Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Artillery preserved in Canada 1: British Columbia

Artillery preserved in the province of

British Columbia

For all official data concerning the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, please click on the link to their website:

Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery Website

The aim of this website is to locate, identify and document every historical piece of artillery preserved in Canada.  Many contributors have assisted in the hunt for these guns to provide and update the data found on these web pages.  Photos are by the author unless otherwise credited.  Any errors found here are by the author, and any additions, corrections or amendments to this list of Guns and Artillery in Canada would be most welcome and may be e-mailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com.

Data current to 9 Oct 2017.

Note: Back in the day, artillery in Canada was referred to by its radio call sign "Sheldrake".  It is now referred to by its "Golf" call sign.  (Acorn sends)

British Columbia

Chilliwack, Canadian Military Education Centre.

The CMEC is a Non Profit Museum Society.  It is a member of the Organization of Military Museums and a recognized Military Museum by the DND.  It is operated by a group of dedicated volunteers and the museum functions by public donations and the support of the City of Chilliwack.

17-pounder QF Towed Anti-Tank Gun being manned by gunners serving with the 57th Battery, 1st Anti-Tank Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, near Campobasso, Italy, 25 October 1943.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3599876)

 (John Eckersley Photos)

17-pounder QF Towed Anti-Tank Gun, located in the veterans section at the North end of the Surrey Centre Cemetery, 16671 Old McLelland Road, West Cloverdale.  This gun is stamped 17-pdr I &  II.  The metal tube covering the vertical shaft of the breech operating mechanism is stamped 558  FL6163.  Previously on display at Surrey, this 17-pounder is  on loan to CMEC from the District of Surrey.

In June 1947, Canada had 149 17-pounder QF Towed Anti-Tank Guns in service.  These guns served until 1952, when they were offered to NATO.  Those remaining in 1959 were scrapped or became part of war memorials where at least 28 have been found and documented on these web pages.

Colwood,  Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site of Canada

 (Trevor Adams Photos)

 (Terry Honour Photo)

 (grayllinq Photos)

13-pounder 8-cwt Muzzleloading Rifle, weight 8-0-0 (896 lbs), (Serial No. 1230), mounted on a wheeled R.C.D. (Royal Carriage Department) gun carriage from the 1890s, on display along the main path through the site.  Six of these 13-pounders were British Royal Marine Artillery brought to Victoria in 1893,  When the British departed they were left behind.  This appears to be the only remaining 13-pounder 8-cwt in Canada. 

 (Trevor Adams Photo)

6-pounder 8-cwt Quick Firing (QF) Mk. I Hotchkiss Gun (Serial No. 502), mounted on a Hotchkiss cone/pedestal mount Mk I, Belmont Battery. 

6-pounder 8-cwt Quick Firing (QF) Mk. I Hotchkiss Gun barrel (not on display).

QF 4.7-inch coast defence gun with shield on a garrison mount.  Two 4.7-inch guns were located at Yorke Island, they were later replaced with 6-inch guns.  (DND Photo)

6-inch BL Gun, one of three installed in coastal defence positions at Point Grey during the Second World War.  (DND Photos)

 (Trevor Adams Photo)

6-inch Breechloading Gun Mk. III/IV (No. 302) weight unknown, mounted on a display base under a replica gin triangle (used for mounting and dismounting guns and carriages on and from traversing platforms), Lower Battery.

 (Maxwell Toms Photos)

6-inch Breechloading Mk. VI Gun (No. 841), on Mk. IV Disappearing Garrison Carriage in the Upper Battery.  One of two, this gun was first test-fired in 1897.

 (Trevor Adams Photos)

 6-pounder 10-cwt QF Mk. I Guns on Mk. I 6-pounder Twin Mounting, Belmont Battery. (Terry Honour Photos)

  

 6-pounder 10-cwt QF Mk. I Guns on Mk. I 6-pounder Twin Mounting, Belmont Battery.  Port side gun, breech open. (Terry Honour Photos)

 

6-pounder 10-cwt QF Mk. I Guns on Mk. I 6-pounder Twin Mounting, Belmont Battery, installed in 1944.  Starboard side gun, breech closed.  (Terry Honour Photos)

From the LAC files, mounting No. 149 had Gun No. L/228 on the left, and Gun No. L/247 on the right while it was installed at Sydney, Nova Scotia in South Bar Battery in 1943.  Confirmation that the serial numbers were Canadian is in the official war records.  The position of the barrels may have been reversed when the guns were transferred from the East to the West coast.  (Doug Knight) 

 (Maxwell J. Toms Photos)

 (Trevor Adams Photo)

12-pounder 12-cwt QF Mk. I Gun (Serial No. 2767), on Mk. I Garrison Carriage, Belmont Battery.  originally from Halifax, ca 1902-1943, currently on loan since 1975 from the RCA Museum, CFB Shilo, Manitoba.

 (Maxwell Toms Photo)

American 90-mm M1A1 Anti-Aircraft Gun, 72382 stamped on the barrel, Chevrolet, and General Motors stamped on the breech.  The left indicator regulator (M1A1) on the gun bears a plate with the serial number 19873.  This gun is on display near the parking lot.

  (Maxwell Toms Photos)

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun, on display along the main path, near the exit. 

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Guns with searchlights mounted on a Canadian National Railways Armoured Train, 12 July 1942.  (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN No. 3224686 and 3224683).

3.7 inch Anti-aircraft gun in service with the 43 Heavy Anti-Aircraft Regiment, RCA for the defence of Vancouver, ca 1945.  (DND Photo)

 (Terry Honour Photo) 

 (Maxwell Toms Photos)

3-pounder QF sub-calibre Gun (Serial No. 1403), for 6-inch BL Gun Mks. VII, XI and XII, on display in the Lower Battery artillery store.  This gun has been on loan since 1975 from the RCA Museum, CFB Shilo, Manitoba.

 (Trevor Adams Photos)

9.2-inch Breechloading Gun, weight 59 ¼-cwt (6,636 lbs), mockup made for display, mounted on an original 30-ton Gun Drug Mk. I, 1902, R.C.D. (Royal Carriage Department), Reg. No.  S. 18681,

British 9.2-inch Breechloading Gun, Mk. III or Mk. VI HMS Iron Duke, mounted on a Mk. I railway truck, in action at Maricourt, France, during the Battle of the Somme, Sep 1916.  (British Government Photo)

British Armstrong Whitworth 12-inch railway gun mounted on a Mk. II railway carriage, Arras, France, Nov 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3194826), and (John Warwick Booth Photo).

British Armstrong Whitworth 12-inch railway gun mounted on a Mk. II railway carriage, France, 1917.  (Daily Mail Postcard)

British Armstrong Whitworth 12-inch railway gun mounted on a Mk. II railway carriage, France, 1917.  (Ernest Brooks Photo)

Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site         

Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site is a 19th-century coastal artillery fort on the Colwood, British Columbia side of Esquimalt Harbour, (Greater Victoria/Victoria BC Metropolitan Area).  The site is adjacent to Fisgard Lighthouse National Historic Site, the first lighthouse on the west coast of Canada.  Both the fort and lighthouse are managed and presented to the public by Parks Canada.

