Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Armoured Fighting Vehicles and Tanks preserved in Canada 7a: New Brunswick, 5 Canadian Divison Support Base Gagetown

Tanks and Armoured Fighting Vehicles preserved at 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown, New Brunswick

The data found on this page has been compiled by the author.  Photos are by the author unless otherwise credited.  Any additions, correctons or amendments to this list of Armoured Fighting Vehicles in Canada would be most welcome

If you have information and photographs of armoured fighting vehicles missing from this list, updates would be most welcome.   French Translation of the technical data presented here would be appreciated.  Corrections, amendments and suggested changes may be emailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com.

Une traduction au français pour l'information technique présente serait grandement apprécié. Vos corrections, changements et suggestions sont les bienvenus, et peuvent être envoyés au hskaarup@rogers.com

Data current to 14 May 2017.

New Brunswick Military History Museum

Royal Canadian Dragoons Memorial outside the front entrance to the New Brunswick Military History Museum (NBMHM).

Universal Carrier, Toronto Scottish Regiment, Nieuport, Belgium, 9 Sep 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3262696)

Universal Carrier, New Brunswick Military History Museum.  This vehicle is now in the museum's vehicle park undergoing restoration.

Universal Carrier

The Universal Carrier, also known as the Bren Gun Carrier is a light armoured tracked vehicle that was produced between 1934 and 1960.  It was used by Canadian units including The Carleton and York Regiment, The New Brunswick Rangers, and the Saint John Fusiliers (Machine Gun), during the Second World War to transport personnel, weapons and equipment.  The 104th Anti-Tank Battery, 7th Canadian Anti-Tank Regiment from Fredericton and the 105th Anti-Tank Battery, 3rd Canadian Anti-Tank Regiment from St. George, New Brunswick, and other Royal Canadian Artillery units used them to tow the Ordnance QF 6 pounder anti-tank gun.  28,992 were built in Canada by the Ford Motor Company of Canada.  A few Universal Carriers were equipped with 2-pounder anti-tank guns and shipped to England in 1942.  The remainder provided emergency airfield defence on the Canadian northwest coast.  This Universal Carrier is being restored by the NBMHM.

Half-track, Canadian Army, France, 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4233293)

White M3 Half-track (Serial No. CZ 4036146), donated by the Royal New Brunswick Regiment.  Museum vehicle park.

M3A1 Half-track Armoured Personnel Carrier

The Carrier, Personnel Half-track M3 was an armoured vehicle used by Canadians and other Allies during the Second World War and in Korea.  The M3 had a single access door in the rear and seating for a 13-man rifle squad.  This vehicle was armed with a .50-calibre M2 Browning machine gun.  The body is armoured all around, with an adjustable armoured shutter for the engine’s radiator and a bulletproof windscreen.  The vehicle lacked overhead protection from airbursting artillery shells and it was vulnerable to machinegun fire.  More than 41,000 were produced.  White M3 Half-track (Serial No. CZ 4036146), was donated to the NBMHM by the Royal New Brunswick Regiment.

Officer cadets at Royal Canadian Armoured Corps School prepare ammunition for loading into Centurion tank at Meaford Tank Range.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4746855)

Centurion Main Battle Tank Mk 5, 20-pounder main gun, New Brunswick Military History Museum, Museum vehicle park.

