Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
Armoured Fighting Vehicles and Tanks preserved in Canada 7: New Brunswick

Armoured Fighting Vehicles preserved in New Brunswick

The data found on this page has been compiled by the author.  Photos are by the author unless otherwise credited.  Any additions, correctons or amendments to this list of Armoured Fighting Vehicles in Canada would be most welcome

If you have information and photographs of armoured fighting vehicles missing from this list that you are willing to share, updates would be most welcome. Any errors found here are by the author.  French Translation of the technical data presented here would be appreciated.  Corrections, amendments and suggested changes may be emailed to the author at hskaarup@rogers.com.

Une traduction au français pour l'information technique présente serait grandement apprécié. Vos corrections, changements et suggestions sont les bienvenus, et peuvent être envoyés au hskaarup@rogers.com

Data current to 31 Jan 2017.

Bathurst

Universal Carrier, 4th Field Regt, RCA, Vaucelles, France, 20 July 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3222766)

Universal Carrier one of two)

Univeral Carrier (second of two)

Centreville

155-mm M109 SP Howitzer, No. 1 of 2, Memorial Park.

155-mm M109 SP Howitzer, No. 2 of 2, Memorial Park.

Grand Anse

M113, Ex Grosse Rochade, Vilshofen, Germany, Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4822868)

M113 APC, CFR TBC.

Harvey

M113 C & R Lynx, Ex Royal Sword, Germany, Oct 1987.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4730780)

M113 C & R Lynx, CFR 67-35967, town cenotaph.

Moncton

Sherman V tank armed with a 75-mm Gun, 5th Canadian Armour Regiment, 8th Princess Louise (New Brunswick) Hussars, Italy, 2 Mar 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada  Photo, MIKAN No. 3599666)

Sherman V tank armed with a 75-mm Gun, 5th Canadian Armour Regiment, 8th Princess Louise (New Brunswick) Hussars, Putten, Netherlands, 18 Apr 1945.  Churchill tank tracks attached to this tank as add-on armour.  (Capt Jack Smith, Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3396461)

Sherman Ic Hybrid Firefly tank armed with a 17-pounder Gun, 5th Canadian Armour Regiment, 8th Princess Louise (New Brunswick) Hussars, Putten, Netherlands, 18 Apr 1945.  The gun has a false muzzle brake added in the middle of the barrel with the remainder painted in a disruptive camouflage pattern to confuse German anti-tank gunners.  (Capt Jack Smith, Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3396461)

HRH Princess Margaret inspecting Princess Louise, 8 CF, Camp Gagetown, New Brunswick, 1958  Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4301771)

Canadian M4A2(76)W HVSS Sherman "Easy 8" tank, “Coriano”, Centennial Park, St George Blvd.

In 1946 the first of 294 M4A2 (76-mm) Wet Horizontal Volute Spring Suspension (HVSS) Sherman tanks arrived at Camp Borden and at the Long Pointe Ordnance Depot in Montreal.  The Canadians referred to this tank as the M4A2E8.  96 Stuart tanks were also delivered at the same time.  The new Shermans were manufactured by the Fisher Tank Arsenal in Grand Blanc, Michigan between May 1944 and May 1945.  M24 Chaffee light tanks were also purchased at this time.  Compared with the Shermans used by Canadians in the Second World War, the ammunition storage in the new tanks was improved by surrounding the racks with water and etheylene glycol-filled jackets to reduce the probability of explosion in the event of penetration of the armour by enemy fire.  The tanks equipped with this protection system were designated "Wet". 

The M4A2E8 was powered by a pair of side-by-side mounted General Motors 6046 diesel engines producing 375 hp mounted in the rear of the hull.  The tank could sustain a speed of 48 kmh (30 mph).  Its main armament was a 76-mm M1A2 long-barreled, high-velocity gun fitted with a muzzle brake.  Its secondary armament included one Browning .30-calibre M1919A4 machine-gun mounted co-axially with the main gun, a bow machine-gun in the front of the hull, and a Browning .50-calibre machine-gun mounted on a post between the loader's and commander's hatches for AA protection.  The HVSS system used four wheels per bogie instead of two, which allowed tracks that were wider (165-mm) to be installed, and which made for better performance on soft ground and allowed for a smoother ride.  The M4A2E8 had a five-man crew.  The driver and co-driver sat in the front of the hull with the driver on the left and co-driver on the right.  The crew commander, loader and gunner sat in the turret.  The crew commander's position was on the right side of the turret, the loader sat on his left and the gunner sat in front of the commander.  After the first batch of the new tanks went to the Royal Canadian Dragoons (RCD) at Camp Borden 1946, another 30 went to the Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadian) (LdSH) at Camp Wainwright, Alberta in March 1947.  Training on the tanks by the LdSH was also conducted at Camp Sarcee in Alberta, and at Camp Petawawa when the RCD moved there in the spring of 1948.

