Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Artillery preserved in Canada 4b: Manitoba, CFB Shilo, Royal Canadian Artillery Museum

Artillery preserved in Canada: Manitoba,

Canadian Forces Base Shilo, Royal Canadian Artillery Museum

The web page has become to big for all the guns in Manitoba to be listed on one page, therefore the guns on display at CFB Shilo and the National Artillery Museum of Canada are listed separately here.  

Data current to 14 Jan 2017.

CFB Shilo, Royal Canadian Artillery Museum

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

Bronze 3-pounder 3-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 3-0-6 (342 lbs), (J. & H. 1810) (John & Henry King) on left trunnion, (Serial No. 447) on right trunnion, barrel marked CCCXLVII (347), King George III cypher, General John Pitt, 2nd Earl of Chatham, Master General of the Ordnance 1801–1806  and 1807–1810, cypher.  Bore diameter 2-7/8-inches, length 47-1/8-inches, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage, Hudson’s Bay Company.

Cypher, General John Pitt, 2nd Earl of Chatham, Master General of the Ordnance 1801–1806  and 1807–1810.

King George III and his cypher.

  (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

Bronze 3-pounder 3-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 2-2-27 (307 lbs) (J. & H. King, 1810) on left trunnion, (Serial No. 445) on right trunnion, barrel marked CCCCXLV (445), King George III cypher, General John Pitt, 2nd Earl of Chatham, Master General of the Ordnance 1801–1806  and 1807–1810, cypher.  Bore diameter 3-inches, length 47-1/2-inches, mounted on a wood Naval Gun carriage, Hudson’s Bay Company.

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

Bronze 3-pounder 2-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 2-0-14 (238 lbs), (F. Kinman, 1812) on the chase (Francis Kinman at Woolwich, England), (Serial No. 447) on right trunnion, 3-inch bore, length 36 inches, mounted on a wood Naval Gun carriage.  Hudson’s Bay Company gun with spiked vent.

Vector representation of an Model 1805 Carronade: 1. Breech bolt, 2. Aft sight, 3. Vent hole, 4. Front sight, 5. First reinforcing ring, 6. Barrel ,7. Muzzle, 8. Second reinforcing ring, 9. Azimutal pivot, 10. Chock, 11. Elevation pivot, 12. Wheel, 13. Mobile pedestal, 14. Carriage, 15. Pommel, 16. Elevation thread.  Delaby Pierre (Walké)

18-pounder 10-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade.  The carronade is a short smoothbore, cast iron cannon, which was used by the Royal Navy and first produced by the Carron Company, an ironworks in Falkirk, Scotland.  It was used from the 1770s to the 1850s.  Its main function was to serve as a powerful, short-range anti-ship and anti-crew weapon.  While considered very successful early on, carronades eventually disappeared as rifled naval artillery changed the shape of the shell and led to fewer and fewer close-range engagements.

Nordenfelt 6-pounder QF Gun mounted on a wheeled carriage.  This type of gun was also used in the coastal defence role.  Photo ca 1900, found in the LAC files.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3394435)

 (Photo courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms)

Bronze 9-pounder 13-1/2-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 1,512 lbs (687 kgs), maker and Serial No. TBC, mounted on a wheeled wood gun carriage. 

 (Author Photo), left, (Clive Prothero-Brooks Photo), right.

9-pounder 6-cwt (SS) Muzzleloading Rifle, weight 5-3-27 (671 lbs), (RGF TBC) on left trunnion, Queen Victoria cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on an iron carriage with wood wheels.

9-pounder 8-cwt Guns, 13th Battery, Winnipeg, July 1905.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3300651)

9-pounder 6-cwt (SS) Muzzleloading Rifle, weight 5-3-26 (670 lbs), (RGF No. 399, II, 1875) on the left trunnion, blank on the right trunnion, Firths Steel 4320 on the muzzle, Queen Victoria cypher on the barrel, is preserved in Halifax, Nova Scotia.  The gun is mounted on an iron carriage, WD, RCD 11872, No. 60, I, with wood 12-pounder wheels, ca. 1874-1895, and stands facing the Halifax Citadel.  A third 9-pounder 6-cwt Muzzleloading Rifle is on display at the war memorial in Shelburne, Nova Scotia, RGF No. unknown.  These 9-pounder 6-cwt guns were probably left behind when the British left Halifax in 1905.  All other 9-pounder Muzzleloading Rifles in Canada are 8-cwt.

 (Photo courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms)

 (Clive Prothero-Brooks Photos)

9-pounder 8-cwt Muzzleloading Rifle, weight 8-1-9 (933 lbs), RGF No. 450. II, 1876, carriage Reg. No. TBC.

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

9-pounder 8-cwt Muzzleloading Rifle with Limber, weight 8-1-6 (930 lbs), Trunion Serial No. 620, Carriage Serial No. 1460, Barrel Serial No. 5791. This gun is on loan from RCMP Depot, and is on display inside the 1 RCHA HQ, 2nd floor.  1 RCHA

 (Clive Prothero-Brooks Photos)

 (Maxwell J. Toms Photos)

12-pounder 6-cwt Breechloading Mk. I Gun (Serial No. 111), mounted on a Mk. I Field Carriage.