Between February 1894 and October 1897, two separate forts were constructed: one at Macaulay Point (site of earlier earthwork batteries), and an entirely new location at Rodd Hill, a bluff of rock overlooking the western side of the narrow entrance to Esquimalt harbour.  Both forts would each mount three 6-inch disappearing guns (Mk VI barrels on a Mk IV mounting).  Because of limitations of space in Rodd Hill, two of these guns were mounted with a common magazine in the “Lower Battery”, while the third required a separate battery (along with an underground magazine, loopholed wall, water supply, guardhouse, etc.) on another, higher hill some 200 meters away, named, logically, the “Upper Battery.”

These guns were sited in concrete emplacements ten feet thick, which were in turn protected by the rock massif of the hillside into which they were sunk.  The barrels were normally kept down in the loading position, within the protection of the concrete emplacement (which also had an overhead metal shield).  Using a central Observation Post and remote electric dial system to pass target information, the guns would be loaded and aimed while in the “down” position.  Only when actually about to fire, would the large hydro-pneumatic system raise the 5-tonne barrel up over the parapet.

The strength of the system was that the barrel was exposed to the enemy for a minimal amount of time, and with naval guns of the time firing on a flat trajectory, it was virtually impossible for an enemy ship to drop a shell on the emplacement, with its sloping rock glacis in front.  Disadvantages of the system included a slow rate of fire (perhaps one shot every two minutes), and a propensity for the complicated hydro-pneumatic system to leak.

The 6-inch guns used “non-fixed ammunition”, that is, the explosive cartridge that propelled the shell was stored and loaded separately from the shell or shot.  Cartridges were made of raw silk, and stored in wooden crates in a special high-security section of the underground magazine.  There were five types of shell on the Fort Rodd manifest in 1897: High Explosive (Lyddite), Armour-piercing, Common Pointed (for non-armoured maritime targets), and Shrapnel.  The other class of projectile (and the one most often fired) was a solid steel shot (without any cavity for explosives or fuses, it was cheapest to produce). The shells and shot all had the same service weight of 94 pounds (to simplify calculation of elevation and depression) and diameter of 6 inches (150 mm); therefore, lengths of the various types varied.

In addition to these medium guns (intended to fend off an attack by up to six enemy light cruisers), smaller quick-firing guns were sited, in order to deal with the potential threat of fast, unarmoured torpedo boats.  At Fort Rodd, a separate emplacement, called Belmont Battery was constructed to house two Quick-Firing 12-pounder guns, which were assisted by two sets of “Defence Electric Lights” (searchlights), which were powered by diesel engines and generators concealed in an engine room built into the landward side of a hill.

For heavy, “counter-bombardment” defence, a battery of 9.2-inch guns was built at Signal Hill, on the east side of Esquimalt harbour; in the event, these guns did not become active until 1912, and even then were rarely fired, as the concussion caused much damage to windows in Esquimalt village, directly below the battery.  Information courtesy of the Fort Rodd Hill Visitor Centre.

Cranbrook

 (Dave Humphrey Photos)

 (BK-Hunters Photos)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. 19241).  This gun was captured by the 7th Battalion (1st British Columbia), 2nd Canadian Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) on 27 Sep 1918 near Marquion.  It is presently on display behind the Heritage Inn on Cranbrook Street, close to the entrance to the Canadian Legion.

German First World War 7.7 cm FK 16 on display at the cenotaph in front of the old Cranbrook Courthouse ca 1920s.

The 7.7 cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7 cm FK 16) was a German First World War field gun with a longer range than the FK 96 n.A.  The barrel is longer and the gun has a box carriage to allow for greater elevation, which increased the range.  It also has separate-loading ammunition to reduce powder consumption and barrel wear at short ranges, although this had the drawback of reducing the rate of fire compared to the older gun.  It was prematurely rushed into production in 1916 and early guns suffered from a number of defects, mainly stemming from the German use of substitute materials to reduce consumption of strategic metals. It also suffered from a large number of premature detonations of its shells during 1916.

CFB Esquimalt

 (Al Dadds Photos)

Cast Iron ½-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 1-1-1 (129 lbs), No. 1 of 2 guarding the entrance to Building 70 in the Dockyard.

Ruth Rhynas Brown published references to these guns in an article on the guns of the East India Company: 1990 “Guns carried on East Indiamen, 1600-1800”. IJNA. vol 19, 17-22. 1995 “Arming the East Indiamen” in The Archaeology of Ships of War, ed. Mensun Bound. Oswestry. 114-119.  Basically it was introduced by the Board of Ordnance. 

Guns marked wit the Crowned P:   After Wheatley and Company were given permission to proof guns for the East India ships, the Board of Ordnance decided on 3 November 1749, that all guns "which pass the King's proof for the future, and for the Merchants' Service, be marked with a Crown and the letter P" (WO 47/34, 422v).  In the next few years increasing numbers of East India Company guns were proofed and in 1755 the Company insisted that all guns for its use had to be proofed at Woolwich.  Robert Davidson at Woolwich was paid for cutting crowned Ps for India ships on guns.  This mark was also used for guns of a semi-official nature, such as those cast by John Fuller for the Sardinian government.  It was used for the civilian branch of the government, such as for troop ships, armed transports and post office packets.  The form of crowned P on guns like this one suggests an 18th century date, possibly something for a transport in the Seven Years War or American Wars.  This type of gun vanishes with the introduction of the carronade.

 (Al Dadds Photos)

Cast Iron ½-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 1-1-1 (129 lbs), No. 2 of 2 guarding the entrance to Building 70 in the Dockyard.

 (Al Dadds Photo)

 (Maxwell Toms Photos)

3-inch 50 Mk. 33 Twin Gun Naval Turret, located beside the Canex parking lot.

 (Al Dadds Photo)

 (Maxwell Toms Photos)

3-inch 70 Mk. 6 Twin Gun Naval Turret, located beside the Canex parking lot.

 (Al Dadds Photo)

ASROC Launcher Mk. 7, CFB Esquimalt. 

 (Al Dadds Photo)

Anti-Sub Mortar Mk. NC 10, CFB Esquimalt.

King George III by Sir William Beechey, ca 1799. (Wikipedia Photo)

Royal cypher of King George III on the barrel of a bronze gun.

Blomefield Cast Iron 32-pounder 56-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 54-2-0 (6,112 lbs), maker and Serial No. TBC, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on a wood Naval gun carriage, 1825, Admiral’s Viewing Stand.

Blomefield Cast Iron 32-pounder 56-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 54-2-4 (6,108 lbs), maker and Serial No. TBC, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on a wood Naval gun carriage, 1825, Admiral’s Viewing Stand.