Centurion tank on exercise, Camp Gagetown, summer 1963.  (Library and Archives Canada photo, MIKAN No. 4235505

 

Centurion Main Battle Tank Mk. 11, L7 105-mm main gun, “Rimini”, Moncton Armoury.

The Canadian Army took delivery of 274 Centurion Mk. 3 tanks between 1952 and 1953.  The Centurion had well-sloped armour, superior mobility andexcellent gun and fire control systems compared with its then existing contemporaries.  The first 21 Centurions were delivered to the Royal Canadian Dragoons in Germany in March 1952, where they served with the Canadian contingent of the NATO forces based there.  The Centurions were used for training in Canada in the late 1960s and early 1970s.  The Mk. 3 tanks were modified to Mk. 5 standard with the replacement of the co-axial Besa MG with a .30-calibre Browning MG.  Most of the Centurions in Canada retained 20-pounder main guns, while the Centurions in Europe were upgunned to the Mk. 6 standard with the L7 105-mm main gun and additional armour in 1962. The Centurions in service with 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group (4 CMBG) in Germany were brought up to Mk. 11 standard in 1965 by fitting a .50-calibre Browning HMG aligned alongside the .30-calibre Browning MG, the fitting of a 100-gallon fuel tank on the rear hull plance, and the installation  of infrared night-fighting gear.  Nine Centurion Armoured Recovery Vehicles (ARV) were purchased by Canada in 1954, and four armoured bridge-layers (ABL) in 1966.  Centurions ended their service in Germany on 2 June 1977, and in Canada as late as 1979 when Leopard tanks began to replace them.

Leopard, Combat Team Commander's Course, CFB Gagetown, April 1995. 

  

Leopard Main Battle Tank, Superior Propane Centre, 55 Russ Howard Drive.

Ferret Scout Car on exercise in Germany, 8th Canadian Hussars.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4234829)

Ferret Scout Car, Moncton Armoury.

8th Canadian Hussars Ferret, Germany.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4234835, left and MIKAN No. 423487, right)

British Ferret Scout Car Mk 1, privately owned by Mike Baxter.

Oromocto

Centurion tank on exercise, Camp Gagetown, summer 1963. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4235424)

  

Centurion Main Battle Tank Mk 5, 20-pounder main gun, "Ironsides", Centennial Park, Wassis Road.

M113 C & R Lynx, Nabburg, Germany, Ex Nab Jubilee, Sep 1977.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4814264

M113 C & R Lynx, CFR TBC, 41, Oromocto Tourist Centre.

 

LAV III, early mod, to be the first of 250 allocated to communities across Canada, located near the Oromocto War Memorial.

Canadian Provost Corps mounted in a Willys Jeep on UN duty in Egypt.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4234422)

Willys Jeep, 1956, private collector.

Willys Jeep, Jason Meade.

Oromocto, 5 Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown

The page for AFVs preserved in New Brunswick has grown too large to download quickly, so the Tanks and AFVs on display at 5 CDSB Gagetown are listed on a separate web page.  (This should keep the webpage from crashing).

Riverview

Centurion tanks on exercise in Germany, 1964.  (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN No. 4235688, left and 4235689, right)

Centurion Mk. 5/2 Main Battle Tank with L7 105-mm main gun, 8th Canadian Hussars, Casley Park, Bradford Road, behind the Municipal Building

Sackville

Ferret Scout Car, Memorial Park.

Sainte-Quentin

M113, river crossing, Bavaria, 8 Sep 1984.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4868492, left and 4868489, right)

M113 APC, Ambulance, beside the war memorial in front of the town library.

Sussex

Unidentified infantryman, possibly of the Cape Breton Highlanders, examining the treads of a Sherman V tank, possibly of "B" Squadron, 8th Princess Louise's (New Brunswick) Hussars, during the assault on the Gothic Line, Italy, ca. 31 August 1944.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 3512561)

 

Canadian M4A2(76)W HVSS Sherman "Easy 8" tank, “Balaclava”, BGen Milton Gregg VC Armoury, Leonard Drive, Sussex, NB.

AVGP Cougar, in front of the HQ, BGen Milton Gregg VC Armoury, Leonard Drive.

AVGP Cougar, in the storage compound of the BGen Milton Gregg VC Armoury.

M113 C & R Lynx, 3 Mech Cdo, Ex Reforger Oct 74, Germany.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4816296)

M113 C & R Lynx, in the storage compound of the BGen Milton Gregg VC Armoury, previously on display in Moncton.

Ferret, RCD, Camp Gagetown, summer concentration, 1963.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4235425)

Ferret Scout Car, (Serial No, 82583), built in 1954, BGen Milton Gregg VC Armoury, Leonard Drive, undergoing restoration.