Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Artillery preserved in Canada 5h: Ontario, City of Ottawa, The Canadian War Museum

Note: The page for artillery preserved in Ontario has grown too large to download quickly, so the guns on display in the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa are listed here separately.  (This should keep the webpages from crashing).

Artillery preserved in the Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, Ontario

For all official data concerning the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, please click on the link to their website:

Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery Website

The aim of this website is to locate, identify and document every historical piece of artillery preserved in Canada.  Many contributors have assisted in the hunt for these guns to provide and update the data found on these web pages.  Photos are by the author unless otherwise credited.  Any errors found here are by the author, and any additions, correctons or amendments to this list of Guns and Artillery in Canada would be most welcome and may be e-mailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com.

Data current to 17 July 2017.

Note: Back in the day, artillery in Canada was referred to by its radio call sign "Sheldrake".  It is now referred to by its "Golf" call sign.  (Acorn)

Ottawa, The Canadian War Museum1 Vimy Place.

British Artillery

 (Photo courtesy of Doug Knight)

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, ca. 1492-1599, 165-cm long. Found during the excavation for the enlargement of St Peter's Canal in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, near the site of Nicholas Deny's Trading Post, built in 1650. CWM (Artifact No. 19610051-023). 

 (Photo courtesy of Doug Knight)

Cast Iron 2-inch Smoothbore Muzzleloading Swivel or Boat Gun on stand, ca. 1750-1825, 2-inch bore, in storage. CWM (Artifact No. 19660058-001).

Bronze 5¾-inch 1-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Land Service Mortar, weight 1-1-13 (153 lbs),  J & H (John & Henry) King, 1807, LXX, crown, King George III cypher.

 

 

Cypher, King George III portrait by Sir William Beechey.  (Wikipedia)

Cast Iron 4.2-inch Smoothbore Muzzleloading Mortar, No. 1 of 2.

Cast Iron 4.2-inch Smoothbore Muzzleloading Mortar, No. 2 of 2.

 (Photo courtesy of Doug Knight)

Bronze 3-pounder 3-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 2-3-23 (331 lbs), stamped J & H (John & Henry) King, 1807, CCLXIII (263), King George III cypher, M G of Ordnance on replica garrison carriage. CWM (Artifact No. 19610055-002).

Bronze 3-pounder 3-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, stamped J & H (John & Henry) King, 1807, CCLXV, King George III cypher, MG of Ordnance. CWM (Artifact No. 19610055-001).

 (Doug Knight Photo)

Cast Iron 4-pounder 8-1/2-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 8-2-0 (952 lbs), crown over the letter P on the first reinforce, W on the right trunnion.  Possibly a 17th Century Gun, presented to the museum by G.T. Bruce who had received it from the Chief of the Ceylonese Navy in 1962.  Bruce was told that it had been recovered in Trincomalee, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), in 1962. The gun may have been cast for an East Indiaman merchant ship.  The W may stand for either Waldron ,
a furnace in Sussex, or Willey, a furnace in Shropshire, dating from ca 1750-1760.

Cast Iron 4-pounder 8-1/2-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, 54-inches long, measured from the muzzle to the base ring. The cascbel is missing.  There are no visible markings.  This gun is associated with the Montmagny House in Joliette, Québec, since about 1900.  Prior to that time, oral history places it in the area to defend against the American invasion. 

Cast Iron 18-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun/culverin, weight 32-2-23 (3,663 lbs), (Serial No. 4632), Queen Anne cypher, IXIII (12), broad arrow mark, 19, ca. 1668.  Portrait of Queen Anne by Willem Wissing and Jan van der Vaardt.  (Wikipedia)

Cast Iron 18-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun/culverin, weight >3,500 lbs, (Serial No. 5633), Queen Anne cypher, IXIII (12), arrow, 23, ca. 1668.  This gun has been returned to the New York State Historical Society.

Blomefield 64-pounder 71-cwt Muzzleloading Rifle, Palliser conversion from a Blomefield 32-pounder 58-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 56-0-7 (6,279 lbs).  The trunnion is stamped 6 Gilbert, 1887, King George III cypher, (Serial No. 1850).