By the 1790s, Blomefield had developed his system of construction of iron guns, that initially included only one 32-pounder of 9-1/2 feet and 55-½  hundredweight.  This gun, which was designated either for garrison or sea service, proved to be very popular to the end of the smooth-bore era.  In 1851, the captain of HMS Excellent, the naval testing laboratory ship, wrote in praise of the gun, "The old gun has been a great favourite.  It works extremely easy, its recoil is not too severe, it does not wear its vent away quickly, its precision is equal to the new A, B, and C guns, which work heavily, and wear the vent away rapidly, and which have reduced windage".  The British Committee on Ordnance reported that at the end of March 1857, there were 1961 of these guns in use and 1733 in store; while they did not recommend that it be reproduced, they recognized that it would continue to be in use for a number of years.  In 1865 it was ordered retained in service.  It seems to have been an excellently designed weapon.  David McConnell, British Smooth-Bore Artillery: A Technological Study, (Ottawa, Minister of Supply and Services Canada, 1988), p. 62.

64-pounder 71-cwt Converted Rifled Muzzleloading Gun with Millar-pattern breeching ring, mounted on sliding garrison carriage medium No. 10, on traversing platform medium No. 11.  (Handbook for the 64-pr RML converted guns of 58 and 71 cwt, Land Service, 1887.

64-pounder 71-cwt Converted Rifled Muzzleloading Gun with Millar-pattern breeching ring, dated 1864, mounted on a riveted iron carriage in front of the Admiral’s Reviewing Stand.

Portrait of Queen Victoria. 1859.  (Wikipedia)

Queen Victoria cypher, on the gun barrel.

 (Al Dadds Photos)

64-pounder 71-cwt Converted Rifled Muzzleloading Gun with Millar-pattern breeching ring, weight 64-1-0 (7,196 lbs),  RGF No. 106, I, 1865 on the right trunnion, Queen Victoria cypher, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage. No. 1 of 2 Guns in the Dockyard, Duntze Head.

 (Al Dadds Photos)

Blomefield Cast Iron 32-pounder 56-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight TBC, maker and Serial No. TBC, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on a wood Naval gun carriage.  No. 2 of 2 Guns in the Dockyard, Duntze Head.

Black Rock Battery

 (Wayne Yetman Photos)

12-pounder 12-cwt QF Mk. V (3-inch-40) Breechloading Naval Gun (Ogden 3-inch Naval gun), No. 1 of 3, originally located at Black Rock, now at the Naden dockyard.

 (Al Dadds Photo)

The three 12-pounder 12-cwt QF Mk. V (3-inch-40) Breechloading Naval Guns that stood at the firing point at Black Rock have been moved to Naden in a corner of the old parade square behind the Drill Hall.  Final destination unknown. 

 (Al Dadds Photo)

Breechblock QF 12-pounder 12-cwt, AV, N, 1, CPR 1942, Serial No. 1316/5, C/S 8. 

12-pounder 12-cwt QF Mk. V (3-inch-40) Breechloading Naval Gun (Ogden 3-inch Naval gun), No. 2 of 3, originally located at Black Rock, now at the Naden dockyard.

 (Al Dadds Photo)

Breechblock QF 12-pounder 12-cwt, AV, N, 1, CPR 1942, Serial No. 1405/1, C/S 164.

12-pounder 12-cwt QF Mk. V (3-inch-40) Breechloading Naval Gun (Ogden 3-inch Naval gun), No. 3 of 3, originally located at Black Rock, now at the Naden dockyard.

 (Al Dadds Photo)

Breechblock QF 12-pounder 12-cwt, AV, N, 1, CPR 1942, Serial No. 1446/1, C/S 391.  This gun was previously on SS Green Gables Park.

 (Al Dadds Photos)

Notes on the 12-pounder 12-cwt QF Mk. V (3-inch-40) Breechloading Naval Guns (Ogden 3-inch Naval Gun), in British Columbia: The army had problems before the war with their 12-pounder being shot out and therefore a few barrels were acquired from the navy in the 1930s.  The Ogden barrels seem to have the S69xx pattern.  Note that in every case in the file, the gun is listed as a Mk. I.  Mounting CAN 396 was an RCN mounting and was in CNAD Esquimalt in 1946.  Mounting CAN 397 was also an RCN mounting and was in CNAD Esquimalt in 1946.

Barrel No. 6539 on mounting A/2514 was located at Duntze Head in 1912 along with Barrel No. 6473 on mounting A/2493 and Barrel No. 52.  6473 is later recorded at Macaulay in 1933 and then 6473 and 6539 are recorded at Black Rock on 1 Oct 1946.   Barrel No. 6539 was manufactured in 1918 at the Royal Gun Factory (RGF) in the UK, so the Mk. I designation may be valid.
Frederick Battery - Prince Rupert
Barrel No. 2902 on A/1813 in 1946 - this combination was located at Halifax in 1901.  Transferred to Prince Rupert by 1941.
Barrel No. 6554 on A/1874 in 1946 - this combination was located at Halifax in 1923.  Transferred to Prince Rupert by 1941.
The west coast 12-pounder 12-cwt QF Mk. V (3-inch-40) Breechloading Naval Guns (Ogden 3-inch Naval Gun), may be Mk. 1 guns or at least production predating Ogden.  They may have been army guns or navy guns, but the mountings were all early production.  Note the different barrel shape.  The Mk. I barrels had liners and stepped down at the mid barrel point, whereas the Mk. V barrel was a monobloc (one piece barrel) and ramps down at mid barrel.  The North Vancouver gun has a different mounting.  In comparison with the Sault Ste Marie 12-pounder data plate, it is probably an HA Mk. IX mounting - assuming Ogden did not produce several different types.  See the photo of the Mk. I mounting that Canada used starting about 1900.  The gun shield of the early ones (when fitted ) is a wraparound, whereas the Mk. IX mounting is a flat plate with no flank protection.  (Doug Knight)
Golf Hill Battery
Barrel No. 1656 on mounting A/1812 in 1946 - mounting was at Black Rock in 1912 with barrel No. 1072.  In 1912, barrel No. 1656 was at Martiniere, Québec on mounting A/2901.  Barrel No. 1656 on mounting A/1811 at Black Rock on A/1811 in 1933 and at Golf Hill on mounting A/1811 in 1943.  Barrel No. 1656 was manufactured at the RGF in 1906 - definitely a Mk I.
Barrel No. 6751 on mounting A/1811 in 1946 - mounting was at Black Rock in 1912 with barrel No. 1057. No. 6751 was transferred from the naval service in 1937 (probably at Halifax - murky) and shows up on A/1811 at Golf Hill in 1943.  No date of manufacture for No. 6751, but it predates the Ogden Mk. V and is probably a Mk. I. 
North Vancouver
Barrel No. 6517 on A/2902 in 1946 - a bit murky. No. 6517 transferred from the Naval service in 1938.  Narrows North Fisheries Research Board (FRB) has it there in 1943, with no specified mounting.  Mounting A/2902 only shows up on the 1946 report and nowhere else.  It could be a naval mounting or a typo.  Note mounting A/2901 is at Golf Hill.
Barrel No. 6542 on A/1814 in 1946 - transferred from the Naval service in 1938.  Narrows North FRB has it there in 1943, with no specified mounting.  A/1814 first noted in Halifax in 1902.
 
