in front of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 581 on Main Street

Collingwood, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of PDA) (Photos courtesy of Tim Laye)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr.  3263), no data.

Cookstown, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of PDA)  (Photo courtesy of Tim Laye)

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), (Serial Nr. 16214).  This trench mortar was captured by the 102nd Battalion near Beaucourt Wood, NW of Les Quesnel on 8 August 1918.  It is mounted on a round iron stand at the cenotaph.

Cornwall

 

 (Photo courtesy of Terry Honour)

 

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. 33750), mounted on a round iron stand with wood wheels, inside the Cornwall Armoury.  This trench mortar was captured by the 2nd Division in France, ca. 1918.  It was originally allocated to RMC.

Durham, Ontario

 (Photos courtesy of Justsomepics)

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), (Serial Nr. 1682), mounted on iron wheels, captured by the 13th Battalion.  City Park.

Finch

 (Photos courtesy of Terry Honour)

German First World War 24-cm Flügelminenwerfer ‘Iko’, Albrecht (Serial Nr. 2715), 1917.  This trench mortar is located front of the Legion on Hwy 43 between Goldfield Road & Mainstreet.

Flesherton, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of PDA)

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), Trench Mortar, (Serial Nr. 4449), AEG M1916.  This trench mortar was captured by the 54th Battalion at Vimy on 9 April 1917.  It is mounted on the right side of the cenotaph.  A German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 Machinegun, (Serial Nr. 22278), captured by 50th Battalion near Dury, France, 2 Sep 1918 is mounted on the left side of the cenotaph.

 

Fordwich

 

 (Photos courtesy of Tim Faye)

 

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. 33912) TBC.  This trench mortar was captured by the 54th Battalion on 27 Sep 1918 at Bourlon Wood, France.  It is located on the west side of Patrick Street, just north of Water Street. 

 

Grand Bend, Ontario

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), Trench Mortar, (Serial Nr. 6170), TBC, mounted on wheels on a concrete stand in the centre of town.

Guelph, Ontario

(Photo courtesy of Balcer)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), possibly (Serial Nr. 12724), reported to be (Serial No. 101433) TBC.  (Serial No. 12724) was captured by the 50th Battalion on 28 Sep 1918 North of Raillencourt, France and allocated to Guelph.  The gun is displayed next to the Guelph Armoury.

Innisfil

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. TBC).

Kars, Ontario

German First World War 24-cm Flügelminenwerfer ‘Iko’, Albrecht, (Serial Nr. TBC), no markings.

 

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. TBC), no wheels, missing parts. Swords & Ploughshares Muse

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. TBC).

 

Kettleby

 

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. 13278), no data.  This trench mortar is located beside the War Memorial at the entrance to Kettleby Cemetery on Kettleby Road.

Kingston, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of PDA)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 8368), mounted on a pedestal.  This is a German Krupp gun that was captured by the 21st Battalion on 9 October 1917 at Vimy near the Les Tilleuls Crossroads.  Later, it was taken to the Royal Gun Factory in Woolwich, London.  There it was mounted on a Pedestal Mark I and sent back out into the field, where it was used by the 22nd Howitzer Battery.  A number of merchant ships were armed with these guns, but this one may have been used for static defence at a coastal installation, or it may even have been mounted on a train car or back of a lorry.  It is located in Clarence Street Park on the grounds adjacent to St. George’s Cathedral in downtown Kingston.  It is listed as an Ordnance QF 77-mm Gun Mk 1, 1917, No. 34, with King George V RI cypher.

L’Original, Ontario 

 (photo courtesy of Alex Comber)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 5255).  Captured by the 3rd Battalion on 27 Sep 1919 near the Arras-Cambrai Road, North of Bourlon Wood.

Lucan

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02) Heavy Field Howitzer.  (Serial Nr. 9), missing its wheels, mounted on concrete pylons in a city park.  This gun was captured by the 43rd Battalion on 8 Aug 1918 near Amiens in front of Vignette Wood, South of Demuin, France.