 (Photo courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms)

15-pounder 7-cwt Breechloading Mk. I Gun mounted on a Mk. I Field Carriage.

1-pounder QF Mk. I V.S.M. (Vickers, Sons & Maxim Limited) 1904, Automatic Guns, Captain Wheatley and Sub Staff of Machine Gun School, M.D. 10, Winnipeg, Manitoba, 16 Dec 1916.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3404495

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

1-pounder QF Mk. I V.S.M. (Vickers, Sons & Maxim Limited) 1904, Automatic Gun, (Serial No. 2513), weight 410 lbs, mounted on a VSM London gun carriage, (Serial No. 5700).  Base HQ.

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

1-pounder QF Mk. I V.S.M. (Vickers, Sons & Maxim Limited) 1905, Automatic Gun, (Serial No. 2497), weight 410 lbs, Reg. No. 117, mounted on a 1-pounder QF Mk. II gun carriage, RCD, 1906, Reg No. C10444.  This "pom-pom" gun stands inside the main entrance to the Base HQ.

 

Armstrong 40-pounder 35-cwt Rifled Breech-loading Gun and carriage diagrams ca 1867.

 (Clive Prothero-Brooks Photo, left, Maxwell J. Toms Photo, right)

Armstrong 40-pounder 35-cwt Rifled Breech-loading Gun, 1867, CFB Shilo Gym.  This gun with a 4.75 inch calibre, was a naval and fortification gun in use from 1860 to the early 1900s.  The guns were typically employed mounted on high "siege travelling carriages" for use as semi-mobile guns in forts, firing over parapets.  Many were mounted on travelling carriages and used by many Volunteer Artillery Batteries to whom they were issued after 1889.  Most remained in use in this role until 1902. A number were used for some years afterwards as saluting guns.  One other Armstrong 40-pounder 35-cwt Rifled Breech-loading Gun is on display in the Canadian War Museum, Ottawa, Ontario.

4.7-inch QF Mk. IV* "B" Gun on Mk. I Travelling Carriage, Canadian Artillery, 1915.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3405480)

4.7-inch QF Mk. IV* "B" Gun on Mk. I Travelling Carriage, Canadian Artillery, 1915.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3405481)

      

King Edward VII and his cypher, (Albert Edward, 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910).  (Canadian Copyright Collection Photo, held by the British Library)

 (Photos courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms) ( (Clive Prothero-Brooks Photos)

4.7-inch QF Mk. IV* "B" Gun on Mk. I Travelling Carriage, Shilo Golf Course.  The BL 4.7 inch 45 calibres gun (actually a metric 120-mm gun) was a British medium-velocity naval gun introduced in 1918 for destroyers, intended to counter a new generation of heavily armed destroyers that Germany was believed to be developing. 

Canadians training on heavy guns, Whitley Camp, England, 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3404393)

Canadian Artillery Observation Post inreserve line, Jan 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3395600), and Observation and Advanced Listening Post, Sep 1916.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3395561)

Canadian Artillery passing an Observation Balloon which is being brought down. Advance East of Arras. September, 1918.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3404935)

 (Photos courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms) (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

7.2-inch Breechloading Mk. I Howitzer, Sergeant’s Mess.

8-inch Breechloading Mk. VI Howitzer M1917, on Mk. VIIA Carriage July 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3395380); and 8-inch Breechloading Mk. VI Howitzer M1917, Jan 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3395340)

 

8-inch Breechloading Mk. VI Howitzer M1917 being hauled into position, June 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3517340); and 8-inch Breechloading Mk. VI Howitzer M1917 at full recoil, Oct 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3395309), and 

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

 (Photos courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms)

8-inch Breechloading Mk. VI Howitzer M1917, on Mk. VIIA Carriage No. 201.  Officer's Mess.

4.5-inch QF Mk. I Howitzer on Mk. I Carriage.  Gunners in action during the Battle of Vimy Ridge, painting by Richard Jack.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 2837452)

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

4.5-inch QF Mk. II Howitzer on Mk. I Carriage.

Canadian Artillerymen training on a 6-inch 26-cwt Breechloading Mk. I Howitzer on a Mk. I Travelling Carriage at Whitley Camp, England, 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3404392)

6-inch 26-cwt Breechloading Mk. I Howitzer on a Mk. I Travelling Carriage being unloaded by Canadian Artillerymen with the 3rd Siege Battery in the UK, ca 1917.  (Photo by R.J.G. Boyd, a gunner who served with the 3rd Siege Battery, also known as "Cape's Battery", from mid 1915 until 31 March 1917, courtesy of Boyd Roberton)

6-inch 26-cwt Breechloading Mk. I Howitzer with pneumatic tires in the Second World War.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 360756)

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

6-inch 26-cwt Breechloading Mk. I Howitzer manufactured at W.B & Co No 5281 in 1918.  It is mounted on carriage No. CA920.  This gun is one of two in Canada, the other is with 3 Field Regiment in Saint John, New Brunswick.

