Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Artillery preserved in Canada 2: Alberta

Artillery preserved in the province of Alberta

For all official data concerning the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, please click on the link to their website:

Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery Website

The aim of this website is to locate, identify and document every historical piece of artillery preserved in Canada.  Many contributors have assisted in the hunt for these guns to provide and update the data found on these web pages.  Photos are by the author unless otherwise credited.  Any errors found here are by the author, and any additions, corrections or amendments to this list of Guns and Artillery in Canada would be most welcome and may be e-mailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com.

Data current to 13 Feb 2017.

Note: Back in the day, artillery in Canada was referred to by its radio call sign "Sheldrake".  It is now referred to by its "Golf" call sign.  (Acorn)

Alberta

Barrhead

17-pounder QF Towed Anti-Tank Gun, standing in a Memorial Park, on the West side of Hwy 33 near the town centre.

In June 1947, Canada had 149 17-pounder QF Towed Anti-Tank Guns in service.  These guns served until 1952, when they were offered to NATO.  Those remaining in 1959 were scrapped or became part of war memorials including at least 28 have been found and documented on these web pages.

Bellevue, Crowsnest Pass

 (Photo courtesy of Ian McKenzie)

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/15, (Serial Nr. 5194), captured by the 2nd Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) , originally allocated to Blairmore, Alberta.

Bragg Creek

 (Photos courtesy of Maxwell Toms)

Cast Iron possible 6-pounder Smoothbore Muzzle Loading Field Gun replica, weight and maker unknown, mounted on a wood wheeled wood gun carriage, standing beside the cenotaph.

 (Photo courtesy of Terry Honour) (Photo courtesy of Maxwell Toms)

Cast Iron possible 6-pounder Smoothbore Muzzle Loading Field Gun replica, weight and maker unknown, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage, standing beside the cenotaph.

Brooks

 (Streetview Photo)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16) Field Gun (Serial Nr. unknown), in front of the Royal Canadian Legion at 235 3rd Street West. 

Calgary, Artillery

Cast Iron ½-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight and maker unknown, mounted on a wood gun carriage, Hudson's Bay Fort.

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/15.

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun manned by British gunners, Russi, Italy, 18 February 1945.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3240422)

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun, Crown Surplus.

5.5-inch Breechloading Mk. III Gun on a Mk. I Carriage, Veteran’s section, Queen’s Park Cemetery, North on 14th Street, West of Calgary Airport.  Canada made carriages for these guns during the Second World War, and after the war acquired 85 of them for the RCA.  The gun fired a 45.5-kg (100-pound) shell to a range of 14,800 metres (16,200 yards).

 

Canadian Signaller receiving the order to fire a 5.5-inch Breechloading Mk. III Gun of a Medium Regiment of the Royal Canadian Artillery (R.C.A.) south of Vaucelles, France.  The photograph also shows a stack of shells for the gun.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3396144)

Calgary, The Military Museums of Calgary, 4520 Crowchild Trail SW.

 (Photo courtesy of Terry Honour)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 1571), originally allocated to the town of Gleichen.

2-pounder QF Mk. X Anti-Tank Gun, inside the main museum building in the PPCLI Museum section.

The 2-pounder QF Mk. X AT Gun in Canada was mounted on Mark 4 and 4A carriages.  These were split-trail 6-pounder anti-tank gun carriages, with the cradle, slipper, and recoil system adapted to mount the 2-pounder.  This allowed the 6-pounder carriage to get into production, while still using the 2-pounder gun.  Both Canadian General Electric and Regina Industries, Ltd, manufactured these carriages in Canada, and they were issued to training centres in Canada starting in December 1941.  The 5th Anti-tank Regiment, RCA, received 2-pounders on Mark 4 carriages in April 1942.  British production of the 6-pounder was delayed after Dunkirk because they had to keep the 2-pounder in production, so Canadain production was up and running first (by a month or so).  Canadians went straight to the 6-pounder carriage and adapted the 2-pounder to it as a temporary fix.  Doug Knight.
6-pounder 7-cwt Towed Anti-Tank Gun being cleaned by Rifleman W.C. McMillan and Lance-Sergeant J.L. Retty of the Royal Winnipeg Rifles Anti-Tank Platoon, Ijzendijke, Netherlands, 21 October 1944. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No.3199976)

6-pounder 7-cwt QF Anti-Tank Gun (Reg. No. 61).

