Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Artillery preserved in Canada 2: Alberta, Calgary

Artillery preserved in the province of Alberta,

Calgary

Data current to 21 Dec 2018.

The aim of this website is to locate, identify and document every historical piece of artillery preserved in Canada.  Many contributors have assisted in the hunt for these guns to provide and update the data found on these web pages.  Photos are by the author unless otherwise credited.  Any errors found here are by the author, and any additions, corrections or amendments to this list of Guns and Artillery in Canada would be most welcome and may be e-mailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com.

For all official data concerning the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, please click on the link to their website:

Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery Website

Note: Back in the day, artillery in Canada was referred to by its radio call sign "Sheldrake".  It is now referred to by its "Golf" call sign.  (Acorn sends)

Calgary, Artillery

Cast Iron ½-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight and maker unknown, mounted on a wood gun carriage, Hudson's Bay Fort.

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/15.

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun manned by British gunners, Russi, Italy, 18 February 1945.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3240422)

 (Wildwoodke Photo)

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun, Crown Surplus. 

5.5-inch Breechloading Mk. III Gun on a Mk. I Carriage, Veteran’s section, Queen’s Park Cemetery, North on 14th Street, West of Calgary Airport.  Canada made carriages for these guns during the Second World War, and after the war acquired 85 of them for the RCA.  The gun fired a 45.5-kg (100-pound) shell to a range of 14,800 metres (16,200 yards).

 

Canadian Signaller receiving the order to fire a 5.5-inch Breechloading Mk. III Gun of a Medium Regiment of the Royal Canadian Artillery (R.C.A.) south of Vaucelles, France.  The photograph also shows a stack of shells for the gun.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3396144)

Calgary, The Military Museums of Calgary, 4520 Crowchild Trail SW.

 (Terry Honour Photo)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 1571), originally allocated to the town of Gleichen.

2-pounder QF Mk. X Anti-Tank Gun, inside the main museum building in the PPCLI Museum section.

The 2-pounder QF Mk. X AT Gun in Canada was mounted on Mark 4 and 4A carriages.  These were split-trail 6-pounder anti-tank gun carriages, with the cradle, slipper, and recoil system adapted to mount the 2-pounder.  This allowed the 6-pounder carriage to get into production, while still using the 2-pounder gun.  Both Canadian General Electric and Regina Industries, Ltd, manufactured these carriages in Canada, and they were issued to training centres in Canada starting in December 1941.  The 5th Anti-tank Regiment, RCA, received 2-pounders on Mark 4 carriages in April 1942.  British production of the 6-pounder was delayed after Dunkirk because they had to keep the 2-pounder in production, so Canadain production was up and running first (by a month or so).  Canadians went straight to the 6-pounder carriage and adapted the 2-pounder to it as a temporary fix.  Doug Knight.
6-pounder 7-cwt Towed Anti-Tank Gun being cleaned by Rifleman W.C. McMillan and Lance-Sergeant J.L. Retty of the Royal Winnipeg Rifles Anti-Tank Platoon, Ijzendijke, Netherlands, 21 October 1944. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3199976)

6-pounder 7-cwt QF Anti-Tank Gun (Reg. No. 61).

 

17-pounder QF Towed Anti-Tank gun of the 57th Battery, 1st Anti-Tank Regiment, RCA near Campobasso, Italy, 25 October 1943.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3599876)

German Jagdpanther 8.8-cm SP gun put out of action by a 17-pounder QF Towed Anti-Tank Gun crewed by gunners with the 6th Anti-Tank Regiment, RCA, being examined by Private W.G. Lourie, Reichswald, Germany, 16 March 1945.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3203401)

17-pounder QF Towed Anti-Tank Gun.  The RCA held 138 of these guns.

Calgary, Naval Museum of Alberta

34-ton heavy Naval Twin Gun Mount minus the guns.

QF 4-inch Gun being loaded with a shell on an RCN warship, ca 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3598672)

Sailors setting shell fuses on board HMCS Uganda, 23 Jun 1945.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3624562)

HMCS Uganda bombarding Sukuma Airfield on Miyako Jima, 4 May 1945.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3191651)

 (Maxwell Toms Photos)

(Author Photo)

4-inch/45 QF Mk. XVI* Twin Guns (Serial No. S/14541), M, P, L, left, and (Serial No. S/14538) M, P, L right, on a Mk. XIX High Angle mounting, S.I.L. 1944, No. 541.   In July 1945, (Serial No. S/14538) was mounted on HMCS Micmac and (Serial No. S/14541) was at SNAD Dartmouth.

4-inch QF Mk. V Naval Gun firing, HMCS Sherbrooke, June 1945.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo,  MIKAN No. 3455882)

4-inch/40 QF Mk. XXI Gun, in a High Angle Mk. XXIV Single Gun Mounting, CAN 40, Cradle (Serial No. Can 39).

