Military History Books
by Harold A. Skaarup   www.SilverHawkAuthor.com   
 
4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group, Canadian Forces Europe

Canada's NATO Brigade

4 CMBG, RCD Leopard tanks and 3rd Bn RCR M113 APCs and jeep, Fallex 80, Germany, Sep 1980.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4922171)

Data current to 20 Sep 2017.

Canadian Forces Europe

Canadian Forces Europe (CFE) was the Canadian Forces military formation in Europe during the Cold War.  The CF assisted other NATO allies in being prepared to counter the military activities of Warsaw Pact and the Soviet Union.

CFE consisted of two formations in West Germany, Canadian Forces Base Lahr with 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group (1957-1993), and No. 1 Air Division RCAF at Canadian Forces Base Baden-Soellingen, which later became 1 Canadian Air Group.  Both formations closed in the early 1990s with the end of the Cold War.

Canadian Army elements in CFE

Canada had maintained a presence in Europe as part of the NATO forces since 1951, when 27 Canadian Infantry Brigade was initially deployed to Hannover, Germany, attached to the British Army of the Rhine (BAOR).  This formation, which was formed primarily with Militia units, eventually moved to a permanent base at Soest, Germany, in 1953.  Initially, it was intended to rotate brigades to Germany - 27 CIB was replaced by 1 Canadian Infantry Brigade Group in October 1953, which in turn was replaced by 2 Canadian Infantry Brigade Group in 1955, and then 4 Canadian Infantry Brigade Group in 1957. 

The arrival of 4 CIBG saw a significant reinforcement of the formation's capabilities; prior to this each brigade had only been equipped with a squadron of main battle tanks.  The arrival of 4 CIBG saw a full armoured regiment equipped with Centurion tanks and an independent brigade reconnaissance squadron with Ferret scout cars.  In 1959, when 4 CIBG's tour was due to end, a change was made in the reinforcement policy for Germany.  Rather than having whole brigades rotating every two years, the decision was made to keep 4 CIBG and its associated brigade units in place, instead rotating the major combat elements to Germany every three years.

The brigade was initially headquartered in Soest.  Individual units were stationed both at Soest and other towns in North Rhine-Westphalia:

Soest - BHQ, 1 x infantry battalion, service units

Hemer - 1 x infantry battalion, artillery regiment

Werl - 1 x infantry battalion, engineer regiment, field ambulance

Iserlohn - armoured regiment

Hiller CH-112 Nomad helicopters in service with 8th Canadian Hussars Ferret Scout cars, Germany, ca 1960s.  (DND Photo)

In 1962, the brigade was reinforced with the addition of the Royal Canadian Armoured Corps helicopter recce troop, equipped with nine Hiller CH-112 Nomad helicopters.  The Nomad helicopter served with the Canadian Army in the utility and aerial observation role, starting in 1961.  Twenty-four were assigned to the units within the Canadian Army, including Europe.  The Nomad was used by the 8th Canadian Hussars - Helicopter Reconnaissance Troop, Command and Liaison Flight of 4 CMBG HQ and Signals Squadron and the Aircraft Repair Platoon.  All amalgamated to become 444 Squadron on 1 Oct 1972 and were re-equipped with the Bell CH-136 Kiowa helicopter.

By the mid 1960s, 4 CIBG's manpower totalled 6,700 men; it featured three mechanised infantry battalions, a reconnaissance squadron equipped with both armoured vehicles and helicopters, artillery equipped with both fire support and tactical nuclear weapons, and an extensive logistic operation.  The extent of the Canadian operation led to the British describing it as "a light division".  The brigade was renamed 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group in May 1968.

M113, Ex Lares Team, Northern Germany, 1976.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4619745)

4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group

4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group (4 CMBG) was a formation of the Canadian Army, then Force Mobile Command (FMC) of the unified Canadian Forces (CF).  It was part of the European formation known as Canadian Forces Europe (CFE).  The formation served as the main forward deployed land element of Canada's armed forces, and was stationed in West Germany from 1957 until it was disbanded in 1993.

In 1951, 27th Canadian Infantry Brigade arrived in Europe, to be succeeded by 1 Canadian Infantry Brigade Group in 1953, then 2 CIBG in 1955, then 4 CIBG in 1957.  In 1959, when 4 CIBG's tour was due to end, a change was made in the reinforcement policy for Germany.  Instead of whole brigades rotating every two years, the decision was made to keep 4 CIBG and its associated brigade units in place, instead rotating the major combat elements to Germany every three years.

