Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Artillery preserved in Canada 6: Québec, Montréal and Fort de l'Île Sainte-Hélène

Artillery preserved in the province of Québec, Montréal and Fort de l'Île Sainte-Hélène

Data current to 14 April 2019.

The aim of this website is to locate, identify and document every historical piece of artillery preserved in Canada.  Many contributors have assisted in the hunt for these guns to provide and update the data found on these web pages.  Photos are by the author unless otherwise credited.  Any errors found here are by the author, and any additions, corrections or amendments to this list of Guns and Artillery in Canada would be most welcome and may be e-mailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com.

For all official data concerning the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, please click on the link to their website:

Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery Website

Une traduction au français pour l'information technique présente serait grandement apprécié. Vos corrections, changements et suggestions sont les bienvenus, et peuvent être envoyés au hskaarup@rogers.com

Canadian field batteries were combined to form the Royal CanadiaField Artillery (RCFA), which in 1905 became the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery (RCHA).  The garrison companies would become the Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery (RCGA).

Les batteries de campagne seront amalgamées plus tard au sein de la Royal Canadian Field Artillery (RCFA) qui, en 1905, deviendra la Royal Canadian Horse Artillery (RCHA): pour leur part, les compagnies de garnison donneront la Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery (RCGA).

Montréal, Fusiliers Mont-Royal

 (Streetview Photo)

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight and maker unknown, CARRON, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage in front of the Fusiliers Mont-Royal Armoury at 3721 Henri Julien Avenue,  No. 1.

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight and maker unknown, CARRON, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage in front of the Fusiliers Mont-Royal Armoury at 3721 Henri Julien Avenue,  No. 2.

Montréal, 2nd Field Artillery Regiment, RCA (2e Régiment d'artillerie de campagne, ARC)

2e ARC is a Royal Canadian Artillery reserve regiment.  It is located in Montreal and shares its headquarters with The Royal Canadian Hussars (Montreal) at the Côte-des-Neiges Armory.  Although there had been temporary volunteer artillery units formed in Montreal as early as 1828, the regiment has its origin in the 3rd Montreal Battery formed in 1855 as a result of the departure of British regular troops for the Crimean War and the passage of the Militia Act of 1855.  Militia forces, including the five field batteries formed, would for the first time be maintained at public expense.  In 1856 the Battalion of Montreal Artillery was formed and in 1895 it was renamed the 2nd "Montreal" Regiment, RCA.  The 2nd Field Regiment reformed in 1966 with initially two and then three batteries, the 7th, 50th, and 66th Field Batteries, each perpetuating a different regiment of the post-war artillery in Montreal.  Côte-des-Neiges Armoury.

 

 (Author Photos)

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer, (17-cm mMW), (Serial Nr. 6219), 1917.  This trench mortar was captured on 8 August 1918 by the 16th Battalion 13th (Canadian Scottish), 3rd Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Division, Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), near Aubercourt, France.  On display outside the 3e batterie d’artillerie de Montréal Armoury, 4185 De la Côte-des-Neiges Ch.

25-pounder C Mk. 2 QF Field Gun with No. 9 circular firing platform, barrel highly polished and on a stand in a display cabinet inside the armouries.

25-pounder C Mk. 2 QF Field Gun with No. 9 circular firing platform, with limber and FAT, 2nd Field RCA, 3e batterie d’artillerie de Montréal re-enactment group.

25-pounder C Mk. 2 QF Field Gun with No. 9 circular firing platform, brought to Canada from Ireland, 2nd Field RCA.

 (Author Photos)

155-mm C1 (M1A2) Medium Howitzer on M1A2 Carriage, aka M114, manufactured at Sorel Industries Limited in Quebec, Queen Elizabeth II cypher.  This gun is on display outside the 3e batterie d’artillerie de Montréal Armoury.

3e Batterie d’artillerie de Montréal, refers to the original 3rd Montreal Field Battery of Artillery, now the 7th Bty of the 2nd Field Artillery Regiment in Montréal, Côte des neiges Armoury.

 (Normand Roberge Photos)

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun.

Montréal, HMCS Donnacona

 (LCdr Geoff Hamilton Photos)

Bronze Lyle type Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun (2.5-inch bore), weight and maker unknown, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage, 2-inch bore (a 1.9-inch ball is 1 lb).  

This gun is on display inside the ship’s drill hall at 3525 St-Jacques Street.  It was used to fire life lines from ship or shore.  Light-weight rope was shot out to a wreck after it had been carefully wound on a rope-board so it would uncoil without snagging. The crews would then use this rope to haul out the heavier lines which actually carried the breeches buoy. The survivors would brought ashore or to the tugboat in a breeches buoy, which was a pair of canvas pants sewed onto a life-preserver.  These line guns are used primarily for shore based rescue operations.  The shooter would fire, aiming over the victims head and then pull the line within reach of the victim.  They are also useful for rescuing victims that have fallen through the ice, or are stranded on a cliff or burning building.  Boats in distress need larger lines.  Lyle guns were designed to throw projectiles weighing approximately 15 pounds, carrying heavier rope over 1000 feet.  Getting this equipment close to a wreck would have been difficult, given the likelihood the conditions that caused the wreck would still have been present.

