Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Artillery preserved in Canada, 10: Newfoundland & Labrador

Artillery preserved in the province of Newfoundland & Labrador

For all official data concerning the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, please click on the link to their website:

Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery Website

The aim of this website is to locate, identify and document every historical piece of artillery preserved in Canada.  Many contributors have assisted in the hunt for these guns to provide and update the data found on these web pages.  Photos are by the author unless otherwise credited.  Any errors found here are by the author, and any additions, corrections or amendments to this list of Guns and Artillery in Canada would be most welcome and may be e-mailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com.

Data current to 5 Oct 2017.

Note: Back in the day, artillery in Canada was referred to by its radio call sign "Sheldrake".  It is now referred to by its "Golf" call sign.  (Acorn)

12-inch Mk. IV Howitzer manned by members of the Newfoundland Heavy Artillery Regiments in England in 1942.  The tray on the right conveys the 750lb shells into the breech, as they are too heavy to be man-handled. They are raised into place by a crane.  The cycinder driving the power rammer, introduced with the Mk II carriage, is visible on the right of the recoil cylinder above the barrel.  (UK Ministry of Information Photo Division, Photo D 8888, Imperial War Museum Collection No. 4700-27)

BL 9.2-inch Mk. II howitzers of the 57th (Newfoundland) Heavy Regiment, Royal Artillery, with Sir Winston Churchill during a tour of England's East Coast defences in 1940.  (Imperial War Museum Photo H2838, Wikipedia)

The 57th (Newfoundland) Heavy Regiment was based as Sussex in Southeast England under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel H.G. De Burgh.  Divided into four Batteries (A, B, C, and D), this unit received six BL 9.2-inch Mk. II Howitzers on 5 June 1940.  Resembling large mortars, each of these massive guns could fire 130-kilogram shells across a maximum distance of 9 kilometres.  A, B, and C Batteries took two howitzers each, and by mid-June, D Battery had received two six-inch guns, which fired 45-kilogram shells over a 17-kilometre range.

On 15 November 1941, the 57th (Newfoundland) Heavy Regiment became the 166th (Newfoundland) Field Regiment equipped with 25-pounder C Mk. 2 QF Field Guns.  In late February 1943, this unit had joined hostilities in Tunisia, where 24 Newfoundlanders were killed in action.  The 166th joined the campaign in Italy in October 1943 and remained in there until the summer of 1945.

Shortly after the 166th (then 57th) Regiment departed Sussex in the summer of 1940, the RA formed the 59th (Newfoundland) Heavy Regiment,  In July 1944 the 59th departed England for France to take part in the Battle of Normandy, where it fought using .7.2-inch howitzers and 155-millimetre guns against German forces.  The 59th (Newfoundland) Heavy Regiment officially disbanded in August 1945, and the 166th followed suit in October.

Disposition of First World War Trophies in Newfoundland.

Following the Armistice in November 1918, individual Canadian soldiers and Canadian units began planning to send some type of war trophy back to Canada.  In most cases the “trophy” being considered was a weapon captured on the battlefield.  The Newfoundland Contingent would have had a similar interest in preserving a number of war trophies and likely had a representative in London who would have requested an allocation of a reasonable number of guns and other items for return to and preservation in Newfoundland.  To decide what to bring back, the following had to be considered:  Only trophies which were of a durable nature should be distributed to municipalities, public institutions, and military units; and, War trophies were the exclusive property of the Crown, and the receiving institution was responsible for keeping them in good repair and had no authority to dispose of them. 
In 1920, the High Commissioner for Newfoundland went to England to petition for war trophies, and there's a detailed list in those papers, (Report of Disposition of War Trophies to Newfoundland, 19 Feb 1921), of the exact guns and ordinance granted to the country.  There are accounts of these war trophies initially being left to languish in the elements until they were finally disbursed to communities.  The people in St.John's reportedly complained about their neglect until the distributions began to take place.  The trophies available were likely distributed based on the wartime enlistments in the Royal Newfoundland Regiment and the various land, sea and air services of the British forces.
The list of War Trophies (focused here on the artillery) allocated and distributed throughout Newfoundland included the following kit:

Report of Disposition of War Trophies to Newfoundland, 19 Feb 1921

Article                                                             Sent to                        Date                 Status

1 Light German Field Gun (7.7-cm FK96)     Grand Falls                 31 Dec 1920    unknown

1 Light German Field Gun (7.7-cm FK96)     Trinity                         31 Dec 1920    Preserved

1 Light German Field Gun (7.7-cm FK96)     Bonavista                    31 Dec 1920    Preserved

1 Light German Field Gun (7.7-cm FK96)     Placentia                      31 Dec 1920    Preserved

1 Heavy Trench Mortar on Carriage               Heart’s Content          14 Jan 1921     unknown

1 Heavy Trench Mortar on Carriage (17-cm mMW)  Catalina           14 Jan 1921     Preserved

1 Heavy Trench Mortar on Carriage               Harbor Grace              14 Jan 1921     unknown

(This may be the 24-cm sMW preserved at Stephenville Crossing)

1 Heavy Trench Mortar on Carriage (7.58-cm leMW) Bay Roberts   14 Jan 1921     Preserved

1 Heavy Trench Mortar on Carriage (7.58-cm leMW) St. Georges    14 Jan 1921     Preserved

1 Heavy Trench Mortar on Carriage (17-cm mMW)  Harbor Breton 14 Jan 1921     Preserved

1 Heavy Trench Mortar on Carriage (17-cm mMW)  Botwood         14 Jan 1921     Preserved

2 Heavy German Howitzers (15 cm sFH 13) Colonial Building, St. Johns 30 Dec 1920

(One of these two large guns is preserved in front of the Legion, the other has been lost)

