Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Artillery preserved in Canada 7b: New Brunswick, 5 CDSB Gagetown

Artillery preserved in Canada: New Brunswick,

5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown, the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery School (RCAS), 4th Artillery Regiment (General Support), and the New Brunswick Military History Museum

The web page has become to big for all the guns in New Brunswick to be listed on one page, therefore the guns on display at 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown, including the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery School (RCAS), 4th Artillery Regiment (General Support), and the New Brunswick Military History Museum are listed separately here.  

Any errors found here are by the author.  French Translation of the technical data presented here would be appreciated.  Corrections, amendments and suggested changes may be emailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com.

Une traduction au français pour l'information technique présente serait grandement apprécié. Vos corrections, changements et suggestions sont les bienvenus, et peuvent être envoyés au hskaarup@rogers.com

Data current to 14 May 2017.

New Brunswick Military History Museum

Cast Iron 12-pounder 6-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, mounted on a wooden carriage, inside the museum.  The carronade is a short smoothbore, cast iron cannon, which was used by the Royal Navy and first produced by the Carron Company, an ironworks in Falkirk, Scotland.  It was used from the 1770s to the 1850s.  Its main function was to serve as a powerful, short-range anti-ship and anti-crew weapon.  While considered very successful early on, carronades eventually disappeared as rifled naval artillery changed the shape of the shell and led to fewer and fewer close-range engagements.

 

9-pounder 8-cwt Muzzleloading Rifle, weight 8-1-4 (928 lbs), RGF No. 23, 1870 on the left trunnion, Firth Steel 1580 on the muzzle, W arrow D, R.C.D. 1877, No. 459, I, stamped on the iron carriage with wood wheels.  Inside the museum.

Hispano-Suiza 20-mm M1079 Mk. V Cannon, Spitfire wing gun (usually one of four) inside the museum.  This gun is on loan from the Canadian War Museum.

German Second World War 7.92-mm MG 81Z twin/paired (four-barreled) machine-guns with a single trigger pistol grip, (Serial Nos. 52108, 52137, 52138, & 64127), New Brunswick Military History Museum, 5 CDSB Gagetown, New Brunswick.  This is a special double twin-mount MG 81Z (the Z suffix stands for Zwilling, meaning "twin") that was introduced for the Luftwaffe in 1942.  It paired up two of the weapons on one mount to provide even more firepower with a maximum rate of fire of 3200 rounds/minute without requiring much more space than a standard machine gun.  The MG 81Z was found in many unique installations in Luftwaffe combat aircraft, like this twin pair of MG 81Z (for a total of four guns) installed in the air defences of the Dornier Do 217.  It was technically designated R19 (R for Rüstsatz) as a factory designed field conversion/upgrade kit.  (Wikipedia)

Captured Dornier Do 217M, RAF AM107, 6158, with MG arrangement.  (RAF Photos)

German Second World War Madsen 20-mm Anti-Aircraft Machine Cannon M/38, (Serial Nr. 168), inside the museum.  This is a Danish Gun manufactured during the German occupation of Denmark during the Second World War.

Oerlikon 20-mm/70 Light Anti-Aircraft Gun being manned by Canadian gunners on the roof of the Canadian Military Headquarters (CMHQ), London, England, ca 1942.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3607578)

Oerlikon 20-mm/70 Light Anti-Aircraft Gun, inside the museum.

Oerlikon 20-mm/70 Light Anti-Aircraft Gun manned by a soldier of the Saskatoon Light Infantry (MG), Spinazzola, Italy, 1 Oct 1943.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3516225)

3-inch Mortar, Essex Scottish Regiment, Groesbeek, Netherlands, 24 Jan 1945.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3524605)

3-inch Mortar, L/C 739, inside the museum.

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun in a Naval gun mount, 1945, outside the front entrance of the museum.  This Bofors came from HMCS Bonaventure, Canada’s last Aircraft carrier.

American 90-mm M1A1 Anti-Aircraft Gun, South Gate.

American 90-mm M1A1 Anti-Aircraft Gun, inside the Main Gate.

75-mm M20 Recoilless Rifle, inside the museum.

106-mm M40A1 Recoilless Rifle mounted on an M38A1 CDN3 Jeep.