12-pounder 12-cwt gun, probably Mk 1 breechloading Gun, ca 1900.  (15th Field Regiment Archive Photo)

CFB Esquimalt Museum

 (Maxwell Toms Photo)

 (John Stanton Photo)

 (Al Dadds Photos)

Bronze 6-pounder 6-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 6-0-2 (674 lbs), Serial No. 1305 on right trunnion, No. 1 of 2, mounted on a wood naval stand very worn, no details visible including ciphers.  These guns are mounted in front of the CFB Esquimalt Museum.

 (John Stanton Photo)

 (Al Dadds Photo)

Bronze 6-pounder 6-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 5-3-25 (669 lbs), Serial No. 513 on right trunnion, No. 2 of 2, No. 2 of 2, mounted on a wood naval stand in front of the CFB Esquimalt Museum.

Work Point Barracks

 (John Eckersley Photos)

 (Al Dadds Photos)

3-inch 20-cwt QF Mk. IIIA Anti-Aircraft Gun, RGF 1916, No. 1013, RGF 1918, 1 1591, with the breech stamped III & III*, RGF 1919, (Serial No. 2018), breech RGF 1918 No. 1013 stamped out, 1918 L/1591, mounted on the grounds of Work Point Barracks, just to the East of the Work Point Power Club building.  The breech mechanism on the Mark III used a two-motion screw system (the breech is opened and closed in two motions), which was introduced for speed of production in 1917.  The Mk. III* was the same as the Mk. III but with rifling with one turn in 40 calibres, and it came out in 1918.  The gun had a maximum range of 23,500' and fired shrapnel, HE and incendiary ammunition.  It remained in use throughout the Second World War. 

It is possible the marking in the photo of the breech shown here which would have meant it was interchangeable with either the Mk. III or Mk. III* guns.  According to Ian Hogg, the Mk. IIIA was a Mk. III or a Mk. III* which had been repaired by the removal of the “A” tube and wire and replaced by an autofrettaged loose liner about 1933.  In English, the original barrel was a steel tube (“A” tube) wrapped with tightly wound wire and covered with a steel jacket.  The barrel and wire could be removed using hydraulic pressure and replaced - cheaper than a complete new barrel.  In this case it was replaced with a liner (think inner barrel) which had been pre-stressed using hydraulic pressure (autofrettaged) which gave a strong barrel.  (Doug Knight)

Col R.A. Jacobsen CD, President of the RCA Association presented this gun to LCol  W.B. Vernon CD, CO 3 PPCLI, on 3 March 1981 as a memorial to all gunners who served at Work Point Barracks.

VENTURE, the Naval Officers Training Centre (NOTC)

  Port side gun, L.

 Starboard side gun, R.

 (Al Dadds Photos)

4-inch/45 QF Mk. XVI* Twin Guns ((Serial No. S/13505), left, and (Serial No. S.8348), right, on a 4-inch High Angle Mk. XIX Twin Sight manufactured by the Vivian Engine Works, Vancouver BC, ring Company, No. Can 58, 1942.

Esquimalt

 (John Eckersley Photos)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.) (Serial Nr. 595), with large wheels  This gun was captured by the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles, 8th Canadian Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) at Cambrai, West of Neuville St. Remy, France on 29 September 1918.  It is on display in Memorial Park, 1200 Esquimalt Rd., Esquimalt.

The 7.7 cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7 cm FK 96 n.A.) is a German First World War field gun.  The gun combined the barrel of the earlier 7.7 cm FK 96 with a recoil system, a new breech and a new carriage. Existing FK 96s were upgraded over time.  The FK 96 n.A. was shorter-ranged, but lighter than the French Canon de 75 modèle 1897 or the British Ordnance QF 18 pounder gun; the Germans placed a premium on mobility, which served them well during the early stages of World War I. However, once the front had become static, the greater rate of fire of the French gun and the heavier shells fired by the British gun put the Germans at a disadvantage. The Germans remedied this by developing the longer-ranged, but heavier 7.7 cm FK 16.  As with most guns of its era, the FK 96 n.A. had seats for two crewmen mounted on its splinter shield.

(Colin Wyatt Photo)

 (John Eckersley Photos)

German First World War 7.7-cm Nahkampfkanone (7.7-cm NK) close support gun (Serial Nr. 9739).  These guns were minimal modifications of the standard gun to make it more suitable  as an infantry support gun.  They were often used as "silent" guns - heavily camouflaged guns which only went into action if the front line was breached during an attack. About the only changes made to the standard gun was to drop the lower part of the gun shield and the footrests of the axle tree seats as well as the smaller wheels.  Charlie Clelland.  This gun was captured by the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles, 8th Canadian Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) at Vimy Ridge, La Folie Farm, France on 9 Oct 1917.  It was initially allocated to Cranbrook but is now on display in Memorial Park, 1200 Esquimalt Rd., Esquimalt..  They were made an official part of the war memorial in 1941.

 (Richard Laughton Photo)

Outstanding restoration of the two German First World War trophy guns at Esquimalt in 2015.

Fort Langley National Historic Site of Canada

 (John Eckersley Photo)

Cast Iron ½-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 1-1-1 (129 lbs), appears to be a replica.

Kamloops

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/15 Machineguns carried by German Prisoners of War captured by Canadians, June 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3403114)

German First World War 7.92-mm Spandau MG 08/15 heavy machine gun (Serial Nr. TBC), inside the Rocky Mountain Rangers Museum.

155-mm C1 (M1A2) Medium Howitzer on M1A2 Carriage, aka M114, manufactured at Sorel Industries Limited in Quebec, Queen Elizabeth II cypher.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4235869)

155-mm C1 (M1A2) Medium Howitzer on M1A2 Carriage, aka M114, manufactured at Sorel Industries Limited in Quebec, Queen Elizabeth II cypher.  R. Vicars Armoury, 1221 McGill Road.

Sorel Industries Limited in Quebec manufactured 209 155-mm Howitzers.  Of these 180 were built for NATO, with the remaining 29 going to the Royal Canadian Artillery.  In 1951 an order was placed for 47 155-mm Howitzers from the USA.  All of the Ordnance BL 5.5-inch Medium Guns in service were replaced by 155-mm Howitzers in 1954.  The guns produced in Canada by Sorel are designated Howitzer, Medium, Towed, 155-mm, C1.  The designation for the guns procured in the USA before 1962, was 155-mm Howitzer M1A1 on Carriage M1A2.  After 1962, it was designated the Howitzer, Medium, Towed, 155-mm, M114.

Queen Elizabeth II. reigning from 6 Feb 1952 to present.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4314245)

Queen Elizabeth cypher, on the barrel of a gun.

Kaslo

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/15 heavy machine gun being examined by Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade Officers, March 1918.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3522120)

 (Mary Linn Photo)

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/15 heavy machine gun, (Serial Nr. 4076).

Kelowna 

 (Al Dadds Photos)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 2577), TBC, captured by the 7th Battalion (1st British Columbia)  2nd Canadian Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) on 2 Sep 1918, West of Vilers-lez-Cagnicourt, France.  Okanagan Military Museum, 1424 Ellis Street in Kelowna.  The gun stands outside surrounded by pedestals topped with stones marking Battles of the First World War in which area residents gave their lives.  The stones are from the original Kelowna Cenotaph, replaced in the City Park several years ago.