1 Heavy German Field Gun (10-cm K17) Bannerman Park, St. Johns 30 Dec 1920 Preserved

1 Heavy German Field Gun (10-cm K17) Victoria Park, St. Johns   30 Dec 1920    Preserved

1 British Whippet Tank, sent to the Dept of Public Works, St. Johns 30 Dec 1920   unknown

34 German Machine Guns in storage.

28 German Granatenwerfer Trench Mortars in storage

1 German Light Trench Mortar on bed in storage

(One German 7.58-cm leMW is preserved at Carbonear)

10 German Light Trench Mortars on carriage in storage

7 German Heavy Trench Mortars on bed in storage

2 German Heavy Trench Mortars on carriage in storage

2 German Heavy Trench Mortars on Carriage in storage

(One German 24-cm Flügelminenwerfer is preserved at Greenspond)

There was also a German Zeppelin Frame, Engine and Gondola in storage

The War Trophies on display throughout Newfoundland may have come from a number of great parks set aside by the British for the assembly of captured enemy equipment.  They would most likely have been captured on the battlefields of France late in 1918, during the advances of the "Hundred Days Offensive" which the Royal Newfoundland Regiment took part in, and in which Thomas Ricketts  became the youngest soldier of the war to win the Victoria Cross.
Communities with a few enlistments may have received a German 7.62-mm machinegun (MG08 or MG08/15), or a light trench mortar (7.58-cm leMWs went to Bay Roberts and St. Georges for example).  Larger numbers of enlistments meant a bigger trophy was allocated, (heavy 17-cm mMW trench mortars went to Botwood and Catalina).  Stephenville, a larger community, currently has a 25-cm heavy trench mortar which may have been allocated to another community such as Harbor Grace.  The larger communities received field guns, such as the four 7.7-cm FK 96s that went to Bonavista, Grand Falls, Placentia and Trinity.  St Johns received the lion's share of big guns with two 10-cm K17 field guns and two 15-cm sFH howitzers (one of which was fairly recently buried in a landfill).  Clearly there was a great deal of respect for these trophies which often served as community war memorials, as nearly all the major guns appear to have survived.  
Confirmation of the status of the guns not listed here would be most welcome. 

Newfoundland and Labrador

Argentia, Fort McAndrew

 (Photos courtesy of Tom OKeefe)

6-inch Gun Model M1903, (Serial No. 8), Gun Battery 282 Emplacement, Shielded Barbette (SBC) M1 No. 44, Erie, manufactured by Watervliet.  Located on Hill 195 on the south side of town.

(Photos courtesy of Tom OKeefe)

6-inch Gun Model M1903, (Serial No. 13), Gun Battery 282 Emplacement, Shielded Barbette (SBC) M1 No. 45, Erie, manufactured by Watervliet.

Batteries 281 and 282 were reinforced concrete, earth covered coastal batteries that were built in Fort McAndrew.  Their purpose was to provide protection of the Argentia Naval Air Station from enemy ship and U-boat attacks.  Although they were never used against an enemy vessel, they serve as a reminder of the fear that the Americans had that an attack on the Air Base was plausible.

Bay Bulls

 (Terry Honour Photos)

Cast Iron possible 9-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown, no visible markings, broken right trunnion, No. 1 of 4 guns mounted upright on a concrete base as part of the front gate to the Roman Catholic Church.  A religious figure/statue with the head missing is set on top. 

Cast Iron Blomefield 18-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown, The Carron Company of Falkirk, Scotland (Serial No. possibly 60051, CARRON, 1805) on left trunnion, (18P) on right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, No. 2 of 4 guns mounted upright on a concrete base as part of the front gate to the Roman Catholic Church, with a religious figure/statue set on top. 

Cast Iron Blomefield 18-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown, The Carron Company of Falkirk, Scotland (Serial No. unknown, CARRON, 1805) on left trunnion, (18P) on right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, No. 3 of 4 guns mounted upright on a concrete base as part of the front gate to the Roman Catholic Church, with a religious figure/statue set on top.

Cast Iron possible 9-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown, no visible markings, broken left trunnion, No. 4 of 4 guns mounted upright on a concrete base as part of the front gate to the Roman Catholic Church.  A religious figure/statue is set on top.

Cast Iron 9-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 29-3-1 (3,333 lbs), (Serial No. 589), King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, half buried in the ground.  Discovered buried during road work in the 1970s.  Gun Hill.

Bay Roberts

(Maxwell J. Toms Photo)

 (Terry Honour Photos)

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), medium trench mortar (Serial Nr. unknown).

Bell Island

4.7-inch QF Mk. IV* "Star" Gun, (Serial No. 1173), No. 1 of 2, on a Central Pivot Mount Mk I.  (DND Photo)

4.7-inch QF Mk. IV* "Star" Gun, (Serial No. 1174), No. 2 of 2, on a Central Pivot Mount Mk I.