Centurion Main Battle Tank

The British designed Centurion was the primary Canadian main battle tank of the post-Second World War era, and was continuosly updated for many years.  The Canadian Army took delivery of 274 Centurion Main Battle Tank Mk 3 between 1952 and 1953.   The Centurion had well-sloped armour, superior mobility and excellent gun and fire control systems compared with its potential adversaries during the Cold War.  The first 21 Canadian Centurions were delivered to the Royal Canadian Dragoons serving with the Canadian Contingent of NATO forces in Germany in March 1952.  The Centurions were used for training in Canada in the late 1960s and early 1970s.  Improvements introduced with the Mk 3 included a more powerful version of the engine and a new gunsight and gun stabiliser. The Mk. 3 tanks were modified to Mk. 5 standard with the replacement of the co-axial Besa MG with a .30-calibre Browning MG.  Most of the Centurions in Canada retained 20-pounder main guns, while the Centurions in Europe were up-gunned to the Mk. 6 standard with the L7 105-mm main gun and additional armour in 1962.  All later variants of the Centurion, from Mark 5/2 on, used the L7 gun.  Centurions remained in Canadian service with the 8th Canadian Hussars (Princess Louise’s), and C Squadron, The Royal Canadian Dragoons, Royal Canadian Armoured Corps and 5th Canadian Division Training Centre at CFB Gagetown until 1979 when they were replaced with the Leopard MBT.

Centurion armoured vehicle-launched bridge (AVLB), 4 Field Sqn, RCE, Ex Reforger 74, Eilheim, Germany, Oct 1974.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4816313)

Centurion AVBL, Ex Regensprung, Lahr, Germany, 9 Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4748878)

Centurion AVBL, CFR 67-10173, New Brunswick Military History Museum.  This vehicle is on display on Champlain Ave., East of the Base Medical Centre.

Centurion Armoured Vehicle Bridge Laying (AVBL)

The Centurion was used as the basis for a range of specialist equipment, including engineering variants like the Armoured Vehicle Bridge Laying (AVBL), four of which were purchased in 1966.  On retirement at CFB Gagetown, the last AVBL was driven to its present location East of the Base Medical Centre and parked intact.

Centurion Armoured Recovery Vehicle (ARV), Ex Reforger Oct 1974, Germany.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4816325)

Centurion Armoured Recovery Vehicle (ARV), CFR 54-81334, New Brunswick Military History Museum, Museum vehicle park. 

Centurion Armoured Recovery Vehicle (ARV)

Nine Centurion Armoured Recovery Vehicles (ARV) were purchased for the Canadian Army  in 1954.  The tank turret was replaced by a superstructure housing a winch powered by an auxiliary engine and capable of pulling of up to 90 tons using a system of blocks.  The ARV was armed with a single .30 inch machine gun on the commander's cupola.  It was used by many different units including the RCEME and 4 Engineer Support Regiment at CFB Gagetown for the recovery of heavy armour and vehicles bogged down in the muddy terrain during training operations until the arrival of the Badger ARV.

The Taurus ARV replaced the Centurion in Canadian service.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4728142)

Taurus ARV, RCD Lines, 5 CDSB Gagetown.

M113s, 3 RCR, Geroldshofen, Germany, Fallex, 14 Sep 1982.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4876339)

M113 Armoured Personnel Carrier

The M113 is an American designed fully tracked armored personnel carrier (APC) first put into service April 1962.  Canada purchased 1,143 M113s from the mid-1960s through the 1990s.  The M113 uses aluminum armour, making it much light enough to be air-transportable and moderately amphibious, but with armour thick enough to protect the crew and passengers against small arms fire. It is powered by a Detroit 6V53 V6 two-stroke diesel engine.  The M113 is armed with a single Browning .50 caliber M2 machine gun.  M113s can swim without deploying flotation curtains, using only a front-mounted trim vane; they are propelled in the water by their tracks.  Canadian M113s have been upgraded with external fuel tanks and internal spall liners for improved protection.  Variants in Canadian service included armoured ambulances, mortar carriers, engineer vehicles and command post vehicles.  They have been used at 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown by the 2nd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment, 4th Artillery Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, and the 5th Canadian Division Training Centre.

M113A2 Armoured Personnel Carrier, CFR 66-35387, painted as 52, Museum Park.  This APC is a runner.

US M113A2 Armoured Personnel Carrier APC, US Army Serial No. MSJ 18316MA, version, UN markings, Museum Park.

US M113A2 Armoured Personnel Carrier APC, US Army Serial No. MSJ 20156, A-85, 31, painted as 65-35001, 42A, Museum Park.

M113, Severn River, Ontario, ca 1965.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4235945)

M113 ARV variant with Palfinger crane, Armour School lines, 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown.