2-pounder QF Mk. 1, V.S.M. (Vickers, Sons & Maxim LL) Automatic Gun, (aka "pom-pom"), being fired on HMCS Assiniboine, 10 July 1940.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3566440)

2-pounder QF Mk. VII, V.S.M. (Vickers, Sons & Maxim LL) Automatic Gun, (aka "pom-pom"), (Serial No. S6596).

  (Clive Prothero-Brooks Photos)

 (Author Photo)

3-pounder QF Hotchkiss Gun Model 1898, Admiralty (Serial No. 1818), pedestal (Serial No. 4180).  This gun is on loan from the RCA Museum, CFB Shilo, Manitoba.

12-pounder 12-cwt QF Mk. V (3-inch-40) Breechloading Naval Gun with shield and stand.

3-inch/50 QF Gun Mk. 32 on a twin gun mount, HMCS Algonquin, 21 Jan 1955.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3348210)

3-inch/50 QF Gun Mk. 32 on a twin gun mount, (Serial No, C16).

3-inch/50 QF Gun loading trainer.

3-inch/70 QF Gun on a Mk. 6 Mount from HMCS Terra Nova.

 

Oerlikon 20-mm/70 Light Anti-Aircraft Gun on HMS Hermione.  The naval gunner utilising the rubber shoulder rests for high-angle firing.  Note the Thornycroft depth charge thrower Mk. II and depth charge launching rail in the background.  (IWM Photo 4700-01)

Oerlikon 20-mm/70 Light Anti-Aircraft Gun manned on HMCS Prince David, off Kithera, Greece, 16 Sep 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3394410)

Oerlikon 20-mm/70 Light Anti-Aircraft Gun, (Serial No. 702), 1944.

Oerlikon 20-mm/70 Light Anti-Aircraft Gun, (Serial No. 2), 1942.

Oerlikon 20-mm/70 Light Anti-Aircraft Gun, Twin Gun Mk. 12 mount, No. 1 of 2, (Serial No. 4212), from HMCS Haida.

Oerlikon 20-mm/70 Light Anti-Aircraft Gun, Twin Gun Mk. 12 mount, No. 2 of 2, (Serial No. TBC), from HMCS Haida.

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun Mk N 1, Breech Casing (Serial No. L 31130).

3-inch Chaff NSN 1055-99-1726, (Serial No, 70/VKB/168).

Mk. MC10 “Limbo” Ahead Throwing Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) triple-barrelled Mortar, (Serial No. CL 100).

Canadian Lewis gunners shooting at German aircraft, July 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3521946)

.303-inch Lewis Machine Gun, on loan from the PPCLI.

Canadian .303-inch Vickers Machine Gunners, Vimy Ridge, 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3241489).   

In the spring of 1918 each Canadian siege battery was issued two machine-guns to provide protection against enemy aircraft.

Vickers .303 MG manned by PPCLI soldiers training in England, 3 Dec 1942.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3238876)

Vickers .303-inch Machine Gun, on loan from the PPCLI.

Calgary, HMCS Tecumseh

 (Lucie Alaimo Photos)

 (Lucie Alaimo Photos)

 (Kenneth Laing Photo)

12-pounder 8-cwt QF Naval Landing Gun, weight 8-0-0 (896 lbs), Gun Serial No. 1034, dated 1899, Breech Block Serial No. 4532 stamped out, new No. 1034, dated 1917, Carriage weight 6-cwt, Admiralty No. 94, 1899,  with Limber.  Queen Victoria cypher.  The 12-pounder 8-cwt QF NLG, was carried on ships of the British and Commonwealth navies for use by naval landing parties. This gun has a breech block for a 12-pounder 12-cwt NLG, (Serial No. 111), 1917.  Several of the photos of the breech screw seem to have “12-pr 12-cwt A & 8-cwt” on them.  This suggests that the breech screw was common to the two guns.  Both were ship’s guns and this would have simplified spare parts.  Apparently an upgrade was made in the QF breech mechanism a few years later, and new blocks were sent out from Britain.  The originals were likely returned to Woolwich or Elswick to be modified in turn and sent to another location.  (Nelson Lawry).  The Naval Landing Guns found in Canada probably originated on early ships of the Royal Canadian Navy, such as HMCS Niobe, HMCS Aurora, HMCS Rainbow and others.  There is also a possibility that the gun may have been left behind when the British garrisons left Canada in 1905-06.

USN 5-inch Gun Mk 38, Mod 6, (Serial No. 13256), NSN L9999-1941-44124, Carriage (Serial No. 7313), Training Gear (Serial No. 4399), from Gerald Bull’s HARP project in Suffield.  These guns have been specially modified by Gerald Bull for testing at Suffield.  They are also the same type of gun used on the Second World War RCN aircraft carriers HMCS Nabob and HMCS Puncher.

Calgary, RCAF Museum of Alberta

7.62-mm M134 Minigun six-barreled machine gun mounted on a fuselage section of a C-130 Hercules inside the museum in the RCAF Museum section.