Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Artillery preserved in Canada 4a: Manitoba

Artillery preserved in the province of Manitoba

For all official data concerning the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, please click on the link to their website:

Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery Website

The aim of this website is to locate, identify and document all historical pieces of artillery preserved in Canada.  Many contributors have assisted in the hunt for these guns to provide and update the data found on these web pages.  Photos are by the author unless otherwise credited.  Any errors found here are by the author, and any additions, corrections or amendments to this list of Guns and Artillery in Canada would be most welcome and may be e-mailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com.

Data current to 17 May 2017.

Note: Back in the day, artillery in Canada was referred to by its radio call sign "Sheldrake".  It is now referred to by its "Golf" call sign.  (Acorn)

Manitoba

Brandon, 26th Field Artillery Regiment, RCA

The 26th Field Artillery Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery is a Primary Reserve Royal Canadian Artillery (RCA) regiment based in Brandon, Manitoba and Portage la Prairie, Manitoba. 71 Field Battery, Headquarters and Service Battery, and Regimental Headquarters are in Brandon and the 13th Field Battery is in Portage la Prairie.

9-pounder 8-cwt Muzzleloading Rifle, weight 8-1-11 (935 lbs), Reg No. 606, carriage Reg. No. 40, RGF 1874, Issued to the Welland Field Battery in Ontario in 1893.  On display in the 26th Field Artillery Museum.

German First World War 7.92-mm MG 08 Machine Gun, 26th Field Artillery Museum.

 (Photos courtesy of Dr Gordon Goldsborough)

German First World War 10.5-cm Feldhaubitze 98/09 (10.5-cm FH 98/09), (Serial Nr. 2637), 1915, captured by the 42nd Battalion (Royal Highlanders of Canada), 7th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), on 8 August 1918 South of Demuin, France.  This gun was moved from Birnie, Manitoba, to the 26th Field Artillery Museum.

The 10.5-cm Feldhaubitze 98/09 (10.5 cm FH 98/09), a short barreled (1625-mm) 105-mm howitzer, also referred to as the 10.5-cm leichte Feldhaubitze (light field howitzer) 98/09, was used by Germany in the First World War and after.  It had a maximum range of 6,300 metres (20,700 ft).   It was originally built by Rheinmetall as the 10.5-cm Feldhaubitze 98, an old-fashioned, fixed-recoil weapon delivered to the German army in 1898; between 1902 and 1904, it was redesigned, by Krupp, with a new recoil mechanism and a new carriage.  However, it wasn't accepted for service until 1909, hence the ending designation 98/09. Existing weapons were rebuilt to the new standard.  As usual, two seats were attached to the gun shield.  There were 1,260 in service at the beginning of the First World War.

 (Photo courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

155-mm M109 Self-propelled Howitzer, (CFR 85-77229), 1968, standing alongside the armoury.

Carman

 (Photos courtesy of Cheryl Young)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. 10726), captured by the 10th Battalion (Canadians), 1st Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), on 2 September 1918 near Villers-lez-Cagnicourt, France.  The gun was then put into action against the enemy.  No. 1 on the West side of the Great War Memorial Hall.

 (Photos courtesy of Cheryl Young)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. 15207), captured by the 13th Battalion (Royal Highlanders of Canada), 3rd Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), at Cagnicourt Wood, France, 2 September 1918.  No. 2 on the East side of the Great War Memorial Hall.

The 7.7 cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7 cm FK 16) was a German field gun with a longer range than the FK 96 n.A.  The barrel is longer and the gun has a box carriage to allow for greater elevation, which increased the range.  It also has separate-loading ammunition to reduce powder consumption and barrel wear at short ranges, although this had the drawback of reducing the rate of fire compared to the older gun.  It was prematurely rushed into production in 1916 and early guns suffered from a number of defects, mainly stemming from the German use of substitute materials to reduce consumption of strategic metals. It also suffered from a large number of premature detonations of its shells during 1916.