These two 4.7-inch quick-firing guns were sent to Bell Island early in the war, and remain located at Beach Hill, at the top of the cliff above the ferry terminal. The extant battery is now a memorial to the Second World War.  These guns were fired in anger during U-boat attacks early in the Second World War but could not be brought to bear on the target because they could not be lowered enough.   Bell Island was the location of strategic iron ore deposits (the mines were closed in 1966).  On 5 Sep 1942 two ore boats, the S.S. Lord Strathcona and the S.S. Saganaga, were in anchorage and sunk by the German U-boat U-513, which had slipped into the bay during the night.  The shore battery, manned by the Newfoundland militia, didn't see or hit the submarine, and the rounds landed on a farm across the bay.  Two months later, on 2 Nov, the German U-boat U-518 torpedoed the S.S. Rose Castle and the Free-French freighter PLM 27.  Again the shore battery fired at an unseen target.  Bell Island has the distinction of being the site of the only coast artillery guns fired in defence of North America during the Second World War. 

A US Army Coastal artillery unit had many portable guns and at least one building at Holyrood for a barracks and storage.  There was also a gun emplacement in the Cherry Lane section of Manuels.  A German U-boat fired a torpedo at the mouth of St. John’s Harbour, and perhaps two at the loading dock in Bell Island.  Nelson Sherren.

Bonavista

 (Terry Honour Photos)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), Field Gun (Serial Nr. unknown), in front of the courthouse.  Rebuilt in 2007 by Jim Steinhauer and Nelson Sherren.  The gun has new wheels and was cleaned and the metal work was restored and painted with epoxy paint.  According to a "Report of Disposition of War Trophies to 19 February 1921 (Journal of the House of Assembly of Newfoundland)", a captured German Field Gun (likely an FK 96) was sent to Bonavista on 31 Dec 1920.  This is most likely the same gun.

 (Terry Honour Photo)

Cast Iron possibly 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a broken breeching ring, weight unknown, markings corroded, mounted on a wooden stand, No. 1 of 2.

 (Terry Honour Photo)

Cast Iron possibly 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight unknown, markings corroded, mounted on a wooden stand, No. 2 of 2.

 (Terry Honour Photo)

Cast Iron possibly 4-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, heavily corroded, no visible markings, mounted on a wooden stand.

Botwood

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), Trench mortars and other German guns captured by Canadians, Cambrai, Nov 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3397968)

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), medium trench mortar (Serial Nr. unknown).

Burgeo

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer, (17-cm mMW), medium trench mortar (Serial Nr. unknown), standing in front of the local museum at 6 Centennial Rd.

Cape Spear

 (David Davies Photo)

 (Martin Durocher Photo)

 (Nilfanion Photo)

 (WikPedant Photo)

 (Author Photo)

10-inch Gun M1888, (Serial No. 41), with the barrel mounted on a concrete stand (originally mounted on a disappearing gun mount, long since scrapped.

A second barrel (Serial No. 3, Watervliet) is reported to be in the same location.  Because of its proximity to convoy routes during the Second World War, the gun battery was installed at Cape Spear to defend the entrance to St. John’s harbour.  Barracks and underground passages leading to the bunkers were built for the use of troops stationed there.

A total of eight 10-inch American ex-pats were located on the East Coast during the Second World War, including two disappearing guns at Fort Cape Spear (both still there), two barbette guns at Botwood, Newfoundland, two barbette guns at Fort McNutt, McNutt's Island, Shelburne, Nova Scotia (both still there), one barbette and one disappearing gun at Fort Prevel, Quebec.

10-inch disappearing Gun M1895 being loaded by the 10th (K) Co., 13th Regiment, June, 1908, Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn, New York, USA.  (Library of Congress Photo)

8-inch, 10-inch & 12-inch Guns on barbette carriages, ca 1898, Sandy Hook Coastal Defense Batteries, Gateway National Recreation Area, Fort Hancock, New Jersey.  (Library of Congress Photo, G.G. Bain 00540)

  (Jonathan Zander Photo)

10-inch disappearing Gun M1895, Fort Casey, Whidbey Island, Washington.

Carbonear

Cast Iron 12-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown, mounted on an iron garrison carriage, previously in Labrador, now in front of the home of the late Fred Earl. 

 (Alan Cass Photo)

 (Cynthia Davis Photo)

(Maxwell J. Toms Photo) (Terry Honour Photo)

Cast Iron 18-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, with blown barrel, weight 39-3-1 (4,453 lbs), trunnions corroded, Royal cypher possibly King George II, heavily corroded, mounted on a wood stand, No. 1 of 2  on Harbour Rock Hill. 

In 1812 Mr. H. C. Watts asked Governor Duckworth to give Carbonear three guns to protect itself from American privateers.  The biggest gun was called "Watts Long Tom" and was mounted on Harbour Rock Hill.  Watts' Long Tom, was placed in a gun pit at Crocker's Cove Point in 1812 by the crew of H.M.S. Comet, under the command of Capt. Blamey.  He had been sent around the  harbours to the north of St. John's both to place weapons to defend the harbours and to raise Volunteer Companies to man them. (Duckworth Papers pp 2647-50, 2810-2811 et al, PANL MG204 - mf copy of orig. PAC).  The cannon was hauled from Crocker's Cove Point to Harbour Rock Hill in February 1817 during the Winter of the Rals.  The starving men from the smaller coves to the north of Carbonear aimed it into the town to threaten the merchants into giving them supplies.  They came to some resolution.  It appears to be an older pattern Armstrong 18 or 24 pdr, probably from the stores in St. John's.  Someone tried to fire it in recent times and blew the front of the muzzle off.  (Alan Cass, Carbonear Heritage Society)

 (Cynthia Davis Photo, Town of Carbonear)

 (Alan Cass Photo)

(Maxwell J. Toms Photos)

 (Terry Honour Photo)

Cast Iron 12-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, heavily corroded, mounted on a wood stand, No. 2 of 2 on Harbour Rock Hill.  This gun is old and the trunnions are corroded, the cascabel is broken and numbers are not visible.  It is reported to have come from the local community of Freshwater.  Its owners and origins are unknown.  (Alan Cass, Carbonear Heritage Society)

Cast Iron 12-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, no data available, mounted on a gun carriage, private ownership, in front of Harold Forwards house on the Southside Road.