 

17-pounder QF Towed Anti-Tank gun of the 57th Battery, 1st Anti-Tank Regiment, RCA near Campobasso, Italy, 25 October 1943.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3599876)

German Jagdpanther 8.8-cm SP gun put out of action by a 17-pounder QF Towed Anti-Tank Gun crewed by gunners with the 6th Anti-Tank Regiment, RCA, being examined by Private W.G. Lourie, Reichswald, Germany, 16 March 1945.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3203401)

(Photo courtesy of Anthony Sewards)

17-pounder QF Towed Anti-Tank Gun.  The RCA held 138 of these guns.

Calgary, Naval Museum of Alberta

34-ton heavy Naval Twin Gun Mount minus the guns.

Naval gunners loading 4-inch shells.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3598672)

Sailors setting shell fuses on board HMCS Uganda, 23 Jun 1945.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3624562)

HMCS Uganda bombarding Sukuma Airfield on Miyako Jima, 4 May 1945.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3191651)

 (Photos courtesy of Maxwell Toms) (Author Photo)

4-inch QF Mk. XVI* Guns on Mk. XIX High Angle Twin Mounting, S.I.L. 1944 Twin Gun (Serial No. S/1451) M, P, L and (Serial No. S/14538), M, P, L, Naval Gun Mount, Adm. No. 541.

4-inch QF Mk. V Naval Gun firing, HMCS Sherbrooke, June 1945.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo,  MIKAN N. 3455882)

4-inch QF Mk. V Naval Gun on High Angle Mounting, 1945, (Serial No. Can 40), Cradle (Serial No. Can 39).

2-pounder QF Mk. 1, V.S.M. (Vickers, Sons & Maxim LL) Automatic Gun, (aka "pom-pom"), being fired on HMCS Assiniboine, 10 July 1940.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3566440)

2-pounder QF Mk. VII, V.S.M. (Vickers, Sons & Maxim LL) Automatic Gun, (aka "pom-pom"), (Serial No. S6596).

  (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

 (Clive Prothero-Brooks Photo, left, Author Photo, right)

3-pounder QF Hotchkiss Gun Model 1898, Admiralty (Serial No. 1818), pedestal (Serial No. 4180).  This gun is on loan from the RCA Museum, CFB Shilo, Manitoba.

3-inch/50 QF Gun Mk. 32 on a twin gun mount, HMCS Algonquin, 21 Jan 1955.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3348210)

3-inch/50 QF Gun Mk. 32 on a twin gun mount, (Serial No, C16).

3-inch/50 QF Gun loading trainer.

3-inch/70 QF Gun on a Mk. 6 Mount from HMCS Terra Nova.

 

Oerlikon 20-mm/70 Light Anti-Aircraft Gun on HMS Hermione.  The naval gunner utilising the rubber shoulder rests for high-angle firing.  Note the Thornycroft depth charge thrower Mk. II and depth charge launching rail in the background.  (IWM Photo 4700-01)

Oerlikon 20-mm/70 Light Anti-Aircraft Gun manned on HMCS Prince David, off Kithera, Greece, 16 Sep 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3394410)

Oerlikon 20-mm/70 Light Anti-Aircraft Gun, (Serial No. 702), 1944.

Oerlikon 20-mm/70 Light Anti-Aircraft Gun, (Serial No. 2), 1942.

Oerlikon 20-mm/70 Light Anti-Aircraft Gun, Twin Gun Mk. 12 mount, No. 1 of 2, (Serial No. 4212), from HMCS Haida.

Oerlikon 20-mm/70 Light Anti-Aircraft Gun, Twin Gun Mk. 12 mount, No. 2 of 2, (Serial No. TBC), from HMCS Haida.