Lunenburg, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of Cam Martel)German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 6959), no data, Lunenburg Cemetery, just north of Long Sault.

Madoc, Ontario

  (Photos courtesy of Terry Honour)

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), (Serial Nr. 1157), TBC.  Thomas Thompson Memorial Park, St Lawrence Ave E.

Milton, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of Bob Elliott)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 9563), L-7586, 1917.  This gun was captured by the 3rd Canadian Infantry Battalion, 1st Brigade of the 1st Canadian Division when the Canadian Corps crossed the Canal du Nord to take Bourlon Wood at Cambrai on 27 September 1918.  Canadian Military Heritage Museum. 

Mount Forest, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of Balcer)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 268).  There is no official record of this gun.  It is stamped R.268.  L.393. AWDr.  On the right side below the breech, and gef. 1898. Fr. Kp. abg. 1907. F.F.E. under the breech.

Morrisburg, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of Cam Martel)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 2542), captured by the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles on 26 August 1918 near Monchy, France.  It was put back into action by the 66th Battery CFA, NW of Monchy-le-Preux.  It stands beside the Great War Memorial in front of the South Dundas Justice Building.

(Photo courtesy of Cam Martel)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 1323), TBC, no data.  This gun stands beside the Great War Memorial in front of the South Dundas Justice Building. 

Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario

(Photo courtesy of Balcer)

German First World War 10-cm Kanone 14 (10-cm K 14), (Serial Nr. 201), 1050 kg, 1916.  This gun was captured by the 7th Battalion, CEF, at Vimy on 13 April 1917.  It was initially allocated to Queenston, Ontario.  Located in the vicinity of Kingston Barracks, this gun has been removed for restoration

Niagara Falls, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of Balcer)

German First World War 10.5-cm Kanone 17 (10.5-cm K 17), (Serial Nr. 39), captured by the 3rd Battalion on 27 Sep 1918 near the Arras-Cambrai Road between Marquion and Raillencourt, France.  It is located with the Niagara Military Museum, 5049 Victoria Ave.

Norfolk, Ontario

German First World War 25-cm schwerer Minenwerfer alt Art (25-cm sMW), (Serial Nr. TBC).

Omemee, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of Terry Honour)

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), Trench Mortar, (Serial Nr. 15867).  This trench mortar was captured by the 7th Battalion near Villers-lez-Cagnicourt, France, on 2 September 1918.  It is mounted on a round stand with spoked wheels.

Ottawa, Ontario, The Canadian War Museum

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. 18328), AEG M1916, mounted on an iron carriage.  12 Can MG Coy on the box trail.

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. 5160), AEG M1916, rifled, stamped 2108625, jk, 2660, 5169, mounted on wooden carriage wheels.  Captured by the 20th Battalion at the Cité St. Emile, North of Lens, France, on 15 August 1917.  This leMW n.A. is marked “captured and claimed by the 3rd Can TM” on the rotator/base plate (most likely the 3rd Canadian Trench Mortar Battery).

German First World War 5-cm leichtes Granatwerfer 36 (5-cm lGrW 36) (Serial Nr. TBC).

German First World War 5-cm leichtes Granatwerfer 36 (5-cm lGrW 36) (Serial Nr. TBC).

German First World War 9.15-cm leichtes Minenwerfer System Lanz, (Serial Nr. 4785JP).  Captured by the 18th Battalion at Vimy on 9 April 1917.

The 9.15 cm leichtes Minenwerfer System Lanz (Trench mortar) was a light mortar used by Germany and Austria-Hungary in the First World War.  It was a smooth-bore, breech-loading design that used smokeless propellant.  It was chosen by the Austrians as an interim replacement for their 9 cm Minenwerfer M 14, pending development of a superior domestic design, which eventually turned out to be the 9 cm Minenwerfer M 17.  The older Austrian design had a prominent firing signature, a less effective bomb and shorter range than the Lanz.  Over 500 were ordered with deliveries beginning in April 1917.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/9.15_cm_leichtes_Minenwerfer_System_Lanz.