Ladysmith

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16),  possibly (Serial Nr. 7065), on display from 1921 until removed in 1941 by rail, and sent to the smelter to aid in the war effort.  (Photos courtesy of Bridget, Ladysmith Historical Society)

Maple Ridge

 (Rudy Lisop Photos)

6-pounder 7-cwt QF Anti-Tank Gun, located across the road from the Lilley Drive bulk loading potable water station 3100 block in the Kanaka Industrial Park.  The 6 acre site is a movie prop storage and assembly company not open to the public.

Japanese Type 93 13.2-mm twin mount light anti-aircraft gun (left).  (USGOV-PD Photo) and a Japanese Type 96 25-mm twin barreled anti-aircraft gun (right).  (Daderot Photo)

Japanese 13.2-mm or 25-mm twin-barreled Anti-Aircraft gun (MISSING - seeking information on its present location).  This gun was brought to to the Vernon, British Columbia Army Training Camp from Kiska, Alaska, in early 1944 by the 24th Field Artillery Regiment, RCA.  The Regimental War Diary entry describes it as a 20-mm twin-barreled AA gun.  Research to date indicates there were no twin-barreled models of 20-mm calibre found on Kiska (viz. intelligence ground survey in 1943 after Allied occupation).  The only 20-mm AA guns were single-barreled models.  However, many twin-barreled types of both 13.2-mm and 25-mm were found.  The same results came from the 2007/8 Kiska Guns and sites preservation survey.  The anti-aircraft gun brought to Vernon by the 24th Field RCA was positioned in front of the regimental sergeants’ mess.  It disappeared from the camp sometime after the 24th Field RCA was disbanded in 1945.  RCA Captain (Retired) Robert H. (Bob) Spring is seeking information from anyone who was posted to the Vernon, BC Army Training Camp during or after 1944 (including as an Army Cadet in later years), who recalls seeing the twin-barreled AA gun referred to and remembers which of the two models depicted in the photos it was.  Additionally, information as to the disposition of the gun or its current location (particularly if it can be confirmed it is in a museum or private collection etc.) is sought.  Please contact Bob at #414 - 12258 224th Street, Maple Ridge, BC, V2X 8Y7, Canada, or by e-mail: bobspring@shaw.ca if you have any information on these missing guns.

Nanaimo

 (Maxwell Toms Photo)

Cast Iron 12-pounder 6-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight TBC, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage, inside the Nanaimo Bastion, 98 Front Street.  The carronade is a short smoothbore, cast iron cannon, which was used by the Royal Navy and first produced by the Carron Company, an ironworks in Falkirk, Scotland.  It was used from the 1770s to the 1850s.  Its main function was to serve as a powerful, short-range anti-ship and anti-crew weapon.  While considered very successful early on, carronades eventually disappeared as rifled naval artillery changed the shape of the shell and led to fewer and fewer close-range engagements.

 (Maxwell Toms Photos)

Blomefield 6-pounder 9-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 9-1-23, (1,059 lbs), maker and Serial No. unknown, mounted on a wooden naval gun carriage, No. 1 of 2 in front of the Nanaimo Bastion.  One is used for firing demonstrations.

Blomefield 6-pounder 9-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 9-1-23, (1,059 lbs), maker and Serial No. unknown, mounted on a wooden naval gun carriage, No. 2 of 2 in front of the Nanaimo Bastion.

 (Al Dadds Photos)

105-mm C1 HowitzerBrigadier Sargent Armoury.

Naramata

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/15 heavy machine gun, (Serial Nr. 7784).  Captured by the 52nd Battalion on 28 August 1918 at Boiry, France, this machine gun was officially allocated to Naramata.

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08 heavy machine gun (Serial Nr. 3720), 1917, mounted on a Schlitten stand.  This machine gun was captured by the 19th Battalion (Central Ontario) 4th Canadian Infantry Brigade, 2nd Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF).  (Photo courtesy of the Naramata Museum)

New Westminster

64-pounder 71-cwt Converted Rifled Muzzleloading Gun with Millar-pattern breeching ring, mounted on an iron garrison carriage.  The gun is from the lower deck of a British Man of War, from redundant stores of the Royal Navy Dockyard sent to Vicotira, in 1895.   It stands in front of the Armoury, home of the Museum of the Royal Westminster Regiment, 530 Queen’s Avenue

The Seymour Battery of Garrison Artillery at "The Battery" southeast of Albert Crescent in New Westminster, ca 1878-1886.  (RCA Photo)

 (Leon Jensen Photo)

Bronze 24-pounder 12-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Howitzer, weight unknown, 1858 stamped on one trunnion, Queen Victoria (1837 to 1901) cypher.  Mounted on a wheeled carriage, No. 1 of 2 on display in front of City Hall.  These guns arrived on 15 Sep 1866 on HMS Sparrowhawk and were used for training and defence until 1873.

 (Leon Jenson Photos)

Bronze 24-pounder 12-cwt Smoothbore Muzzle-loading Howitzer, weight 12-2-24 (1,424 lbs), 1858 stamped on one trunnion, Queen Victoria cypher.  Mounted on a wheeled carriage, No. 2 of 2 on display in front of City Hall.

Ordnance Rifle, replica, 1861, Seymour Battery.

 

Queen Victoria and her cypher, reigned from 2 June 1837 to 22 Jan 1901, portrait at her Coronation, 1838.  (Wikipedia Photo)

North Vancouver 

 (John Eckersley Photos)

12-pounder 12-cwt QF Mk. V (3-inch-40) Breechloading Naval Gun with shield and stand (Ogden 3-inch Naval gun) mounted on a (probably) Mk. IX naval mounting, (Serial No. S69107), standing in front of the Navy League of Canada, 1555 Forbes Ave.

Roger’s Pass

105-mm C1A1 M2A2 Howitzer, RCHA, Germany, ca 1960.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4234806)

 (The A-Team Photos)

105-mm C1A1 M2A2 Howitzer, CDN 34042, No. 1 of 3 RCA monuments.  This Howitzer carries the suffix AVCON denoting its usage in avalanche control. 34042 is mounted on a 1955-built M2A2 carriage. At the time it was disposed by the Canadian Armed Forces, the gun was under the custody of 25 Canadian Forces Supply Depot in Montreal, Quebec.

 (The A-Team Photo)

A plaque mounted on top of eight spent 105-mm shell casings stands between these two guns.  It reads: "To commemorate the 125th Anniversary of Glacier National Park, the 100th Anniversary of Parks Canada and the 50th Anniversary of the Canadian Forces' partnership with Parks Canada in the operation of avalanche control by artillery fire at Rogers Pass, this gun has been presented by The Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery and Canada Command to honour all those who have served to keep Canadians, the Trans-Canada Highway and the Canadian Pacific Railway safe."  Presented on the 10th of September 2011.

 (The A-Team Photo)

105-mm C1A1 M2A2 Howitzer, CDN 34134, No. 2 of 3 RCA monuments.  This Howitzer carries the suffix AVCON denoting its usage in avalanche control. 34134 is mounted on a 1955-built M2A2 carriage. At the time it was disposed by the Canadian Armed Forces, the gun was under the custody of 25 Canadian Forces Supply Depot in Montreal, Quebec.