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun Mk N 1, Breech Casing (Serial No. L 31130).

3-inch Chaff NSN 1055-99-1726, (Serial No, 70/VKB/168).

Mk. MC10 “Limbo” Ahead Throwing Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) triple-barrelled Mortar, (Serial No. CL 100).

Canadian Lewis gunners shooting at German aircraft, July 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3521946), left, British Lewis gunners on the right.  (UK DoD Photo)

.303-inch Lewis Machine Gun, on loan from the PPCLI.

Canadian .303-inch Vickers Machine Gunners, Vimy Ridge, 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3241489).   

In the spring of 1918 each Canadian siege battery was issued two machine-guns to provide protection against enemy aircraft.

Vickers .303 MG manned by PPCLI soldiers training in England, 3 Dec 1942.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3238876)

Vickers .303-inch Machine Gun, on loan from the PPCLI.

Calgary, HMCS Tecumseh

 (Photos courtesy of Lucie Alaimo)

12-pounder 8-cwt QF Royal Navy Landing Gun (Serial No. 1034), 1899, weight 8-0-0 (896 lbs), mounted on a wood wheeled carriage (Serial No. 94), 1899, and Limber (Serial No. 9936).  Queen Victoria cypher.  The 2-pounder 8-cwt Naval Landing Gun was carried on ships of the British and Commonwealth navies for use by naval landing parties. This gun has a breech block for a 12-pounder 12-cwt NLG, (Serial No. 111), 1917.  Several of the photos of the breech screw seem to have “12-pr 12-cwt A & 8-cwt” on them.  This suggests that the breech screw was common to the two guns.  Both were ship’s guns and this would have simplified spare parts.  Apparently an upgrade was made in the QF breech mechanism a few years later, and new blocks were sent out from Britain.  The originals were likely returned to Woolwich or Elswick to be modified in turn and sent to another location.  (Nelson Lawry).  The Naval Landing Guns found in Canada probably originated on early ships of the Royal Canadian Navy, such as HMCS Niobe, HMCS Aurora, HMCS Rainbow and others.  There is also a possibility that the gun may have been left behind when the British garrisons left Canada in 1905-06.

USN 5-inch Gun Mk 38, Mod 6, (Serial No. 13256), NSN L9999-1941-44124, Carriage (Serial No. 7313), Training Gear (Serial No. 4399), from Gerald Bull’s HARP project in Suffield.  These guns have been specially modified by Gerald Bull for testing at Suffield.  They are also the same type of gun used on the Second World War RCN aircraft carriers HMCS Nabob and HMCS Puncher.

Calgary, RCAF Museum of Alberta

7.62-mm M134 Minigun six-barreled machine gun mounted on a fuselage section of a C-130 Hercules inside the museum in the RCAF Museum section.

CFB Cold Lake

 (DND Photo)

3.7-inch C Mk. 2/2 Anti-Aircraft Gun, (Serial No. unknown), standing at the corner of Kingsway and Medley Road at the edge of the base.

An Anti-Aircraft Gun wheel assembly is on base, possibly for the 3.7-inch C Mk. 2/2 AA Gun, likely from the Air Defence unit originally assigned to protect the airfield at CFB Cold Lake.

Didsbury

Replica Anti-Tank Gun mounted on a stone cairn War Memorial.

Edmonton, 20th Field Artillery Regiment, RCA

The 20th Field Artillery Regiment, RCA, is a Primary Reserve Royal Canadian Artillery (RCA) regiment of the 41 Canadian Brigade Group, composed of two batteries, the 61st Field Battery, RCA, based in Edmonton and 78th Field Battery, RCA, based in Red Deer, Alberta.

Edmonton

 (Anthony Sewards Photos)

155-mm M109 Self-propelled Howitzer, (Serial No. unknown), 25C, Royal Canadian Legion branch  No. 175, 14339 50th St NW, Edmonton.

155-mm M109 Self-propelled Howitzer, (Serial No. unknown), 15B, Lancaster Gold Park, Edmonton.