Cast Iron 12-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, no data available, mounted on a gun carriage, private ownership, Fred Earle Jrs., yard.

 (Cynthia Davis Photo)

 (Alan Cass Photos)

 (Maxwell J. Toms Photos)

 (Terry Honour Photos)

3-pounder QF (V) (Vicker's Model) Hotchkiss Gun, mounted on a naval gun stand in the War Memorial Park.  It is marked R.C.D. 1906.  It was a shipboard weapon brought to Carbonear by Capt. Cyrus Taylor, and stood across the road from his house until being moved to the present site in 1980.  Capt. Taylor was captain of many semi-official vessels during and after the First World War and this 3-pounder could have been taken from any one of them.  For instance he commanded the ex-RN sloop Lobelia when it had been given to Newfoundland and outfitted as a Labrador passenger ship.  (Carbonear Heritage Society)

Canadian soldier examining a German First World War 7.58-cm leMW trench mortar as German prisoners carrying their wounded pass by him during the advance East of Arras, France, Aug 1918.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3403179)

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW n.A.), (Serial Nr. unknown), Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 23.   (Alan Cass Photos)

This leMW n.A Minenwerfer was donated to the community of Carbonear in 1921 as part of the distribution of War trophies given Newfoundland by government of Great Britain.  It stood in front of the Court House, later the Town Hall, on Musgrave Street.  At some point it was disposed of as scrap to the current owner.  He has displayed it in front of his house on White's Road for many years, minus its wheels.  (JHA 1922 appdx. p.152).  (Alan Cass, Carbonear Historical Society)

The 7.58 cm Minenwerfer a.A. (alter Art or old model) (7.58 cm leMW).  The Germans fielded a whole series of mortars before the beginning of the First World War.  Their term for them was Minenwerfer, literally mine-thrower; they were initially assigned to engineer units in their siege warfare role.  By the Winter of 1916-17, they were transferred to infantry units where the leMW's light weight permitted them to accompany the foot-soldiers in the advance.  In common with Rheinmetall's other Minenwerfer designs, the leMW was a rifled muzzle-loader that had hydraulic cylinders on each side of the tube to absorb the recoil forces and spring recuperators to return the tube to the firing position.  It had a rectangular firing platform with limited traverse and elevation.  Wheels could be added to ease transportation or it could be carried by at least six men.  In 1916, a new version, designated as the n.A. or neuer Art, was fielded that included a circular firing platform, giving a turntable effect, which permitted a full 360 degree traverse.  It also had a longer 16 inches (410 mm) barrel and could be used for direct fire between 0° and 27° elevation if the new 90 kg (200 lb) trail was fitted to absorb the recoil forces.  In this mode it was pressed into service as an anti-tank gun.

Carbonear Island

Cast Iron 6-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, severely corroded, protruding from a rock pile.

Catalina

Cast Iron 2-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, severely corroded, set on a wood cradle near the museum.

 (Joyce Sherren Photo)

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer, (17-cm mMW), medium trench mortar (Serial Nr. unknown).  

The 17 cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17 cm mMW).  This mortar was useful in destroying bunkers and field fortifications otherwise immune to normal artillery.  It was a muzzle-loading, rifled mortar that had a standard hydro-spring recoil system. It fired 50 kilogram (110 lb) HE shells, which contained far more explosive filler than ordinary artillery shells of the same calibre.  The low muzzle velocity allowed for thinner shell walls, hence more space for filler. Furthermore, the low velocity allowed for the use of explosives like Ammonium Nitrate-Carbon that were less shock-resistant than TNT, which was in short supply.  This caused a large number of premature detonations that made crewing the minenwerfer riskier than normal artillery pieces.  A new version of the weapon, with a longer barrel, was put into production at some point during the war.  It was called the 17 cm mMW n/A (neuer Art) or new pattern, while the older model was termed the a/A (alter Art) or old pattern.  In action the mMW was emplaced in a pit, after its wheels were removed, not less than 1.5 meters deep to protect it and its crew.  It could be towed short distances by four men or carried by 17.  Despite its extremely short range, the mMW proved to be very effective at destroying bunkers and other field fortifications.  Consequently its numbers went from 116 in service when the war broke out to some 2,361 in 1918.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/17_cm_mittlerer_Minenwerfer.

 (Joyce Sherren Photo)

6-pounder 7-cwt QF Anti-Tank Gun at the war memorial.

Centreville-Wareham-Trinity

25-pounder C Mk. I QF Field Gun with No. 9 circular firing platform, beside the cenotaph.

Possible German First World War 7.92-mm Shwarzlose MG M.7/12 mounted on a tripod beside the cenotaph.