105-mm C1A1 M2A2 Howitzer, CDN 34040, No. 3 of 3 RCA monuments.  This gun is located on the side of the Trans-Canada Highway near the summit of Rogers Pass.  

These 105-mm C1A1 Howitzers were used as part of Operation PALACI, the Canadian Armed Forces' contribution to Parks Canada's avalanche-control program in Rogers Pass.  Every winter, Howitzers like this are used to trigger controlled avalanches high in the surrounding mountains in an effort to prevent potentially-deadly uncontrolled avalanches from coming down on the Trans-Canada Highway.  These guns are  located on the side of the Trans-Canada Highway near the Rogers Pass monument, at the summit of Rogers Pass in British Columbia.

Sidney

  (Colin Stevens Photo)

 (John Eckersley Photos)

4-inch/45 QF Mk. IV Gun, on a single mount, (Serial No. 985), from HMCS Aurora.  This naval gun is located in front of the Merchant Navy, Army, Navy & Air Force (ANAF) Hall, 9831 4th St.

"Considering that both her 6-inch guns and at least five out of six of her 4-inch guns eventually joined the Army, HMCS Aurora should be considered an honorary member of the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery".  (Doug Knight)

 (John Eckersley Photo)

German First World War 7.92-mm Spandau MG 08/15 heavy machine gun (Serial Nr. TBC).  This machine-gun is located inside the Merchant Navy, Army, Navy & Air Force (ANAF) Hall, 9831 4th St. 

Trail, 24th Field Artillery Regiment

The 24th Field Artillery Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery was a Primary Reserve Royal Canadian Artillery (RCA) regiment based in Trail, British Columbia.  The regiment currently exists on the Supplementary Order of Battle.

Ucluelet

 (John Eckersley Photo)

12-pounder 12-cwt QF Mk. V (3-inch-40) Breechloading Naval Gun (Ogden 3-inch Naval gun)from HMCS Thiepval, located at the harbour shore near the dock.   

Valemont

C1A1 105-mm M2A2 Howitzer, CDN No. unknown, 1950.  This gun stands in front of the Royal Canadian Legion, 907 Main Street.

Canoe River Memorial.  On 21 November 1950, 17 soldiers of 2 RCHA were killed in a train wreck while en route to the West Coast and embarkation for Korea.  The wreck occurred near Canoe River, a remote settlement in the Rocky Mountains.  The Canoe River Memorial marks this tragedy.

Vancouver

 (Thesocialistesq Photo)

Cast Iron 12-pounder 6-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun with Dolphin carrying handles, weight unknown, H & C King, 1816, DCLVII, King George III cypher (1760-1820), and Henry Phipps, 1st Earl of Mulgrave, Master General of the Ordnance cypher.  This gun is mounted on a wood Naval gun carriage, and currently rests behind a wire cage in Stanley Park.  It is one of the guns given by the British Government to the "provinces of Canada" in 1856.   Originally located at Nanimo, the gun was moved to Esquimalt during the Pig War with the US.  In 1894 it was moved to Vancouver’s Stanley Park, where it is fired every night at 9 PM.

 (ChapterhouseInc Photos)

Cast Iron possibly 6-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, replica, mounted on a wood Naval Gun carriage.  Located just outside the War of 1812 Museum at Canada Place.

 (Mike Thornley Photo)

Cast Iron 64-pounder 64-cwt Muzzleloading Rifle, weight unknown, maker and Serial No. unknown, mounted on an iron garrison carriage, No. 1 of 2, Beatty Street Drill Hall, 620 Beatty St.  There were six of these MLRs at Victoria in 1906.

 (Leon Jensen Photos)

Cast Iron 64-pounder 64-cwt Muzzleloading Rifle, weight unknown, maker and Serial No. unknown, mounted on an iron garrison carriage, No. 2 of 2, Beatty Street Drill Hall, 620 Beatty St.  

Vancouver, 15th Field Artillery Regiment, RCA

The 15th Field Artillery Regiment is a Primary Reserve Royal Canadian Artillery (RCA) regiment based in Vancouver at the Bessborough Armoury.  15th Field Regiment is part of the 39 Canadian Brigade Group of Land Force Western Area.  The regiment was created in 1920 as one of the recommendations of the Otter Committee.  In the Second World War it manned the coastal defence artillery guns that protected the Port of Vancouver.  After the war the regiment reverted to field artillery.

 (John Eckersley Photo)

Cast Iron 9-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight, maker and Serial No. unknown, 15 above a Queen Anne cypher, No. 1 of 2, mounted on a concrete stand in front of the East entrance to the Bessborough Armoury.  The Queen Anne gun would date between 1702 and 1714.  This gun was one of two found buried at the Woolwich Arsenal in London.   They were brought to Canada in the 1980s, as a favour via a Royal Fleet Auxiliary vessel, cleaned at Chilliwack, and mounted outside the armoury.

Anne, Queen of Great Britain (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714).  She became Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland on 8 March 1702.  On 1 May 1707, under the Acts of Union, two of her realms, the kingdoms of England and Scotland, united as a single sovereign state known as Great Britain.  She continued to reign as Queen of Great Britain and Ireland until her death.

 

 (John Eckersley Photos)

Cast Iron 24-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight, maker and Serial No. unknown, 25, No. 2 of 2, mounted on a concrete stand in front of the West entrance to the Bessborough Armoury.  This gun was one of two originally buried at the Woolwich Arsenal in London.   It may date from the 18th century, but without markings, its provenance is unknown.  The two guns were brought to Canada in the 1980s, as a favour via a Royal Fleet Auxiliary vessel, cleaned at Chilliwack, and mounted outside the armoury.

25-pounder C Mk. 2 QF Field Gun with No. 9 circular firing platform, towed by a Canadian Military Pattern (CMP) Field Artillery Tractor (FAT).   (Library and Archives Canada, MIKAN No. 3607521)

25-pounder C Mk. 2 QF Field Gun with No. 9 circular firing platform,  being served by Gunners of 17th Fd Regt, RCA, in action at Castel Frentano, Italy, 10 Feb 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3534477)

25-pounder C Mk. 2 QF Field Gun with No. 9 circular firing platform, RCA, ca 1950s.  (DND Photos)

 

 (John Eckersley Photos)

25-pounder C Mk. 2 QF Field Gun with No. 9 circular firing platform, Carriage Reg. No. CA 15944.  

 (John Eckersley Photos)

25-pounder C Mk. 2 QF Field Gun with No. 9 circular firing platform, Carriage Reg. No.  CA 10642 with Limber CA-29149.  Inventory of the Regiment, can be fired.

 (John Eckersley Photos)

25-pounder C Mk. 2 QF Field Gun with No. 9 circular firing platform, with funeral platform, Carriage Reg. No. CA 10636, with Limber CA-29258.  Inventory of the Regiment.

 (John Ekersley Photo)

Canadian Military Pattern Field Artillery Tractor.

 (John Eckersley Photos)

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun, Breech Casing No. 7880. 

