Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Artillery (6) Québec, Maple Grove, Montmagny, Mont Saint Hilaire, New Carlisle, New Richmond, Nicolet, Normandin, Pointe-au-Père, Pointe-à-la-Croix, Pointe-à-la-Frégate, Quyon, Rimouski and Rivière du Loup

Artillery in QuébecMaple Grove, Montmagny, Mont Saint Hilaire, New Carlisle, New Richmond, Nicolet, Normandin, Pointe-au-Père, Pointe-à-la-Croix, 

Pointe-à-la-Frégate, Quyon, Rimouski and Rivière du Loup 

Data current to 14 July 2019.

The aim of this website is to locate, identify and document every historical piece of artillery preserved in Canada.  Many contributors have assisted in the hunt for these guns to provide and update the data found on these web pages.  Photos are by the author unless otherwise credited.  Any errors found here are by the author, and any additions, corrections or amendments to this list of Guns and Artillery in Canada would be most welcome and may be e-mailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com.

For all official data concerning the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, please click on the link to their website:

Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery Website

Une traduction au français pour l'information technique présente serait grandement apprécié. Vos corrections, changements et suggestions sont les bienvenus, et peuvent être envoyés au hskaarup@rogers.com

Canadian field batteries were combined to form the Royal CanadiaField Artillery (RCFA), which in 1905 became the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery (RCHA).  The garrison companies would become the Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery (RCGA).

Les batteries de campagne seront amalgamées plus tard au sein de la Royal Canadian Field Artillery (RCFA) qui, en 1905, deviendra la Royal Canadian Horse Artillery (RCHA): pour leur part, les compagnies de garnison donneront la Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery (RCGA).

Quebec

Maple Grove

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun, Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 146, Hwy 132.

Montréal.  Artillery preserved in the Montréal region is listed on a separate page on this web site.

Montmagny

 (Author Photos)

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight 17-0-9 (1,913 lbs), CARRON, 1801, mounted on a wood carriage in front of the 59th Battery, 6 RAC Armoury, Avenue de la Gare.  No. 1. 

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight 17-0-11 (1,915 lbs), CARRON, 1803, mounted on a wood carriage in front of the 59th Battery, 6 RAC Armoury, Avenue de la Gare.  No. 2.

 (Author Photo)

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight 17-0-9 (1,913 lbs), CARRON, 1812, mounted on a wood carriage in front of the 59th Battery, 6 RAC Armoury, Avenue de la Gare.  No. 3. 

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight 17-0-23 (1,927 lbs), CARRON, 1821, mounted on a wood carriage in front of the 59th Battery, 6 RAC Armoury, Avenue de la Gare.  No. 4.  All four guns are in excellent shape.

Mont Saint Hilaire

German First World War 25-cm schwerer Minenwerfer alt Art (25-cm sMW), (Serial Nr. unknown).  This trench mortar was likely captured ca 1918 by a Battalion within an Infantry Brigade of a Canadian Division, with the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), in France.

New Carlisle

 (Author Photos)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. 17391), captured on 29 Sep 1918 by the 42nd Battalion, 7th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division, Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), on the Douai-Cambrai Road West of Tillby, France. 

  (Author Photos)

Cast Iron probable 3-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, heavily corroded, no markings, mounted on a wooden stand across from the park with the FK 16. 

New Richmond

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 973), likely captured by a Battalion within a Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditonary Force (CEF) serving in France in 1917-18.  The only record of the one that went to Carleton, Quebec, states that it arrived in 1921.

Nicolet

 (Maxwell Toms Photo)

8-inch Breechloading Mk. VIII Howitzer M1917, on Mk. VIIA Carriage inside a fenced compound.  After the war, four Mk. VIII howitzers and their firing platforms were brought to Canada with two sent to the 9th Heavy Battery at Halifax (Serial Nos. 952 and 1111), and two sent to the 12th Heavy Battery in Victoria, British Columbia (Serial Nos. 974 and 975).  This gun is possibly the second eastern 8-inch howitzer from the 9th Heavy Battery in Halifax (Serial No. 952).

 (Maxwell Toms Photo)

155-mm C1 (M1A2) Medium Howitzer on M1A2 Carriage, aka M114, manufactured at Sorel Industries Limited in Quebec, Queen Elizabeth II cypher.  This gun is inside a fenced compound.