Churchill, Prince of Wales Fort, National Historic Site of Canada

 (Ansgar Wal Photo)

 (Diagram courtesy of Parks Canada)

Diagram of Prince of Wales Fort.  Inner numbers designate cannon calibre, outer numbers cover 40 guns mounted on the inner walls of the fort, plus two outside the fort.

The Prince of Wales Fort National Historic Site of Canada near Churchill in Northern Manitoba was built in the early 18th century by the Hudson’s Bay Company to support the fur trade.  The Fort stands at the mouth of the Churchill River and encompasses a massive fortification along with installations at Cape Merry, a defensive battery situated on a point of land across the river opposite the fort, and Sloop Cove, which was the HBC’s winter harbour.  Built between 1731 and 1771, the 12-metre thick walls of the fortress protected the HBC’s major supply route through Arctic waters until it was surrendered by Samuel Hearne to the French in 1782.

 

Queen Anne of Great Britain and her Royal cypher (1665-1714, r. 1702-1714).  (Wikipedia Photo)

  

King George II and his Royal cypher, reigned from 11 Jun 1727 to 25 Oct 1760.  (Wikipedia Photo)

Each of the 40 guns mounted on the ramparts of Prince of Wales Fort is positioned at a gun port and located on a stone plinth.  24 of the guns bear the Royal cypher of King George II (1727-1760), six of the guns bear the Royal cypher of Queen Anne (1702-1714), and 12 guns do not have a visible cypher.  Gun weights and data courtesy of Parks Canada, Henry Unglik and Alex Barbour,  A Metallurgical and Corrosion Study of the 18th Century Cast Iron Cannons from Fort Prince of Wales, Manitoba, prepared for Kathryn Roll, Chief, Historic Resource Conservation, Prairie Region, Winnipeg.  Laboratory Nos. : 89-2193 to 89-2215.  (Historic Resource Conservation, National Historic Sitess, Environment Canada, Parks Service Canada; and Heritage Conservation Program, Architecture and Engineering Services, Public Works Canada, Ottawa, March 1992).  Gun weights from pp. 28-34.  

All Guns listed are mounted on wood Naval Gun carriages.

Gun No. 1, Cast Iron 6-pounder 22-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 22-2-7 (2,527 lbs), no Royal cypher, ca. 1710, 8’5.4” long, 3.7” bore.

Gun No. 2, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 32-0-1 (3,585 lbs), King George II cypher, ca 1740, 8’11.3” long, 4.4” bore.

Gun No. 3, Cast Iron 6-pounder 22-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 24-0-0 (2,688 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 9’0.3” long, 3.7” bore.

Gun No. 4, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-1-17 (3,741 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 8’11.8” long, 4.3” bore.

Gun No. 5, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-0-5 (3,701 lbs), Queen Anne cypher, ca. 1710, 8’11.7” long, 4.4” bore.

Gun No. 6, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-0-14 (3,710 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 8’11.8” long, 4.8” bore, .

Gun No. 7, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-1-3 (3,727 lbs), Queen Anne cypher, ca. 1710, 8’11.8” long, 4.6” bore.

Gun No. 8, Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, 49-3-26 (5,598 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 9’6.2” long, 5.8” bore.

Gun No. 9, Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 48-0-21 (5,397 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 9’6.2” long, 5.9” bore.

Gun No. 10, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 32-0-1 (3,585 lbs), Queen Anne cypher, ca. 1710, 8’11.8” long, 4.8” bore.

Gun No. 11, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-0-24 (3,720 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 8’0.2” long, 4.8” bore.

Gun No. 12, Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 48-1-21 (5,425 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 9’6.5” long, 5.9” bore.

Gun No. 13, Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 48-2-0 (5,432 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 9’6.7” long, 5.8” bore.

Gun No. 14, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 32-2-4 (3,756 lbs), no cypher, ca. 1720 (TBC), 9’0.3” long, 4.6” bore.

Gun No. 15, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-1-17 (3,741 lbs), Queen Anne cypher, ca. 1710, 8’11.5” long, 4.8” bore.