M548A1 Carrier, Cargo, Full Tracked with winch, Scheinfurt, Germany, Fallex, 14 Sep 1982.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4876341)

M548A1 Carrier, Cargo, Full Tracked with winch, CFR 35479, 49E, New Brunswick Military History Museum vehicle park.

M548 Tracked Cargo Vehicle

The M548 is an un-armoured tracked cargo carrier equipped with a rear cargo bed based on the M113 APC chassis. They have been used at CFB Gagetown by the 2nd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment, 4th Artillery Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, and the 5th Canadian Division Training Centre.

 

M577 Command Post, Ex Grosse Rochade, Danube, Germany, 18 Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4748894)

M577 Command Post, Geroldshofen, Germany, Fallex, 14 Sep 1982.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4876347)

M577 Command Post, CFR 66-35530, painted as 93A, Museum vehicle park.

M577 Command Post, Artillery variant, 4th Artillery Regiment (General Support), 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown.

M577 Command Post

The M577 Command Post vehicle is a variant of the M113 APC.  The roof over the rear troop compartment is higher.  The vehicle also carries additional radios and a generator.  They have been used at CFB Gagetown by the 2nd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment, 4th Artillery Regiment (General Support), Royal Canadian Artillery, and the 5th Canadian Division Training Centre..

M578 Light Recovery Vehicle, New Brunswick Military History Museum, EFCC storage compound.

M578 Light Recovery Vehicle

The M578 an American designed armoured recovery vehicle in service with the Canadian Army.  It provided maintenance support to mechanized infantry and artillery units and to recover disabled light armored vehicles using its crane boom.  The cab can rotate 360°, and has a 30,000 lb (13,600 kg) capacity winch was run through a crane on the cab.  Another winch, 60,000 lb (27,000 kg) capacity, was mounted on the front of the cab.  The crane operator and rigger both had vision cupolas in the cab roof.  The M578 was designed with systems to be powered even while the vehicle was shut off.  An auxiliary system drove an onboard generator as well as hydraulic pumps which, in turn, supplied drive power to the cab, the boom arm, a pair of winches, and an anchor spade - the latter fitted to the rear of the hull. It was armed with a heavy machine gun fitted on the turret roof.  They have been used at CFB Gagetown by the RCEME and by 4 Engineer Support Regiment.

M113 C & R Lynx, CFR 67-35885, CR2-76, painted as 41E, New Brunswick Military History Museum, Museum vehicle park.

M113 C & R Lynx, CFR 67-35916, E11A, New Brunswick Military History Museum.  This vehicle stands on a Bailey Bridge Section outside the North Gate.

M113 Lynx Command & Reconnaissance Vehicle

The M113 Lynx command and reconnaissance vehicle (M1123 C & R) is an American designed tracked armoured fighting vehicle.  It is a smaller vehicle built using M113A1 components, including aluminum armour, but with only four road wheels on each side and with the engine mounted in the rear instead of the front.   The M113 C & R was employed in the reconnaissance role by Canada, where it was officially designated the Lynx.  It is amphibious, propelled in the water by its tracks.  The Canadian Forces accepted 174 vehicles from 1968, replacing the Ferret armoured car.  The Lynx remained in Canadian service with the 8th Canadian Hussars (Princess Louise’s), and C Squadron, The Royal Canadian Dragoons, Royal Canadian Armoured Corps and 5th Canadian Division Training Centre at CFB Gagetown until they were withdrawn from service in 1993, and replaced by 203 Coyote eight-wheeled reconnaissance vehicles.

Ferret Scout Car Mk 1, CFR 54-82525, 25, previously painted all white, (Serial N. UNEF 1598),  K17 Armour School training compound South of Bldg J-7, 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown. 

Ferret Scout Car Mk 1, CFR 54-82592, standing on a section of Bailey Bridge, Champlain Ave., West of the Carleton Barracks Officer’s Mess.