106-mm M40A1 Recoilless Rifle mounted on a jeep, Canadian Guards, ca 1964.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4235730)

106-mm M40A1 Recoilless Rifle mounted on an M113 APC, Ex Reforger, Germany, 25 Sep 1973.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4692196)

 

105-mm C1A1 M2A1 Howitzer, Serial No. 13166, 1945, weight 1,060 lbs, in front of the museum.

The C1/C1A1 (aka American M2A1) were made in Canada by the Quebec based Sorel gun makers.  The C2 version were 88 American M2A1s that Canada bought in 1951 as an interim until Sorel could produce them.  The carriages were identical but the guns were not.  The Canadian Forces ran a mixed fleet until the 1980s, when there was a big overhaul program where the all the C2 were converted to C1 configuration, and thenall ref to the C2 in the inventory was deleted.  Some of the C2 were disposed of before the overhaul - or not overhauled because they were to be disposed of - which accountes for a few of the guns in Canada still carrying US numbers.  A few of these guns may also have American M2A2 barrels that replaced the older M2A1s during the overhaul.  (Doug Knight, CWM)

105-mm L5 Pack Howitzer, (Serial No. 57656), CFR 50-34041, Sgt’s and WO’s Mess.

105-mm L5 Pack Howitzer, (Serial No. 57659), inside the Main Gate.

155-mm C1 (M1A2) Towed Medium Howitzer, aka M114, manufactured at Sorel Industries Limited in Quebec, Queen Elizabeth II cypher.  CFR 00-34411.  The carriage plate reads: CARR. HOW. 155MM M1A2 CDN. SOREL INDUSTRIES LTD. CANADA 1955, REG. NO. CDN 2, INSP (symbol).  This gun is located outside the Main Gate.

155-mm M109 Self-Propelled Howitzer, 1 RCHA, Fallex 1976, Germany. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4631311)

155-mm M109 Self-Propelled Howitzer, CFR 85-77247, 1985, AC: NX, ECC: 119205 HUI C: 0105, SAUI C: 0105, VMO No. DLE21802, VMO.  Painted as 45B, Museum Park.

5.5-inch Medium Gun, Vaucelles, France 23 July 1944. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3396146)

5.5-inch Breechloading Mk. III Gun on a Mk. I Carriage, weight 1-14-1-0, King George VI cypher, to be restored, standing in the museum park.  Canada made carriages for these guns during the Second World War, and after the war acquired 85 of them for the RCA.  The gun fired a 45.5-kg (100-pound) shell to a range of 14,800 metres (16,200 yards).  A missing barrel for this gun has recently been sourced at CFB Edmonton, and hopefully the parts will be mated and assembled some time in the near future!

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/15 Machineguns carried by German Prisoners of War captured by Canadians, June 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3403114)

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/15 Machinegun, (Serial Nr. 8483), J.P. Sauer & Sohn, Suhl, 1918.  Museum Small Arms storage.

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/15 Machinegun (Serial Nr. 3729).  Museum Small Arms storage.

German First World War 7.92-mm Schwarzlose M07.12 MG (Serial Nr. 51192).

German Second World War 17-cm Kanone 18 Mrslaf in action in Italy, Feb 1944.  (Bundesarchiv, Bild 1011-310-0895-13A)

German Second World War 17-cm Kanone 18 Mrslaf in action in Tunisia, 1943.  (Bundesarchiv, Bild 1011-554-0865-17A)

German Second World War 17-ton 17-cm Kanone 18 (K18) in Mörserlafette (on a big gun carriage), (Serial Nr. R320), sent from Europe to Aberdeen, and then to Canada in 1945.  This gun was shipped from Aberdeen in the USA on 3 Mar 1945, along with a new spare barrel.  It was located in the Munitions Experimental Test Centre (CEEM), until it was transferred to the NBMHM, CFB Gagetown, on 4 Dec 2012.  Once it has been restored, it will be displayed at the New Brunswick Military History Museum (NBMHM) on Base. 

 (MOXING.Net Photo)

K18 guns were used in the battles in Italy in 1943 against gunners from Saint John, New Brunswick .  The bye marking on the gun is the manufacturers code for HANOMAG-Hannover'sche Maschinenbau AG vorm. Georg Egestorff, Hannover.  This company manufactured approximately 300 of these guns from 1941 onwards (before then, they were built by the Krupp firm).  The camoflage paint for this gun was field gray.