German First World War 24-cm Flügelminenwerfer ‘Iko’, Albrecht, (Serial Nr. TBC), no markings.

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 204). Captured by the 72nd Battalion on 9 Oct 1917 near Vimy on the Sunken Road 250 yards SW of Givenchy, France.  This gun has a blown barrel.

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 13224), 1918, Krupp Ehrhardt.  Captured by the 3rd Battalion near the Arras-Cambrai Road, North of Bourlon Wood, France, on 27 September 1918.  This gun is mounted on a British Naval/Coast Defence Mounting.

German First World War Beobachtungwagen für feldartillerie, Artillery Observation Wagen.

German First World War 8.8-cm L/30C U-boat Deck Gun from U-91, (Serial Nr. 1972), Fried. Krupp AG 1916, 488KG stamped on the breech, 1972L on the trunnion, 510 F.N. 532, 1972.0 on the barrel.  SM U-91 was a German First World War Type Mittel U submarine launched in 1917.  SM U-91 was one of the 329 submarines serving in the Imperial German Navy (Kaiserliche Marine) during the First World War.  U-91 served with III Flotilla from 13 December 1917 to 11 November 1918.  During its service, this submarine conducted eight patrols and sank 37 ships and damaged two.  U-91 took part in the First Battle of the Atlantic and remained in service until it was surrendered to France on 26 November 1918.  U-91’s deck gun likely came to Canada before the submarine was broken up at Brest, France in July 1921.  Internet, http://www.uboat.net/wwi/boats/index.html?boat=91.

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02), (Serial Nr. 877), no data, Fried Krupp AG, 1916.  1182 on the carriage.  This gun was originally allocated to Hamilton, Ontario.

German First World War 21-cm Mörser 1910 neuer Art Heavy Mortar, (Serial Nr. 679), Krupp AG, Essen, 1916.  Captured by the 18th Battalion.  Originally allocated to Hamilton, Ontario.

CFB Petawawa, Ontario

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), possibly (Serial Nr. 24714), no data.  Apparently found on the Menin Road in France.  This gun is not listed in the official records.

Petrolia

 (Streetview Photo)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. 22990), (Serial Nr. 1176), no data, allocated to Petrolia. 

Port Hope, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of Will S.) (Photos courtesy of Erin Walsh, Port Hope Archives)

 (Photos courtesy of Tim Laye)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 291).  This gun was captured by the 116th Battalion North of Cambrai, France, on 29 September 1918.

Sault Ste Marie, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of LCol Leon Jenkins)

German First World War 10.5-cm Feldhaubitze 98/09 (10.5-cm FH 98/09), (Serial Nr. 46).  This gun was captured by the 3rd Battalion near Raillencourt, France on 27 September 1918.  Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 25.

Shelburne, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of Balcer)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 435), originally allocated to Dufferin County, Ontario, now in a public park.

St. Catherine's, Ontario

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. 1916), captured by the 5th Battalion at Vimy Ridge on 9 April 1917.  This trench mortar was originally allocated to Penetanguishene, Ontario.  Dennis Walker collection.

St. Catherine’s, Ontario, Ridley College

 (Photos courtesy of JustSomePics)

 (Photo courtesy of Carrie Houston)

German First World War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 16 (10.5-cm leFH 16), (Serial Nr. 7981), no data.  This gun was received by Ridley College on 7 February 1923.

Sturgeon Falls, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of LCol Leon Jensen)

German First World War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 16 (10.5-cm leFH 16), (Serial Nr. 3264).  This gun was captured by the 102nd Battalion and 10th Battalion West of Bourlon Wood, France, on 27 September 1918.

Tavistock, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of Terry Honour)

German First World War 25-cm schwerer Minenwerfer alt Art (25-cm sMW), (Serial Nr. 1846) above the trunnions left and right TBC.  This heavy treanch mortar was captured by the 102nd Battalion on 9 Oct 1917 at Vimy Ridge.  Mounted in front of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 518, 223 Hope Street.