Clarenville

 (Terry Honour Photos)

 (Maxwell J. Toms Photo)

105-mm L5 Pack Howitzer, CFR unknown, carriage No. 57668, 1969.  This gun is located on Memorial Ave and Balbo Street, in front of the cenotaph and across from the Town Hall.

Corner Brook

 (Terry Honour Photo)

 (Maxwell J. Toms Photo)

25-pounder C Mk. 2 QF Field Gun with No. 9 circular firing platform, located beside the cenotaph in front of City Hall at Main Street and West Street.

Cupids

 (Terry Honour Photos)

 (Maxwell J. Toms Photos)

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Gun, heavily corroded, possibly King George II cypher, mounted on an iron garrison carriage.

Ferryland

 (Terry Honour Photos)

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, heavily corroded, No. 1 of 2 on a wooden stand beside the cenotaph.

 (Terry Honour Photos)

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, heavily corroded, No. 2 of 2 on a wooden stand beside the cenotaph.

Grand Falls - Windsor

3-pounder QF Hotchkiss Gun, Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 12.

25-pounder C Mk. 2 QF Field Gun with No. 9 circular firing platform, with CMP FAT & limber, 2nd Division parade, ca 1945.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4233445)

 (John MacDonald Photos)

 (Maxwell J. Toms Photos)

25-pounder C Mk. 2 QF Field Gun with No. 9 circular firing platform, a gift from the Netherlands, this gun is on display at the town War Memorial.  

According to a "Report of Disposition of War Trophies to 19 February 1921 (Journal of the House of Assembly of Newfoundland)", a captured German Field Gun (likely an FK 97), (Serial Nr. unknown), was sent to Grand Falls on 31 Dec 1920.  This gun may still be there, location and confirmation to be determined.

Greenspond

Cast Iron possible 6-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade, No. 1 of 4 Guns, behind the cenotaph and in front of the Greenspond Memorial Library.  (Streetview Photos)

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun No. 2 of 4 Guns, mounted on a concrete stand behind the cenotaph and in front of the Greenspond Memorial Library.

Possible German First World War 24-cm Flügelminenwerfer, No. 3 of 4 guns, behind the cenotaph and in front of the Greenspond Memorial Library.

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun No. 4 of 4 Guns, mounted on a concrete stand behind the cenotaph and in front of the Greenspond Memorial Library.

Happy Valley, Labrador

105-mm C1A1 M2A2 Howitzer, CDN No. unknown, Royal Canadian Legion, Branch No. 51.

Harbour Buffet

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), medium trench mortar (Serial Nr. unknown).

Harbour Grace

 (Terry Honour Photos)

German First World War 17-cm mittlerer Minenwerfer (17-cm mMW), medium trench mortar (Serial Nr. 7417), embedded in a concrete base.

 (T

erry Honour Photos)

Cast Iron possibly 4-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, heavily corroded, no visible markings, mounted in the sidewalk barrel down, used as a bollard.

Hearts Content

Cast Iron 6-pounder Smoothbore Carronade, Royal Canadian Legion.  The Carronade is a short smoothbore, cast iron cannon, which was used by the Royal Navy and first produced by the Carron Company, an ironworks in Falkirk, Scotland.  It was used from the 1770s to the 1850s.  Its main function was to serve as a powerful, short-range anti-ship and anti-crew weapon.  While considered very successful early on, Carronades eventually disappeared as rifled naval artillery changed the shape of the shell and led to fewer and fewer close-range engagements.

Heart's Delight

 (Maxwell J. Toms Photos)

German First World War 7.92-mm Shwarzlose MG M.7/12 mounted on a tripod beside the cenotaph.

Holyrood

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Guns (two) from a British Warship wreck in Placentia Bay, with a private owner.

La Poile

Cast Iron 3-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 12-2-14 (1,414 lbs), set in a concrete bed dated 1998 on a bluff overlooking the South shore.

Cast Iron 3-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, set in a concrete bed near the village wharf.

Mortier

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, heavily corroded.

Mount Pearl

25-pounder C Mk. 2 QF Field Gun with No. 9 circular firing platform, beside Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 36.

Placentia

  (Anita O'Keefe Photos)

 (Tom O'Keefe Photos)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art Field Gun (Serial Nr. 3690), R, D.  Restored by the Highways Department with all metal wheels.  According to a "Report of Disposition of War Trophies to 19 February 1921 (Journal of the House of Assembly of Newfoundland)", a captured German Field Gun (likely an FK 96) was sent to Placentia on 31 Dec 1920. 

 (Terry Honour Photos)

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, heavily corroded, no visible markings, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage in front of the O'Reilly House Museum, No. 1 of 2.

 (Terry Honour Photos)

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, heavily corroded, no visible markings, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage in front of the O'Reilly House Museum, No. 2 of 2.

3-pounder QF Hotchkiss Gun on display at the Trade School.

Placentia, Fort Royal, Castle Hill National Historic Site

 (Maxwell J. Toms Photos)

Placentia, named Plaisance by the French, was founded in 1662.  It was established to protect French fishing interests in Newfoundland and was the French capital of Newfoundland during the 17th and 18th centuries.  Using Plaisance as their home base, French forces successfully raided British settlements during times of war while Fort Royal, on top of Castle Hill, protected the colony from attack by British warships.  In 1713, the French gave up their right to settlement in Newfoundland and established a new stronghold at Louisbourg on Cape Breton Island.  British settlers replaced the French and their soldiers garrisoned the fortifications until 1811.  Roughly 30 minutes away is Ship Harbour is where Winston Churchill and Franklin Roosevelt met to plan strategy during the Second World War.