Homemade wooden cannon, 1838.

 (Doug Knight Photo)

Cast Iron 4-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, John Armstrong pattern sea service Gun, W, commercial 1750 (from tag).

The W mark on the right trunnion of this gun was in use Britain for a long time and may refer to more than one furnace in turn. There are two possible foundries that could have cast this gun.  

1.  Waldron Furnace.  A gun marked W was proved for Harrison and Company in October, 1757 (Hodgkinson, 1993, 58).

Waldron furnace was run at the beginning of the eighteenth century by the Pelham family and later was owned by the Fullers although they probably did not use it themselves.  Instead, it was leased to the Harrison partnership.  John Legas wrote to his partner Samuel Remnant about the shot-casting programme taking place at Waldron in 1745-46.  However in the 1747-48 campaign Waldron was used for casting 6 and 9 pounder guns.  The change may have been caused by the building of a new air furnace at Hamsell and the two furnaces’ uses were exchanged.

In the 1750s Waldron was being operated by Richard Tapsell in conjunction with Gloucester furnace.  In January 1753 John Fuller subcontracted Tapsell to cast guns for him at Waldron for the King of Sardinia which Fuller specified had to be marked IF (Crossley and Saville).  Later in 1757 Harrison had guns marked W proofed at Woolwich.  The furnace at Waldron was rented out for only a pound in 1785 and was closed by 1787.  The W is found on smaller guns up to 12-pounders.

2. Willy Furnace.  Isaac Wilkinson and his son John both were involved in gun-casting using several furnaces.  The earliest mention of Isaac Wilkinson of Bersham in the Board's records is his request to export small calibre guns from Wrexham for the London merchant service in June 1756.  John Wilkinson left Bersham and moved to Willey in Shropshire. His agent John Fawcett offered to cast guns for the Board of Ordnance in 1759.  Thus John Wilkinson's first guns for the Board were cast at Willey.

The form of the W on the gun in the CWM collection favours the later date, ca 1755-ca 1770.   It is most likely to have been cast by either Waldron, a gun furnace in the Weald run by the Harrison partnership, or Willey, an iron furnace in Shropshire owned by John Wilkinson who would become one of the most famous of gunfounders.  Ruth Rhynas Brown.

Cast Iron 18-pounder 10-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring,  weight 10-0-7 (1,127 lbs), broad arrow mark, mounted on an iron garrison carriage.  Presentation plaque to J.H. Macqueen.  The carronade is a short smoothbore, cast iron cannon, which was used by the Royal Navy and first produced by the Carron Company, an ironworks in Falkirk, Scotland.  It was used from the 1770s to the 1850s.  Its main function was to serve as a powerful, short-range anti-ship and anti-crew weapon.  While considered very successful early on, carronades eventually disappeared as rifled naval artillery changed the shape of the shell and led to fewer and fewer close-range engagements.  

 (Photos courtesy of Doug Knight)

Cast Iron 6-pounder 14-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight 14-1-19 (1,615 lbs), crown cypher, probable commercial manufacture, in storage, unmounted.

Cast Iron 12-pounder 6-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring,  1808 (unmounted), weight 6-0-18 (690 lbs), arrow.

Cast Iron 18-pounder 10-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight 10-0-7 (1,127 lbs), broad arrow mark, mounted on an iron garrison carriage.  Presentation plaque to J.H. Macqueen.

Cast Iron 6-pounder 3-cwt Breechloading Rifle, RGF No. 73, 1862, weight 3-0-9 (345 lbs), W, broad arrow, D, Queen Victoria cypher.

Armstrong 40-pounder 35-cwt Breechloading Rifle, weight 35-1-0, (3,948 lbs), (Serial No. 419-G), 1871.  This gun with a 4.75 inch calibre, was a naval and fortification gun in use from 1860 to the early 1900s.  The guns were typically employed mounted on high "siege travelling carriages" for use as semi-mobile guns in forts, firing over parapets.  Many were mounted on travelling carriages and used by many Volunteer Artillery Batteries to whom they were issued after 1889.  Most remained in use in this role until 1902. A number were used for some years afterwards as saluting guns.