Thunder Bay, Ontario

 (Photos courtesy of Terry Honour

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 69), TBC, Mountain View Cemetery.

Trenton, Ontario

  (Photo courtesy of PDA) 

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. 12490), no data.

Uxbridge

 (Photo courtesy of Andre Blanchard)

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02), (Serial Nr. 911), Fried Krupp.

Waterford, Ontario

 (Photos courtesy of JustSomePics)

German First World War 25-cm schwerer Minenwerfer alt Art (25-cm sMW), (Serial Nr. 1930), TBC.  This trench mortar was captured by the 9th Field Company, Canadian Engineers at Vimy Ridge on 9 April 1917.  Listed in the records as a 17-cm, it is on display as a High School Monument.

The 25 cm schwerer Minenwerfer (German for "mine launcher"), often abbreviated as 25 cm sMW, was a heavy trench mortar developed for the Imperial German Army in the first decade of the 20th century.  It was developed for use by engineer troops for destroying bunkers and fortifications otherwise immune to normal artillery.  The 25 cm schwerer Minenwerfer was a muzzle-loading, rifled mortar that had a hydro-spring type recoil system.  It fired either a 97 kg (210 lb) shell or a 50 kg (110 lb) shell, both contained far more explosive filler than ordinary artillery shells of the same caliber.  The low muzzle velocity allowed for thinner shell walls, hence more space for filler for the same weight shell.  The low velocity also allowed the use of explosives like ammonium nitrate–carbon that were less shock-resistant than TNT, which was in short supply at the time.  Shells filled with TNT caused a large number of premature detonations, making the Minenwerfer riskier for the gun crew than normal artillery pieces.  In service, the wheels were removed and the sMW was then placed in a pit or trench at least 1.5 meters (4 ft 11 in) deep, protecting the mortar and its crew.  Despite the extremely short range, the sMW proved to be very effective as its massive shells were almost as effective in penetrating fortifications as the largest siege guns in the German inventory, including the 42 centimeters (17 in) Dicke Bertha (Big Bertha), a howitzer that was more than 50 times the weight of the sMW.  The effectiveness of the sMW is indicated by the number in service, which increased from 44 when the war broke out, to 1,234 at its end.  In 1916, a new longer barrelled version was put into production.  This new model, which had a longer range, was designated the 25 cm schwerer Minenwerfer neuer Art (German for "new pattern"), which was abbreviated as 25 cm sMW n/A.  The older, short-barrel model was then designated as the 25 cm sMW a/A (alter Art)(German for "old pattern").  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/25_cm_schwerer_Minenwerfer.

Windsor, Ontario

  (Photos courtesy of Kevin Hodson)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 4451), being restored at St. Clair College.

  (Photo courtesy of Kevin Hodson)

German First World War 15-cm schwerer Feldhaubitze 13 (15-cm sFH 13), (Serial Nr. 125), TBC, salvaged by the 2nd Division Southeast of Bois de Bouche, near Cagnicourt by No. 2 Section, 1 CDAC.  It is now on display with the Essex-Kent Scottish Regiment at Sandwich Street. 

The record on this sFH 13 states ‘salvaged’ rather than captured.  Likely damaged in counter-battery fire, Kevin Hodson guided the restoration and notes the breech block is severely jammed half-way and the firing pin still present, possibly indicating the crew didn’t have time to remove it before capture.  The gun crew was either incapacitated or already deceased.  The restorers at St Clair College tried extreme measures to free-up the block including heating the breech ring and applying an 18-ton hydraulic jack – to no avail.  Kevin concludes the crew simply abandoned it since it could no longer be fired.  It may have backfired and distorted the block; therefore the only way to remove it would have been to saw through the breech ring. 