 

Blomefield Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 32-3-17 (3,685 lbs), Samuel Walker & Company of Rotherham, England (WCo) on the left trunnion, (Serial No. 190) on the right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark.  North East Bastion of the Castle Hill National Historic Site.  Currently unmounted, a new gun carriage has been built for this gun by Nelson Sherren and Jim Steinhauer.

North West Bastion, Fort Royal, Castle Hill, with three unmounted smoothbore muzzleloading guns.  (Maxwell J. Toms Photo)

 (Terry Honour Photos)

Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-0-1 (3,697 lbs), King George II cypher, broad arrow mark, “S.S.  Louisbourg” on barrel.  Castle Hill National Historic Site, No. 1 of 3 Guns in the North West Bastion.

 (Maxwell J. Toms Photos)

Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-0-20 (3,716 lbs), King George II cypher, broad arrow mark.  Castle Hill National Historic Site, No. 2 of 3 Guns in the North West Bastion.

 (Terry Honour Photos)

Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-0-8 (3,708 lbs), King George II cypher, 15 beside it turned 90 degrees, broad arrow mark.  Castle Hill National Historic Site, No. 3 of 3 Guns in the North West Bastion.

 (Terry Honour Photos)

Cast Iron 9-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 26-2-2 (2,970 lbs), C, Queen Anne cypher (1702 to 1714), broad arrow mark, mounted on wood naval gun carriages in the South East Bastion, No. 1 of 2.

 (Terry Honour Photos)

Cast Iron 9-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 25-3-0 (2,884 lbs), C, Queen Anne cypher (1702 to 1714), broad arrow mark, mounted on wood naval gun carriages in the South East Bastion, No. 2 of 2.

+ (Terry Honour Photos)

Cast Iron 9-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 26-2-2 (2,970 lbs), C, Queen Anne cypher (1702 to 1714), 4 at a right angle to the cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on wood naval gun carriages, guarding the front entrance to the Visitor's Centre. 

Placentia, Fort Frederick

 (Terry Honour Photos)

Blomefield Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 33-2-4 (3,756 lbs), maker unknown, King George II cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on a wood gun carriage, No. 1 of 2, beside the Fort Frederick memorial marker.

 

 (Terry Honour Photos)

Blomefield Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 32-3-17 (3,685 lbs), Samuel Walker & Company of Rotherham, England (WCo) on left trunnion, (Serial No. 191) on right trunnion, ca. 1813, King George III cypher, mounted on an iron garrison carriage.

Placentia Bay

Cast Iron 4-inch Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, mounted on an iron garrison carriage, No. 1 of 2 in front of a Floral Design store.

Cast Iron 4-inch Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, mounted on an iron garrison carriage, No. 2 of 2 in front of a Floral Design store.

 (Terry Honour Photos)

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, Queen Anne's cypher, broad arrow mark, heavily corroded, mounted on a wood navalgun carriage, No. 1 of 2 in front of St. Luke's Church.

 (Terry Honour Photos)

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, Queen Anne's cypher, broad arrow mark, heavily corroded, mounted on a wood navalgun carriage, No. 2 of 2 in front of St. Luke's Church.

Seal Cove

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown, mounted on a wooden carriage, (from Trinity), on display with a private owner.

Spaniards Bay

Captured German 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 Machine-gun being examined near Nieuport, Belgium, 15 Sep 1944.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3250984)

 (Maxwell J. Toms Photos)

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 Machine-gun (Serial Nr. unknown), top cover missing, mounted on a Schlitten stand.

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. unknown).  Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 32.

St. Georges

 (Maxwell J. Toms Photos)

 (Terry Honour Photos)

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. 3838), light trench mortar.  Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 38.

St. John’s

4.7-inch QF Mk. III Gun (Serial No. 1060) on a Central Pivot Mount Mk I, C10, No. 1 of 2 at Fort Amherst.  This gun is in very poor condition and has fallen into the land wash.  is on mounting C10 and (Serial No. 1159) is on mounting C5.  (Author Photo)

4.7-inch QF Mk. III Gun (Serial No. 1159) on a Central Pivot Mount Mk I, C15, No. 2 of 2 at Fort Amherst.  This gun is in very poor condition.

3-pounder QF Hotchkiss Gun, stored at Signal Hill by Parks Canada, along with a number of spare guns of various weights.  (Author Photo)

American 75-mm M1917 Field Gun, on a Pedestal Mount, Chain Rock Battery, Signal Hill National Park.  This gun and one other have been placed in storage by Parks Canada.  (Serial No. 24), and (Serial No. 821).  (Author Photo)

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Guns (three) in poor condition from a wreck in Placentia Bay.  Entrance to the Battery Hotel.

Cast Iron 6-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Guns mounted on garrison carriages from Fort Townsend, Quidi Vidi National Historic Site.

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight unknown, King George III cypher, No. 1 of 2, Quidi Vidi Battery.  (Photo courtesy of Nilfanion)

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight unknown, No. 2 of 2, Quidi Vidi Battery.

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, reproduction, weight 41-2-14 (4,662 lbs), The Carron Company of Falkirk, Scotland (Serial No. unknown, CARRON, year unknown) purchased in 1967.  No. 1 of 2, Quidi Vidi National Historic Site.