Steel 7-pounder 2-cwt Mk. IV Muzzleloading Rifle, (Serial No. RGF No. 440), 1880, weight 1-3-7 (203 lbs), Queen Victoria cypher.  This gun is mounted on an iron boat carriage for ship's landing parties.

 (Doug Knight Photos)

Cast Iron 9-pounder 8-cwt Muzzleloading Rifle Mk. II, weight 8-1-10 (934 lbs), RGF No. 596, I, 1873, mounted on a black replica carriage.  Also known as “The Turner gun”, this 9-pounder was presented to BGen W.W. Turner when he was Colonel Commandant of the RCA.  It is in the Guns of Kingston list and was on his lawn at Kingston for a while. Before presentation to him, it was supposedly at Valcartier, or at least refurbished for presentation there.  The gun has an extra vent identical to the Ottawa Time Gun and it is possible that it was a time gun at or near Québec after it retired from the CF.  It is mounted on a replica sea service carriage that has no relation to the gun.

Cast Iron 9-pounder 8-cwt Muzzleloading Rifle Mk. II, weight 8-1-13 (937 lbs), RGF No.  2850, 1873, unmounted, stamped Sir W.G. Armstrong and Co., Newcastle on the Tyne.  This gun was a bollard that stood in front of the Ottawa Armouries.  It is corroded forward of the trunnions, and does not have a carriage. 

Canadians at the Battle of Paardeberg, South Africa, February 1900.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 2993542)

12-pounder 6-cwt Breechloading Mk. I Gun, Ottawa training exercise, 18 Oct 1906.  (Library and Archives canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3300754)

 (Doug Knight Photo)

12-pounder 6-cwt Breechloading Mk. I Gun, Boer War “D” Battery.  RGF BL 12-Pr 6 Cwt I, 1896, No. 97.

12-pounder 6-cwt Breechloading Mk. I Gun, left wheel 1871, RCR, T13956, right wheel 1870, RCD, Queen Victoria cypher.

3-inch Mortar, 1st Cdn Corps, night fring, Italy, 6 April, 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3396064)

3-inch Mortar, Support Coy, The Regina Rifles, Bretteville-Orgueilleuse, France, 9 June 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3256086)

3-inch Mortar (in Gallery 3).

3-inch Mortar (on Mortar Carrier).

13-pounder 6-cwt QF Land Mk. II Field Gun, VSM 1911, (Serial No. 279), King George V cypher.

13-pounder 9-cwt QF Anti-Aircraft Gun in action, Oct 1916.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3395208)

13-pounder 9-cwt QF Anti-Aircraft Gun Mk. I, 1917, (Serial No. 1372) on Mounting Motor Lorry RCD IV 1916, (Serial No.  A3414).

18-pounder QF Mk. I Field Gun, Camp Valcartier, ca. 1914.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3336980)

 

18-pounder QF Mk. I Field Gun, RCA, ca. 1918.  (Library & Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN 3405482)

 (Doug Knight Photos)

18-pounder QF Mk. II Field Gun, weight 9-0-0 (1,008 lbs), (Serial No. 3820), 1915.

18-pounder QF Mk. II Field Gun being trialed against enemy tanks, ca 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3395092)

18-pounders, Ottawa, ca 1920s.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3395977)

18-pounder QF Mk. II Field Gun with limber being towed by a 1936 model Ford-Marmon-Harrington half-track used by the Royal Canadian Artillery, Camp Shilo, 1937.  (Photo courtesy of Colin Stevens)

1936 model Ford-Marmon-Harrington half-track.

