Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Artillery (6) Québec, Lévis

Artillery in QuébecLévis

Data current to 22 Sep 2019.

The aim of this website is to locate, identify and document every historical piece of artillery preserved in Canada.  Many contributors have assisted in the hunt for these guns to provide and update the data found on these web pages.  Photos are by the author unless otherwise credited.  Any errors found here are by the author, and any additions, corrections or amendments to this list of Guns and Artillery in Canada would be most welcome and may be e-mailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com.

For all official data concerning the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, please click on the link to their website:

Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery Website

Une traduction au français pour l'information technique présente serait grandement apprécié. Vos corrections, changements et suggestions sont les bienvenus, et peuvent être envoyés au hskaarup@rogers.com

Canadian field batteries were combined to form the Royal CanadiaField Artillery (RCFA), which in 1905 became the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery (RCHA).  The garrison companies would become the Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery (RCGA).

Les batteries de campagne seront amalgamées plus tard au sein de la Royal Canadian Field Artillery (RCFA) qui, en 1905, deviendra la Royal Canadian Horse Artillery (RCHA): pour leur part, les compagnies de garnison donneront la Royal Canadian Garrison Artillery (RCGA).

Lévis, 6th Field Artillery Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery

The 6th Field Artillery Regiment, is a Primary Reserve Royal Canadian Artillery (RCA) regiment located at 10 Arsenal Street, Lévis, Québec.  It is part of 35 Canadian Brigade Group in the 2nd Canadian Division.  Its headquarters is located in Lévis, Quebec.  The regiment is composed primarily of members from different batteries in the regions of Lévis, Montmagny and Val-Belair, and has a total authorized strength of 335.   The 6th Field Artillery Regiment consists of four Batteries.  The 57th Battery surveillance and target acquisition, and the Command and Service Battery are located in Lévis.  The 58th Field Artillery Battery (formerly Air Defense) is located in Val Bel-Air. Finally, the 59th Field Artillery Battery is located in Montmagny.  The 6th Field Artillery Regiment is the first artillery regiment in Canada to be commanded by a woman : Lieutenant-Colonel Chantal Bérubé.

2nd Division Shoulder patch.   Écusson de la 2e Division du Canada

Lévis, 6e Régiment d'artillerie de campagne, RAC

Le 6e Régiment d’artillerie de campagne (6 RAC) est un régiment d'artillerie de campagne de la Première réserve de l'Armée canadienne des Forces canadiennes.  Il fait partie du 35e Groupe-brigade du Canadadans la 2e Division du Canada.  Son quartier général est situé à 10 Rue Arsenal, Lévis au Québec.  Le régiment est surtout composé de membres provenant des différentes batteries dans les régions de Lévis, Montmagny et Val-Belair, et a un effectif total autorisé de 335.

Le 6 RAC est composé de quatre batteries.  La 57e Batterie de surveillance et d'acquisition d'objectifs, ainsi que la Batterie de Commandement et Service sont situées à Lévis.  La 58e Batterie d'artillerie de campagne (anciennement de défense aérienne) est située à Val Bel-Air. Finalement, la 59e Batterie d'artillerie de campagne est située à Montmagny.  Le 6 RAC est le premier régiment d’artillerie au Canada à être commandé par une femme, la Lieutenant-colonel Chantal Bérubé.

  

 (Author Photos)

German First World War 7.7-cm Feldkanone 96 neuer Art (7.7-cm FK 96 n.A.), (Serial Nr. 1022), captured on 8 Aug 1918 by the 13th Battalion (Royal Highlanders of Canada), 3rd Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Division, Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), North of Aubercourt, France. 10 rue de l’Arsenal Lévis.

 (Author Photos)

German First World War 15-cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15-cm sFH 02), (Serial Nr. 360), this gun was also captured on 8 Aug 1918 by the 13th Battalion (Royal Highlanders of Canada), 3rd Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Division, Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF), North of Aubercourt, France.  10 rue de l’Arsenal.