This gun has been left it as is since it can tell history to other theorists. The gun was most likely involved in the 1st Battle of Cambrai, since that was a rather fierce exchange of fire, and the first one using tanks. There is evidence of battle damage on this piece that was taken care of by field repairs. These have been left intact for their historical significance – the trail frame had been bent and broken and then partially straightened and fixed by ‘scab’ plates with over 60 rivets.  The recoil mechanism cradle also was patched by in-field riveting.[3]

Wingham

 (Photos courtesy of JustSomePics)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. 12602), in front of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 180, at 183 Victoria Street W.  This gun was captured  by the 10th Canadian Infantry Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, during  the Battle of Drocourt-Queant on 2 August 1918.  It was given to the town of  Wingham as part of the post-First World War trophy redistribution  program

Woodbridge, Ontario

 (Photo courtesy of Tim Laye)

 

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. 5803).  This gun was captured by the 10th Battalion, 2nd Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Division at Cagnicourt Wood, France, on 2 September 1918.  Woodbridge Tower Memorial, Canadian Military Heritage Museum (CMHM).

 (Photo courtesy of the City of Vaughn Recreation and Culture Department, Cultural Services Division) 

German First World War 15-cm Feldkanone L/40 in Räderlafette (40 calibre Naval Gun on mounted on a Wheeled Carriage), (Serial Nr. 84), no data.  This gun was originally allocated to Vaughan Township, Vellore.  It stands by the Woodbridge Tower Memorial, CMHM.

 (Photo courtesy of the City of Vaughn Recreation and Culture Department, Cultural Services Division)

 

German First World War 15-cm Feldkanone L/45 in Räderlafette (45 calibre Naval Gun on mounted on a Wheeled Carriage), (Serial Nr. TBC), Woodbridge Tower Memorial, CMHM.

Kahnawake, Québec
 
German First World War 7.58-cm leMW n.A. (Serial Nr. TBC), mounted on top of the cenotaph.

Knowlton, Québec, Brome County Historical Society Museum, 120 Lakeside.

German First World War Granatenwerfer 16 (Serial Nr. TBC).

 

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW), possibly (Serial Nr. 5001), TBC, captured by the 3rd Canadian Division.  On base, no wheels.

 

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. TBC), no base, no wheels.  352, G3298 (with an upside down 20 above).  Marked “captured by the 25th Battalion on 18 August 1917”.

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. TBC), marked H516, 2.0 MR, mounted on wheels.

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), (Serial Nr. 6043), 1917 M, captured by the 102nd Battalion (the War record lists it as the 10th Bn).

German First World War 25-cm schwerer Minenwerfer alt Art (25-cm sMW), damaged, no markings visible, possibly (Serial Nr. 1524), captured by the 102ndBattalion at Vimy Ridge, 9 April 1917.

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 8382), captured by the 5th Canadian Mounted Rifles, Cambrai, France, 9 October 1918.

Lac Megantic, Québec

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 6502), no data.  This gun stands in a park facing the lake.

Lachute

German First World War 7.58-cm leMW n.A. (Serial Nr. 46643), TBC.  This guns stands in front of Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 70, 634 Rue Lafleur.

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. TBC), No. 1 of 2.

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. TBC), No. 2 of 2.

Lévis, Québec

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 1022).  This gun was captured by the 13th Battalion North of Aubercourt, France on 8 August, 1918. It stands outside the Armoury at 10 rue de l’Arsenal Lévis.

 

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02), (Serial Nr. 360), this gun was also captured by the 13th Battalion North of Aubercourt, France on 8 August 1918.  10 rue de l’Arsenal.

Montréal, Québec, Côte-des-Neiges Armoury

 

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), (Serial Nr. 6219), letter P under the number and LK.  This trench mortar was captured by the 16th Battalion on 8 August 1918 near Aubercourt, France.  This mMW is outside the armoury at 4185 Chemin de la Côte des Neiges.

 

Mont Saint Hilaire

 

German First World War 25-cm schwerer Minenwerfer alt Art (25-cm sMW), (Serial Nr. 571), TBC.

New Carlisle, Québec

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. 17391), captured by the 42nd Batallion, 29 Sep 1918 on the Douai-Cambrai Road West of Tillby.