Canadian 8-inch Breechloading Mk. VIII Howitzer firing into Lens, France, Jan 1918.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3522087)

Canadian 8-inch Breechloading Mk. VIII Howitzer, Jan 1918.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3395340)

 (Photos courtesy of Doug Knight)

8-inch Breechloading Howitzer Mk. VIII, (Serial No. 1111), carriage (Serial No. C16548), Elswick Ordnance Company, 1918.  After the war, four Mk. VIII howitzers and their firing platforms were brought to Canada with two sent to the 9th Heavy Battery at Halifax (Serial Nos. 952 and 1111), and two sent to the 12th Heavy Battery in Victoria, British Columbia (Serial Nos. 974 and 975).  This gun is from the 9th Heavy Battery in Halifax (Serial No. 1111).

 

2-pounder QF Anti-Tank Gun mounted on a Universal Carrier, on display at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, 29 Sep 1944.  (Library & Archives Canada Photo, Mikan No. 339038).

2-pounder QF Anti-Tank Gun mounted on a Universal Carrier.

6-pounder 7-cwt QF Anti-Tank Gun Mk. V, (Serial No.  3282).

17-pounder QF Towed Anti-Tank Gun Mk. I, (Serial No.  L23987).  The RCA held 138 of these guns.

25-pounder QF Field Gun Mk. I, (Serial No. CA10282).

Limber for 25-pounder QF Field Gun.

25-pounder QF Field Gun Mk. II, (Serial No.  L11041).

British 105-mm FV433 Abbot Self-Propelled Gun.

Naval Guns

Royal Canadian Navy sailors training with the .303-inch Lewis Gun, Esquimalt, BC, 15 Mar 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3201900)

.5-inch Vickers Mk. III AA Machine Guns on a quad naval gun mount, ca 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4820939), and Quad AA Gun assembly, Dominion Engineering Works, 1942.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3196183)

Mixed group of Anti-Aircraft Guns on board HMCS Assiniboine with an unidentified Royal Navy destroyer taking over the escort of Convoy HX180 from its Royal Canadian Navy escort, 19 March 1942.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3334449)

Oerlikon 20-mm/70 Light Anti-Aircraft Gun mounted on a Landing Craft Infantry (LCI), RCN, May 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3303867)

Defensively Armed Merchant Sips (D.E.M.S.) personnel learning to fire an Oerlikon 20-mm/70 Light Anti-Aircraft gun, Esquimalt, British Columbia, 15 March 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3201902)

Oerlikon 20-mm/70 Mk. 4 Light Anti-Aircraft Gun  on an RCN Mk. V Mounting.

Soviet model .303-inch Maxim Heavy Machine-gun being crewed by Canadians serving with the Mackenzie-Papineau Battalion in Spain ca. 1938.  "Mac-Paps" were a battalion of Canadians who fought as part of the XV International Brigade on the Republican side in the Spanish Civil War.  Except for France, no other country gave a greater proportion of its population as volunteers in Spain than Canada.  The first Canadians in the conflict were dispatched mainly with the U.S. Abraham Lincoln Battalion and later the North American George Washington Battalion, with about forty Canadians serving in each group.  The Lincoln Brigade was involved in the Battle of Jarama in which nine Canadians are known to have been killed.  (Wikipedia)

Canadian troops, Company "C" in the South African Constabulary.  The "Messenger Boy", No. 8 Armoured train, named by Devons, showing Maxim Gun, search-light and gun crew.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3407086)

1-pounder QF Mk. 1, V.S.M. (Vickers, Sons & Maxim LL) 1905 Automatic Gun, Mk. 1, weight (410 lbs), (Serial No. 2496), Reg. No. 113, aka "pom-pom", on a Naval deck gun mount.

1-¼-pounder QF Mk. III, V.S.M. (Vickers, Sons & Maxim LL) 1905 Automatic Gun (Serial No. 6819), aka "pom-pom", from CGS Canada.

40-mm/39 2-pounder Mk. I single, V.S.M. (Vickers, Sons & Maxim LL) Autpomatic Gun, weight (410 lbs), VSM 1905, aka "pom-pom", manned on an RCN destroyer, 1940.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3566993)

40-mm/39 2-pounder Mk. VIII single, V.S.M. (Vickers, Sons & Maxim LL) Automatic Gun, (Serial No. S9463/14786), on Single Mounting, aka "pom-pom", from HMCS Kamloops.