The 15 cm schwere Feldhaubitze 1902 (15 cm sFH 02) was a German heavy field howitzer introduced in 1903.  It was the first artillery piece to use a modern recoil system in the German Army. Some 416 were in service at the beginning of the war.  Its mobility, which allowed it to be deployed as medium artillery, and fairly heavy shell gave the German army a firepower advantage in the early battles in Belgium and France in 1914 as the French and British armies lacked an equivalent.

25-pounder C Mk. 2 QF Field Gun with No. 9 circular firing platform.  Originally with the Irish Army, now with 6e RAC.

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Gun, Camping du Fort De La Martinière, 9825 Bd de la Rive Sud, Lévis, QC G6V 9R4 at the Royal Canadian Legion Memorial.

Lévis, Fort No. 1

 

 

 (Author Photos)

Armstrong 7-inch 72-cwt (110-pounder) Rifled Breech-Loading Gun, weight 81-1-0 (9,100 lbs), (RGF No. 243) Queen Victoria cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on a long wood traversing carriage on the ramparts of Fort No. 1 facing East.

 

 (Author Photos)

Armstrong 7-inch 72-cwt (110-pounder) Rifled Breech-Loading Gun, weight 81-1-0 (9,100 lbs), (RGF No. 243) Queen Victoria cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on a long wood traversing carriage on the ramparts of Fort No. 1 facing East.

 (Bernard Gagnon Photos)

 (Jean-Phillipe Bourgoin Photo)

 

 (Terry Honour Photos)

 (Author Photos)

Armstrong 7-inch 72-cwt (110-pounder) Rifled Breech-Loading Gun, weight 81-1-0 (9,100 lbs), (RGF No. 243) Queen Victoria cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on a long wood traversing carriage on the ramparts of Fort No. 1 facing East.

 (Author Photos)

Cast Iron 8-inch 9-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Land Service Mortar, weight 8-1-6 (930 lbs), (S BOWLING] on the left trunnion, (Serial No. 242) on the right trunnion, 1 foot 10 inches long, No. 1 of 2.

 (Terry Honour Photos)

Cast Iron 8-inch 9-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Land Service Mortar, weight 8-1-6 (930 lbs), (S BOWLING] on the left trunnion, (Serial No. 242) on the right trunnion, 1 foot 10 inches long, No. 1 of 2.

 

 

 (Author Photos)

Cast Iron 8-inch 9-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Land Service Mortar, weight 8-2-14 (966 lbs), (S) on the left trunnion, (Serial No. 109) on the right trunnion, 1 foot 10 inches long, No. 2 of 2.

 (Terry Honour Photos)

 (Terry Honour Photos)

Cast Iron 8-inch 9-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Land Service Mortar, weight 8-2-14 (966 lbs), (S) on the left trunnion, (Serial No. 109) on the right trunnion, 1 foot 10 inches long, No. 2 of 2.

 (Terry Honour Photos)

 (Author Photos)

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight 17-3-0 (1,988 lbs), mounted on an iron garrison carriage, No. 1 of 2.

 (Terry Honour Photos)

 (Author Photos)

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight 17-0-18 (1,922 lbs), mounted on an iron garrison carriage, No. 2 of 2.

 (Terry Honour Photos)

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight 17-1-11 (1,943 lbs), mounted on a wood naval gun carriage, inside the fort.

 (Author Photos)

Cast Iron 12-pounder 6-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight stamp 6-2-11 (739 lbs), mounted on an iron garrison carriage.

 (Terry Honour Photos)

Cast Iron 12-pounder 6-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight stamp 6-2-11 (739 lbs), mounted on an iron garrison carriage.

 (Author Photos)

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight 17-3-11 (1,999 lbs), No. 1 of 2, unmounted.