Montréal La Tour du Souvenir

 (NICMM Photo)

4.7-inch QF Mk. IV* "Star" Gun, mounted on an iron pivot, No. 1 at La Tour du Souvenir near Alexandra Pier (Originally Victoria Pier).

4.7-inch QF Mk. IV* "Star" Gun, mounted on an iron pivot, No. 2 at La Tour du Souvenir near Alexandra Pier (Originally Victoria Pier).  

Montréal, Isle Ste-Hélène, Fort-Ste-Hélène-Montréal

 (Jean Gagnon Photo)

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, mounted on an iron garrison carriage.

Ce type particulier d'affût et de platte-forme tout en métal fut utilisé en temps de paix tout au cours du 19 ème siècle. En cas de conflits, les affûts de bois remplaçaient ceux de fer. Bien que moins résistants aux intempéries, les affûts de bois résistaient aux éclatements.

Russian Cast Iron probable 24-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight and Serial No. unknown,  by Foullon at Alexandrovski, with double-headed Eagle, Crimean War trophy.

 (Mike B Photo)

 (Jean Gagnon Photo)

At least eight Bronze and Cast Iron guns and two large Cast Iron Mortars are on display on the grounds of Fort Stewart.

 (Jean Gagnon Photos)

Bronze 12-pounder 18-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, King George III cypher.

 (Jean Gagnon Photos)

Bronze 24-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, dolphin carrying handles. 

 (Jean Gagnon Photo)

Cast Iron 10-inch 18-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Land Service Mortar with dolphin handles, one broken.

Cast Iron 10-inch 18-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Land Service Mortar.

 (Jean Gagnon Photo)

Blomefield Cast Iron 32-pounder 56-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, unmounted.

Cast Iron possible 32-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun with Millar pattern breeching ring, unmounted.

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, unmounted.

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, unmounted.

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, unmounted.

Cast Iron possible 6-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, unmounted.

Montréal, Chateau Ramsay

Guns and Mortars, Chateau Ramsay, Montreal, 1955.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4312503)

Montréal, Mont Royal Cemetery

 (Author Photos)

9-pounder 8-cwt Muzzleloading Rifle, weight 8-1-8 (932 lbs), RGF No. unknown, mounted on a ca. 1840 field carriage, No. 1 on the North side of the Section Militaire du cimetière Mont-Royal, on a hill overlooking the military gravestones.

 (Author Photos)

9-pounder 8-cwt Muzzleloading Rifle, weight 8-1-9 (933 lbs), RGF No. unknown, mounted on a ca. 1840 field carriage, No. 2 on the South side of the Section Militaire du cimetière Mont-Royal, on a hill overlooking the military gravestones.

 (Author Photos)

Cast Iron 12-pounder 6-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight stamp 6-1-26 (726 lbs), mounted on a concrete stand, inside the iron fence next to the military gravestones.

 (Jean-Philippe Boulet Photo)

9-pounder 8-cwt Muzzleloading Rifle, weight unknown, RGF No. unknown, mounted on a ca. 1840 field carriage.  This gun stands inside the Cemetery Gates to the National Field of Honour.

Montréal, Place du Canada

 (tatie Photos)

 (Author Photos)

25-pounder C Mk. 2 QF Field Gun with No. 9 circular firing platform, Place du Canada.  A bronze plaque mounted on the gun states: “This 25-pounder QF Field Gun was presented to the city by the Montreal Units of the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery to commemorate the service of the Regiment in time of War.  13 October 1962”.  

Russian Cast Iron probable 24-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight and Serial No. unknown, forged by Foullon at Alexandrovski, with double-headed Eagle, Crimean War trophy.  No. 1.  Removed from Place du Canada, possibly in storage for preservation.

Russian Cast Iron probable 24-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight and Serial No. unknown, forged by Foullon at Alexandrovski, with double-headed Eagle, Crimean War trophy.  No. 2.  Removed from Place du Canada, possibly in storage for preservation.

Montréal, CFB Montréal, Longue Point Garrison, Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps (RCOC) Museum, 6560 Hochelaga Street.  The data for this page has grown too large to download quickly, details for the artillery preserved with the RCOC Museum may be found on a separate page on this website.

Montréal, Westmount Park

 

 (Normand Roberge Photos)

Bronze 12-pounder 18-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, 1810, H.J. King, (Serial No. 769), turned over by the British to the Dominion of Canada government as a gift in 1870.  General John Pitt, 2nd Earl of Chatham, Master General of the Ordnance 1801–1806  and 1807–1810, above King George III cypher on the barrel.  No. 1.  In storage for restoration.

 

(Normand Roberge Photos)

Bronze 12-pounder 18-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, 1810, H.J. King, (Serial No. 770), General John Pitt, 2nd Earl of Chatham, Master General of the Ordnance 1801–1806  and 1807–1810, above King George III cypher on the barrel.  Turned over by the British to the Dominion of Canada government as a gift in 1870.   No. 2.  In storage for restoration.