Bronze 3-pounder 3-cwt Smoothbore Gun, weight 3-0-4, (340 lbs), (Serial No. 452) on right trunnion, 1810, King George III cypher (1760-1820) and General John Pitt, 2nd Earl of Chatham, Master General of the Ordnance 1801–1806  and 1807–1810 cypher, mounted on a wood Naval gun carriage, No. 1 of 2, Provincial Museum of Alberta.

Cypher, General John Pitt, 2nd Earl of Chatham, Master General of the Ordnance 1801–1806  and 1807–1810.

Bronze 3-pounder 3-cwt Smoothbore Gun, weight, maker and Serial No. TBC, No. 2 of 2, details required.  Possibly on display in Fort Edmonton.

King George III and his cypher, reigned from 25 Oct 1760 to 29 Jan 1820.  (Wikipedia Photo)

CFB Edmonton, LFWA HQ

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 929), M.3706 Kp, carriage 2361. This gun was captured by the 49th Battalion (Edmonton Regiment), 7th Canadian Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) near Marquion, France on 27 September 1918.  No. 1 in front of LFWA HQ.

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 4945), carriage No. 8246.  This gun was also captured by the 49th Battalion (Edmonton Regiment), 7th Canadian Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) near Marquion, France on 27 September 1918.  No. 2 in front of LFWA HQ.

Edmonton

155-mm C1 (M1A2) Medium Howitzer, aka M114, manufactured at Sorel Industries Limited in Quebec, Queen Elizabeth II cypher.  LCol Philip L. Debney Armoury, 8402 Roper Road

CFB Edmonton, 1 CMBG

Bronze 3-pounder 3-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, 1809, inscription LXXVIIIM (1076), inside wreath with crown, I.H.  King 1809, “Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense”, GR under crown, mounted on a wood wheeled gun carriage.  Property of the Canadian Military Engineers Museum, acquired 1964.  Edmonton Garrison.

Bronze 3-pounder 3-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, 1812, inscription CCCLVIM (1354), inside wreath with crown, I.H.  King 1812, “Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense”, GR under crown, mounted on a wood wheeled gun carriage.  Property of the Canadian Military Engineers Museum, acquired 1964.

155-mm C1 (M1A2) Medium Howitzer, aka M114, depending on whether the gun was manufactured at Sorel or in the US, to be established when the serial number is confirmed.  On loan from the RCA Museum, CFB Shilo, Manitoba.

155-mm C1 (M1A2) Medium Howitzer, aka M114, depending on whether the gun was manufactured at Sorel or in the US, to be established when the serial number is confirmed.  1 CMBG HQ, No. 1 in front of the HQ.

155-mm C1 (M1A2) Medium Howitzer, aka M114, depending on whether the gun was manufactured at Sorel or in the US, to be established when the serial number is confirmed.  1 CMBG HQ, No. 2 in front of the HQ.

155-mm M109 Self-propelled Howitzer, (Serial No. 34813), 1968, AC: MD, ECC: 119204 HUI C: 1941, SAUI C: 1941, VMO No. DLE21343, VMO Date: 10 Jun 2005.  Churchill Park South of the Officer’s Mess, Edmonton Garrison.

The 155-mm M109 self-propelled medium howitzers were highly mobile artillery weapons. The M109 had a crew of six, consisting of detachment commander, gunner, three ammunition members and the driver. The hull was made of all-welded aluminium armour. The driver had a single-piece hatch cover that opened to the left, with three M45 periscopes in front that could be covered by small metal flaps to prevent damage. The commander was seated on the right side of the turret and had a cupola that could be traversed through 360°, a single-piece hatch cover that opens to the rear and an M27 periscope. Pintle mounted on the forward part of the commander’s cupola was a 12.7 mm (0.50) machine gun for use in local defence. Mounted at the rear of the hull, each side of the hull door, is a large spade which is lowered manually to the ground before firing. 