40-mm Bofors L/60 Light Anti-Aircraft Gun in Mk. VC Boffin Mounting.

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Guns in a Twin Mount with gunners on board HMCS Algonquin.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3577106)

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Guns in a Twin Mount on board HMCS Magnificent, 1952.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4821511)

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Guns Mk. XI in a Twin Mount, practice firing on the aircraft carrier HMCS Nabob, Jan 1944.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3230534)

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Guns Mk. XI in a Twin Gun RP50 Mk. IV Mount.

4-inch QF Mk. IX Gun on board HMCS Nanaimo, ca 1945.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4821017, left and (Jack Lindsay Photo, City of Vancouver Archives CVA 1184-3365), right

4-inch/40 QF Mk. IV Naval Gun training, HMCS Hamilton, 10 Aug 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3201273), and 4-inch naval gun, Dominion Engineering Works, 1942.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3196181)

4-inch/40 QF Mk. XXI Gun on the High Angle Single Mk. XXIV Mounting, CAN 42.

4-inch/45 QF Mk. XVI* Twin Guns  (Serial No. S/15025), L, left, and (Serial No. S/14512), R, right, on a Mk. XIX High Angle mounting (Serial No. unknown), from HMCS Victoriaville.

4.7 inch QF Mk. V Naval Gun aboard an unidentified defensively equipped merchant ship (DEMS), 1943.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3394508)

Depth Charge Thrower, HMCS Saguenay, 30 Oct 1941.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3576681)

Knebworth Corvus eight-barreled chaff launcher.  The eight barrels are mounted in two rows of three crossed at right angles with an additional two above and angled between the lower ones.  The barrels are 102-mm in diameter and 1.6 mm long, fixed at 30 degrees.  The Corvus was primarily used on ships of the Royal Navy.  (It is unknown as to whether ships of the RCN ever carried them).  The RCN was equipped with the Mk. 36 SRBOC and then the Plessey Shield and now utilizes a MASS (Multi-ammunition soft kill) system after the FELEX (Frigate life extension) programme on the Halifax class frigates.  LCdr Neil S. Bell.

 (Photo courtesy of LCdr Neil S. Bell)

Squid Anti-Submarine Mortar Mk. IV, (Serial No. C1185), (Depth Charge Thrower).  This Squid is mounted on board HMCS Haida in Hamilton, Ontario.

 (photo courtesy of Alex Comber)

FMC 3-inch/50 Twin Gun Mk. 33, HMCS QuAppelle McKenzie class destroyer.

Canadian Artillery

Polsten 20-mm Quadruple Anti-Aircraft Gun Mk. I on a wheeled Mounting C Mk. I, (Serial No. 15939).

Sexton 25-pounder C Mk. 2 Self-propelled Gun assembly, Montreal Locomotive Works, Aug 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3193087)

Sexton 25-pounder C Mk. 2 Self-propelled Gun (Serial No. 613).

Projector, Rocket, 3-inch, No. 8, Mk. 1 - The Land Matress, Multiple Rocket Launcher (MRL), being loaded by Gunners of the 1st Rocket Battery, RCA, Helchteren, Belgium, 29 Oct 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3204964)

Projector, Rocket, 3-inch, No. 8, Mk. 1 - The Land Matress, Multiple Rocket Launcher (MRL), 1st Rocket Battery, RCA, Helchtgeren, Belgium, 29 Oct 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3601142)

Projector, Rocket, 3-inch, No. 8, Mk. 1 - The Land Matress, Multiple Rocket Launcher (MRL), AC Cars 1945, (Serial No.  108).

155-mm C1 (M1A2) Medium Howitzer on M1A2 Carriage, aka M114, manufactured at Sorel Industries Limited in Quebec, Queen Elizabeth II cypher.  CFR 0034400.  The carriage plate reads: CARR. HOW. 155MM M1A2 CDN. SOREL INDUSTRIES LTD. CANADA (1956), REG. NO. CDN 166, INSP (Symbol).  Breech block SIL 179.  This gun was in service with “Z” Battery, RCHA.

