Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Artillery preserved in Canada 6: Quebec, Quebec City, la Citadel

Artillery preserved in the Quebec Citadel

Data current to 20 Aug 2018.

The aim of this website is to locate, identify and document every historical piece of artillery preserved in Canada.  Many contributors have assisted in the hunt for these guns to provide and update the data found on these web pages.  Photos are by the author unless otherwise credited.  Any errors found here are by the author, and any additions, corrections or amendments to this list of Guns and Artillery in Canada would be most welcome and may be e-mailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com.

For all official data concerning the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, please click on the link to their website:

Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery Website

Note: Back in the day, artillery in Canada was referred to by its radio call sign "Sheldrake".  It is now referred to by its "Golf" call sign.  (Acorn sends)

Une traduction au français pour l'information technique présente serait grandement apprécié. Vos corrections, changements et suggestions sont les bienvenus, et peuvent être envoyés au hskaarup@rogers.com

R22eR, Quebec Citadel, ca 1965.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4234391)

HM Queen Elizabeth II with Rt Hon Georges P. Vanier, GG of Canada, la Citadel, Quebec, Oct 1964.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3401078)

Winter gun drill with horse-drawn sled, Quebec Citadel, 1885.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3245964)

 (David Robert Photo)

  (chensiyuan Photo)

Québec City, La Citadelle, aerial view in winter. 

Diagram showing the placement of large guns on display at La Citadelle, Québec City.

 (Jean Gagnon Photo)

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight 17-x-x (>3,584 lbs), mounted on a wood naval gun carriage.  No. 1 of 2 in front of the Residence of the Governor General at the Citadelle of Québec.

 (Fishead64 Photo)

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight 17-x-x (>3,584 lbs), mounted on a wood naval gun carriage.  No. 2 of 2 in front of the Residence of the Governor General at the Citadelle of Québec.

 (Jean Gagnon Photo, left, Gilles Y. Hamel Photo, right)

Blomefield Cast Iron 32-pounder 56-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight >(6,000 lbs), maker and Serial No. TBC.  Mounted on a iron garrison gun carriage.  No. 1 in front of the former Hospital Administration Building, Mann’s Bastion, No. 1 of 2.

 (Óðinn Photo)

Blomefield Cast Iron 32-pounder 56-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight >(6,000 lbs), maker and Serial No. TBC.  Mounted on a iron garrison gun carriage.  No. 2 in front of the former Hospital Administration Building, Mann’s Bastion, No. 1 of 2.

 (KEDL Photo)

75-mm M20 Recoilless Rifle, inside the Museum Annex.  Located in the Quebec Citadel National Historic Site of Canada within the King’s Bastion and adjacent to the Governor General’s Residence, Building No. 10, also known as the Former Military Prison or Museum Annex, is a two-storey rectangular stone structure with a hipped roof pierced by three brick chimneys.

 (Greymouser Photo)

Cast Iron 10-inch 16-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Land Service Mortars, forward of the inside entrance to the Citadel.

Cast Iron 10-inch 16-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Land Service Mortar, weight 16-1-8 (1,828 lbs), (Serial No. 241) on right trunnion, broad arrow mark,  No. 1 of 2, set near the guard house at the inside entrance to the Citadel.

Cast Iron 10-inch 16-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Land Service Mortar, weight 16-1-11 (1,831 lbs), Serial No. TBC.  No. 2 of 2, set near the guard house at the inside entrance to the Citadel.

 (Jean Gagnon Photo)

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Guns arrayed along the King's Bastion on the Northeast corner of the Citadel.

 (James Simmonds Photos)

80-pounder 5-ton Palliser-Converted Rifled Muzzleloading Gun (Serial No. 1776, 1867), (RGF No. 109, I, 1869) on the left trunnion.  Trunnion marked weight 11,228 lbs, Preponderance 1,417 lbs.  Sir W.G. Armstrong & Co. (WCo) on right trunnion.  CV, C.  The muzzle of the gun is marked C.N. 1648.  This gun was converted from a 68-pounder 95-cwt smoothbore gun and is mounted on a 7-inch 7-ton iron traversing carriage.  Museum tag 90-989-1.  1860.  (This gun may have been cast by the Low Moor Iron Works in Bradford, England)  

In 1879, a report to Parliament noted that Sir William Palliser had donated a 7-inch and 8-inch gun to the Dominion “converted to his system”.  The 1894 inventory records a 7-inch 68-pounder and an 8-inch 68-pounder at Quebec – both cast iron converted (i.e. SBML to RML) guns.  Not to be confused with the RBL 7-inch Gun made by Armstrong, at Quebec, or the RML 7-inch 6.5 ton Gun at Esquimalt.  There is an issue with this data, in that the 68-pounder 95 cwt calibre 8.12-inch gun was converted to the Palliser 80-pounder 7-ton calibre 6.3-inch gun – all the Palliser conversions were to 6.3 inch calibre so they could fire the 32-pounder SB ammo, although the shells were not interchangeable.  One of these is at Quebec today.  The conversions were all from the 95-cwt gun - Owen 1879.  This could account for the 8-inch 68-pounder.  Doug Knight.