The M109 was fitted with night vision equipment for night moves. The upgrade to A4 included a Nuclear, Biological, Chemical (NBC) defence system. It could ford to a depth of 1.828 m without preparation and could be fitted with an amphibious kit consisting of nine air bags, four each side of the hull and one at the front. The bags, which are not carried on the vehicle as part of its normal equipment, are inflated from the vehicle and it can then propel itself across rivers by its tracks at 6.43 km/h.  The initial M109 was equipped with a short barrel, double baffle muzzle brake, large fume extractor, and a maximum range of 14,600m. The M109A2/A3/A4 howitzers used an extended M185 barrel and achieved a range of 23,500 meters.

105-mm L5 Pack Howitzer, (Reg. No. 057658), in front of the Officer’s Mess, Edmonton Garrison.  This gun is on loan from the RCA Museum, CFB Shilo, Manitoba.

German Second World War 10.5-cm LeFH 18/40 Howitzer being examined by Canadian soldiers in France, ca June 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4233166), left and (MIKAN No. 4233112), right. 

German Second World War 10.5-cm LeFH 18/40 Howitzer, Barrel (Serial Nr. R351) Fl 905, dxk, Breech Block (Serial Nr. Fl 539) mrf, SB dxk, Trail (Serial Nor Fl 697) bwl, Memorial Park South of the Officer’s Mess, Edmonton Garrison.

75-mm M20 Recoiless Rifle, PPCLI HQ, CFB Edmonton, Alberta.

 

105-mm M40 Recoilless Rifle mounted on a jeep, back in the day.  The soldier kneeling on the left is armed with a 7.62-mm FNC2 and the Corporal on the right is armed with a 9-mm Sterling SMG.  (Library & Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4235712)

Russian 12.7-mm NSV Heavy Machine Gun on an Anti-Aircraft mount, PPCLI HQ, CFB Edmonton, Alberta.

Edmonton, HMCS Nonsuch

US Navy 5-inch Gun Mk 37 Mod 2, (Serial No. 538) from Gerald Bull’s HARP project in Suffield.  These guns have been specially modified by Gerald Bull for testing at Suffield.  They are also the same type of gun that was on the Second World War Aircraft Carriers HMCS Nabob and HMCS Puncher in the RCN.  The gun stands in the Northwest corner inside the security fence facing the Municipal Airport.

Fort Macleod

9-pounder 8-cwt Muzzleloading Rifles operated by the NWMP Artillery Detachment, D & H Divisions with Fort MacLeod, Alberta, 17 Dec 1890.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3574417)

 (Photo courtesy of Maxwell Toms)

Cast Iron 1-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight, maker and Serial No. unknown, mounted on a wood wheeled wood gun carriage.

 (Photos courtesy of Maxwell Toms)

Bronze 7-pounder 2-cwt Mk. II Rifled Muzzleloader Gun (painted black), mounted on a field carriage.

Fort McMurray

British FV433 Abbot 105-mm Self-Propelled Gun, Royal Canadian Legion, Branch No. 165.

M113 C & R Lynx, Royal Canadian Legion, Branch No. 165, 9317 Huggard Street.

Fort McMurray, Jack Cross Collection

British Chieftain Main Battle Tank, 120-mm Gun.

British FV432 Armoured Personnel Carrier.

British FV433 Abbot 105mm SP Gun.

British FV603 Saracen Armoured Personnel Carrier.

British FV 620 Stalwart Amphibious Truck.

Fort Saskatchewan

 (Internet Photo)

German Great War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 1251), captured by a Canadian Battalion within an Infantry Brigade, in the 2nd Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF).  This gun stands beside the Royal Canadian Legion, Branch 9964 93rd Ave.

M113 C & R Lynx, standing behind the Royal Canadian Legion, Branch, 9964 93rd Ave

Frank

   (Ian McKenzie Photos)

German First World War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 98/09 (10.5-cm leFH 98/09) Light Field Howitzer, (Serial Nr. 3392), no data, 1916.  This gun is part of a War Memorial located on the Crowsnest Highway, Route 3, Alberta, a few miles east of the divide in the small community of Frank.  The gun is flanked by two German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG08 Machineguns.