Ferret Scout Car Mk 1, CFR 54-82608, New Brunswick Military History Museum, Museum Park.

Ferret Scout Car

Ferret armoured Scout car was designed by the British for reconnaissance purpose and was produced between 1952 and 1971.  It was built from an all-welded monocoque steel body, making the vehicle lower but also making the drive extremely noisy inside as all the running gear was within the enclosed body with the crew.  Four-wheel drive was incorporated together with “Run flat” tires (which kept their shape even if punctured in battle thus enabling a vehicle to drive to safety).  The Canadian Army had 124 in service from 1954 to 1981, serving with the 8th Canadian Hussars (Princess Louise’s), and C Squadron, The Royal Canadian Dragoons, Royal Canadian Armoured Corps and 5th Canadian Division Training Centre at CFB Gagetown until they were replaced by the Lynx tracked reconnaissance vehicles.

Armoured Vehicle General Purpose (AVGP) AFVs

The AVGP (Armoured Vehicle General Purpose) is a series of three armoured fighting vehicles ordered by the Canadian military in 1977.  The three vehicles are the Cougar, Grizzly and Husky.  These vehicles were based on the six-wheeled version of the Swiss MOWAG Piranha I.  They formerly had propellers and trim vanes for amphibious use, like the eight-wheeled Bison.  Recent retrofits have removed the marine drive system, as it is no longer used and service is expensive.  The Canadian Armed Forces’ LAV III, the United States Marine Corps’ LAV-25, and the US Army’s Stryker are other variants of the Piranha family. 

The AVGP variants brought into Canadian service were intended for use only in Canada, but they were eventually pressed into service for several United Nations missions, including UNPROFOR and the mission to Somalia.

AVGP Grizzly, CFR 78-37252, painted as 13B, New Brunswick Military History Museum, Museum vehicle park.

AVGP Grizzly

The AVGP (Armoured Vehicle General Purpose) Grizzly is an APC designed to carry a section of infantry with a with a three-man crew.  It mounts a Cadillac-Gage 1 metre turret, armed with a .50 ca HMG and a 7.62-mm machine gun. It is one of a series of three armoured fighting vehicles ordered by the Canadian military in 1977.  The AVGP variants brought into Canadian service were intended for use only in Canada, but they were eventually pressed into service for several United Nations missions, including UNPROFOR and the mission to Somalia.  The Grizzly served with the 8th Canadian Hussars (Princess Louise’s), C Squadron, The Royal Canadian Dragoons, 2nd Battalion Royal Canadian Regiment and 5th Canadian Division Training Centre at CFB Gagetown until they were replaced by the LAV III.

AVGP Cougar, CFR 78-37368, painted as 21C, New Brunswick Military History Museum, Museum vehicle park.

AVGP Cougar

The AVGP (Armoured Vehicle General Purpose) Cougar is used as a tank trainer, and as a fire support vehicle on United Nations missions.  It is manned by a three-man crew.  It is armed with a 76-mm main gun mounted in the turret of a British Scorpion reconnaissance vehicle.  It is one of a series of three armoured fighting vehicles ordered by the Canadian military in 1977.  The Cougar  served with the 8th Canadian Hussars (Princess Louise’s), C Squadron, The Royal Canadian Dragoons, and 5th Canadian Division Training Centre at CFB Gagetown until they were replaced by the LAV III

AVGP Husky in action, (Anthony Seward Photo)

AVGP Husky, CFR 78-37557, painted as 88C, New Brunswick Military History Museum, Museum vehicle park.

AVGP Husky ARV

 The AVGP (Armoured Vehicle General Purpose) Husky is an Armoured Recovery Vehicle (ARV) operated by a two-man crew.  The Husky is designed to provide mechanical support for the other two AVGP vehicles. The Husky served with the 8th Canadian Hussars (Princess Louise’s), C Squadron, The Royal Canadian Dragoons, 2nd Battalion Royal Canadian Regiment, 4 Canadian Engineer Regiment  and 5th Canadian Division Training Centre at CFB Gagetown until they were replaced by the LAV III.