Italian 75-mm Cannone da 75/27 modello 06 Field Gun, Gio. Ansaldo & C., Genova 1916, FCA 1099, MLA 3432, KG 345.  This gun is on display in the Museum's outdoor park.  This gun was shipped from the Mediterranean Theatre in 1944 to Halifax, then went to the CWM and then to CFB Gagetown.

The Cannone da 75/27 modello 06 was a field gun used by Italy during both World Wars.  It was a license-built copy of the Krupp Kanone M 1906 gun.  It had seats for two crewmen attached to the gunshield as was common practice for the period.  Captured weapons were designated by the Wehrmacht during the Second World War as the 7.5 cm Feldkanone 237(i).  Many guns were modernized for tractor-towing with pressed-steel wheels and rubber rims.  These weighed some 65 kilograms (143 lb) more than the original version with spoked wooden wheels.  The gun is reported to have had a 10 km range.

Japanese 70-mm Type 92 Battalion Gun (Serial No. 2561), inside museum.  On loan from the RCA Museum, CFB Shilo, Manitoba.

The Type 92 Battalion Gun was a light howitzer used by the Imperial Japanese Army during the Second Sino-Japanese War and the Second World War.  The Type 92 number was designated for the year the gun was accepted, 2592 in the Japanese imperial year calendar, or 1932 in the Gregorian calendar.  Each infantry battalion included two Type 92 guns; therefore, the Type 92 was referred to as Battalion Artillery.  This gun was probably found in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska that had been occupied by the Japanese and retaken by a combined Canadian – American force in 1943.

81-mm Mortar, inside the museum.

 

Russian ASU-57 SP Airborne Assault Gun, New Brunswick Military History Museum, Museum Park.

CFB GagetownThe Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery School (RCAS), Bldg J7.

Cast Iron ½-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown, mounted on a wood carriage, inside the school.  Presented to the Artillery School by LCol J.D.E. Crossman, 13 Aug 1978, and restored in 2004.

      

12-pounder 6-cwt Breechloading Mk. IV Gun, weight 6-0-9 (681 lbs), made by Armstrong, mounted on a wheeled carriage, Queen Victoria cypher, inside the school.  No. 136, RGF 1898, 12 pdr 6 cwt on right trunnion.  RCD 1910 on right wheel hub, RCD 1896 on left wheel hub as well as 628470.  No. 20 on the carriage box trail.  1307024 on the breech.

Three of these guns were recorded as on strength in with 90 Field Battery, Fredericton in 1933: Reg. No. 285, RGF 01, carriage OCM; RGF No. 286, carriage OCM; and Reg. No. 200, RGF 01, carriage OCM).

U.S. Model 1905 3-inch field gun, (Serial No. 309), built by Bethlehem Steel, 1914.  This gun is one of 477 produced by three different makers prior to the First World War.  The gun is mounted on a Model 1902 field carriage (Serial No. 548), built by Rock Island Arsenal, 1917.  It is accompanied by a Model 1916 Limber.  This gun was presented to the Royal Regiment of Canadian School (RCAS) by the United States Army Artillery and Missile School, 7 November 1961.

Limber (Serial No. 1890), 3-inch Gun Caisson, Model of 1916, Rock Island Arsenal, 1918.  This limber was made in Illinois.  The Rock Island Arsenal was the traditional builder of U.S. Army field carriages, limbers, and caissons.  The number of Model 1902 carriages built exceeds that of the Model 1905, because the Models 1902, 1904, and 1905 3-inch guns were all mounted on the Model 1902 field carriage.  In 1918 the year the First World War ended, the U.S. Army was still being provided with 3-inch ordnance matériel, whereas the American units sent overseas used only French 75-mm Guns.

U.S. Model 1917 75-mm field gun (British), Bethlehem Steel Coy, 1912, 995 Pounds, (Serial No. 489) on the muzzle.  This gun is mounted on a 75-mm Gun Carriage Model of 1917 (British), Bethlehem Steel Company, 1918, (Serial No. 2079), MMC, according to the builder's plate on the carriage.  This gun is on loan from the Royal Canadian Artillery Museum.  This is an American version of the British QF 18-pounder modified to fire French 75-mm ammunition.  One other gun like it is preserved in the RCA Museum, CFB Shilo, Manitoba.

81-mm Mortar, inside the RRCAS.

American 4.2-inch Mortar on M24 Mount, Rock Island Arsenal, 1952, inside the RRCAS.