Québec City, Québec, La Citadelle

 (Photo courtesy of James Simmonds)

German First World War 21-cm Mörser 16 (21-cm Mrs 16), (Serial Nr. 825), TBC, captured on 3 Sep 1918 on a road North-East of Villers-lez-Cagnicourt, France.

Plains of Abraham Park, Québec City, Québec

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 9742), captured by the 87th Battalion, near Bourlon, France, 27 September 1918.

 

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. 8899), Fr.  Kp.  This gun was captured by the 87th Battalion near Bourlon, France, 27 September 1918

 

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. 12323), TBC, Fr.  Kp.  This gun was captured 2 September 1918 Cagnicourt Wood, France.

 

German First World War 10-cm Kanone 17 (10-cm K 17), (Serial Nr. 10), Kp, 1918 with a blown barrel (listed in the records as a 10.5-cm).  This gun was captured by the 42nd Battalion on 28 August 1918.

German First World War 10.5-cm Feldhaubitze 98/09 (10.5-cm FH 98/09), (Serial Nr. 5051), Fr.  Kp. 1917.  This gun was captured by the 22nd Battalion.  There is a cannonball cemented in the muzzle (not used in this Shell-Gun).

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02), (Serial Nr. 473), TBC, near the site where General Wolfe fell.

 

German First World War 21-cm Mörser 16 (21-cm Mrs 16), (Serial Nr. 85) captured by the 42nd Battalion Southeast of Demuin, France.  The barrel on this gun is locked in the recoil position.

Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Collège militaire royal de Saint-Jean

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. 14585), TBC.  This gun was captured by the 87th Battalion, on the sunken road SW of Bourlon, France on 27 September 1918.

Sayabec, Québec

 (Photo courtesy of Amqui

German First World War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 98/09 Light Field Howitzer, (Serial Nr. 2908). This gun was captured by the 27th Battalion on 9 Oct 1917 near the edge of Farbus Wood at Vimy. The gun was taken over by the 4th Howitzer Battery and used in action against the Germans. It was on display in a park at Tournant-de-la-Rivière de Sayabec. The gun was relocated to the Municipal Park in 1977.

Saint-Agathe-des-Monts

German First World War 24-cm Flügelminenwerfer ‘Iko’, Albrecht (finned smoothbore Trench Mortar), (Serial Nr. 1351), mounted on a concrete stand at the corner of Rue St Joseph and Rue Leblanc.

Saint-Jérôme

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr.  3743) TB), No. 1 in front of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 190, 940 Rue du Souvenir.

Terrebonne, Québec

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), Trench Mortar, (Serial Nr.  305), no data.

CFB Valcartier, Québec

 (Photo courtesy of James Simmonds)

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 13 (15-cm sFH 13), (Serial Nr. 1098), 1916, 788 M.V.  This gun was captured by the R22eR near Cherisy, France, on 27 August 1918.  It is on display beside the Garrison Officer’s Mess.

Campbellton, New Brunswick.

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 2402), no data.

Chipman, New Brunswick

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), (Serial Nr. 7095), H, 2, 1918.  This trench mortar was captured by the 13th Battalion near Aubercourt, France, on 8 August 1918.  It is mounted on an iron-wheeled carriage in the Community Park on Main Street.

Grand Falls, New Brunswick

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 8283).  This gun was captured by the 25th Battalion at Moon Quarry near Cherisy, France, on 27 August 1918.  It is on the Main Street in a small centre island park.

Hopewell Cape, New Brunswick

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 784), no data.  1906 Fr.  Kp. Gg. over crown 29.   Restored by CFB Gagetown.

German First World War 10-cm Kanone 14 (10-cm K 14), (Serial Nr. 590), 1917.  This gun was captured by the 27th Battalion at Farbus near Vimy on 9 April 1917.  A plaque fixed to the gun states, “This German Gun No. 590 captured in the World War by the 26th Battalion recruited in this province was won by the citizens of Albert County, New Brunswick in the Victory Loan competition of 1919.  Henry L.  Drayton, Minister of Finance.”

