Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Artillery (6) Québec City (Part III) Presbytère St-Michel de Sillery, Upper Town Fortifications, Dufferin Terrace, Batterie Royale

Québec City Artillery, 

Presbytère St-Michel de Sillery, Upper Town Fortifications, Dufferin Terrace, Batterie Royale

Data current to 3 Oct 2019.

The aim of this website is to locate, identify and document every historical piece of artillery preserved in Canada.  Many contributors have assisted in the hunt for these guns to provide and update the data found on these web pages.  Photos are by the author unless otherwise credited.  Any errors found here are by the author, and any additions, corrections or amendments to this list of Guns and Artillery in Canada would be most welcome and may be e-mailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com.

For all official data concerning the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, please click on the link to their website:

Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery Website

Note: Back in the day, artillery in Canada was referred to by its radio call sign "Sheldrake".  It is now referred to by its "Golf" call sign.  (Acorn sends)

Une traduction au français pour l'information technique présente serait grandement apprécié. Vos corrections, changements et suggestions sont les bienvenus, et peuvent être envoyés au hskaarup@rogers.com

Québec City

 (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3330196)

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, Quebec City, ca 1950s. 

There are many guns located in and around the defence works of old Québec City.  From the Highway 20 exiting North on Highway 73, you turn East onto Route 173, Boulevard Laurier, and then take a turn South onto St. Louis Street.  Four guns are located in front of the church overlooking the St Lawrence River at Sillery.

Québec City, Presbytère St-Michel de Sillery

 (James Simonds Photos)

Blomefield Cast Iron 32-pounder 56-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 56-2-23 (6,351 lbs), The Carron Company of Falkirk, Scotland (Serial No. 70743, CARRON, 1807) on left trunnion, (32P) on right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on an iron garrison carriage marked 24-pounder, weight 21-32-2 (2,438 lbs).  The Blomefield 32-pounder 56-cwt Gun has a length of 9 feet 6 inches.  It is the most common 32-pounder in Canada and can be recognized by a reinforcing ring that is slightly raised followed by a definite "step-down" in the barrel just forward of the trunnions heading to the muzzle.  This Gun is No. 1 of 4 facing the St Lawrence River.

Blomefield Cast Iron 32-pounder 56-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 55-2-18 (6,234 lbs), Samuel Walker & Company of Rotherham, England (WCo) on left trunnion, (Serial No. 318) on right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on an iron carriage, weight 22-3-25 (2,573 lbs).  No. 2 of 4 facing the river.

Blomefield Cast Iron 32-pounder 56-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 55-3-14 (6,258 lbs), Samuel Walker & Company of Rotherham, England (WCo) on left trunnion, (Serial No. 316) on right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on an iron garrison carriage, weight 21-3-6 (2,442 lbs).  No. 3 of 4 facing the river.

Blomefield Cast Iron 32-pounder 56-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 56-0-0 (6,272 lbs), Samuel Walker & Company of Rotherham, England (WCo) on left trunnion, (Serial No. 315) on right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on an iron garrison carriage, weight 21-2-20 (2,428 lbs).  No. 4 of 4, beside the church, facing the river.

Artillery found on the Plains of Abraham Battlefield Park is listed on a separate page.

Québec City, Upper Town

Cast Iron 10-inch 16-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Land Service Mortar, weight 16-1-7 (1,827 lbs), maker and Serial No. unknown.  No. 1 of 2, standing in front of the entrance to 35 Brigade Group Headquarters on the street leading up to the Citadel.

Cast Iron 10-inch 16-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Land Service Mortar, weight 16-1-7 (1,831 lbs), maker and Serial No. unknown.  No. 2 of 2, standing in front of the entrance to 35 Brigade Group Headquarters on the street leading up to the Citadel.

Cast Iron 10-inch 16-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Land Service Mortar, weight 16-1-7 (1,827 lbs), with a pair of Dolphin carrying handles, mounted on a wood carriage minus the wheels, No. 1 of 2, guarding the outside entrance to the Citadel.

Cast Iron 10-inch 16-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Land Service Mortar, weight 16-?-? (>1,800 lbs), with a pair of Dolphin carrying handles, mounted on a wood carriage minus the wheels, No. 2 of 2, guarding the outside entrance to the Citadel.

Cast Iron 68-pounder 36-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight TBC, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage in front of Hotel Ashton on Rue St. Louis in Old Quebec.