60-pounder Breechloading Mk. I Howitzers in action, Battle of Amiens, France, August 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3522237); and 60-pounder Breechloading Mk. I Gun, Camp Valcartier, Quebec, ca. 1914.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3336979)

60-pounder Breechloading Mk. I Gun, Camp Valcartier, Quebec ca. 1914.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3336982); and 60-pounder Breechloading Mk. I Gun, Camp Valcartier, Quebec, ca. 1914.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3337050)

 (Clive Prothero-Brooks Photos)

60-pounder Breechloading Mk. I Gun, inside the museum.

9.2-inch Breechloading Mk. I Howitzer on a Mk. I Carriage being loaded, Sep 1916.  The shell weighed 290 lbs (130 kgs).  The steel box the howitzer rests on was filled with about 9 tons of earth to stabilize the mounting can be seen behind the gunner holding the hand wheel on the right.  Two Canadian batteries used these guns in France.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3395180), left, and 9.2-inch Howitzer, Canadian Gunners, Sep 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3194249)

9.2-inch Heavy Howitzer on the Somme, Nov 1916.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3395220 and 3395221)

 (IWM Photo, H1468, left, Martin Wickary Photo, right)

9.2-inch Breechloading Mk. I Howitzer on a Mk. I Carriage.  The photo on the left shows Gunners of the British 56th Heavy Regiment with a Mk. II Howitzer, May 1940, the photo on the right shows a Mk. I preserved in the Imperial War Museum.   The 1st Siege Battery in the 1st Brigade, Canadian Garrison Artillery, and the 5th Siege Battery in the 2nd Brigade, CGA, used the 9.2-inch howitzer.  Both brigades were part of the Canadian Corps Artillery.  This was the heaviest howitzer used by the RCA during the First World War.  None are preserved in Canada.

During the Second World War, the 57th (Newfoundland) Heavy Regiment, Royal Artillery, was equipped with 9.2-inch howitzers when it was formed in 1940.  They gave them up when they were converted to a field regiment on 15 Nov 1941.  The 59th (Newfoundland) Heavy Regiment was also issued 9.2-inch howitzers (and other types) in July 1940.  They continued to use them until they were replaced by 7.2-inch howitzers in September 1942.  Doug Knight.

12-inch Naval Howitzer, mounted on a railway platform, Nov 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3522407)

15-inch gun base being rivetted, Oct 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3194250)

15-inch heavy howitzer being loaded, Sep 1916.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3395166), and 15-inch Howitzer Breech, May 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3395235)

15-inch gun being cleaned, May 1917.   (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN Nos. 3395237 and 3395239)

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3194244, left, IWM Photo Q4459, right)

15-inch Breechloading Howitzer, on the Western front, May 1917.  Although data for the photograph on the left indicates these are Canadian soldiers examining the howitzer, they were not used by Canadian gunners, and none are preserved in Canada.  

  (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

13-pounder 6-cwt QF Mk. I Field Gun, weight 6-0-13 (685-lbs), RGF J 1913, N. 290 on barrel, carriage plate 13-pr Mk. I.IP, L, 1917, GCR 1910, Reg. No. 10.

18-pounder QF Mk. I Field Gun being examined by the Earl of Athlone, Governor General of Canada, during his visit to the 4th Fd Regt, RCA, Petawawa, Ontario, 1940.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3563835)

 (LCol Leon Jensen Photo, left, Maxwell J. Toms Photo, right)

 (Photos courtesy of Terry W. Honour)

18-pounder QF Mk. I Field Gun with pneumatic tires, VSN 1918, Serial No. 8864. 

 (Clive Prothero-Brooks Photos)

 (Maxwell J. Toms Photos)

 (Photos courtesy of Terry W. Honour)

18-pounder QF Mk. I Field Gun with spoked carriage wheels.

18-pounder QF Mk. I Field Gun, Camp Valcartier, ca. 1914.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3336980)

18-pounder QF Mk. I Field Gun, RCA, ca. 1918.  (Library & Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN 3405482)

18-pounder QF Mk. I Field Guns, Sir Robert Borden, Bramshot, UK, Apr 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3642847)

75-mm Field Gun mounted front and rear on a Canadian National Railway Armoured train, often traveling through Winnipeg during the Second World War, 15 July 1942.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3224682)

 (Photos courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms)

U.S. Model 1917 75-mm field gun (British), Bethlehem Steel Coy, 1912, 995 Pounds, (Serial No. TBC) on the muzzle.  This gun is mounted on a 75-mm Gun Carriage Model of 1917 (British), Bethlehem Steel Company, 1918, (Serial No. TBC), MMC, according to the builder's plate on the carriage.  This is an American version of the British QF 18-pounder modified to fire French 75-mm ammunition.  One other gun like it is preserved in the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery School, 5 Canadian Division Support Group Base Gagetown, New Brunswick.

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun, manned by Canadian Gunners, Brighton, England, March 1943.  (Library & Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3223277).

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun.

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gunners in Normandy.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4233812)

 (Photos courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms)

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun Mk 1 (naval mount), CFR 34522, Officers’ Mess.

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun Mk. III, O.F.E./C 1942, Reg. No. L/12971 (Bantam).