25-pounder QF Field Gun, in front of the main entrance to the school.

25-pounder QF Field Gun with funeral carriage mounted, inside the school.

Limber for 25-pounderQF Field Gun.

American M116 75-mm Pack Howitzer M1A1 (Serial No. 3063), Arsenal No. 5024, nside the school.  This gun is on loan from the RCA Museum, CFB Shilo, Manitoba.

105-mm L5 Pack Howitzer, inside the school.

120-mm Mortar with wheeled flat base plate and 1941 Canadian tires, outside K lines.

German/French Second World War Hotchkiss 25-mm AT Gun, (Serial No. 2206), stamped APX 1940, G 25, SAL 1937, outside the school’s K lines.

Russian 85-mm D-44 Divisional Gun, outside the school’s K lines.

Blowpipe launcher and Missile, inside the school.

Javelin launcher, inside the RRCAS.

105-mm C1A1 M2A1 Howitzer, (Reg. No. 15062), outside the Artillery School’s K lines.

 155-mm M109 Self-Propelled Howitzer, 1 RCHA, Fallex 1982, Germany.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4876327)

155-mm M109 Self-Propelled Howitzer, (Reg. No. 77240), 1985, AC: NX, ECC: 119205 HUI C: 1760, SAUI C: 1760, VMO No. DLE21801, VMO.  Display Monument.

105mm C3 Howitzer, with brass plate marked Mechanism, Recoil, 105 mm Howitzer M101/33, (Serial No. 077), Rotterdam - Netherlands, 1998, inside the Artillery School’s K lines hangar.

105mm LG1 Mk. II Howitzer, inside the K lines hangar, Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery School (RCAS), 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown, New Brunswick.

155-mm M777 Howitzers inside the K Line hangar of the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery School (RCAS), 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown, New Brunswick.

Cessna L-19E Bird Dog (Serial No. 16733), Canadian Army, Royal Canadian Artillery Spotter aircraft in flight over CFB Gagetown, July 1973.  (Photo courtesy of the Shearwater Aviation Museum)

4th Artillery Regiment (General Support), 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown

3-pounder Vickers, Sons & Maxim LD Semi-Automatic QF Gun, stamped Vickers Sons & Maxim LD 3 pdr Autom.  QF, No. 4615, 1901.  Mk VII, ESQ 150.  3-pounder Stand VI Mod 2, No. 90, EWE, GHE 346. 1915.   No. 1 in front of the 4th Artillery Regiment (General Support), Headquarters, main entrance.

3-pounder USN, Vickers, Sons & Maxim LL Semi-Automatic QF Gun, plaque Patent No. 453702, dated 9th June 1891, plate USN Vickers Sons & Maxim London 3-pounder VI No. 531, JBB, 832, 1901, 35466, 4616, No. 2 in front of the 4th Artillery Regiment (General Support), Headquarters, main entrance.

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun, 4th Artillery Regiment (General Support), Headquarters, west entrance.

American 90-mm M1A1 Anti-Aircraft Gun, inside the vehicle compound, 4th Artillery Regiment (General Support), 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown, New Brunswick.

   

Oerlikon 35-mm Twin Cannon, inside the 4 vehicle compound, 4th Artillery Regiment (General Support), 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown, New Brunswick..

Skyguard Radar System, inside the vehicle compound, 4th Artillery Regiment (General Support), 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown, New Brunswick.

ADATs, 4th Artillery Regiment (General Support), 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown, New Brunswick.  The Air Defense Anti-Tank System (ADATS) is a dual-purpose short range surface-to-air and anti-tank missile system based on the M113A2 vehicle.  It is manufactured by the Swiss company Oerlikon-Contraves, a member of the Rheinmetall Defence Group of Germany.  The ADATS missile is a laser-guided supersonic missile with a range of 10 kilometres, with an electro-optical sensor with TV and Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR). The carrying vehicle has also a conventional two-dimensional radar with an effective range of over 25 kilometres.

155-mm M777 Gun Crew, Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery School (RCAS), 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown, New Brunswick, taking part in New Brunswick Day celebrations on the grounds of the Lieutenant-Governor of New Brunswick in Fredericton, 6 August 2012.

4 (GS) Regiment LAV III, Fredericton, New Brunswick, taking part in NB Day celebrations on the grounds of the Lieutenant-Governor, 6 August 2012.