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight and maker unknown, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage in front of Hotel Ashton on Rue St. Louis in Old Quebec.

Québec CityDes Braves Monument

 (Pjposullivan Photo)

In the early 1850s, some workers discovered bones that appeared to belong to the soldiers who died on 28 April 1760, in the Battle of Sainte-Foy.  On 5 June 1854, the Saint-Jean Baptiste Society undertook to transfer the remains to a common grave on a property donated by a private citizen.  To commemorate this French victory, plans were made to erect a monument on the site of the Dumont Mill, where the fiercest fighting had taken place.  The cornerstone of the monument was laid on 18 July of the same year, in the presence of a procession of thousands.  Also participating in the ceremony was the crew of the French warship “La Capricieuse,” one of the first French ships to visit Quebec City since the Conquest.  This symbolic reconciliation coincided with the new alliance between England and France during the Crimean War (1853-1856).  A subscription campaign was conducted by the Saint-Jean Baptiste Society of Quebec to produce the monument designed by architect Charles Baillairgé and constructed by John Ritchie and Joseph Larose.  A stone base was erected in 1860, on the occasion of the battle’s centennial. The pedestal and cast column were added on 24 June 1861. The statue on top of the column, a representation of Bellona, the Roman goddess of war, was donated by the French prince Jerome-Napoleon, the uncle of Emperor Napoleon III.  The figure stands three metres high, carries a lance and shield, and looks over the part of the battlefield that was occupied by the French army.  On the cenotaph furnishing the base of the statue are four bronze mortars. Inscribed on two plaques are the names of Lévis and Murray, the generals who led the opposing armies. The 22-metre monument was officially inaugurated on 19 October 1863.  Archives of the National Battlefields Commission.

  (Studio Livernois Photo)

Bronze Smoothbore Muzzleloading Mortar, weight and maker TBC, No. 1 at the foot of Des Braves Monument, Des Braves Avenue and St. Foy Road.

Bronze Smoothbore Muzzleloading Mortar, weight and maker TBC, No. 2 at the foot of Des Braves Monument, Des Braves Avenue and St. Foy Road.

Bronze Smoothbore Muzzleloading Mortar, weight and maker TBC, No. 3 at the foot of Des Braves Monument, Des Braves Avenue and St. Foy Road.

Bronze Smoothbore Muzzleloading Mortar, weight and maker TBC, No. 4 at the foot of Des Braves Monument, Des Braves Avenue and St. Foy Road.

 (Jeangagnon Photo)

Québec CityLa Citadelle

 (Musée Royal 22e Régiment - Caporal David Robert Photo)

The guns on display in the Quebec Citadel are listed on a separate web page.

The guns on display along the Rues des Remparts in Quebec City are listed on a separate web page.

Québec CityChateau Frontenac, Dufferin Terrace

There are six smoothbore muzzleloading guns mounted on Duffering Terrace facing the St. Lawrence River.  The guns are listed from right to left as you stand behind them.

Blomefield Cast Iron 32-pounder 56-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight corroded, (6,000 lbs +), The Carron Company of Falkirk, Scotland (Serial No. 71504, CARRON, 1807) on left trunnion, (32P) on right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on an iron garrison carriage.  West side of the Promenade in front of Chateau Frontenac.  No. 1.

 

Blomefield Cast Iron 32-pounder 56-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight corroded (6,000 lbs +), Samuel Walker & Company of Rotherham, England (WCo) on left trunnion, (Serial No. 291) on right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on a iron garrison gun carriage.  West side of the Promenade in front of Chateau Frontenac.  No. 2.

Blomefield Cast Iron 32-pounder 56-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight corroded, (6,000 lbs +), The Carron Company of Falkirk, Scotland (Serial No. 70952, CARRON, 1806) on left trunnion, (32P) on right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on an iron garrison carriage.  West side of the Promenade in front of Chateau Frontenac.  No. 3.

 

Blomefield Cast Iron 32-pounder 56-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight corroded (6,000 lbs +), Samuel Walker & Company of Rotherham, England (WCo) on left trunnion, (Serial No. 446) on right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on a iron garrison gun carriage.  West side of the Promenade in front of Chateau Frontenac.  No. 4.