 (Photo courtesy of Ian McKenzie)

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 Machineguns, the mounts are original, but the real machineguns were stolen in the 1970s, these are replicas.  The missing MGs were (Serial Nr. 5203) captured by the 2nd Canadian Division and (Serial Nr. 5307) captured by the 27th Battalion at Passchendaele, or (Serial Nr. 44996) (no data).

Missing War Trophy Guns

There are a number of guns known to have been on display in Canada until recently, that appear to have been moved to another location or otherwise lost.  These include two that were on display at High Prairie.  Any information on their present location would be welcome.

High Prairie

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02) Heavy Field Howitzer, (Serial Nr. 223), unconfirmed.  Captured by the 3rd Battalion at Vimy on 9 April 1917; or possibly (Serial Nr. 512) captured by the 31st Battalion.  Both guns were originally allocated to Edmonton.  This gun was located in a park beside the Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 37, 4721, 51st Ave.  The Legion President advises these guns are no longer there, present location unknown.

Russian SBML possible 36-pounder (TBC) Gun from the Crimean War era.  This gun is missing its carriage, and was mounted on concrete blocks.  This gun was located in a park beside the Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 37, 4721, 51st Ave.  The Legion President advises these guns are no longer there, present location unknown.

There are unique weights and numbers for the 18 Russian iron guns from the Crimean War presently known to be on display in Canada.  The unit of weight of the gun’s design all up weight is the Russian pood, about 36 lbs. (To gunners, the ‘gun’ is the barrel, not the carriage.)  Shown as P, or the Cyrillic/Greek for ‘pi’.  The unit of weight of the shot is the English pound from the Western influence on the Russian court, as they strove to get their artillery up to standard. T he figure is followed by a squiggle which is a stylised lb.  .  The guns were cast in chronological order, with (Serial No. 551) from 1807 on a mortar in Dublin, Ireland being the earliest known survivor.  The Alexandrovski factory where the gun was made is abbreviated to ALXDVK or in Cyrillic, and the gun may be stamped “Závod” or ZAV or ZVD (also in Cyrillic letters which may appear as “3aB”).  The designer, Nachimatel, abbrev ‘nach’ (in Cyrillic it looks like HaY) is also shown, and for two of the guns in Kingston, Ontario, Foullon is marked on them with a Russian ? (F), similar to the Greek phi, familiar to classic scholars and mathematicians.  The designer of the Russian guns was named Armstrong, not the British one most often mentioned here, but an early Scot at the Tsar’s court.  The figure is followed by ‘God’, year, or ‘G’.   Major Colin Robins OBE FRHistS, Editor Emeritus, 'The War Correspondent', Journal of the Crimean War Research Society, e-mail 8 Jan 2013.

Lethbridge

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16) Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 12706), M.495, S.3588 no data.  Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 4, 324 Mayor McGrath Drive South.

 (Photos courtesy of Kevin McLean)

German First World War 10-cm Kanone 17 (10-cm K 17) Field Gun, (Serial Nr. 160), Spandau, 1909, 1346 kg.m.V., missing its carriage.  This gun was captured by the 50th Battalion (Calgary), 10th Canadian Infantry Brigade, 4th Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF)  near the Marquion-Cambrai road Northwest of Raillencourt, France on 28 September 1918.  This gun stands at the east end of Henderson Lake on Oakside Dr S in Lethbridge.

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02), captured by Canadians, Arras, France, Sep 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397947)

 (Photo courtesy of Kevin McLean)

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02), (Serial Nr. 1101), no data.  This gun also stands at the east end of Henderson Lake on Oakside Dr S in Lethbridge.

The 15 cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15 cm sFH 02) was a German heavy field howitzer introduced in 1903.  It was the first artillery piece to use a modern recoil system in the German Army. Some 416 were in service at the beginning of the war.  Its mobility, which allowed it to be deployed as medium artillery, and fairly heavy shell gave the German army a firepower advantage in the early battles in Belgium and France in 1914 as the French and British armies lacked an equivalent. 

20th Independent Field Battery, RCA (Lethbridge)

9-pounder 8-cwt Muzzleloading Rifle, weight 8-?-? (>896 lbs), No. 1, mounted on a wheeled carriage, inside the Vimy Ridge Armoury, 337 Stubb Ross Road.