The presence of the three mechanized infantry battalions led Canada's brigade in Germany to be renamed as 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group on 1 May 1968, three months after Canada's three separate armed forces were unified into the single Canadian Forces.  Around the same time, a review of Canada's foreign policy was announced by the Prime Minister, Pierre Trudeau, part of which involved an investigation into the role of 4 CMBG, which was the Canadian military's main overseas asset.  The ultimate result of the investigation was the announcement by the Prime Minister, as part of an overall cut in defence spending, to reduce the Canadian military commitment in Europe by half.  4 CMBG would also be re-roled - rather than its attachment as an active part of the British Army of the Rhine (BAOR), it would become a reserve attached to either the VII (US) Corps or II (GE) Corps, relocating to Lahr in Southern Germany.  Most notably, this downsizing and re-roling led to the withdrawal of the tactical nuclear weapons capability.  4 CMBG remained in place as part of NATO's forces throughout the Cold War until the final drawdown of Canada's military presence in Europe when it was disbanded in 1993.

Major combat units of the CF that served in 4 CIBG/4 CMBG:

Armour

The Royal Canadian Dragoons - 1957-1959, 1970-1987

Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians) - 1966-1970

8th Canadian Hussars (Princess Louise's) - 1960-1964, 1987-1993

The Black Watch (1st Bn), Royal Highland Regiment of Canada - 1959-1962

The Fort Garry Horse - 1962-1966

Infantry

1st Battalion, Canadian Guards - 1959-1962

2nd Battalion, Canadian Guards - 1957-1959

1st Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment - 1962-1965

2nd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment - 1965-1969

3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment - 1977-1984, 1988-1993

1st Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry - 1964-1967

2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry - 1966-1970, 1984-1988

1er Bataillon, Royal 22e Régiment - 1967-1993

2e Bataillon, Royal 22e Régiment - 1965-1969

1st Battalion, The Queen's Own Rifles of Canada - 1960-1964

2nd Battalion, The Queen's Own Rifles of Canada - 1957-1959

2nd Battalion, The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) of Canada - 1962-1965

3rd Mechanized Commando, The Canadian Airborne Regiment - 1970-1977

Artillery

1st Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery - 1957-1960, 1967-1993

2nd Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery - 1964-1967

3rd Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery - 1960-1964

4 Field Squadron, Royal Canadian Engineers

444 Combat Support Squadron

        

4 CMBG HQ and Signals Sqn

4 CMBG HQ and Signals Squadron, G2 Intelligence Section

 

4 Service Battalion was created at CFB Soest in 1968 and moved to CFB Lahr in 1970 in support of 4 CMBG until the close out of Canada's NATO commitment there in 1993.

4 Combat Medical Support Unit

4 Military Police Platoon

4 Canadian Military Support Unit

Ancillary supporting signal and service units in Soest, Werl, Iserlohn, and Hemer included the following units from 1957 to 1959:

  • 1 Transport Company

  • 1 Field Ambulance

  • 4 Field Park Company

  • 4 Ordnance Field Park

  • 1 Canadian Base Ordnance Unit

  • 4 Field Workshop RCEME

  • 4 CIBG Light Aid Detachment

  • 1 Field Detention Barracks

  • 1 Cdn Base Medical Unit

  • 4 Provost Platoon

  • PPCLI Band

On 1 February 1968 the Canadian Army merged with the RCAF and the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) to form the unified Canadian Forces. RCAF Station Baden-Soellingen was renamed Canadian Forces Base Baden-Soellingen, or CFB Baden-Soellingen.

Further defence cuts and consolidation saw the Canadian Army (then renamed to Force Mobile Command) units of 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group based in Soest area of northern West Germany moved to Canadian Forces Base Lahr.  However, a mechanized infantry battalion was stationed alongside the RCAF fighter squadrons based at Baden-Soellingen:

1970-1977: 3rd Mechanized Commando, The Canadian Airborne Regiment

1977-1984: 3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment

1984-1988: 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry

1988-1993: 3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment

In addition, there was also a communications squadron, and after 1987, an air defence battery.
 