Perth-Andover, New Brunswick

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 4095), no data, r.Kp, 5012.  M.  Kp., 4598.  S. BNA 18.  The gun sits on a hill overlooking Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 36.

New Brunswick Museum, Saint John, New Brunswick

German First World War Granatenwerfer 16 spigot mortar with 2 kg fin-stabilized grenade mounted on the spigot (Serial Nr. TBC).  The sheet metal stabilizing fins caused a tell-tale whirring sound and could be fired out to 300 metres.  The grenade had a very sensitive fuze which caused it to detonate on the surface causing more damage than it would by penetrating into the ground in a crater.

Woodstock, New Brunswick

 

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 2398), no data.  The gun is inside the 89th Field Battery Armoury in Woodstock, undergoing restoration.

Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), Trench Mortar, (Serial Nr. 16634), 2047, 1733, 799, 111, and 1686, mounted on iron wheels inside the Armoury.  This trench mortar came to PEI in 1920 as part of the War Trophies Act.  It stood in the Mount Stewart Cemetery until it was donated to Prince Edward Island Regiment Museum, Queen Charlotte Armoury in 2008.

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), (Serial Nr. 848), stamped Rh.M.F. 1916.  This trench mortar was captured by the 16th Battalion near Aubercourt, France, 8 August 1918.  Originally allocated to Stamford, Ontario, this mMW was collected by Tom Skelding, held at the Armour School, CFB Gagetown for a number of years, and donated to the PEIR in 2013.  It is currently on dfisplay outside the Armoury.

Kensington, Prince Edward Island

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02), (Serial Nr. 86).  This gun was originally allocated to Charlottetown.  Kensington Veteran’s Memorial Military Museum, next to Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 9.

Lennox Island, Prince Edward Island

German First World War 10.5-cm Feldhaubitze 98/09 (10.5-cm FH 98/09), (Serial Nr. 223), Rh MF, 1911.  This gun was originally allocated to Grand River.

Montague

Possible German First World Minenwerfer mounted on steel wheels (Serial Nr. TBC), beside the cenotaph in front of the Royal Canadian Legion at 15 Douses Road.

Mount Stewart

German First World War 10.5-cm Feldhaubitze 98.09, (Serial Nr. 438). This gun was captured by the 11th Division Imperials operating with Canadians on 27 Sep 1918 SW of Epinoy, France. Originally allocated to Charlotteown, it is now located beside the cenotaph at Mount Stewart, PEI, missing its wheels. The Gunner's shield shows evidence of penetration.

Summerside, Prince Edward Island

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. 13820).  This gun was captured by the 25th Battalion on 29 September 1918 at Moon Quarry near Cherisy, France.

German First World War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 16 (10.5-cm leFH 16), (Serial Nr. 7419), no data.

Black River, Nova Scotia

 (Don Miles Photo)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 16.), (Serial Nr. 376), captured by the 13th Battalion on 27 Sep 1918 East f Sains-lez-Marquion, SE of Demain, France.  Originally allocated to Hamilton, Ontario, this gun stood in Windsor until it deteriorated and was disposed of.  It was rescued and refurbished with wagon wheels and now stands on the front lawn of Major (Ret'd) Don Miles at Black River, Nova Scotia.

Kelly Hancock advises that "54th CDN" (Kootenays) is inscribed on top of the gun barrel.  The gun's trail data plate records the date of manufacture as 1918.   According to Don Miles, at some point the gun was removed from Fort Edward and displayed at the King's College School for Boys in Windsor. Sometime around 1945-47, the boys rolled it down a hill as a Halloween prank.  It got away from them and careened straight thru the side of a barn!   Don stated that at that time a wheel was sheared off and it likely sustained the damage visible on the left seat back/armour plate.  Apparently it ended up in an old gypsum sinkhole in the woods behind the school.