9-pounder 8-cwt Muzzleloading Rifle, weight 8-?-? (>896 lbs), No. 2, mounted on a wheeled carriage, inside the Vimy Ridge Armoury, 337 Stubb Ross Road.

25-pounder Field Gun with Limber, Vimy Ridge Armoury.

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun manned by 1st Canadian Division gunners.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4233963)

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun.

Lougheed

 (DHH Photo)

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 Machinegun (Serial Nr. unknown), No. 1 of 2, mounted on a Schlitten stand beside the Soldier's Memorial.  Lougheed was allocated four MGs in 1919, (Serial Nrs. 2315, 3227, 7520 and 9393).

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 Machinegun (Serial Nr. unknown), No. 2 of 2, mounted on a Schlitten stand beside the cenotaph.

Mannville

 (Streetview Photo)

 (Terry W. Honour Photos)

American 90-mm M1A2 Anti-Aircraft Gun (Serial No. 3465), 50th Street and 50th Ave.

Peace River

 (Photos courtesy of Laura Gloor)

German First World War 7.7cm Infanteriegeschütze L/27 (7.7-cm IG L/27), (Infantry Gun), (Serial Nr. 9366), no data, mounted on an iron wheeled carriage.  This gun stands beside the Memorial Cairn.

The 7.7cm IG (Infanteriegeschutz) L/27 was Krupp's third attempt at building an infantry support gun which could closely follow the infantry in attack and provide close support and anti-tank fire in defence.  The gun was extensively modified compared to the standard field gun.  From observation some of the changes are: 1. the wheel diameter was reduced to about 1m.  2. the wheel track was reduced by about 30cm.  3. the axle was moved back about 30cm.  4. no axle tree seats were fitted.  5. the gun shield was designed so it could be removed easily and was narrower.  6. the cover over the recuperator spring adjuster was enlarged and hinged (the barrel could be removed by unlocking the spur under the barrel from the recoil assembly).  7. the gunner's and loader's seat brackets were a different design so they could be quickly removed.  8. there are brackets at the end of trail which originally held a counterweight required because the gun unbalanced because the axle had been moved back.  9. the spade is a different profile (TBC).  Charlie Clelland.

Provost

25-pounder Field Gun, No. 1 of 2, placed beside  the Royal Canadian Legion, Royal Canadian Legion, 5024-48th Street.

25-pounder Field Gun, No. 2 of 2, placed beside  the Royal Canadian Legion.

Redcliffe

 (Photos courtesy of Clive Prothero-Brooks)

German First World War 10.5-cm leichtes Feldhaubitze 16 (10.5-cm leFH 16), (Serial Nr. 12626).  This gun was captured by the 31st Battalion (Alberta), 6th Canadian Infantry Brigade, 2nd Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF).  The gun is located beside the Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 6 at 302 Broadway St E.

Red Deer, 20th Field Artillery Regiment, RCA, 78th Field Battery, Cormack Armoury

 (Photos courtesy of Maxwell Toms)

25-pounder Field Gun, mounted in front of the Cormack Armoury, 4402 55 St.  Home to 78 Field Battery, 20 Field Regiment, RCA.

Red Deer

155-mm C1 (M1A2) Medium Howitzer, aka M114, manufactured by Sorel Industries Limited, Quebec.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4235871)

 (Photos courtesy of Maxwell Toms)

155-mm C1 (M1A2) Medium Howitzer, aka M114, manufactured at Sorel Industries Limited in Quebec, Queen Elizabeth II cypher.  CFR 34445.  The carriage plate reads: CARR. HOW. 155MM M1A2 CDN. SOREL INDUSTRIES LTD. CANADA (year TBC). REG. NO. CDN 159, INSP (symbol).  Korea Veterans Unit No. 67, Royal Canadian Legion, Branch No. 35, 2810 Bremner Ave.

20-pounder gun barrel from a Centurion Main Battle Tank mounted on a concrete stand with a NATO plaque.