American Artillery

.45-calibre Model 1883 Gatling Gun (one of three).

75-mm M20 Recoilless Rifles (three).

75-mm M4 series cutaway gun, (Serial No. 1885), mounted on an iron dolly for training.

American 90-mm M1A1 Anti-Aircraft Gun, (Serial No. 29012).  This gun as been transferred on long term loan to the Lincoln and Welland Regiment museum.

106-mm M40A2 Recoilless Anti-Tank Gun, (Serial No. 9611), mounted on an M38A1 CDN3 Jeep.

762-mm M31/M50 Honest John Rocket (replica), hanging from the ceiling.

105-mm C1A1 Howitzer.

105-mm C2 M2A5 Howitzer, CDN 80, 1942.

155-mm M109 Self-propelled Howitzer, (Serial No. 77249), 1985, AC: TX, ECC: 119205 HUI C: 2184, SAUI C: 2184, VMO No. DLE26843, VMO Date: 13 May 2002.

20-mm M61A1Vulcan Cannon, 1959.

60-mm Mortar.

4.2-inch Mortar fired by Canadians of the Kensington Regt, British 49th Div, Zetten, Netherlands, 20 Jan 1945.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3191580)

4.2-inch Chemical Mortar No. 1.

4.2-inch Chemical Mortar No. 2.

French Artillery

French Cast Iron 13-inch Cast Iron Mortar, 30-48-cm bore, ca. 1758, from the Fortress of Louisbourg, Nova Scotia, stamped C, 4338, 22, 1.

 (Photo courtesy of Doug Knight)

Bronze Smoothbore Gun, 42-mm bore, (Serial No. 738 on trunnions), unmounted, marked “Des Indes Compagne de France”, “Fait par GOR a Paris 1732”.  An old CWM Ledger from 1910 noted that this gun was used in the war between the English and French East India Companies 1746-1766.  Unfortunately, there is no record of how it came to the Archives before it came to the CWM.  Doug Knight.

French 75-mm M1897 Field Gun (Canon de 75-mm modèle 1897), (Serial No. 14391), mfr ABS 1917.

French 80-mm M1878 Mountain Gun, Puteau AC 1879.

British Hotchkiss 1.65-inch (42-mm) Light Mountain Gun mounted on a German Boer War Gun carriage.

German Guns

German Boer War 75-mm Krupp QF Field Gun, Boer War Trophy, (Serial Nr. 1888), stamped 1892.  British forces captured this gun at the November 1900 Battle of Bothaville.  It was one of six guns imported for the Orange Free State Artillery Corps in 1892.  It was given to Canada as a war trophy, and was displayed on Parliament Hill in 1906.

(NB – German practice was to use cm instead of mm to identify the calibre of guns).

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 Machinegun being assembled by German Prisoners, Camblain-l'Abbé, France, May 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3403104)

 

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 Machinegun (Serial Nr. 4943), 1917, mounted on a Schlitten stand.

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 Machinegun (Serial Nr. 2685), unmounted, part of a battlefield diorama.

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. 18328), AEG M1916, mounted on an iron carriage.  12 Can MG Coy on the box trail.

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. 5160), AEG M1916, rifled, stamped 2108625, jk, 2660, 5169, mounted on wooden carriage wheels.  Captured by the 20th Battalion at the Cité St. Emile, North of Lens, France, on 15 August 1917.  This leMW n.A. is marked “captured and claimed by the 3rd Can TM” on the rotator/base plate (most likely the 3rd Canadian Trench Mortar Battery).

German First World War 5-cm leichtes Granatwerfer 36 (5-cm lGrW 36) (Serial Nr. unknown).

German First World War 5-cm leichtes Granatwerfer 36 (5-cm lGrW 36) (Serial Nr. unknown).