3.7-inch Heavy Anti-Aircraft Gun manned by 2nd Canadian Heavy Anti-Aircraft Regiment.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3607529)

3.7-inch Heavy Anti-Aircraft Gun being cleaned.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3225276)

3.7-inch Heavy Anti-Aircraft Gun, 2nd Heavy Anti-Aircraft Regiment, RCA.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3211345)

3.7-inch Heavy Anti-Aircraft Gun being maneuvered out of the mud.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4233362)

3.7-inch Heavy Anti-Aircraft Gun Battery, Artillery ranging equipment, 1st Canadian Division, England, ca 1942.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4233960)

3.7-inch Heavy Anti-Aircraft Gun.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4234049)

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

3.7-inch Anti-Aircraft Gun, No. 1 of 2.

 (Photo courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms)

3.7-inch Anti-Aircraft Gun, mounted on wheels, No. 2 of 2.

3.7 Anti-Aircraft gun being fired at Valcartier, Quebec, Feb 1943.  (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN No. 3196436, and MIKAN No. 3196437)

3.7 Anti-Aircraft gun being fired at Valcartier, Quebec, Feb 1943.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3196440)

American 90-mm M1A1 Anti-Aircraft Gun.

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

Sherman Skink 20-mm Quad Self-Propelled Anti-Aircraft Gun Turret.

 (Author Photos) (Author Photo, left, Clive Prothero-Brooks Photo, right)

 (Clive Prothero-Brooks Photos)

Oerlikon 35-mm twin cannon towed anti-aircraft gun paired with the off-gun Skyguard fire control radar system.

 (Clive Prothero-Brooks Photo)

2-pounder QF Mk. X Anti-Tank Gun.

 (Rob Love Photos)

 (Maxwell J. Toms Photos)

QF 2-pounder David experimental Anti-Tank gun developed in Canada during the Second World War and recently rediscovered in Shilo.  It is a hybrid that used a 6-pounder necked down to a 2-pounder shot. 

6-pounder 7-cwt QF Anti-Tank Gun crewed by Private L.P. McDonald and Lance-Corporals W. Stevens and R. Dais, all of the Royal Canadian Artillery at Nieuport, Belgium, 9 September 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3524442)

 (Clive Prothero-Brooks Photos)

6-pounder 7-cwt QF Anti-Tank Gun (Serial No. 206).

 (Photo courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms) (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

17-pounder QF Towed Anti-Tank Gun, CFB Shilo Gym.

In June 1947, Canada had 149 17-pounder QF Towed Anti-Tank Guns in service.  These guns served until 1952, when they were offered to NATO.  Those remaining in 1959 were scrapped or became part of war memorials including at least 28 have been found and documented on these web pages.

 (D Sean Barnett Photo)

95-mm Centaur Tank Howitzer provided close support to infantry by laying smoke screens or engaging pillboxes.  During the Second World War the First Canadian Army used British Centaurs manned by Canadian gunners.  The 1st Centaur Battery, RCA, was formed on 6 August 1944 and was comprised of an HQ and three troops, each equipped with one Sherman OP tank and four 95-mm SP Centaurs.  Their main role included carrying out harassing fire on the enemy's logistic elements and retaliatory fire on mortars and support weapons.  The battery fought in a number of engagements in Normandy until it was disbanded on 29 Aug 1944.  One Centaur has been preserved at Sword Beach in Normandy.

 

 

25-pounder Field Gun with Canadian Military Pattern (CMP) Field Artillery Tractor (FAT), ca. 1944.  (Library & Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN 3607521)

 

25-pounder Field Gun in action, served by Gunners of B Troop, 5th Bty, 5th Fd Regt, RCA.  (Library & Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3192317).

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks, RCAM)

 (Maxwell J. Toms Photos)

 (Terry W. Honour Photos) (Clive Prothero-Brooks Photo)

25-pounder Mk I Field Gun with Limber.

 (Maxwell J. Toms Photos)

25-pounder Funeral Gun, and limber.

25-pounder Mk II Field Gun.

 (Maxwell J. Toms Photo, left, Terry Honour Photo, right)

 (Terry W. Honour Photos)

 (Terry W. Honour Photo, left, Clive Prothero-Brooks Photo, right)

25-pounder Mk. 2 Field Gun, standing in front of 1 RCHA HQ.

 (Photo courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms) (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

25-pounder Gun Mk 1 Field Gun, No. 1 of 2, Canoe River Memorial.

 (Photo courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms)

25-pounder Gun Mk 1 Field Gun, No. 2 of 2, Canoe River Memorial.

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks, RCAM)

Canadian Military Pattern Field Artillery Tractor “Quad” 4x4 (CMP FAT).

Forward Observation Post of "B" Battery, 1st Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, 24 Sep 1943, near Potenza, Italy.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3260954)

Captains S.A. Mooney and I.C. Stewart, Forward Observation Officers attached to the 6th Airborne Division, British Army, Greven, Germany, 5 April 1945.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3225419)

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

25-pounder Sexton C Mk. I Self-Propelled Gun, (Reg. No. CS172740), part of the Dr. William Gregg Collection donated to the RCA Museum.