 

Russian Cast Iron 24-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight corroded, Serial No. 64312 on left trunnion, forged by Gascoigne at Alexandrovski with double-headed Eagle, Crimean War trophy with trunnions, mounted on an iron garrison carriage.  West side of the Promenade in front of Chateau Frontenac.  No. 5.

 

 

Russian Cast Iron 24-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight corroded, Serial No. 7379 on left trunnion, forged by Gascoigne at Alexandrovski with double-headed Eagle, Crimean War trophy with trunnions, mounted on an iron garrison gun carriage.  East side of the Promenade in front of Chateau Frontenac.  No. 6.

Québec City, Artillery Park

 (Photo courtesy of Christophe Finot)

Cast Iron 24-pounder 13-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Carronade with a Blomefield pattern breeching ring, weight TBC, mounted on a wooden naval carriage.  La Fonderie du bastion Saint-Jean.

Québec City, Batterie Royale

The Batterie Royale (Royal Battery) saw service from 1691 to 1759, although initially the only enemy the battery faced was the weather and nature.  During that period it was surrounded by the river and brushed by the tides, water currents and thick ice.  These elements caused extensive damage, and therefore over the years many repairs and adjustments were required to keep it intact.  The battery engaged in its first and only action in 1759.  General James Wolfe led the British Army to Quebèc and for three months, Commander Monckton and his gunners bombarded the city from the Lèvis shore.  Between 12 July and 13 September, over 40,000 rounds of shot and 10,000 shells rained down on the city.  Because the Royal Battery was a well-known defensive fortification it was a frequent target and during the bombardment, hundreds of houses behind it were reduced to rubble. The Battle of the Plains of Abraham on 13 September ended the siege, and five days later the city surrendered.  Once its military function became obsolete, the battery was used as a wharf.  Over the course of the 19th century, the battery was gradually built over and buried under landfill.  It was restored in 1977 after the buried ruins were discovered by archeologists.

There are ten replica SBML guns of various weights and sizes, but no markings, cyphers or makers marks, mounted on wood naval gun carriages behind a reconstructed wood defence position on Boulevard Champlain.

 

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, reproduction, No. 1.

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, reproduction, No. 2.

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, reproduction, No. 3.

 

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, reproduction, No. 4.

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, reproduction, No. 5.

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, reproduction, No. 6.

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, reproduction, No. 7.

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, reproduction, No. 8.

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, reproduction, No. 9.

Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, reproduction, No. 10.

There are a number of Cast Iron Smoothbore Muzzleloading Guns in Quebec City for which the location has not been confirmed.  These guns may have the following weights and measures:

Blomefield Cast Iron 18-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 41-3-?-? (>4,676 lbs), Samuel Walker & Company of Rotherham, England (WCo) on left trunnion, (Serial No. TBC) on right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage, location TBC.

Blomefield Cast Iron 18-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 41-3-12 (4,688 lbs), Samuel Walker & Company of Rotherham, England (WCo) on left trunnion, (Serial No. TBC) on right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage, location TBC.  

Blomefield Cast Iron 18-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 41-3-11 (4,687 lbs), Samuel Walker & Company of Rotherham, England (WCo) on left trunnion, (Serial No. TBC) on right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage, location TBC.

Blomefield Cast Iron 18-pounder Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, No. 4 of 4, weight 42-0-19 (4,723 lbs), Samuel Walker & Company of Rotherham, England (WCo) on left trunnion, (Serial No. TBC) on right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage, location TBC. 

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Gun, weight 48-0-6 (5,382 lbs), Samuel Walker & Company of Rotherham, England (WCo) on left trunnion, (Serial No. TBC) on right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage, location TBC.

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 47-3-4 (5,352 lbs), Samuel Walker & Company of Rotherham, England (WCo) on left trunnion, (Serial No. TBC) on right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage, location TBC.

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, weight 50-1-21 (5,649 lbs), The Carron Company of Falkirk, Scotland (Serial No. TBC, CARRON, 1812) on left trunnion, (24P) on right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage, location TBC.

Blomefield Cast Iron 24-pounder 50-cwt Smoothbore Muzzleloading Gun, No. 4 of 4, weight 51-2-0 (5,768 lbs), The Carron Company of Falkirk, Scotland (Serial No. TBC, CARRON, 1807) on left trunnion, (24P) on right trunnion, King George III cypher, broad arrow mark, mounted on a wood naval gun carriage, location TBC.

