Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Artillery preserved in Canada 1: British Columbia, Belleville, Chilliwack, Cranbrook, Esquimalt, Fort Langley, Kamloops, Kaslo, Kelowna, Ladysmith and Maple Ridge

Artillery preserved in the province of

British Columbia, Belleville, Chilliwack, Cranbrook, Esquimalt, Fort Langley, Kamloops, Kaslo, Kelowna, Ladysmith and Maple Ridge

Data current to 3 Feb 2019.

The aim of this website is to locate, identify and document every historical piece of artillery preserved in Canada.  Many contributors have assisted in the hunt for these guns to provide and update the data found on these web pages.  Photos are by the author unless otherwise credited.  Any errors found here are by the author, and any additions, corrections or amendments to this list of Guns and Artillery in Canada would be most welcome and may be e-mailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com.

For all official data concerning the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, please click on the link to their website:

Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery Website

Note: Back in the day, artillery in Canada was referred to by its radio call sign "Sheldrake".  It is now referred to by its "Golf" call sign.  (Acorn sends)

British Columbia

Belleville

Blomefield 6-pounder 9-cwt SBML Gun, Belleville, BC, ca 1918.  City of Vancouver Archives Photo, AM640-S1-: CVA 260-1926)

Chilliwack, Canadian Military Education Centre.

The CMEC is a Non Profit Museum Society.  It is a member of the Organization of Military Museums and a recognized Military Museum by the DND.  It is operated by a group of dedicated volunteers and the museum functions by public donations and the support of the City of Chilliwack.

17-pounder QF Towed Anti-Tank Gun being manned by gunners serving with the 57th Battery, 1st Anti-Tank Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, near Campobasso, Italy, 25 October 1943.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3599876)

 (John Eckersley Photos)

17-pounder QF Towed Anti-Tank Gun, located in the veterans section at the North end of the Surrey Centre Cemetery, 16671 Old McLelland Road, West Cloverdale.  This gun is stamped 17-pdr I &  II.  The metal tube covering the vertical shaft of the breech operating mechanism is stamped 558  FL6163.  Previously on display at Surrey, this 17-pounder is  on loan to CMEC from the District of Surrey.

In June 1947, Canada had 149 17-pounder QF Towed Anti-Tank Guns in service.  These guns served until 1952, when they were offered to NATO.  Those remaining in 1959 were scrapped or became part of war memorials where at least 28 have been found and documented on these web pages.

Colwood,  Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site of Canada.  Artillery preserved in this location is listed on a separate page on this web site.

Cranbrook

 (City of Vanvouver Archives Photo, AM54-S4-: Mil P171)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), being removed from grounds of Legislature on 25 July 1941.

 (Dave Humphrey Photos)

 (BK-Hunters Photos)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16), (Serial Nr. 19241).  This gun was captured by the 7th Battalion (1st British Columbia), 2nd Canadian Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) on 27 Sep 1918 near Marquion.  It is presently on display behind the Heritage Inn on Cranbrook Street, close to the entrance to the Canadian Legion.

German First World War 7.7 cm FK 16 on display at the cenotaph in front of the old Cranbrook Courthouse ca 1920s.

The 7.7 cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7 cm FK 16) was a German First World War field gun with a longer range than the FK 96 n.A.  The barrel is longer and the gun has a box carriage to allow for greater elevation, which increased the range.  It also has separate-loading ammunition to reduce powder consumption and barrel wear at short ranges, although this had the drawback of reducing the rate of fire compared to the older gun.  It was prematurely rushed into production in 1916 and early guns suffered from a number of defects, mainly stemming from the German use of substitute materials to reduce consumption of strategic metals. It also suffered from a large number of premature detonations of its shells during 1916.

CFB Esquimalt Artillery is listed on a separate page on this web site.

Esquimalt

 (John Eckersley Photos)

 (Author Photos, 29 Jan 2019_

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.) (Serial Nr. 595), with large wheels  This gun was captured by the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles, 8th Canadian Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) at Cambrai, West of Neuville St. Remy, France on 29 September 1918.  It is on display in Memorial Park, 1200 Esquimalt Rd., Esquimalt.

Painting of Canadians capturing a German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.),  entitled "Taking the Guns", ca 1918, by Forunino Matania.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3636763)

The 7.7 cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7 cm FK 96 n.A.) is a German First World War field gun.  The gun combined the barrel of the earlier 7.7 cm FK 96 with a recoil system, a new breech and a new carriage. Existing FK 96s were upgraded over time.  The FK 96 n.A. was shorter-ranged, but lighter than the French Canon de 75 modèle 1897 or the British Ordnance QF 18 pounder gun; the Germans placed a premium on mobility, which served them well during the early stages of World War I. However, once the front had become static, the greater rate of fire of the French gun and the heavier shells fired by the British gun put the Germans at a disadvantage. The Germans remedied this by developing the longer-ranged, but heavier 7.7 cm FK 16.  As with most guns of its era, the FK 96 n.A. had seats for two crewmen mounted on its splinter shield.

(Colin Wyatt Photo)

 (John Eckersley Photos)

 (Author Photos, 29 Jan 2019)

German First World War 7.7-cm Nahkampfkanone (7.7-cm NK) close support gun (Serial Nr. 9739).  These guns were minimal modifications of the standard gun to make it more suitable  as an infantry support gun.  They were often used as "silent" guns - heavily camouflaged guns which only went into action if the front line was breached during an attack. About the only changes made to the standard gun was to drop the lower part of the gun shield and the footrests of the axle tree seats as well as the smaller wheels.  Charlie Clelland.  This gun was captured by the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles, 8th Canadian Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) at Vimy Ridge, La Folie Farm, France on 9 Oct 1917.  It was initially allocated to Cranbrook but is now on display in Memorial Park, 1200 Esquimalt Rd., Esquimalt..  They were made an official part of the war memorial in 1941.