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, reproduction, weight unknown), The Carron Company of Falkirk, Scotland (Serial No. unknown, CARRON, year unknown) purchased in 1967.  No. 2 of 2, Quidi Vidi National Historic Site.

Cast Iron 24-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 6-1-21 (721 lbs), King George III cypher.  No. 1 of 2, Signal Hill National Historic Site.

Cast Iron 24-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown, King George III cypher.  No. 2 of 2, Signal Hill National Historic Site.

Cast Iron 18-pounder 42-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, with family overlooking St. Johns Harbour, Aug 1960.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No.  4301465)

Blomefield Cast Iron 18-pounder 42-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 41-2-21 (4,669 lbs), maker unknown, King George III cypher.  Signal Hill National Historic Site.

Blomefield Cast Iron 18-pounder 42-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 41-2-14 (4,662 lbs), maker unknown, King George III cypher.  Signal Hill National Historic Site.

Blomefield Cast Iron 18-pounder 42-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 42-0-0 (4,704 lbs), maker unknown, King George III cypher.  Signal Hill National Historic Site.

Blomefield Cast Iron 18-pounder 42-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 42-0-0 (4,704 lbs), maker unknown, King George III cypher.  Signal Hill National Historic Site.

Blomefield Cast Iron 42-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight and maker unknown, 12-feet long, (recorded in McConnell as located on Signal Hill).  David McConnell, British Smooth-Bore Artillery: A Technological Study, (Ottawa, Minister of Supply and Services Canada, 1988), p. 60.

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, reproduction, Cabot Tower, fired as the noon day gun during tourist season.

 (Terry Honour Photos)

Cast Iron 6-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Land Service Mortar, reproduction, weight 18-1-1 (2,045 lbs), mounted on an iron carriage, weight 17-0-1 (1,905 lbs), WCo, B broad arrow O, 62.  This mortar stands on the roof of Cabot Tower, and is used by the Tattoo re-enactors.

Cast Iron 6-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 16-2-6 (1,854 lbs), King George III cypher.  North of Queen’s Battery.

Cast Iron 9-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, King George III cypher.  North of Queen’s Battery.  Rebuilt after it had been rolled over the hill and damaged.  It is now displayed in the artefacts collection in the Visitors Centre.

Blomefield Cast Iron 18-pounder 38-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun,weight 36-0-5 (4,037 lbs), 1709, Queen Anne cypher, broad arrow mark.  North of Queen’s Battery.

Blomefield Cast Iron 18-pounder 42-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark.  North of Queen’s Battery.

Blomefield Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, North of Queen’s Battery.

Blomefield Cast Iron 12-pounder 34-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, North of Queen’s Battery.

Cast Iron 68-pounder 36-cwt Smoothbore Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight 34-1-3 (3,839 lbs), reproduction.  North of Queen’s Battery.

 (Author Photo)

Cast Iron 16-pounder 8-cwt Muzzleloading Rifle, mounted on a wheeled carriage, Queen Victoria cypher.  Visitor Centre. 

 (Terry Honour Photo)

Cast Iron 6-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, reproduction, mounted on a field carriage, used for artillery demonstrations.  Visitor Centre.

Cast Iron 24-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown, Queen Ann cypher, no trunnions, No. 1 of 2, resting on timbers.  Admiral’s (Fort) Point.

Cast Iron 24-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown, Queen Ann cypher, no trunnions, No. 2 of 2, resting on timbers.  Admiral’s (Fort) Point.

Cast Iron 24-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown, Queen Ann cypher, resting on timbers.  Admiral’s (Fort) Point.

Cast Iron 24-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown, Queen Ann cypher, resting on timbers.  Admiral’s (Fort) Point.

Cast Iron 24-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, buried vertically with 12-inches of the muzzle visible above ground, used as a support for the flag pole behind Lester green House.

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight unknown, No. 1 of 2, in front of Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 1.

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight unknown, No. 2 of 2, in front of Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 1.

Bronze 2.5-inch Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, No. 1 of 2 ceremonial guns with cast wheeled carriages, donated from the Touton Property to the Admiralty House Museum, Mount Pearl.  Restored by Jim Steinhauer and Nelson Sherren.  This gun came from the HMS Calypso, a Royal Newfoundland Naval Reserve (RNR) sail training corvette.

Bronze 2.5-inch Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, No. 2 of 2 ceremonial guns with cast wheeled carriages, donated from the Touton Property to the Admiralty House Museum, Mount Pearl.  Restored by Jim Steinhauer and Nelson Sherren.  This gun came from the HMS Calypso, a Royal Newfoundland Naval Reserve (RNR) sail training corvette.

German First World War 10-cm Kanone 17 Field Gun (10-cm K 17), (Serial Nr. unknown), field gun in Bannerman Park.  This Gun has had its wheels replaced and has been restored four times by Nelson Sherren.   (Author photo ca. 1971)

German First World War 10-cm Kanone 17 (10-cm K17), (Serial Nr. unknown), field gun in Victoria Park.  The trail has been cut off and the forward part of the gun rests on a concrete stand with a plaque.  (Author photo ca 1971)

St. John’s, HMCS Cabot,  220 Southside Road, Pier 27.

3-pounder QF Hotchkiss Gun, inside the main entrance to the ship.   (Photos courtesy of Able Seaman Brittany Hayes, HMCS Cabot)

St. John’s, Pleasantville, Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 56, St. John’s

 (Steve Cooney Photo)

 (Author Photo)

 (elyob Photos)

 (Terry Honour Photos)

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 13 (15-cm sFH 13), (Serial Nr. 2634), heavy field howitzer.  This sFH 13 stands in front of the Legion.  Originally No. 1 of 2, previously in front of the Colonial Building.