Sangudo

American 90-mm M1A1 Anti-Aircraft (Serial No. 2879).  This gun was obtained in 1967 from the West Coast  Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 123, cenotaph on 50th Street.

Sedgewick

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 Machinegun (Serial Nr. 846).  This gun was captured by the 10th Battalion (Canadians), 1st Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) on 2 Sep 1918 at Villers-lez-Cagnicourt, France.

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 Machinegun (Serial Nr. unknown).

Stavely

 (Photo courtesy of Clayton Gillespie)

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), (Serial Nr. 1972).  This trench mortar was captured by the 46th Battalion (South Saskatchewan), 10th Canadian Infantry Brigade, 4th Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) at Vimy Ridge on 9 April 1917.

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 Machinegun (Serial Nr. unknown).

Taber

(Photo courtesy of Sgt Ed Martin, Sgt at Arms, RCL Branch 20)

 (Photos courtesy of Kerry Van Ham)

German First World War 7.7cm Infanteriegeschütze L/27 (7.7-cm IG L/27), (Infantry Gun), (Serial Nr. 9383), no data.  This gun stands beside the town cenotaph, opposite the Royal Hotel. 

The 7.7cm IG (Infanteriegeschutz) L/27 was Krupp's third attempt at building an infantry support gun which could closely follow the infantry in attack and provide close support and anti-tank fire in defence.  The gun was extensively modified compared to the standard field gun.  From observation some of the changes are: 1. the wheel diameter was reduced to about 1m.  2. the wheel track was reduced by about 30cm.  3. the axle was moved back about 30cm.  4. no axle tree seats were fitted.  5. the gun shield was designed so it could be removed easily and was narrower.  6. the cover over the recuperator spring adjuster was enlarged and hinged (the barrel could be removed by unlocking the spur under the barrel from the recoil assembly).  7. the gunner's and loader's seat brackets were a different design so they could be quickly removed.  8. there are brackets at the end of trail which originally held a counterweight required because the gun unbalanced because the axle had been moved back.  9. the spade is a different profile (TBC).  Charlie Clelland.

 (Photos courtesy of Sgt Ed Martin, Sgt at Arms, RCL Branch 20)

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 Machinegun, No. 1 of 2, (Serial Nr. 21584), DWM 1917, no data  Stands beside the town cenotaph, near the Royal Canadian Legion, Branch No. 20.

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 Machinegun, No. 2 of 2, (Serial Nr. 42354), DWM 1918, no data.  Stands beside the town cenotaph, near the Royal Canadian Legion, Branch No. 20.

Thorhild

 (Streetview Photos)

25-pounder Field Gun at the cenotaph, corner of 2nd St and 6th Ave. 

Two Hills

 (Streetview Photo)

155-mm C1 (M1A2) Medium Howitzer, aka M114, depending on whether the gun was manufactured at Sorel or in the US, to be established when the serial number is confirmed.  This gun is located behind the cenotaph at 50th Ave and 50th St.

Vauxhall

25-pounder Field Gun in front of the Royal Canadian Legion, 217 5th St. N.

Vermilion

 (Photo courtesy of Terry Honour)

German First World War 7.7-cm Infantriegeshutz L/27 (7.7-cm IG L/27), (Serial Nr. 9406), no data, beside Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 11 at 5144 Railway Ave.

Wainright, CFB Wainwright

18-pounder QF Mk. II Field Guns upgraded with pneumatic tires, being fired by Canadian Reserve Artillery Gunners.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4232665), left and (MIKAN No. 4232664), right.

     (WO Chris Damjanoff Photos)

18-pounder QF Mk. II Field Guns upgraded with pneumatic tires, Reg. No. 9121, WBC 18 II, C871, RMC Arty Dept Kingston, 1933.  This gun is a presentation piece that was used by the Royal Artillery and presented to the Canadian Army in 1945.  It was mounted in Wainwright in August 1981 by One Troop, 9 Para Squadron during Exercise Pond Jump West III.

25-pounder Field Gun, placed on the ring road circling the ranges between 1978 and 1983.  On loan from the RCA Museum, CFB Shilo, Manitoba.