The 68-pounder was the most successful of the three new heavy guns brought into service by the British in the 1840s (the others were the 42 and 56-pounders).  According to Miller, it “is the most powerful smooth-bored gun in the service; it gives the longest ranges, throws the greatest projectile, and is generally the most accurate in its fire…”  David McConnell, British Smooth-Bore Artillery: A Technological Study, (Ottawa, Minister of Supply and Services Canada, 1988), p. 55.

 (James Simmonds Photos)

80-pounder 5-ton Palliser-Converted Rifled Muzzleloading Gun (Serial No. 1708, 1867), (RGF No. 6, I, 1869) on the left trunnion.  Trunnion marked weight 10,962 lbs, Preponderance 1,375 lbs.  Sir W.G. Armstrong & Co. on the right trunnion.  The muzzle of the gun is marked C.N. 1648.  This gun was converted from a 68-pounder 95-cwt smoothbore gun and is mounted on a 7-inch 7-ton iron traversing carriage.  Museum tag HG 49.  1860.  The gun is marked EXPN 352A.  Weight 95-1-0, (10,668 lbs), 1861.  Museum tag 86-31-1, 1860.  Museum tag No. HG 49.  (This gun may have been cast by the Low Moor Iron Works in Bradford, England)

 (Internet Photo)  (Réjean Montmarquet Photos)

Armstrong Cast Iron 7-inch 82-cwt (110-pounder) Breech-Loading Rifle, weight 81-2-0 (9,130 lbs), mounted on a wood gun carriage, DND 4G-59, Museum No. 86-8-1.

Armstrong Cast Iron 7-inch 82-cwt (110-pounder) Breech-Loading Rifle, weight 81-2-2 (9,128 lbs), mounted on a wood gun carriage, DND HG-50, Museum No. 86-14-1.

Armstrong Cast Iron 7-inch 82-cwt (110-pounder) Breech-Loading Rifle, weight 81--- (>9,100 lbs), mounted on a wooden carriage, Museum No. 90-863-1.

 (Réjean Montmarquet Photos)

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown (>5,000 lbs), mounted on a wood naval gun carriage.

 (James Simmonds Photos)

 (Gilles Y. Hamel Photo)

9-inch 12-ton Mk II Muzzleloading Rifle, weight 12-11-1-0, (12 X 2,240 lbs = 26,880 lbs) + (11 X 112 lbs = 1,232 lbs) + 28 lbs = 28,140 lbs, mounted on an iron traversing gun carriage, DND 4G-48, 587, Museum No. 86-10-1.

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown (>5,000 lbs), Samuel Walker & Company of Rotherham, England (WCo) on left trunnion, (240) on right trunnion, la Citadel, Quebec.  Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4235669)

There are seven Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Guns, weight unknown (>5,000 lbs), mounted on iron garrison 24-pounder gun carriages, aligned in a row on the ramparts of the NW corner of the Citadel.  (A few of these guns have changed position).

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown (>5,000 lbs), mounted on an iron garrison 24-pounder traversing gun carriage.  No. 1.

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown (>5,000 lbs), mounted on an iron garrison 24-pounder traversing gun carriage.  No. 2.

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown (>5,000 lbs), mounted on an iron garrison 24-pounder traversing gun carriage.  No. 3.

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown (>5,000 lbs), mounted on an iron garrison 24-pounder traversing gun carriage.  No. 4.

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown (>5,000 lbs), mounted on an iron garrison 24-pounder traversing gun carriage.  No. 5.

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown (>5,000 lbs), mounted on an iron garrison 24-pounder traversing gun carriage.  No. 6.

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown (>5,000 lbs), mounted on an iron garrison 24-pounder traversing gun carriage No. 7.

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight 17-1-0 (1,932 lbs), mounted on an iron garrison carriage South of the main entrance.  One of a number of SBML Carronades of various sizes are mounted in various locations on the ravelins and ramps inside the Citadel.

 (James Simmonds Photo)

1-pounder QF Mk. 1, V.S.M. (Vickers, Sons & Maxim LL) 1905 Automatic Gun, aka "pom-pom",  weight (410 lbs), (Serial No. 2492), Reg. No. 112, mounted on a wheeled carriage near the Royal 22e Regiment Museum.

 (R22eR Museum Photo)

1-pounder QF Mk. 1, V.S.M. (Vickers, Sons & Maxim LL) 1905 Automatic Gun, aka "pom-pom",  weight (410 lbs), (Serial No. unknown), Reg. No. unknown, mounted on a wheeled carriage inside the Royal 22e Regiment Museum.

 (Normand Roberge Photos)

.303-inch Vickers-Maxim machine gun, Model 1898, mounted on a wheeled gun carriage with limber inside the museum.