The ramp-up in defence spending during renewed Cold War tensions in the late 1970s and 1980s saw CFB Baden-Soellingen receive much-needed new infrastructure, including updated quarters for its personnel and their dependents.
 
In October 1989 the Berlin Wall came down and by the end of 1990 Germany had reunited, thawing Cold War tensions and removing the role for Canada's active units stationed in Western Europe under NATO command.

In September 1990 it was announced that an infantry company from the 3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment, would deploy from CFB Baden-Soellingen to a base in Qatar as part of Operation Desert Shield along with some airfield security personnel.

The last major deployment from CFB Baden Soellingen occurred in April 1992, when infantry soldiers from November Company of The Royal Canadian Regiment were deployed to a United Nations peacekeeping mission in the disintegrating country of Yugoslavia.  November Company's deployment was the first of many that the Canadian Forces would undertake to the nation under the banner of United Nations Protection Force (UNPROFOR).  On the first night in Sira?, Croatia, November Company came under indirect mortar fire and was hit by 10-25 shells.  In July 1992, the company was re-located to Sector Sarajevo, and fell under the command of General Lewis MacKenzie.  November Company was ordered to break through to and seize Sarajevo International Airport for UNPROFOR to use for transporting food and supplies to civilians in the city.

The post-Cold War defence cuts of the early 1990s identified both CFB Baden-Soellingen and CFB Lahr for closure by 1994.  With the end of the Cold War, the Canadian government opted to withdraw its forces stationed in Europe. 

The airfield at CFB Baden Soellingen closed on 31 March 1993.  By summer 1993 most personnel had vacated CFB Baden-Soellingen with the base becoming a detachment of CFB Lahr, whose personnel had also largely vacated by 31 August 1993.  During the final months, Baden-Soellingen operated largely as a detachment of CFB Lahr and was permanently closed on 31 December 1993.  CFB Lahr would continue on until being officially closed 8 months later on 31 August 1994.  The Baden Airpark GmbH took over the area in 1995 and commercial flights started in 1997.

Lahr Caserne, HQ 4 CMBG and HQ CFE, aerial view.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4221659)

The brigade in action

4-inch M30 Mortar, 1st Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment, 4 CMBG, Germany, ca 1963.  (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN No. 4235849 and 4235854)

105-mm C1A1 live fire, Germany, 1964.  (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN No. 4235755 and 4235756)

105-mm C1A1 Field Gun, 2nd Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, training in Germany, 1964.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4234806)

Live fire arty demo, 2nd Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, Germany, 1964.  (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN Nos. 4235774 and 4235775)

Centurion tanks, 8th Canadian Hussars (Princess Louise’s), on exercise in Germany, 1964.  (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN Nos. 4235688, 4235689, 4235690, and 4235750)

Ferret, 8th Canadian Hussars, Germany, ca 1964. (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN Nos. 4234827, 4234829 and 4234835)

Canadian Provost Corps (Military Police) working with German politzei, Northern Germany, ca 1965.  (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN Nos. 4234837 and 4234834)

Ferret Scout car, 4 Fd Sqn RCE, R22eR M113s swimming the Weser River, Ex Rob Roy, Sep 1967, Germany.  (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN No. 42216644)

2-1/2-ton trucks, 4 CMBG, convoy, near Heilbronn, Germany, Ex Reforger I, winter exercise, Feb 1979.  (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN No. 4886171).  There appears to be a 1976 5/4 ton in the foreground, and there also appears to be a 1976 M800 series 5 ton in the background judging by the air filter on it's fender.  Rob Love.

Centurion tanks, RCD, and American M47 Patton tanks, Ex Reforger III, on a railway siding in Germany, 9 Oct 1971. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4922183)

M113 C & R Lynx momentarily hung-up on the river bank during the Ex Reforger III exercise in Germany, 25 Sep 1971.  The Lynx is being recovered by a an M113, while another M113, 66B, waits to cross armed with a 106-mm M40A1 Recoilless Rifle.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4692196)

M113 C & R Lynx & M113, Ex Reforger III, Germany, 9 Oct 1971.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4922182)

Canadians were supported with these German M48 AVLBs during Ex Gutes Omen, Germany, 25 Sep 1971. (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN Nos. 4692197 and 4922176)