105-mm M-7 Priest Self-Propelled Howitzer A3, 19th Fd Regt, RCA, France, July 1944.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3396109)

105-mm M-7 Priest Self-Propelled Howitzer, LBdr W.J. Pelrine, 14th Field Regt, RCA, France, 20 June 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3396095)

105-mm M-7 Priest Self-Propelled Howitzer A3, 34th Bty, 14th Fd Regt, RCA, France, 20 June 1944.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3396099)

105-mm M-7 Priest Self-Propelled HowitzerA3, 19th Fd Regt, RCA, France, July 1944.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3396110)

105-mm M7 Priest SP Gun, CSM W.H. Galloway and Captain Stirling, 19th Field Regt, RCA, Normandy, France, 22 June 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3231470)

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

105-mm American M-72 Priest Self-Propelled Howitzer “Zulu Warrior”.

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

95-mm Howitzer.

5.5-inch Breechloading Mk. III Gun on a Mk. I Carriage, Canada 43-cent stamp.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 2266434)

4.5-inch Breechloading Mk. II Gun on a Mk. I Carriage, Canadian Gunners, 2nd Medium Regiment, RCA, Netherlands, 2 Apr 1945.  Apart from the barrel, this gun was identical to the 5.5-inch gun.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3209132)

5.5-inch gun adjustment, National Railways Munitions plant, 1943.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3625452), and 5.5-inch Medium Gun, RCA, Otterloo, Netherlands, 5 May 1945.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3208405)

  (Clive Prothero-Brooks Photos)

5.5-inch Breechloading Mk. III Gun on a Mk. I Carriage (Serial No. 583), WO & Sgts Mess. 

 (Maxwell J. Toms Photo, left, Clive Prothero Brooks Photo, right)

5.5-inch Breechloading Mk. III Gun on a Mk. I Carriage (Serial No. 859).  Canada made carriages for these guns during the Second World War, and after the war acquired 85 of them for the RCA.  The gun fired a 45.5-kg (100-pound) shell to a range of 14,800 metres (16,200 yards).

 (Clive Prothero-Brooks Photos)

155-mm American M2 Long Tom on Mk. I Carriage.

 (Clive Prothero-Brooks Photos)

155-mm C1 (M1A2) Medium Howitzer, aka M114, manufactured at Sorel Industries Limited in Quebec, Queen Elizabeth II cypher.  CFR 34402, Reg. No. 174.  The carriage plate reads: CARR HOW 155mm M1A2 CDN, SOREL INDUSTRIES LTD, CANADA (1956), REG. NO. CDN 174, INSP (Maple Leaf).

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

155-mm C1 (M1A2) Medium Howitzer, aka M114, manufactured at Sorel Industries Limited in Quebec, Queen Elizabeth II cypher.  CFR 34402.  The carriage plate reads: CARR. HOW. 155MM M1A2 CDN. SOREL INDUSTRIES LTD. CANADA (year TBC), REG. NO. CDN 152, INSP (Symbol).

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

  (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

155-mm C1 (M1A2) Medium Howitzer, aka M114, manufactured at Sorel Industries Limited in Quebec, Queen Elizabeth II cypher, Reg. No. CDN 1. The carriage plate reads: CARR HOW 155mm M1A2 CDN, SOREL INDUSTRIES LTD, CANADA (1952), REG. NO. CDN 1, INSP (symbol).  1 RCHA.

 (Photos courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms)

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

155-mm C1 (M1A2) Medium Howitzer, aka M114, manufactured at Sorel Industries Limited in Quebec, Queen Elizabeth II cypher.  Reg. No. 9.  The carriage plate reads: CARR HOW 155mm M1A2 CDN, SOREL INDUSTRIES LTD, CANADA (year TBC), REG. NO. CDN 9, INSP (Symbol).  1 RCHA.

  (Author Photos)

 (Terry W. Honour Photos)

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

155-mm C1 (M1A2) Medium Howitzer, M114/39.  This Gun was manufactured at Sorel Industries Limited in Québec), modified with an American M185 39-calibre barrel (Serial No. 1141) by RDM Technologies in the Netherlands to M114/39 configuration.  RDM  developed a conversion kit which enabled the US 155 mm M114 towed howitzer to fire new extended range ammunition.  The company reputedly converted two Canadian 155-mm Howitzers to the M114/39 configuration and completed trials with them in Canada, however Canada did not proceed with an upgrade to the M114/39 standard.  CFR 34441.  The carriage plate reads CARR. HOW. 155MM M1A2 CDN. SOREL INDUSTRIES LTD. CANADA (year TBC), REG. NO. CDN 27, INSP (Symbol).