Gun No. 16, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-2-17 (3,769 lbs), Queen Anne cypher, ca. 1710, 8’11.5” long, 4.7” bore.

Gun No. 17, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, 9’0.2” long, weight 33-0-0 (3,696 lbs), 4.7” bore, King George II cypher, ca. 1740.

Gun No. 18, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-1-21 (3,745 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 8’11.5” long, 4.6” bore.

Gun No. 19, Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 49-3-14 (5,586 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 9’6.0” long, 5.9” bore.

Gun No. 20, Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 49-3-21 (5,593 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 9’6.4” long, 5.9” bore.

Gun No. 21, Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight ?-?-24 (>5,500 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 9’6.0” long, 5.7” bore.

Gun No. 22, Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 49-3-21 (5,593 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 9’6.1” long, 5.8” bore.

Gun No. 23, Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 49-3-21 (5,593 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 9’6.0” long, 5.8” bore.

Gun No. 24, Cast Iron 6-pounder 22-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 21-2-21 (2,429 lbs), no Royal cypher, ca. 1710, 8’5.7” long, 3.5” bore.

Gun No. 25, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-0-21 (3,717 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 8’10.7” long, 4.6” bore.

Gun No. 26, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 35-1-0 (3,948 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 9’5.8” long, 4.7” bore.

Gun No. 27, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-2-0 (3,752 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 9’6.3” long, 4.7” bore.

Gun No. 28, Cast Iron 6-pounder 22-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun,weight 23-3-0 (2,660 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 8’11.4” long, 3.7” bore, 

Gun No. 29, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-2-21 (3,773 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 9’6.2” long, 4.6” bore.

Gun No. 30, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-0-17 (3,713 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 9’0.1” long, 4.6” bore.

Gun No. 31, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-2-4 (3,756 lbs), no cypher, ca. 1740 (TBC), 8’11.7” long, 4.6” bore.

Gun No. 32, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-1-14 (3,738 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 8’11.5” long, 4.7” bore.

Gun No. 33, Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 48-1-14 (5,418 lbs), King George II cypher, ca. 1740, 9’6.3” long, 5.8” bore.

Gun No. 34, Cast Iron 6-pounder 22-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 22-1-0 (2,492 lbs),  no cypher, ca. 1710 (TBC), 8’5.9” long, 3.6” bore.

Gun No. 35, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-1-18 (3,742 lbs), no cypher, ca. 1740 (TBC), 8’11.8” long, 4.7” bore.

Gun No. 36, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-1-0 (3,724 lbs), no cypher, ca. 1740 (TBC), 8’11.8” long, 4.7” bore.

Gun No. 37, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-1-11(3,735 lbs), no cypher, ca. 1740 (TBC), 8’11.7” long, 4.6” bore.

Gun No. 38, Cast Iron 6-pounder 22-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 22-0-21 (2,485 lbs), no cypher, ca. 1710 (TBC), 8’5.4” long, 3.8” bore.

Gun No. 39, Cast Iron 6-pounder 22-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, no cypher, ca. 1710, weight 22-0-11 (2,475 lbs), 8’5.8” long, 3.8” bore.

Gun No. 40, Cast Iron 6-pounder 22-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 22-0-7 (2,471 lbs), no cypher, ca. 1710 (TBC), 8’5.7” long, 3.7” bore.

Gun No. 41, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun,, weight 32-1-3 (3,615 lbs), Queen Anne cypher, ca. 1710, 8’11.8” long, 4.6” bore.  Outside the Fort at Cape Merry.

Gun No. 42, Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-0-14 (3,710 lbs), no cypher, ca. 1740 (TBC), 9’0.2” long, 4.7” bore.  Outside the Fort at the Eskimo Museum, Churchill.

 (Peter Fitzgerald Photo)

Darlingford

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 Machinegun (Serial Nr. TBC), on the left in front of the town War Memorial.

German First World War 9.15-cm leichtes Minenwerfer System Lanz, being examined by Canadians in France, May 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397824)

German First World War 9.15-cm leichtes Minenwerfer System Lanz (Serial Nr. TBC), on the right in front of the town War Memorial.  This trench mortar was likely captured by a Canadian Battalion within an Infantry Brigade of a Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF). 