 (Author Photos)

Cast Iron 32-pounder 17-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight 17-0-2 (1,906 lbs), No. 2 of 2, unmounted.

 (Author Photos)

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 48-1-18 (5,422 lbs), Samuel Walker & Company of Rotherham, England (WCo) on left trunnion, (Serial No. 55) on right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage, No. 1 of 2.

 (Bernard Gagnon Photo)

 (Terry Honour Photos)

 

 

 (Author Photos)

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 48-0-0 (5,376 lbs), Samuel Walker & Company of Rotherham, England (WCo) on left trunnion, (Serial No. 59) on right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage, No. 2 of 2.

Fort No. 1 was begun in 1865 and was surrounded with a 16-foot deep ditch, which was covered by flank howitzers in each of the fort's caponnieres, as well as loopholes from whence the garrison could fire their rifles at attackers who had made it into the ditch.  The fort was designed to mount twenty big guns, and there were thirteen brick casemates under the terreplein, in which the garrison would be housed and/or be protected whilst under bombardment.  None of the forts was ever garrisoned, though each received a single Armstrong 7-inch 72-cwt (110-pounder) Rifled Breech-Loading Gun in 1878.

Lévis, Fort No. 2

Also begun in 1865, Fort No. 2 had earthen ramparts on three sides and a masonry wall along the back side and a 40' wide ditch surrounded the perimeter. Outside the ditch a 45% sloped earthwork hid the ditch from the enemy.  Two interior caponiers provided protection for the ditches should the enemy penetrate that far. Interior casemates provided quarters for a garrison of about 170 officers and men.  Fort No. 2 was essentially complete by 1 July 1869 except for the bridges over the ditch and the doors.  The Levis Fort No. 2 Site has been overbuilt by an Insurance Building.  It was also armed with a single Armstrong 7-inch 72-cwt (110-pounder) Rifled Breech-Loading Gun in 1878, which appears to have been relocated.

Lévis, Fort No. 3

Fort No. 3 is located near the intersection of Gagnon St. and Boulevard de la Rive South, Levis City.  Construction began on Fort No. 3 on 7 Aug 1865.  All of the forts were of similar but not identical design, differing sites and the necessity to protect one another dictated the differences.  Fort No. 3 had earthen ramparts on three sides and a masonry wall along the back side and a 40' wide ditch surrounded the perimeter.  Outside the ditch a 45% sloped earthwork hid the ditch from the enemy.  Two interior caponiers provided protection for the ditches should the enemy penetrate that far.  Interior casemates provided quarters for a garrison of about 170 officers and men.  Fort No. 3 was essentially complete by 1 Jul 1869 except for the bridges over the ditch and the doors.  The contractors had finished work on both their forts before the Royal Engineers had finished work on Fort No. 1.  In 1878 all three of the forts received a single Armstrong 7-inch 72-cwt (110-pounder) Rifled Breech-Loading Gun, and Fort No. 3's gun remains in situ.  Since all three of the forts faced America and not the Saint Lawrence River they were of little defensive value and by 1905 they were deactivated.

Lévis, Peace Park Cenotaph

6-pounder 7-cwt QF Anti-Tank Gun, No. 1 of 4 in the Peace Park at Rue Memorial and Rue Monsigneur-Borget.
 (Author Photo)
6-pounder 7-cwt QF Anti-Tank Gun, No. 2 of 4 in the Peace Park at Rue Memorial and Rue Monsigneur-Borget.
 (Author Photo)
6-pounder 7-cwt QF Anti-Tank Gun, No. 3 of 4 in the Peace Park at Rue Memorial and Rue Monsigneur-Borget.
 (Author Photo)
6-pounder 7-cwt QF Anti-Tank Gun, No. 3 of 4 in the Peace Park at Rue Memorial and Rue Monsigneur-Borget.
Probable QF 1-pounder pom-pom Anti-Aircraft Gun, in the Peace Park at Rue Memorial and Rue Monsigneur-Borget.