German First World War 9.15-cm leichtes Minenwerfer System Lanz, captured at Vimy Ridge by the Canadians, being examined by Prince Arthur of Connaught May, 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397826)

German First World War 9.15-cm leichtes Minenwerfer System Lanz, (Serial Nr. 4785JP).  Captured by the 18th Battalion at Vimy on 9 April 1917.

The 9.15 cm leichtes Minenwerfer System Lanz (Trench mortar) was a light mortar used by Germany and Austria-Hungary in the First World War.  It was a smooth-bore, breech-loading design that used smokeless propellant.  It was chosen by the Austrians as an interim replacement for their 9 cm Minenwerfer M 14, pending development of a superior domestic design, which eventually turned out to be the 9 cm Minenwerfer M 17.  The older Austrian design had a prominent firing signature, a less effective bomb and shorter range than the Lanz.  Over 500 were ordered with deliveries beginning in April 1917.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/9.15_cm_leichtes_Minenwerfer_System_Lanz.

German First World War 24-cm Flügelminenwerfer ‘Iko’, Albrecht, (Serial Nr. unknown), no markings.

 (Photos courtesy of Doug Knight)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 204). Captured by the 72nd Battalion on 9 Oct 1917 near Vimy on the Sunken Road 250 yards SW of Givenchy, France.  This gun has a blown barrel.

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 13224), 1918, Krupp Ehrhardt, converted to QF 77-mm.  Captured by the 3rd Battalion near the Arras-Cambrai Road, North of Bourlon Wood, France, on 27 September 1918.  This gun is mounted on a British Naval/Coast Defence Mounting.

German First World War Beobachtungwagen für feldartillerie, Artillery Observation Wagen.

German First World War 8.8-cm L/30C U-boat Deck Gun from U-91, (Serial Nr. 1972), Fried. Krupp AG 1916, 488KG stamped on the breech, 1972L on the trunnion, 510 F.N. 532, 1972.0 on the barrel.  SM U-91 was a German First World War Type Mittel U submarine launched in 1917.  SM U-91 was one of the 329 submarines serving in the Imperial German Navy (Kaiserliche Marine) during the First World War.  U-91 served with III Flotilla from 13 December 1917 to 11 November 1918.  During its service, this submarine conducted eight patrols and sank 37 ships and damaged two.  U-91 took part in the First Battle of the Atlantic and remained in service until it was surrendered to France on 26 November 1918.  U-91’s deck gun likely came to Canada before the submarine was broken up at Brest, France in July 1921.  Internet, http://www.uboat.net/wwi/boats/index.html?boat=91.

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02), (Serial Nr. 877), no data, Fried Krupp AG, 1916.  1182 on the carriage.  This gun was originally allocated to Hamilton, Ontario.

German First World War 21-cm Mörser blown on its side from an explosion of a nearby ammunition dump destroyed by Canadian Artillery fire, Arras, Oct 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397960)

Canadian troops with captured German First World War 21-cm Morser.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3406014)

German First World War 21-cm Morsers being inspected by General Currie.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397919)

German First World War 21-cm Mörser Heavy Mortar damaged by shellfire, being examined by a Canadian Officer, May 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN No. 3397820 and 3397825)

German First World War 21-cm Mörser, Vimy Ridge, captured by the 27th Bn, Aug 1917.  MIKAN No. 3397851)

German First World War 21-cm Mörser 1910 neuer Art Heavy Mortar, (Serial Nr. 679), Krupp AG, Essen, 1916.  Captured by the 18th Battalion.  Originally allocated to Hamilton, Ontario.

 

German Second World War 7.5-cm leichtes Infanteriegeschütz 18 (7.5-cm leIG 18), short-barrelled Field Gun stamped with German emblem, 2682, (Serial Nr. R1285), 1927.

German Second World War 8.1-cm Schwerer Granatwerfer 34 (s.Gr.W.34) (Serial Nr. unknown).

German Second World War 7.92-mm MG 42 Machine Gun.

German Second World War 2-cm FlaK 30 Anti-Aircraft Gun, 1936, (Serial Nr. 466).

German Second World War 2-cm Flakvierling 38, FlaK 38 Anti-Aircraft Gun, Rheinmetall (Serial Nr. 10660), W646, W648, mounted on a wheeled trailer.