Normandin

 (Weathervane Photos)

Blomefield Cast Iron 32-pounder 56-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown, (WCo), (Walker & Company of Rotherham, Yorkshire, England), on the left trunnion, (Serial No. 161) on the right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage in a park in the centre of town.

Blomefield canon à boulets de 32 livres est situé dans le parc du Centre-Ville, à Normandin,  Un canon de 32 livres est un canon tirant des boulets de 32 livres, armant les plus gros vaisseaux de ligne anglais puis britanniques et les batteries côtières, du XVIIe siècle au milieu du XIXe siècle.  Le calibre de ce canon est exprimé à partir de la masse du boulet, 32 livres étant égal à 14,5 kilogrammes, ce qui correspond à un diamètre de 154 mm (6 inches).
Le canon de 32 livres arme les plus puissantes unités anglaises puis britanniques (les autres calibres étant ceux de 24, 18, 12, 9 et 6 livres). Si quelques vaisseaux ont été armés avec des pièces de 42 livres (par exemple le HMS Sovereign of the Seas lancé en 1637), le canon de 32 est en général le plus gros calibre à bord des vaisseaux de troisième, deuxième et premier rangs de la Royal Navy.  Une pièce d'artillerie de 32 livres pèse 3,5 tonnes, dont 2,7 pour le canon lui-même et 750 kg pour son affût.

Pointe-au-Père

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, heavily corroded having been recovered from the shipwreck of Sir Hoveden Walker's ships in 1711.  No. 1.  Located behind the Sea Museum.

 (Streetview Photo)

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, heavily corroded having been recovered from the shipwreck of Sir Hoveden Walker's ships in 1711.  No. 2.  Located behind the Sea Museum.

 (Streetview Photo)

Blomefield Cast Iron probable 24-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight and maker unknown, mounted on an iron garrison carriage, No. 3.  Rue du Phare.

Pointe-à-la-Croix

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, probably recovered from a wreck near the site of the Battle of the Restigouche.

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade, recovered from the site of the Battle of the Restigouche.  The Battle of Restigouche was a naval battle fought during the French and Indian War on the Restigouche River between the British Royal Navy and the small flotilla of vessels of the French Navy, Acadian militia and Mi'kmaq militias.  The French vessels had been sent to relieve New France after the fall of Quebec.  Supplies were extraordinarily important because France ran their colonies such that the colonies were wholly dependent on products and manufacturing of the motherland.  The loss of the Battle of Restigouche and the consequent inability to supply the troops, marked the end of any serious attempt by France to keep hold of their colonies in North America, and it severely curtailed any hopes for a lengthy resistance to the British by the French forces that remained.  The battle was the last major engagement of the Mi'kmaq and Acadian militias before the Burying of the Hatchet Ceremony between the Mi'kmaq and the British.  (Wikipedia)

Pointe-à-la-Frégate

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Guns visible at low tide, buried in the sand.  These guns are the remnants of the English frigate HMS Penelope, a ship that ran aground near the area.

Quebec City and the Citadel

The page for artillery preserved in Quebec has grown too large to download quickly, so the guns on display in the Citadel and Quebec City fortifications are listed on a separagte web page.  (This should keep the webpage from crashing).

Quyon

155-mm C1 (M1A2) Medium Howitzer on M1A2 Carriage, aka M114, manufactured at Sorel Industries Limited in Quebec, Queen Elizabeth II cypher.  This gun was on display in a Memorial Park, but appears to have been moved, location unknown.

Rawdon

 (Streetview Photo)

17-pounder QF Towed Anti-Tank Gun, in front of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 198 at 3604 Albert St. 

Remparts porte Saint-Jean

 (Malimage Photo)

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Gun, weight, maker and Serial No. unknown, mounted on an iron garrison carriage, No. 1.

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Gun, weight, maker and Serial No. unknown, mounted on an iron garrison carriage, No. 2.

Rimouski

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage.  This gun stands near the cenotaph in the Rimouski Veterans Park (on Hwy 132 between Ave de la Cathedrale and Rue des Marins).

 (Streetview Photo)

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun.  This gun stands near the cenotaph in the Rimouski Veterans Park. 

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun.  This gun stands near the cenotaph in the Rimouski Veterans Park.

RimouskiHMCS D’Iberville

Rivière du Loup

 (Author Photos)

Cast Iron 12-pounder 6-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a broken Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight 6--- (672 lbs), with broken trunnions mounted on an iron carriage designed for a larger gun.  This Carronade is located on the North side of Fraser Street and Domaine Street facing the St Lawrence River.