 (Photo courtesy of Terry W. Honour)

American 105-mm M2A1 Howitzer, identifiable by being built with an early bolt together US style rims.  This gun was recovered from an American range in Germany.  It was brought back from Germany by 1RCHA when it moved back to Shilo in the mid 1990s.  The gun was missing several original parts, including the breech ring, and was restored in 1998.  During the restoration, Rob Love replaced the tires and completely repainted the gun.  Weapons Sergeant Dave Smith contacted the LCMM which led to the acquisition of the Canadian breech and breeching ring, NO. CDN 122, 1956, shown in the photo, as the orihginal items had been removed by the Americans.  The LCMM had a set that had reached their maximum EFCs and therefore it was on the loading dock in Montreal waiting to go for smelting.  It was sent to the restoration team at Shilo and installed on the M2A1.  When examining the gun, a knowledgeable gunner will note that there is no swelling on the end of the barrel nor is it set back from the rifling, which leads to the confusion when it comes to recognition and mis-identification when the observer goes by the breech ring data.  The restorers installed a uniquely Canadian spare sight box on the front shield which has the little hump on it for the C1 panoramic telescope.  (Thanks to Rob Love for the update)

 (Clive Prothero-Brooks Photo, left, Maxwell J. Toms Photo, right)

155-mm M109 Self-Propelled Howitzer, (CFR No. 85-34817), AC: MD, ECC: 119205 HUI C: 0118, SAUI C: 0118, VMO No. DLE21739, VMO Date: 14 Jul 2005.  Display Monument at the front gate.

 (Maxwell Toms Photo, left, Clive Prothero-Brooks Photo, right)

155-mm M109 Self-Propelled Howitzer, (Reg. No. 77245), 1985, AC: MD, ECC: 119205 HUI C: 0118, SAUI C: 0118, VMO No. DLE21739, VMO Date: 14 Jul 2005.  Display Monument.

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

 (Photos courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms)

155-mm M109 Self-Propelled Howitzer, (Reg. No. 34838), 1968, AC: MD, ECC: 119205 HUI C: 0118, SAUI C: 0118, VMO No. DLE21739, VMO Date: 14 Jul 2005.   Inside the Museum.

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

155-mm M109 Self-Propelled Howitzer, (CFR 85-77245), 1 RCHA.

 (Photos courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms)

ADATs.  The Air Defense Anti-Tank System (ADATS) is a dual-purpose short range surface-to-air and anti-tank missile system based on the M113A2 vehicle.  It is manufactured by the Swiss company Oerlikon-Contraves, a member of the Rheinmetall Defence Group of Germany.  The ADATS missile is a laser-guided supersonic missile with a range of 10 kilometres, with an electro-optical sensor with TV and Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR). The carrying vehicle has also a conventional two-dimensional radar with an effective range of over 25 kilometres.

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

MGN-5 Corporal Missile.

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

MIM-3 Nike Ajax Missile.

 (Clive Prothero-Broos Photo)

MIM-14 Nike Hercules Missile.

SSII Rocket mounted on a 3/4-ton truck, ca 1960s.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4235904)

762-mm M31/M50 Honest John Rocket with M33 launcher trailer set-up and in operation.  (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN Nos. 4235073-4235080)

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

762-mm M31/M50 Honest John Rocket with M33 launcher trailer.

Foreign Equipment and Artillery

British 105-mm FV433 Abbot Self-Propelled Gun.

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

French First World War Canon de 75-mm modèle 1897, No. 2512, Puteaux, 1917.

 (Clive Prothero-Brooks Photos)

French First World War Canon de 75-mm modèle 1897, No. 3378, Bourges 1918.

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

French First World War Canon de 105 mle 1913 Schneider Field Gun.

 (Clive Prothero-Brooks Photo, left, Maxwell J. Toms Photo, right)

French Second World War Canon de 105 L modèle 1936 Schneider Field Gun.

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

Russian 122-mm M1938 (M30) Howitzer.

 (Photo courtesy of the Chipman family)

MWO Jim Chipman with the same gun in Egypt, ca. 1970.

 (Photo courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms) (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

Russian 45-mm M1937 Anti-Tank Gun (53-K), Serial No. 5795.

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

 (Photo courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms)

Russian 14.5-mm ZPU-4 Anti-Aircraft Gun.

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

 (Photos courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms)

Russian 152-mm 2S3 Akatsiya M1973 SP Gun.

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

Czech RM-70 Multiple Rocket Launcher.

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

Russian/Czech 2P25 SA-6 Gainful Transporter Erector Launcher (TEL).

 (Photo courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms)

Yugoslav M-55A Triple 20mm Anti-Aircraft Gun, No. 1 of 3.

 (Photo courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms)

Yugoslav M-55A Triple 20mm Anti-Aircraft Gun, No. 2 of 3.

 (Photo courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms)

Yugoslav M-55A Triple 20mm Anti-Aircraft Gun, No. 3 of 3

German Artillery and Machine Guns in the RCA Museum from the First World War

German Artillery, trench mortars and machine guns captured by Canadians, East of Arras, France, Sep 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397945)

German MG 08s being examined by LGen Julian Byng, May 1917.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3213520)

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG08 Machinegun (Serial Nr. 1133), captured by the RCR, 3rd Canadian Division on 26 August 1918 at Faction Trench N.E. of Monchy-le-Preux, France.  Originally allocated to the town of Binscarth, Manitoba.

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG08 Machinegun (Serial Nr. 1870), captured by the 27th Battalion, late 1918.  Also originally allocated to the town of Binscarth, Manitoba.

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG08 Machinegun S(erial Nr. 4882), no data, originally allocated to Lockport, West Selkirk, Manitoba.