 (Richard Laughton Photo)

Outstanding restoration of the two German First World War trophy guns at Esquimalt in 2015.

Fort Langley National Historic Site of Canada

 (John Eckersley Photo)

Cast Iron ½-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 1-1-1 (129 lbs), appears to be a replica.

Kamloops

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/15 Machineguns carried by German Prisoners of War captured by Canadians, June 1917.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3403114)

German First World War 7.92-mm Spandau MG 08/15 heavy machine gun (Serial Nr. TBC), inside the Rocky Mountain Rangers Museum.

155-mm C1 (M1A2) Medium Howitzer on M1A2 Carriage, aka M114, manufactured at Sorel Industries Limited in Quebec, Queen Elizabeth II cypher.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4235869)

155-mm C1 (M1A2) Medium Howitzer on M1A2 Carriage, aka M114, manufactured at Sorel Industries Limited in Quebec, Queen Elizabeth II cypher.  R. Vicars Armoury, 1221 McGill Road.

Sorel Industries Limited in Quebec manufactured 209 155-mm Howitzers.  Of these 180 were built for NATO, with the remaining 29 going to the Royal Canadian Artillery.  In 1951 an order was placed for 47 155-mm Howitzers from the USA.  All of the Ordnance BL 5.5-inch Medium Guns in service were replaced by 155-mm Howitzers in 1954.  The guns produced in Canada by Sorel are designated Howitzer, Medium, Towed, 155-mm, C1.  The designation for the guns procured in the USA before 1962, was 155-mm Howitzer M1A1 on Carriage M1A2.  After 1962, it was designated the Howitzer, Medium, Towed, 155-mm, M114.

Queen Elizabeth II. reigning from 6 Feb 1952 to present.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4314245)

Queen Elizabeth cypher, on the barrel of a gun.

Kaslo

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/15 heavy machine gun being examined by Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade Officers, March 1918.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3522120)

 (Mary Linn Photo)

German First World War 7.92-mm Maxim Spandau MG 08/15 heavy machine gun, (Serial Nr. 4076).

Kelowna 

 (Al Dadds Photos)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 2577), TBC, captured by the 7th Battalion (1st British Columbia)  2nd Canadian Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Division of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) on 2 Sep 1918, West of Vilers-lez-Cagnicourt, France.  Okanagan Military Museum, 1424 Ellis Street in Kelowna.  The gun stands outside surrounded by pedestals topped with stones marking Battles of the First World War in which area residents gave their lives.  The stones are from the original Kelowna Cenotaph, replaced in the City Park several years ago.

Ladysmith

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 16 (7.7-cm FK 16),  possibly (Serial Nr. 7065), on display from 1921 until removed in 1941 by rail, and sent to the smelter to aid in the war effort.  (Photos courtesy of Bridget, Ladysmith Historical Society)

Maple Ridge

 (City of Vancouver Archives Photo, AM1545-S3-: CVA 586-1213)

6-pounder 7-cwt QF Anti-Tank Gun being fired at Kitsilano Beach during training exercises in 1943.

 (Rudy Lisop Photos)

6-pounder 7-cwt QF Anti-Tank Gun, located across the road from the Lilley Drive bulk loading potable water station 3100 block in the Kanaka Industrial Park.  The 6 acre site is a movie prop storage and assembly company not open to the public.

Japanese Type 93 13.2-mm twin mount light anti-aircraft gun (left).  (USGOV-PD Photo) and a Japanese Type 96 25-mm twin barreled anti-aircraft gun (right).  (Daderot Photo)

Japanese 13.2-mm or 25-mm twin-barreled Anti-Aircraft gun (MISSING - seeking information on its present location).  This gun was brought to to the Vernon, British Columbia Army Training Camp from Kiska, Alaska, in early 1944 by the 24th Field Artillery Regiment, RCA.  The Regimental War Diary entry describes it as a 20-mm twin-barreled AA gun.  Research to date indicates there were no twin-barreled models of 20-mm calibre found on Kiska (viz. intelligence ground survey in 1943 after Allied occupation).  The only 20-mm AA guns were single-barreled models.  However, many twin-barreled types of both 13.2-mm and 25-mm were found.  The same results came from the 2007/8 Kiska Guns and sites preservation survey.  The anti-aircraft gun brought to Vernon by the 24th Field RCA was positioned in front of the regimental sergeants’ mess.  It disappeared from the camp sometime after the 24th Field RCA was disbanded in 1945.  RCA Captain (Retired) Robert H. (Bob) Spring is seeking information from anyone who was posted to the Vernon, BC Army Training Camp during or after 1944 (including as an Army Cadet in later years), who recalls seeing the twin-barreled AA gun referred to and remembers which of the two models depicted in the photos it was.  Additionally, information as to the disposition of the gun or its current location (particularly if it can be confirmed it is in a museum or private collection etc.) is sought.  Please contact Bob at #414 - 12258 224th Street, Maple Ridge, BC, V2X 8Y7, Canada, or by e-mail: bobspring@shaw.ca if you have any information on these missing guns.