German Second World War 8.8-cm FlaK 37 Anti-Aircraft Gun, (Serial Nr. R534), Gallery 3.

German Second World War Anti-Aircraft Searchlight.

German Second World War Rheintochter Anti-Aircraft Missile.

German Second World War 2.8-cm schwere Panzerbüchse 41 Anti-Tank  Gun (sPzB 41), (Serial Nr. BpK 1333), stamped 9/277, MEL 600.  This Gun was collected in Northwest Europe before 12 Oct 1944 and shipped to Canada from CMHQ in the UK after 7 Nov 1944.

German/Austrian Second World War 4.7-cm Böhler Da 44/32 M35 Anti-Tank Gun, (Serial Nr. 35447).

German Second World War 3.7-mm PaK 38(t) Anti-Tank Gun in service in Northern France, summer 1944.  (Bundesarchiv Bild 101I-299-1831-26)

German Second World War 3.7-cm PaK 36 Anti-Tank Gun , Rheinmetall, (Serial Nr. 1937), RMB 14182.

German Second World War 5-cm PaK 38 (L/60) Anti-Tank Gun, Rheinmetall Borsig, (Serial Nr.  R8453), 1942, stamped BS FL549csh, Mr Fl 860csh.

German Second World War 5-cm Nebelwerfer 41, six-barrelled Multiple Rocket Launcher, captured by Canadian troops near Fleury-sur-Orne, France, 20 July 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3394488)

German Second World War 5-cm Nebelwerfer 41, six-barrelled Multiple Rocket Launcher (Serial Nr. unknown).

German Second World War 21-cm Nebelwerfer 42 five-barrelled Multiple Rocket Launcher, 1944, BEQ 43, (Serial Nr. 988), FeH 43.

German Second World War 7.5-cm Leichtgeschütz 40, (LG 40) Recoilless Rifle, Airborne Forces, stamped FL 390, BWO, Eagle and swastika, (Serial Nr. R287JT0, stamped  4116/R287JT/F1390.

German Second World War 8.8-cm Raketenwerfer 43 “Puppchen” (hollow charge rocket launcher), 1943, (Serial Nr.  RW 3935).

German Second World War Sturmgeschütz StuG III Ausf G SdKfz 142/2 Assault Gun, Barrel (Serial Nr. R5453).

German Second World War Jagdpanzer IV/70 (V) 7.5-cm Tank Destroyer.  Early 1945 production vehicle, captured by the 4th Canadian (Armoured) Division near Wilhelmshaven, Germany in May 1945.

Italian Second World War 45-mm 45/5 Modello 35 Brixia Light Trench Mortar.

Italian Second World War 81-mm Mortaio da 81/14 Modello 35  Mortar.

Howitzer, Pack, 105-mm, L5, (Serial No. 057734).

Japanese 20-mm Type 98 Anti-Aircraft Machine Gun/Cannon, (Serial No. 177/836) (1).

Japanese 75-mm Type 41 Mountain Gun, 1908, (Serial No. 10441), 799.

Russian 14.5-mm Vladimirov ZPU-4 Quadruple Anti-Aircraft Gun wheeled mounting, (missing the guns).

Russian 76.2-mm ZIS-3 M1942 Divisional Field Gun, (Serial No. 766104).

Russian 82-mm M1937 Mortar (three).

Russian 82-mm B-10 Recoilless Anti-Tank Gun.

Russian 107-mm B-11 Recoilless Anti-Tank Gun, (Serial No. 1195).

Russian 122-mm M1943 Heavy Mortar.

Russian 122-mm M1938 M30 Howitzer (Serial Nr. 2669), designated 12.2-cm FH 396(r) in German service.  This gun came to the CWM from the Canadian School of Military Intelligence (CSMI) in 1966.

Russian 122-mm M1931/37 (A19) Field Gun, (Serial No. N463).

Swiss Artillery

Oerlikon 35-mm twin cannon towed anti-aircraft gun system.