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 13 Heavy Field Howitzer (Serial Nr. unknown).  Originally No. 2 of 2, previously in front of the Colonial Building, this gun has been lost in a landfill.  (Author Photo)

The 15 cm schwere Feldhaubitze 13 (15-cm sFH 13), was a German heavy field howitzer.  The gun was a development of the previous standard howitzer, the 15-cm sFH 02.  Improvements included a longer barrel resulting in better range and a gun shield to protect the crew.  Variants were: the original "kurz" (L/14 – 14 calibre short barrel version), the lg. sFH13 with a longer barrel; and lg. sFH13/02 with minor modifications to simplify wartime manufacture of the lg. sFH weapons. Initially there were serious issues of weak recoil spring mechanisms that would break, and gun barrel explosions.  The problems were solved with the upgrades.  The British referred to these and their shells as "5 point 9"s or "5 9"s as the bore was 5.9 inches (150 mm).  The ability of these guns to deliver mobile heavy firepower close to the frontline gave the Germans a major firepower advantage on the Western Front early in the First World War, as the French and British lacked an equivalent.  It was not until late 1915 that the British began to deploy their own 6 inch 26 cwt howitzer.  About 3,500 of these guns were produced from 1913 to 1918.

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. unknown), light trench mortar.  Royal Artillery Park Museum, preserved by Gordon Stamp, 166th (Newfoundland) Field Artillery Regiment.

German First World War 7.58-cm leichtes Minenwerfer neuer Art, (7.58-cm leMW), (Serial Nr. unknown), light trench mortar.  Royal Artillery Park Museum, also preserved by Gordon Stamp.

 (Photo courtesy of Steve Cooney)

25-pounder C Mk. 2 QF Field Gun, originally on display in Bowring Park, this gun has been refurbished and is now in the Royal Artillery Park.  The Royal Artillery Park in Pleasantville was officially opened on 20 October 2010.  

 

American 155-mm American M2 Gun "Long Tom" on Mk. I Carriage, in service with the British 33/61 Heavy Regiment, Royal Artillery, at Vergato, Italy.  Gunners of the 59th (Newfoundland) Heavy Regiment made good use of this gun during the Second World War.  (IWM Photo NA 22470)

 (Steve Cooney Photo)

American 155-mm American M2 Gun "Long Tom" on Mk. I Carriage.  This 7-foot 2-inch long Heavy Gun came from Woolwich Artillery Park in the UK.  It is one of only three survivors.  Veterans of the 59th (Newfoundland) Heavy Regiment arranged for the Gun to brought to Newfoundland.  The Gun has been restored and repainted under Nelson Sherren`s direction.  

 (Nelson Sherren Photo)

Universal Carrier, (Serial No. TL12870D).

The top section of this Universal Carrier is completely enclosed.  This vehicle was purchased from a local owner by Nelson Sherren and 3 others and restored by Metal World.  This unit was one of many used by the Lincoln and Welland Regiment from Sarnia, Ontario, in the defence of the Airport and the Avalon Peninsula in the Second World War.  

Stephenville Crossing

German 25-cm schwerer Minenwerfer alt Art, (25-cm sMW), (Serial Nr. unknown), Flat Bay, Stephenville Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 38.

Tilting

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun.  This heavily corroded but still trunnioned Gun lies at Tilting on Fogo Island. It may have been a merchant's gun placed to guard the harbour, perhaps in the American Revolutionary War period. (Alan Cass, Carbonear Historical Society)

Trepassey, Chance Cove Provincial Park

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight and maker unknown, No. 1 of 2.

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight and maker unknown, No. 1 of 2.

Trinity

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art Field Gun (Serial No. 7661).  Rebuilt in 2007 by Jim Steinhauer and Nelson Sherren.  The gun has new wheels, was cleaned and the metal work restored and painted with epoxy paint.  According to a "Report of Disposition of War Trophies to 19 February 1921 (Journal of the House of Assembly of Newfoundland)", a captured German Field Gun (likely an FK 97) was sent to Trinity on 31 Dec 1920.  This is most likely the same gun, Serial Nr. to be confirmed. (Photos courtesy of Jim Miller)

Trinity Bay, Fort Point

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight and maker unknown, No. 1 of 4.

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight and maker unknown, No. 2 of 4.

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight and maker unknown, No. 3 of 4.

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight and maker unknown, No. 4 of 4.

Fort Point, also known as Admiral’s Point, was fortified in 1746 with three batteries mounting 18  guns, a store house, a powder magazine, barracks for 224 soldiers and a pavilion for 9 officers, all surrounded by parapets and palisades.  During the 1740s, the fort was garrisoned with only one artillery officer and 20 men, and an infantry officer with 30 soldiers.  In 1748, theses fortifications were improved as they appear in “A Plan of the Admirals Point in Trinity Harbour, Newfoundland in 1748.”  This plan shows a 15 gun battery, a 3 gun battery and a 4 gun battery, parapet walls, Storekeepers Hut, Gunners Hut, Storehouse, Magazine and intended Barracks.  This “intended barracks” was probably built soon after to accommodate the garrison of Royal Artillery men.  (Trinity Historical Society)