German First World War 21-cm Mörser captured by Canadians with the 13th Bn, Amiens, France, Aug 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397899)

 (James Simmonds Photos)

 (Jean Gagnon Photos)

 (Van Felt Photo) (Larry Dunn Photo)

German First World War 21-cm Mörser 1916 neuer Art (21-cm Mrs 16 n.A.) Heavy Mortar, (Serial Nr. 825) on the breech, (Mrs Nr. 1237) on the trail.  This Mrs 16 was captured on 3 Sep 1918 by a Battalion of the 11th Infantry Brigade, 4th Canadian Division, Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), on a road NE of Villers-lez-Cagnicourt, France.

25-pounder QF Field Gun, Valcartier, ca 1943.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3597666)

25-pounder QF Field Gun.  This gun is located between the Chapel and the parade square.

105-mm C1A1  live fire, Germany, 1964.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4235756

105-mm C1A1 M2A2 Howitzer, CDN No. unknown.  On the rampart above the 21-cm Mörser.

I would imagine that many of you who are reading this book are very likely familiar with the standard routine of military training exercises and the rigours of being in the field in all seasons, not to mention the conditions found on deployment these days. Whether or not you have experienced it, I am sure you can well imagine what it is like to train and work in the heat, the dust and the mosquitoes in summer, the wind, the rain and the mud in the spring and fall, the snow and the cold in the winter and of course the routine day-to-day challenges of combat exercises in the training areas of the Canadian Forces. For most in the Army, this includes CFB Gagetown, CFB Valcartier, CFB Petawawa, CFB Kingston, CFB Shilo, CFB Edmonton, CFB Wainwright, CFB Suffield and all the fields and exercise areas of LFAATC Aldershot and LFCATC Meaford and their environs.

As an Army Officer in the Canadian Forces, it has been my privilege to have served alongside a tremendous number of highly professional military men and women of our nation while taking part in training in Germany, the UK and the USA and while on operational deployments to Cyprus, Bosnia-Herzegovina and in Afghanistan. During my training and military professional development, I have learned much about our long military history. My interest in our multi-faceted historical record has led me to write about it and to seek out the stories about Canada's military servicemen and women and the tools and equipment they used to preserve our security when warclouds darkened our horizons.

As a military history enthusiast, I have learned over the years that there are many with similar interests in preserving our story. We have all seen the odd old gun or retired tank placed on display outside a Militia Drill Hall, War Memorial, city park site or Royal Canadian Legion Hall, and many will have enjoyed visiting a number of our military Museums. The vast majority of retired wartime combat equipment used by members of the CF have dwindled in number, many being scrapped, others being shot up as targets, while a few have been sold to overseas operators and collectors. Fortunately, a handful of important examples of retired CF guns and war machines have been preserved and may be found in a wide variety of locations throughout Canada.

Curators, docents and volunteers working in Canada's military museums have been successful in preserving a good number of retired military weapons of war and many are still being sought after and in some cases, being restored to running condition again. As an artist, photographer and military history enthusiast, I have attempted to keep track of where historic Canadian military equipment has survived and is presently located and to make that information available to others with the same interest. For those of like mind, the purpose of this handbook is to provide a simple checklist of the classic Great War and WWII artillery that is part of our military heritage and a location guide to where they can be found in Canada. The book includes a number of photographs to illustrate an example of each gun wherever possible, and lists the locations of the survivors by province.

The numbers of restored Canadian guns is actually increasing as a few rare examples are being recovered from scrapyards and monument sites and salvaged for restoration. (Ultra rare items such as Skink AA gun turrets come to mind). One of the aims of this book is to help an enthusiast track down these monuments and museum artefacts and to have a simple reference book on hand with more detailed information about them such as a serial number, a Museum location and contact information which might be helpful in learning a bit of the history of a particular vehicle. The guns detailed in this handbook are listed alphabetically by manufacturer, number and type in the order that they came into service with the CF. The data is also appended with a list of most of the current guns found in the various collections and Museums in Canada. The book is also meant to serve as a companion volume to "Ironsides", Canadian Tanks and Armoured Fighting Vehicle Museums and Monuments, also available online.

It is my sincere hope that more of the guns and artillery found in this list will one day be added to the record of historically important military armament survivors that have been recovered and restored.


Shelldrake can be ordered online in softcover or e-book at these bookstores:

http://www.amazon.ca/Shelldrake-Canadian-Artillery-Museums-Monuments/dp/1469750007/ref=sr_1_44?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1331231081&sr=1-44

http://www.amazon.com/Shelldrake-Canadian-Artillery-Museums-Monuments/dp/1469750007/ref=sr_1_45?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1331231130&sr=1-45

http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000542288/Shelldrake.aspx

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/shelldrake-harold-a-skaarup/1109124375?ean=9781469750002&itm=46&usri=harold+skaarup 

Photos and technical data on artillery preserved in Canada may be viewed by Province on seprate pages on this website.