Bridgewater, Nova Scotia

German First World War 7.7-cm leichte Feldhaubitze 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), possibly (Serial Nr. 1638), TBC, no data.

Halifax, Nova Scotia, Army Museum

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. 18351), 213.  Captured by the 19th Battalion on 26 August 1918 at Guemappe, France.

Shelburne

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 18251).  There is a six-point star in a circle on the barrel.  The gun is also stamped  M753 AB, G. S7422 k.p (2), 1918.  A.B. TgL. Sp 48 (OR Cp 48). 18251.R.  No data on this gun's capture, but it was allocated to Shelburne in 1920.

Sydney

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer, (17-cm mMW), possibly (Serial Nr. 1078), TBC, captured by the 43rd Battalion on 8 August 1918 at Dodo Wood SW of Demuin, France.

Bonavista, Newfoundland

 (Photo courtesy of Dennis Goodland)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. TBC).

Botwood, Newfoundland

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), Medium Trench Mortar (Serial Nr. TBC).

Carbonear, Newfoundland

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. TBC), Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 23.

Catalina, Newfoundland

(Photo courtesy of Joyce Sherren)

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), (Serial Nr. TBC).

Harbour Buffet, Newfoundland

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), (Serial Nr. TBC).

Stephenville Crossing, Newfoundland

German First World War 25-cm schwerer Minenwerfer alt Art (25-cm sMW), (Serial nr. TBC.  Flat Bay, Stephenville Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 38.

Placentia, Newfoundland

 (Photo courtesy of Tom O'Keefe)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 3690).

St. Georges

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. TBC), Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 38.

St. John’s, Pleasantville, Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 56, St. John’s

(Author photo ca. 1971)

German First World War 10-cm Kanone 17 Field Gun (Serial Nr. TBC), City Park.  This Gun has had its wheels replaced and has been restored four times by Nelson Sherren.

 (Author photo ca. 1971) (Photo courtesy of Steve Cooney)

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 13 Heavy Field Howitzer (Serial Nr. TBC).  In front of the Legion.

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 13 Heavy Field Howitzer (Serial Nr. TBC), buried in a landfill, location unknown.

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. TBC)Royal Artillery Park Museum, preserved by Gordon Stamp, 166th (Newfoundland) Field Artillery Regiment.

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. TBC), Royal Artillery Park Museum, also preserved by Gordon Stamp.

Spaniard’s Bay, Bay Roberts, Newfoundland

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), Trench Mortar, (Serial Nr. TBC), Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 32.

St. John’s, Newfoundland

 (Author photo ca 1970)

German First World War 10-cm Kanone 17 (10-cm K 17), (Serial Nr. TBC), Victoria Park.  The trail has been cut off and the forward part of the gun now rests on a concrete stand with a plaque in the park.

Stephenville Crossing

German 25-cm schwerer Minenwerfer alt Art, (25-cm sMW), (Serial Nr. TBC), Flat Bay, Stephenville Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 38.

Trinity, Newfoundland

 (Photo courtesy of Jim Miller)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. TBC).

Dawson City, Yukon Territory

German First World War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 16 (10.5-cm leFH 16), possibly (Serial Nr. 6562), no data.  This gun is apparently equipped with the shield from an sFH13.  Facing the cenotaph, the gun is on the right side of the memorial at Victory Gardens.

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02), (Serial Nr. 1169).  This gun was captured by the 16th Battalion on 8 August 1918 near Aubercourt, France.  It stands facing the cenotaph on the left side of the memorial.

Whitehorse, Yukon Territory

 (LCol Bruce Kiecker Photos)
German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16) Field Gun (Serial Nr. 7414).  This gun was captured by the 102nd Central Ontario Battalion, CEF, near Bourlon Wood, France, on 27 Sep 1918 during the battle of Canal du Nord.  The gun was originally allocated to Dawson City.
 (LCol Bruce Kiercker Photo)
German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), Medium Trench Mortar (Serial Nr. 5270), captured by the 2nd Division in France ca 1918.  Allocated to White Horse.

End of List