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG08 Machinegun (Serial Nr. 4900), captured by the 20th Battalion on 5 August 1917 at the Cité St Emile, N. of Lens, France.  Originally allocated to Brandon College, Brandon, Manitoba.

German First World  War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG08 Machinegun (Serial Nr. 7109), no data, originally allocated to Lockport, West Selkirk, Manitoba.

German First World   War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG08 Machinegun (Serial Nr. 40553), captured by the 3rd Canadian Division in October 1918 in the vicinity of Cambrai, France.  Originally allocated to Carman, Manitoba.

German 7.68-cm trench mortars captured by Canadians, Apr 1917.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3521829)

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. 32258), no data, on heavy metal base with ramp, handle intact, painted dark grey, mounted on a wheeled carriage.  New wheels and trail in 1988, weight in action 550 lbs.  Sent to CFB Shilo from the CME Museum, CFB Gagetown, New Brunswick in January 2013.  Originally allocated to Maillardville, Fraser Mills, British Columbia.

German 17-cm trench mortars captured by Canadians, Apr 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3521845)

 (Photos courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms)

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), (Serial Nr. TBC).  Medium trench mortar mounted on an iron baseplate, no wheels.

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German First World War 24-cm Flügelminenwerfer ‘Iko’, Albrecht (finned smoothbore Trench Mortar), (Serial Nr. 339), no data.  This mortar was originally allocated to Lockport, West Selkirk, Manitoba.

In 1914 The German Army had three types of minenwerfer (mine throwers) used by their engineers to place a demolition charge against a fortification without exposing the men to enemy fire.  At that time, the British army did not have trench mortars, but quickly understood their value and began to develop an equivalent.  In mid-1915 the 3-inch Stokes mortar was accepted for service in the infantry.  The artillery operated a 2-inch medium "toffee apple" mortar and 9.45-inch heavy mortars.  The 2-inch mortar was replaced with the 6-inch Newton mortar in 1917.

3-inch Stokes mortar.  (Wikimedia Photo)

'Z.C. Trench Mortar Battery' France 'Suicide Club' after the Battle of Lens, Lieutenants. J.A. McGibbon and B.E. Scott, M.C. with a Canadian trench mortar battery equipped with a 2-inch Muzzleloading Trench Howitzer (The "Toffee Apple" Mortar).  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, PA-004921).  The designation "2-inch" refers to the mortar barrel, into which only the 22-inch bomb shaft but not the bomb itself was inserted; the spherical bomb itself was actually 9 inches (230-mm) in diameter and weighed 42 lb (19 kg), hence this weapon is more comparable to a standard mortar of approximately 5-6 inch bore.

6-inch Newton Trench Mortar being fired by Canadian troops at Valenciennes, France, 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, PA-003380) 

9.45-inch Trench Mortar being made ready for firing.  The Canadian gunner is checking the setting of the No. 31 time fuze at the 1st Army School, Clarques, Feb 1917.  The mortar round is being fired in the photo on the right.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3404552, left and MIKAN No. 3521982, right)

German 7.7-cm FK 96 Field Gun captured by Canadians, Amiens, Aug 1918.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397896)

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 3316), no data, originally allocated to Gleichen, Alberta.

The 7.7 cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7 cm FK 96 n.A.) is a German field gun.  The gun combined the barrel of the earlier 7.7 cm FK 96 with a recoil system, a new breech and a new carriage. Existing FK 96s were upgraded over time.  The FK 96 n.A. was shorter-ranged, but lighter than the French Canon de 75 modèle 1897 or the British Ordnance QF 18 pounder gun; the Germans placed a premium on mobility, which served them well during the early stages of World War I. However, once the front had become static, the greater rate of fire of the French gun and the heavier shells fired by the British gun put the Germans at a disadvantage. The Germans remedied this by developing the longer-ranged, but heavier 7.7 cm FK 16.  As with most guns of its era, the FK 96 n.A. had seats for two crewmen mounted on its splinter shield.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/7.7_cm_FK_96_n.A.

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 3734), no data, originally allocated to Rockwood, Ontario.

German Artillery in the RCA Museum from the Second World War

A British soldier examines a captured German 2.8-cm sPzB 41 anti-tank gun, Sicily, 21 July 1943.  (IWM Photo NA 4961)

German Second World War 2.8-cm schwere Panzerbüchse 41 Anti-Tank Gun (2.8-cm sPzB 41) Anti-Tank Gun (Serial Nr. 2556).  The barrel has a separate number, (Serial Nr. 52536).  The sPzB 41 light AT Gun worked on the squeeze-bore principle.  This gun is  currently on loan to the Base Museum, CFB Petawawa, Ontario.

German Second World War 3.7-mm PaK 36(t) Anti-Tank Gun in service in Northern France, summer 1944.  (Bundesarchiv Bild 101I-299-1831-26)

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German Second World War 3.7-mm Czech Škoda PaK 36(t) Anti-Tank Gun.  The gun is marked 1937, AKC SPOL, 93 kg, d?. Škodovy Závody v Plzni, tov ?ís. 21532, E1 37, 3.7 cm k vz.37, ?ís. 7, VL0217!