Québec CityHMCS Montcalm

40-mm Bofors Light Anti-Aircraft Guns.  CFFS (Q) has four of these guns, all used for training.  One is on HMCS Montcalm’s parade square for students to practice gun drills, one is in a training simulator (FATS) at 170 Dalhousie Street, and two are operational and used on a range at CFB Valcartier.  All RCN Kingston Class vessels continue to operate the QF 40-mm Bofors LAA Gun.

I would imagine that many of you who are reading this book are very likely familiar with the standard routine of military training exercises and the rigours of being in the field in all seasons, not to mention the conditions found on deployment these days. Whether or not you have experienced it, I am sure you can well imagine what it is like to train and work in the heat, the dust and the mosquitoes in summer, the wind, the rain and the mud in the spring and fall, the snow and the cold in the winter and of course the routine day-to-day challenges of combat exercises in the training areas of the Canadian Forces. For most in the Army, this includes CFB Gagetown, CFB Valcartier, CFB Petawawa, CFB Kingston, CFB Shilo, CFB Edmonton, CFB Wainwright, CFB Suffield and all the fields and exercise areas of LFAATC Aldershot and LFCATC Meaford and their environs.

As an Army Officer in the Canadian Forces, it has been my privilege to have served alongside a tremendous number of highly professional military men and women of our nation while taking part in training in Germany, the UK and the USA and while on operational deployments to Cyprus, Bosnia-Herzegovina and in Afghanistan. During my training and military professional development, I have learned much about our long military history. My interest in our multi-faceted historical record has led me to write about it and to seek out the stories about Canada's military servicemen and women and the tools and equipment they used to preserve our security when warclouds darkened our horizons.

As a military history enthusiast, I have learned over the years that there are many with similar interests in preserving our story. We have all seen the odd old gun or retired tank placed on display outside a Militia Drill Hall, War Memorial, city park site or Royal Canadian Legion Hall, and many will have enjoyed visiting a number of our military Museums. The vast majority of retired wartime combat equipment used by members of the CF have dwindled in number, many being scrapped, others being shot up as targets, while a few have been sold to overseas operators and collectors. Fortunately, a handful of important examples of retired CF guns and war machines have been preserved and may be found in a wide variety of locations throughout Canada.

Curators, docents and volunteers working in Canada's military museums have been successful in preserving a good number of retired military weapons of war and many are still being sought after and in some cases, being restored to running condition again. As an artist, photographer and military history enthusiast, I have attempted to keep track of where historic Canadian military equipment has survived and is presently located and to make that information available to others with the same interest. For those of like mind, the purpose of this handbook is to provide a simple checklist of the classic Great War and WWII artillery that is part of our military heritage and a location guide to where they can be found in Canada. The book includes a number of photographs to illustrate an example of each gun wherever possible, and lists the locations of the survivors by province.

The numbers of restored Canadian guns is actually increasing as a few rare examples are being recovered from scrapyards and monument sites and salvaged for restoration. (Ultra rare items such as Skink AA gun turrets come to mind). One of the aims of this book is to help an enthusiast track down these monuments and museum artefacts and to have a simple reference book on hand with more detailed information about them such as a serial number, a Museum location and contact information which might be helpful in learning a bit of the history of a particular vehicle. The guns detailed in this handbook are listed alphabetically by manufacturer, number and type in the order that they came into service with the CF. The data is also appended with a list of most of the current guns found in the various collections and Museums in Canada. The book is also meant to serve as a companion volume to "Ironsides", Canadian Tanks and Armoured Fighting Vehicle Museums and Monuments, also available online.

It is my sincere hope that more of the guns and artillery found in this list will one day be added to the record of historically important military armament survivors that have been recovered and restored.


Shelldrake can be ordered online in softcover or e-book at these bookstores:

http://www.amazon.ca/Shelldrake-Canadian-Artillery-Museums-Monuments/dp/1469750007/ref=sr_1_44?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1331231081&sr=1-44

http://www.amazon.com/Shelldrake-Canadian-Artillery-Museums-Monuments/dp/1469750007/ref=sr_1_45?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1331231130&sr=1-45

http://bookstore.iuniverse.com/Products/SKU-000542288/Shelldrake.aspx

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/shelldrake-harold-a-skaarup/1109124375?ean=9781469750002&itm=46&usri=harold+skaarup 

Photos and technical data on artillery preserved in Canada may be viewed by Province on seprate pages on this website.