The 9.15 cm leichtes Minenwerfer System Lanz (Trench mortar) was a light mortar used by Germany and Austria-Hungary in the First World War.  It was a smooth-bore, breech-loading design that used smokeless propellant.  It was chosen by the Austrians as an interim replacement for their 9 cm Minenwerfer M 14, pending development of a superior domestic design, which eventually turned out to be the 9 cm Minenwerfer M 17.  The older Austrian design had a prominent firing signature, a less effective bomb and shorter range than the Lanz.  Over 500 were ordered with deliveries beginning in April 1917.

Douglas

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG08, (Serial Nr. 5821), no data, mounted on a stone cairn war memorial next to the Douglas Community Hall.

Neepawa

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 13, (15-cm sFH 13), (Serial Nr. 2790), Fried. Krupp.  This gun was captured by 10th Battalion (Canadians) and 14th Battalion (Royal Montreal Regiment, 3rd Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), at Cagnicourt, France, on 2 September 1918.  It is on display in front of Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 23.

The 15 cm schwere Feldhaubitze 13 (15 cm sFH 13), was a German heavy field howitzer.  The gun was a development of the previous standard howitzer, the 15 cm sFH 02.  Improvements included a longer barrel resulting in better range and a gun shield to protect the crew.  Variants were: the original "kurz" (L/14 – 14 calibre short barrel version), the lg. sFH13 with a longer barrel; and lg. sFH13/02 with minor modifications to simplify wartime manufacture of the lg. sFH weapons. Initially there were serious issues of weak recoil spring mechanisms that would break, and gun barrel explosions.  The problems were solved with the upgrades.  The British referred to these and their shells as "5 point 9"s or "5 9"s as the bore was 5.9 inches (150 mm).  The ability of these guns to deliver mobile heavy firepower close to the frontline gave the Germans a major firepower advantage on the Western Front early in the First World War, as the French and British lacked an equivalent.  It was not until late 1915 that the British began to deploy their own 6 inch 26 cwt howitzer.  About 3,500 of these guns were produced from 1913 to 1918.

Portage la Prairie, 26th Field Artillery Regiment, 13th Field Battery

Pilot Mound

 (Photos courtesy of Jeannette Greaves)

 (Photos courtesy of Terry Honour)

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.).  (Serial Nr. 18043), no data, 1451.  This trench mortar was likely captured by a Canadian Battalion within an Infantry Brigade of a Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF).  It is currently located at the Manitoba First World War Military Museum outside La Riviere, where the wheels have been removed and it is undergoing restoration.

The 7.58 cm Minenwerfer a.A. (alter Art or old model) (7.58 cm leMW).  The Germans fielded a whole series of mortars before the beginning of the First World War.  Their term for them was Minenwerfer, literally mine-thrower; they were initially assigned to engineer units in their siege warfare role.  By the Winter of 1916-17, they were transferred to infantry units where the leMW's light weight permitted them to accompany the foot-soldiers in the advance.  In common with Rheinmetall's other Minenwerfer designs, the leMW was a rifled muzzle-loader that had hydraulic cylinders on each side of the tube to absorb the recoil forces and spring recuperators to return the tube to the firing position.  It had a rectangular firing platform with limited traverse and elevation.  Wheels could be added to ease transportation or it could be carried by at least six men.  In 1916, a new version, designated as the n.A. or neuer Art, was fielded that included a circular firing platform, giving a turntable effect, which permitted a full 360 degree traverse.  It also had a longer 16 inches (410 mm) barrel and could be used for direct fire between 0° and 27° elevation if the new 90 kg (200 lb) trail was fitted to absorb the recoil forces.  In this mode it was pressed into service as an anti-tank gun.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/7.58_cm_Minenwerfer.

Selkirk, Lower Fort Garry National Historic Site of Canada,

Bronze 3-pounder 3-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 3-0-1 (337 lbs), J & H (John & Henry) King, 1807.  No. 1 of 5.