Canadian Forces School of Military Engineering

AVLB Beaver in front of the Canadian Forces School of Military Engineering.

AVLB Beaver

The Beaver armoured vehicle launched bridge (AVLB), is an armoured, fully tracked vehicle built on the chassis of a Leopard Tank.  It is a highly mobile, rapidly deployable assault bridge that can be used to span natural and man-made obstacles on the battlefield.  The vehicle’s 22 meter-long bridge can support vehicles as heavy as 60 tonnes over streams and anti-tank ditches.  The Beaver is powered by a V-10, twin super charged, 830 HP, multi-fueled engine.  It is equipped with an NBCD system that provides protection against nuclear, biological, and chemical agents.  It is also equipped with eight smoke/HE grenade dischargers.

Soviet and former Warsaw Pact AFV Collection

Russian T-72 Main Battle Tank, New Brunswick Military History Museum, Museum vehicle park.

Russian T-72 Main Battle Tank

The T-72 is a Soviet-designed main battle tank that entered production in 1970.  It was the most common tank used by the Soviet Army from the 1970s to the collapse of the Soviet Union.  It has been widely exported and is in use by more than 40 countries.

Laser rangefinders have equipped T-72 tanks since 1978.  The T-72 is equipped with the 125-mm 2A46 series main gun and is capable of firing anti-tank guided missiles, as well as standard main gun ammunition, including HEAT and APFSDS rounds.  The main gun of the T-72 has a mean error of one metre (39 inch) at a range of 1,800 m (2,000 yd).  Its maximum firing distance is 9,100 m (10,000 yd), due to limited positive elevation.  The limit of aimed fire is 4,000 m (4,400 yd) (with the gun-launched anti-tank guided missile, which is rarely used outside the former USSR).  The T-72’s main gun is fitted with an integral pressure reserve drum, which assists in rapid smoke evacuation from the bore after firing.  The 125 millimetre gun barrel is certified strong enough to ram the tank through forty centimetres of iron-reinforced brick wall, though doing so will negatively affect the gun’s accuracy when subsequently fired.  One with the NBMHM came to CFB Gagetown in the early 1990s from East Germany.

Russian ASU-57 SP Airborne Assault Gun, Gun Serial No. 52-∏-270, N?556, New Brunswick Military History Museum, Museum vehicle park.

Russian 57-mm ASU-57 SP Gun

The ASU-57 was a small, lightly constructed Soviet assault gun specifically designed for use by Soviet airborne divisions.  The ASU-57 was designed to be a light-weight assault gun that could be air-dropped and deployed by rocket-assisted parachute along with the troops.  The ASU-57’s engine was taken from the Pobeda civilian car.  The ASU-57 was a successful design, and saw service with Soviet airborne divisions for around 20 years before being replaced by the 85-mm ASU-85 SP Gun.  During its years of operation 54 vehicles would have been assigned to each airborne division.

One main drawback was the vehicle’s welded aluminum hull and open top which offers little protection for the crew.  However for airborne troops such vehicles are invaluable, giving lightly armed soldiers who are isolated behind enemy lines mobile artillery support on the battlefield.  One is preserved at 5 CDSB Gagetown, New Brunswick.

Russian AT-S/T Artillery Tractor, New Brunswick Military History Museum, Museum vehicle park.

Russian AT-S/T Artillery Tractor

The AT-S/T is a Soviet artillery tractor used mainly for towing 152-mm Howitzers and as an ammo transporter.  It was replaced in 1959 by the ATS 59.  It has a six passenger cab.  The AT-S chassis was used in a variety of roles to carry anti-aircraft guns, missiles, BM-24T rockets as well as utility and cargo transport.  It was in use by all the former Warsaw Pact countries and many in the Middle East.

Russian BTR-152 Armoured Personnel Carrier, New Brunswick Military History Museum, Museum vehicle park.