 (City of Vancouver Archives Photo, CVA 371-1102)

French Canon de 75-mm modèle 1897, being towed by a truck from the 148th Field Artillery Regiment Battery East Vancouver, at 1062 West Georgia Street in 1938.

6-pounder 7-cwt QF Anti-Tank Gun with the 3rd Anti-tank Regiment RCA during training exercise, 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4542723)

  

 (John Eckersley Photos)

6-pounder 7-cwt QF Anti-Tank Gun stamped 6 PDR B/R No. L/17978 Montreal T G-1966.  Previously on display at the Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 30, Kerrisdale, 2177 W 42nd Street.  This gun is currently in storage and after being restored will be on display at the Bessborough Armoury.

Vancouver, Old Hastings Mill Store Museum

Three guns are located just inside the museum, located at 1575 Alma Street.  Lieutenant Governor Eric Hamber contributed these guns to Hastings Mill collection of memorabilia.  The guns came with the mill’s first shipment of supplies from England, ca 1865.  The rough-sawed cedar plank pioneer store was initially erected on the south shore of Burrard Inlet for British Captain Edward Stamp’s British Columbia and Vancouver Island Spar, Lumber and Sawmill Company, established in 1865.  On 28 July 1930, the old Hastings Mill store and post office was hoisted aboard a large scow, and towed some ten kilometers from Burrard Inlet, through the Lions Gate and across English Bay to its present location.

  (John Eckersley Photo)

Cast Iron 4-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with Blomefield pattern breeching ring, stamped FALKIRK PROVD. 4PR, weight unknown, trunnion data unknown, mounted on a small wood naval gun carriage. No. 1 of 3.

  (John Eckersley Photos)

Cast Iron 4-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with Blomefield pattern breeching ring, stamped FALKIRK PROVD. 4PR, weight unknown, trunnion data unknown, mounted on a small wood naval gun carriage. No. 2 of 3.

 (John Eckersley Photos)

Bronze 4-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown, (No. 18) on the left trunnion.  The length from muzzle to the tip of the knob is 37 inches and the diameter of the bore at the muzzle is 3.25 inches (this measurement is consistent with a 4-pounder).  The gun is mounted on a small wood naval gun carriage. with a stone holding the button down.  No. 3 of 3.

Vancouver, HMCS Discovery

1-pounder QF Mk. I (Maxim) Gun, V.S.M. (Vickers, Sons and Maxim LL) 1902 Automatic Gun, (Serial No. N1103), mounted on a stand stamped (Serial No. 10875).  This gun aka "pom-pom", is inside the main entrance to HMCS Discovery.

6-pounder 8-cwt QF Mk. I Hotchkiss Gun, No. 1 of 2, (Serial No. TBC), Montreal, 1941-42, mounted on Vickers, Sons & Maxim LL 8-pound 1901 stand.  These guns were used on board HMCS Bonaventure.  Alberni Street.  (Photos courtesy of PO2 Gordon J. McGee)

6-pounder 8-cwt QF Mk. I Hotchkiss Gun, No. 2 of 2, (Serial No. TBC), Montreal, 1941-42, mounted on Vickers, Sons & Maxim LL 8-pound 1901 stand.  Alberni Street.

Vancouver

 (City of Vancouver Archives Photos)

German First World War 21-cm Mörser 1916 neuer Art (21-cm Mrs 16 n.A.) Heavy Mortar, (Serial Nr. 1136), captured by 72nd Bn on 27 Sep or 2 Nov 1918.  This gun was sent to Vancouver ca 1919, and carried a dedication plaque that read, "This twenty-one centimeter German howitzer is one of the two such guns captured by the 72nd Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders of Canada during the operations in France of November 1st to November 4th, 1918.  These operations resulted in the passage of the Canal de l'Escaut and the taking of the City of Valenciennes and several smaller towns. The forward movement initiated by this attack never slackened for one moment until Mons was captured and the Armistice declared on November 11th, 1918."  It is believed that the gun was scrapped ca 1939/1942 to aid the war effort.

Vernon

(Bob Spring Photo)

 (John Eckersley Photo)

76-mm QF Naval Gun  N211945, 1898.  This British-made gun was in service with the Japanese as a Type 41 3-inch Naval Gun.  The Japanese characters stamped above the breech translate to "No. 328".  This gun is currently on display at the Army Cadet Camp, Vernon, British Columbia.  It was originally captured by the Japanese at Singapore in 1941.  The Japanese Army's No. 3 Special Landing Party and 500 Marines went ashore at Kiska, Alaska on 6 June 1942 capturing the ten-man US Navy Weather Detachment based there.  The gun was then set up in a coastal defence position on the beach at Kiska.  The Japanese became aware of a large Allied invasion force headed their way after the loss of the island of Attu.  They successfully withdrew their troops under the cover of severe fog on 28 July without being detected.  On 15 August 1943, an Allied invasion of 34,426 troops including 5,300 Canadians landed on the island and discovered it had been completely abandoned.  In spite of this, there were casualties, with 17 Americans and four Canadians dying as a result of preparatory suppression fire and, booby traps.

The Naval gun was collected and brought to Vernon in 1944 by Canadian Engineers.  It was set up in front of their mess hall where it stood for a few years until being moved to its present display location in front of the headquarters of the Vernon Army Cadet Summer Camp.  The gun serves as a memorial to the four Canadian fatalities from the Winnipeg Grenadiers, the Fusiliers de Mont-Royal and the Rocky Mountain Rangers.

Type 41 3-inch (76.2 mm)/40 QF Naval Gun

The 12 pounder 12 cwt QF Naval Gun was a common 3-inch (76.2-mm) calibre naval gun introduced in 1894 and used until the middle of the 20th century.  It was produced by Armstrong Whitworth, Elswick and used on Royal Navy warships, and exported to allied countries.  In British service, “12-pounder” was a rounded reference to the projectile weight and “12 cwt” referred to the weight of the barrel and breech: 12 hundredweight  = 12 x 112 pounds = 1,344 pounds, to differentiate it from other “12 pounder” guns.  As the Type 41 3-inch (76.2 mm)/40 naval Gun it was used on most early battleships and cruisers of the Imperial Japanese Navy, though it was commonly referred to by its UK designation as a “12-pounder” gun.

Victoria

 (Maxwell Toms Photo)

Bronze ½-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Rail Gun, possibly ca. 1457, large cypher,weight, maker and Serial No. unknown.  Maritime Museum of British Columbia.

 (Maxwell Toms Photo)

Cast Iron 4-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun with Blomefield-pattern breeching ring, weight unknown, Brander Potts and Co., no cypher, small gun made for the Hudson's Bay Company, mounted on a small wood naval gun carriage, Maritime Museum of British Columbia.

  (Maxwell Toms Photo)

Bronze 6-pounder 6-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight unknown, (F. KINMAN) (Francis Kinman at Woolwich, England) on the chase, John Pitt, 2nd Earl of Chatham, Master General of the Ordnance (MG) 1807-1810 cypher. This gun is equipped with a fitting for an elevating screw, and is mounted on a wooden naval gun carriage in the Maritime Museum of British Columbia.