Bronze 3-pounder 3-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 3-0-3 (309 lbs), J & H King, 1809.  No. 2 of 5.

Bronze 3-pounder 3-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gunweight 3-0-6 (332 lbs), J & H King, 1810.  No. 3 of 5.

Bronze 3-pounder 3-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 3-0-7 (333 lbs), J & H King, 1810.  No. 4 of 5.

Bronze 3-pounder 3-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 2-0-14 (238 lbs), F.  Kinman, 1812.  No. 5 of 5.

Bronze 3-pounder 3-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 6---1, (>673 lbs), J & H King, 1797.

Cast Iron ½-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, 2-feet, 6-inches long.  No. 1 of 2.

Cast Iron ½-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, 2-feet, 6-inches long.  No. 2 of 2.

Cast Iron 3-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 4-3-8 (540 lbs), Queen Ann (1702-1714) cypher.

Cast Iron 3-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, 3-feet, 6-inches long, ca. 1800, stamped S & Co.  No. 1 of 3.

Cast Iron 3-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, 3-feet, 6-inches long, ca. 1800, stamped S & Co.  No. 2 of 3.

Cast Iron 3-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, 3-feet, 6-inches long, ca. 1800, stamped S & Co.  No. 3 of 3.

Cast Iron 6-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with trunnion.  The carronade is a short smoothbore, cast iron cannon, which was used by the Royal Navy and first produced by the Carron Company, an ironworks in Falkirk, Scotland.  It was used from the 1770s to the 1850s.  Its main function was to serve as a powerful, short-range anti-ship and anti-crew weapon.  While considered very successful early on, carronades eventually disappeared as rifled naval artillery changed the shape of the shell and led to fewer and fewer close-range engagements.

Seven Sisters

155-mm M109 Self-propelled Howitzer, (CFR unknown).

Shilo

 (Photo courtesy of Maxwell Toms)

American 90-mm M1A1 Anti-Aircraft Gun, private collector.

CFB Shilo, Royal Canadian Artillery Museum

The web page has become to big for all of the guns in Manitoba to be listed here.  The guns on display at CFB Shilo are listed on a separate web page on this website.

Upper Fort Garry

Cast Iron possible 1-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun mounted on a wood wheeled carriage and two small Bronze Coehorn Smoothbore Smoothbore Muzzleloading  Mortars mounted on wood carrying boxes, ca. 1899, Upper Fort Garry, Manitoba.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3304159)

Winnipeg

German Second World War 8.8-cm Raketenwerfer 43 “Puppchen” (hollow charge rocket launcher), (Serial Nr. RW2491), Fort Garry Horse Museum, McGregor Armoury, 551 Machray Ave.  (Fort Garry Horse Museum Photos)

Winnipeg, HMCS Chippewa

Winnipeg, Naval Museum of Manitoba

 (Photos courtesy of Lt (N) Simone Smith)

12-pounder 8-cwt QF Royal Navy Landing Gun, weight 7-3-10 (878 lbs), Gun Serial No. TBC, Breech Block Serial No. TBC, Carriage weight 6-cwt, Admiralty No. 71, dated 1898, with Limber.  Queen Victoria cypher.  The Naval Landing Guns found in Canada probably originated on early ships of the Royal Canadian Navy, such as HMCS Niobe, HMCS Aurora, HMCS Rainbow and others. Details on the gun may be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ordnance_QF_12_pounder_8_cwt.

 (Photo courtesy of Curtis Kostin) 

4-inch/45 QF Mk XVI* Guns on Mk. XIX High Angle Twin Mounting from HMCS Chippewa, located in the front lobby, 1 Navy Way.

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun, HMCS Prince Henry.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3612507)

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun in a Deck Gun Mount.

.50-calibre Anti-Aircraft Gun in a Deck Gun Mount.

York Factory

Bronze 6-pounder 6-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Guns, weight, maker and Serial Nos. unknown, mounted on wood wheeled gun carriages, York Factory, Hayes River, Manitoba, 1925.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3394425)