Russian BTR-152 Armoured Personnel Carrier

The BTR-152 (also known as BTR-140) was a non-amphibious Soviet wheeled armoured personnel carrier (BTR stands for Bronetransporter, literally “armoured transporter”) that entered Soviet service in 1950.  By the early 1970s it had been replaced in the infantry vehicle role by the BTR-60.  However, it remained in service in the Soviet Army and the Russian Army until 1993 in a variety of other roles.  It was also exported to many Third World countries where some still remain in service.

Russian BRDM-2 Combat Reconnaissance/Patrol Vehicle, New Brunswick Military History Museum, Museum vehicle park. 

Russian BRDM-2 Combat Reconnaissance/Patrol Vehicle

The BRDM-2  Combat Reconnaissance/Patrol Vehicle is an amphibious armoured patrol car used by Russia.  The BRDM-2 entered service with Soviet Army in 1962.  It has a crew of four, a driver, a co-driver, a commander, and a gunner.  It has two pairs of chain-driven belly wheels lowered by the driver which allow trench crossing and a centralized tire pressure regulation system which can be used to adjust the tire pressure of all four tires or individual tires while the vehicle is in motion to suit to the ground conditions.

The BRDM-2 has a GAZ-41 gasoline V-8 engine in the rear which means the engine is much better protected from enemy fire.  The BRDM-2 is amphibious.  The GAZ-41 gasoline V-8 engine supplies power to the circular water-jet, equipped with a four-bladed propeller at the rear of the vehicle, which allows amphibious travel with a speed of 10 km/h for 17 to 19 hours.  The armament is a 14.5-mm KPVT heavy machine gun with a coaxial 7.62-mm PKT general purpose machine gun as a secondary weapon both in a small conical BPU-1 turret mounted on the hull in a central position above the belly wheels. The armour on the vehicle which is composed of welded steel, protects it fully against small arms fire and small shell fragments.

M109A4 155-mm SP Howitzer, CFR 85-7724785, painted as 45B, New Brunswick Military History Museum, Museum vehicle park.  

M109A4B 155-mm Self-Propelled Howitzer

The M109 is an American-made self-propelled 155-mm Howitzer, first introduced in the early 1960s.  76 A4B+ were in use by the Canadian Forces from 1967 until they were phased ou in 2005.  In the 1980s of of these SP Howitzers were modernized to the M109A4B+ SPH standard.  24 of the M109s served with 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group (4 CMBG) in Germany, with the remainder disptributed to units in Canada, including CFB Shilo where more extensive and varied live fire exercises could be carried out than those conducted by 1 RCHA at Grafenwoehr and Musnter in Germany. Many were in service at CFB Gagetown.

The M109 has a crew of six: the section chief, the driver, the gunner, the assistant gunner and two ammunition handlers.  The gunner aims the cannon left or right (deflection) and the assistant gunner aims the cannon up and down (quadrant).  The cannon is an M185 155-mm Howitzer.  It has a secondary armament of a .50-inch (12.7-mm) M2 machine gun, Mk I9 Mod 3 40-mm Automatic Grenade Launcher, or 7.62-mm M60 or M240 machine gun.

Combat Training Centre, 5 CDSG Base Gagetown, Armour School

Canadian M4A2(76)W HVSS Sherman "Easy 8" tank, CFR 78-980, (Serial No. 1080E), 76-mm Gun, “Addy”, West of Bldg J-7.

Canadian M4A2(76)W HVSS Sherman "Easy 8" tank, CFR 65038, built by Fisher, Reg. No. 30123017, “Fox”, painted as CFR 78-980, New Brunswick Military History Museum, Main Gate. 

M4A2E8 HVSS Sherman Medium Tank

In 1946 the Canadian Army acquired 294 M4A2 (76-mm) Wet Horizontal Volute Spring Suspension (HVSS) Sherman tanks manufactured in the USA by the Fisher Tank Arsenal in Grand Blanc, Michigan between May 1944 and May 1945.  The Canadians referred to this tank as the M4A2E8.  Compared with the Shermans used by Canadians in the Second World War, the ammunition storage in the new tanks was improved by surrounding the racks with water and ethylene glycol-filled jackets to reduce the probability of explosion in the event of penetration of the armour by enemy fire.  The tanks equipped with this protection system were designated "Wet".  The M4A2E8 was powered by a pair of side-by-side mounted General Motors 6046 diesel engines producing 375 hp mounted in the rear of the hull. 