The 3,7cm ÚV vz. 38 (Czech: úto?ná vozba), manufacturer's designation Škoda A7, was a 3.7-cm tank gun designed by the Skoda Works in Czechoslovakia before the Second World War began.  The gun was the primary armament of the Czech LT vz. 38 light tank, known in German service as the Panzer 38(t).  The primary user of the A7 was the Wehrmacht during the Second World War where the weapon went by the name 3,7cm Kampfwagenkanone 38(t).  In German service, in addition to conventional high explosive ammunition, the weapon fired twoanti-tank rounds.  The primary round was the Panzergranate 39 armor-piercing composite ballistic cap (APCBC) which could penetrate 41-mm of armour plate at 100-m and 35-mm at 500-m.  Penetration dropped to 29-mm at 1000-m and 24-mm at 1500-m.  The APCBC round was ineffective at 2000 m. The rarer tungsten Panzergranate 40 armour-piercing composite rigid (APCR) round could penetrate 64-mm at 100-m, but only 34-mm at 500-m.  The APCR round was not effective at 1000-m or beyond.

German SS gunners man a 7.5-cm leichtes Infanteriegeschütz 18 Light Infantry Gun (7.5-cm leIG 18) during the Battle of Uman, Cherkasy Oblast, Ukraine, Soviet Union. 18 August 1941. (German Wehrmacht Photo)

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German Second World War 7.5-cm leichtes Infanteriegeschütz 18 Light Infantry Gun (7.5-cm leIG 18) (Serial Nr. R191).

German soldiers prepare a 55-cm PaK 38 (L/60) Anti-Tank Gun for action in the outskirts of Stalingrad. Near Stalingrad (now, Volgograd), Volgograd Oblast, Russia, Soviet Union. September 1942.  (Wehrmacht Photo)

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

5-cm PaK 38 (L/60) Anti-Tank Gun (Serial Nr. R4024), shipped to Canada from the UK on 24 Oct 1944.

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German Second World War 5-cm PaK 38 (L/60) Anti-Tank Gun (Serial Nr. R10087).  1 RCHA.

German Second World War 5-cm PaK 38 (L/60) Anti-Tank Gun in action, ca 1943.  (Wehrmacht Photo)

 (Photo courtesy of Tighe McManus)

5-cm PaK 38 (L/60) Anti-Tank Gun (Serial Nr. R5709), on loan to the Antler River Museum, Manitoba.  

 

Canadian soldiers examining a captured 7.5-cm PaK 40 Anti-Tank Gun marked with 15 kill rings, ca. 1945.  (Library & Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3208583)

7.5-cm PaK 40 Anti-Tank Gun, Italy.  (Willi Ude Photo, Wikipedia)

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

7.5-cm PaK 40 Anti-Tank Gun (Serial Nr. R807).

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 16 (10.5-cm leFH 16), (Serial Nr. R341).

German artillery examined by Canadians in France, ca. June 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4233165)

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 18/40 (10.5-cm leFH 18/40) Howitzer (Serial Nr. R158).  (Captain F.M. Mowat).

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 18/40 (10.5-cm leFH 18/40) Howitzer (Serial Nr. R284).

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

 (Photos courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms)

15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 18 (15-cm sFH 18) (Serial Nr. R856).  (Captain F.M. Mowat).

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

17-cm Kanone 18 (17-cm K 18) in Mörserlafette Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 58).  (Captain F.M. Mowat).

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

 (Photos courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms)

30-cm Raketenwerfer 56, (no Serial Number visible).

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

 (Photo courtesy of Maxwell J. Toms)

10.5-cm Leichtgeschütz 42 (10.5-cm LG 42 Recoilless Gun, (Serial Nr. R121).  (Captain F.M. Mowat). 

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German Jagdpanzer Kanone 90-mm Tank Destroyer, outside the Range Control Building.

Japanese 70-mm Type 92 Howitzer, (Serial No. 2561), currently on loan to the NBMHM, CFB Gagetown, New Brunswick.

RCA Museum Aircraft

Cessna L-19 Bird Dog.

 (Clive Prothero-Brooks Photos)

Auster AOP Mk. V (Serial No. TJ398).  Recently acquired for the RCAM and flown to the museum in an RCAF CC-130 Hercules transport from the UK.  It is painted to represent a Canadian Army artillery spotting aircraft operating in Italy during the Second World War.

Briefing of air observation pilots operating in support of regiments of the Royal Canadian Artillery. (Left to right): Capts. Pat Henderson, N.H. Chase, Maj. Ted Mcnaughton. Castel Frentano, Italy, 10 Feb 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN No. 3524504 and 3524505)

The Flewin Field Cairn, CFB Shilo Artillery Park.  The Flewin Field Cairn in the CFB Shilo Artillery Park was dedicated on 5 June 1970 by the Officers and Men of CFB Shilo to the memory of Captain G.I.  Ross Flewin, CD, RCA, who served at Shilo as an AOP pilot with 2 AOP Flight in 1956 and as an Instructor Gunnery with RCSA in 1959.  On 17 January 1964 Captain Ross Flewin was killed while piloting a light aircraft on a routine training flight.