Cypher, General John Pitt, 2nd Earl of Chatham, Master General of the Ordnance 1801–1806  and 1807–1810

  (Maxwell Toms Photo)

Bronze 6-pounder 6-cwt Lyle Gun, weight, maker and Serial No. unknown, mounted on a naval carriage, Maritime Museum of British Columbia.  Possibly an artifact listed as a small SBML bronze Mortar, received from the RCN in 1953.  These guns were used to fire a safety line to aid in rescues.

  (Maxwell Toms Photo)

Cast Iron ½-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight, maker and Serial No. unknown, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage, waterside walkway, Laurel Point.

Victoria, 5 (British Columbia) Field Artillery Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery

The 5th Field Artillery Regiment is a Primary Reserve Royal Canadian Artillery (RCA) regiment based in Victoria.  15th Field Regiment is part of the 39 Canadian Brigade Group of Land Force Western Area.  5th Field Regiment sub units include the 55th Field Battery and the 56th Field Battery.

  (Maxwell Toms Photo)

 (Al Dadds Photos)

6-pounder 8-cwt QF Mk. I Hotchkiss Gun, (Serial No. 1585), previously served as part of the Victoria harbour coast defences until 1956.  Room 505 of the Armoury, 715 Bay Street.

   (Maxwell Toms Photo)

 (Al Dadds Photos)

  (Maxwell Toms Photo)

13-pounder 6-cwt QF Mk. I Field Gun, weight 7-3-26 (894 lbs), Queen Victoria cypher, RGF No. 26, I, 1881 on the right trunnion, 1° 3', muzzle stamped WHITWORTH S STEEL, 5929, trail marked W arrow D, RCD 1881, No. 55.

This gun is one of only six Guns of this type used in Canada, issued to the 5th Canadian Garrison Artillery (CGA) Field Company for the Victoria/Esquimalt fortress defences.

 (Maxwell Toms & Terry Honour Photos)

12-pounder 8-cwt QF Naval Landing Gun, weight 8-0-0 (896 lbs), Gun Serial No. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­14, 1898, Breech Block Serial No. 1010, 87, dated 1910, Carriage weight 6-1/4-cwt, Admiralty No. 89, 1899, with Limber Serial No. unknown.  The breech block on this gun is for a 12-pounder 12-cwt Field Gun.

 (Al Dadds Photos)

The 12-pounder 8-cwt QF Naval Landing Gun was carried on ships of the British and Commonwealth navies for use by naval landing parties.  This is one of two in Victoria.  These guns were almost entirely restricted to use as naval landing guns by sailors and marines. Its ammunition was separate Quick Firing (QF), which means the projectile and propellant were separate loading, the latter in an ejectable brass cartridge case; this same ammunition was also used by heavier shipboard 12-pounders. Typically, the landing gun appears on a low carriage, with small-diameter spoked wheels. Despite its 8 hundredweight (8-cwt), it had the same length of rifled bore as the 12-pounder 7-cwt. Nelson Lawry.  The Naval Landing Guns found in Canada probably originated on early ships of the Royal Canadian Navy, such as HMCS Niobe, HMCS Aurora, HMCS Rainbow and others. Details on the gun may be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ordnance_QF_12_pounder_8_cwt.

 (Maxwell Toms Photo)

 (Al Dadds Photos)

25-pounder C Mk. 2 QF Field Gun with No. 9 circular firing platform, and Limber.  This was previously equipped with a funeral platform for the funeral of General Pearkes, who was the Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia.

German First World War 7.92-mm Spandau MG 08 heavy machine gun (Serial Nr. unknown), inside the Canadian Scottish Regiment Museum in the Bay Street Armoury.

German First World War 7.92-mm Spandau MG 08/15 heavy machine gun (Serial Nr. unknown), inside the Canadian Scottish Regiment Museum in the Bay Street Armoury.

German Second World War 7.92-mm MG 34 heavy machine gun (Serial Nr. unknown), inside the Canadian Scottish Regiment Museum in the Bay Street Armoury.

German Second World War 7.92-mm MG 42 heavy machine gun (Serial Nr. unknown), inside the Canadian Scottish Regiment Museum in the Bay Street Armoury.

Japanese 7.92-mm Type 99 machine-gun inside the Museum.
 

 

  
 
 
 (Al Dadds Photos)
106-mm M40 Recoiless Rifle, CO-9809, inside the Museum.

 Victoria, HMCS Malahat

 (Richard Gear Photos)

12-pounder 8-cwt QF Naval Landing Gun, weight 8-0-0 (896 lbs), Gun Serial No. 1213, 1900, Breech Block Serial No. 2294 stamped out, new number 1213, dated 1910, Carriage weight 6-cwt, Admiralty No. TBC, 1899, with Limber.  20 Huron Street.  The 12-pounder 8-cwt QF Naval Landing Gun was carried on ships of the British and Commonwealth navies for use by naval landing parties.  This one of two in Victoria.

The original breechblock of the landing gun at HMCS Malahat has been replaced with a new and likely reworked block. The old serial number on the breechblock has been scratched out and a new serial number, 1213 (in 1910) at Malahat has been stamped on so that the parent gun and block continue to possess the same serial number. Apparently an upgrade was made in the QF breech mechanism a few years later, and new blocks were sent out from Britain.  The originals were likely returned to Woolwich or Elswick to be modified in turn and sent to another location.  (Nelson Lawry).  The Naval Landing Guns found in Canada probably originated on early ships of the Royal Canadian Navy, such as HMCS Niobe, HMCS Aurora, HMCS Rainbow and others.  There is also a possibility that the gun may have been left behind when the British garrisons left Canada in 1905-06.   Details on this type of gun may be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ordnance_QF_12_pounder_8_cwt.

 (Richard Gear Photos) 

Cast Iron possible 3-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, reproduction, ESQ 001 above the touchhole, mounted on a wood wheeled wood gun carriage, used for the "gun run" drills.

Victoria, Lieutenant-General E.C. Aston Armoury

German Second World War 7.92-mm MG 42 heavy machine gun (Serial Nr. TBC), inside the 39 Canadian Brigade Group Armoury Museum.

Portable Infantry Anti-Tank Projector (PIAT).

Victoria, Canadian Forces Ammunition Depot, Rocky Point

Part of CFB Esquimalt, Canadian Forces Ammunition Depot (CFAD) Rocky Point is one of four ammunition depots strategically located across Canada. It provides ammunition, explosives and related support services to CF operations and DND activities.

  

 (Al Dadds Photos)

4-inch/45 QF Mk. XVI* Twin Guns ((Serial No. unknown), left, and (Serial No. unknown), right, on a 4-inch High Angle Mk. XIX Twin Sight manufactured by the Vivian Engine Works, Vancouver BC, ring Company, No. Can 83, 1942.

White Rock

 (Maxwell Toms Photo)

 (John Eckersley Photos)

25-pounder C Mk. 2 QF Field Gun with No. 9 circular firing platform, II/I S.I.C.-9-42.  CFL 5647SIC 44, C.VI. RX, standing in a park located at 15322 Buena Vista Avenue.