The tank could sustain a speed of 48 kmh (30 mph).  Its main armament was a 76-mm M1A2 long-barreled, high-velocity gun fitted with a muzzle brake.  Its secondary armament included one Browning .30-calibre M1919A4 machine-gun mounted co-axially with the main gun, a bow machine-gun in the front of the hull, and a Browning .50-calibre machine-gun mounted on a post between the loader's and commander's hatches for AA protection.  The HVSS system used four wheels per bogie instead of two, which allowed tracks that were wider (165-mm) to be installed, and which made for better performance on soft ground and allowed for a smoother ride.  The M4A2E8 had a five-man crew.  The driver and co-driver sat in the front of the hull with the driver on the left and co-driver on the right.  The crew commander, loader and gunner sat in the turret.  The crew commander's position was on the right side of the turret, the loader sat on his left and the gunner sat in front of the commander.  Both regular and reserve units used these tanks, including the 8th CH in Sussex and various units training at Camp Gagetown until they were replaced by the Centurion tank in the mid 1950s.

Canadian M4A2 W HVSS Sherman "Easy 8" armoured recovery vehicle (ARV), Camp Gagetown, ca 1946-1970s.  (NBMHM, 5 CDS Base Gagetown Photo)

A number of Canadian post war Shermans in Canada were converted into turretless APCs.  This one appears to be in use as an armoured recovery vehicle based on the tow bar attached at the rear, but it may also have been used as a driver trainer.  The headlights and guards on the glacis plate appear to have been taken from a Centurion and the box in the middle of the glacis plate is a Centurion driver's windscreen stowage box.  It also appears that the Centurion tank front fenders have been attached to the front of the Sherman.  The exhausts have been re-routed up the rear of the hull as indicated by the dual stacks.  This is reminisent of privately owned post war Shermans used for logging and other industries.  Jason Bobrowich.

Centurion Main Battle Tank Mk. 5, CFR 52-31201, 20-pounder main gun, on display on Tilley Ave., Southeast of the Base Medical Centre.

Centurion Main Battle Tank Mk. 5/2, CFR 53-81201, L7 105-mm Gun, “Worthy”, West of Bldg J-7.

Leopard C1 Main Battle Tank, 105-mm Gun, “Nixon”, West of Bldg J-7.

M113 C & R Lynx, CFR unknown, CR2-147, “Radley-Walters”, West of Bldg J-7.

M113 C & R Lynx, CFR 67-35953, CR2-5, under a tarp in the K17 Armour School training compound South of Bldg J-7.

AVGP Cougar, L-137-F-J79, in the K17 Armour School training compound South of Bldg J-7.

Combat Training Centre, 5 CDSB Gagetown, Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery School

M109 155-mm Self-propelled Howitzer, (Reg. No. 77240), 1985, AC: NX, ECC: 119205 HUI C: 1760, SAUI C: 1760, VMO No. DLE21801, VMO.  Display Monument, now in front of the School.

Combat Training Centre, 5 CDSB Gagetown, Infantry School

AVGP Grizzly, west side of the Infantry School.

M113 line up, Ex Royal Sword, Germany, Fallex 87.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4730782).

M113, Hohenfels, Germany, Fallex, 27 Aug 1984.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4868468)

M113A1 APC, 12, west side of the Infantry School.

Present day Armour in service with the RCD at 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown.

Leopard A4, C Tp, RCD, 5 CDSB Gagetown, Oct 2016.  (Author Photo)

Leopard A4M, C Tp, RCD, 5 CDSB Gagetown.

Leopard A6, C Tp, RCD, 5 CDSB Gagetown,

Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle (TAPV), with the Author, at 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown, New Brunswick.