Centurion caught in a ditch, RCD, Lahr, Germany, (possibly Robert Cable and Fred Lavelle, 24 Jan 1973. (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN Nos. 4692417 and 4692413)

Centurion tank, Ex Reforger IV, RCD, Lahr, Germany, Jan 1973.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4692410)

Centurion tank engaging the enemy, Ex Reforger V, Sep 1973.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4692396)

Centurion, Royal Canadian Dragoons on Ex Reforger V, Sep 1973.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4619700)

Centurion armoured recovery vehicles (ARV), Ex Reforger 74, Germany, Oct 1974.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4816325)

Centurion, Ex Reforger 74, Germany, Oct 1974.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4728205)

Centurion armoured vehicle-launched bridge (AVLB), 4 Field Sqn, RCE, Ex Reforger 74, Eilheim, Germany, Oct 1974. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4816313).

106-mm M40A1 Recoilless Rifle mounted on an M113, Ex Reforger 74, 3rd Mechanized Commando, The Canadian Airborne Regiment, Oct 1974.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4631327)

Centurion, Ex Reforger 74, crane lifting engine, Germany, Oct 1974.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4631322)

Centurion, Ex Reforger 74, Germany, Oct 1974.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4816309)

Centurion & M113, Ex Reforger 74, Bavaria, Germany, Oct 1974. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4816317)

M113 C & R Lynx, Ex Reforger 74, Oct 1974, Germany, 3rd Mechanized Commando, The Canadian Airborne Regiment, crew Commander MWO Michael Bond.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4816296)

M113, Ex Reforger 74, Germany 1R22eR, Oct 1974.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4816336)

Centurion, RCD, Ex Regensprung, Regenstauf, Germany, 19 Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4692422)

Bell CH-136 Kiowa, 444 Sqn, Ex Reforger 74, Germany, Oct 1974.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4816307)

M113 of 1 R22eR,guarded by 3 Mech Cdo soldiers, Ex Reforger 74, Germany, Oct 1974.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4816297)

M113, R22eR, 106-mm recoilless rifle, Ex Certain Trek, South of Wurzburg, 20 Oct 1975. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4692424)

Centurion armoured vehicle-launched bridge (AVLB), Ex Regensprung, Lahr, Germany, 9 Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4748878)

Centurion, roadside repairs, Ex Grosse Rochade, Germany Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4822866)

155-mm M109 SP Howitzer, 4 CMBG, Grosse Rochade, Germany, 18 Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4748921)

Centurions and M113, Ex Grosse Rochade, 18 Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4748904)

4 CMBG Linemen, Ex Certain Trek, SW of Wurzburg, Germany, 20 Oct 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4692433)

HQ & Sig Sqn 4 CMBG, Ex Grosse Rochade, Germany, 18 Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4748900)

4 CMBG, Ex Grosse Rochade, Cpl Beauchamps fuels German Army motorcycle, 18 Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4748898)

4 CMBG, Ex Grosse Rochade, Germany, ferry over the Danube, 18 Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4748879)

M113 APC , Ex Grosse Rochade, Danube, GE Ferry, 18 Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4748905 and 4748913)

M113 C & R Lynx and 2-1/2-ton truck boarding a German assault ferry, Ex Grosse Rochade, Danube River, 18 Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN Nos. 4221652 and 4748911)

M577 CP, Ex Grosse Rochade, Danube, Germany, 18 Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN No. 4748894)

155-mm M109 SP Howitzer, 1 RCHA, Ex Grosse Rochade, Danube, Germany, 18 Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. MIKAN No. 4748892, 4748897 and 474880)

155-mm M109 SP Howitzer, Ex Regensprung, Lahr, Germany, 9 Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4748866 and 4748867)

3/4-ton truck, Ex Gross Rochade, Bavaria, Germany, 4 CMBG, Danube River Crossing, Sep 1975. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4748893)

4 CMBG, Ex Grosse Rochade, Germany, ferry over the Danube, 18 Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4748892)

Centurion tank, RCD, Ex Certain Trek, South of Wurzburg, Germany, 20 Oct 1975. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4728207)

Centurion, Ex Grosse Rochade, Germany, 18 Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4822869)

M113A1 APC pulling off the road, French Army EBR Scout Cars, Ex Grosse Rochade, Bavaria, 18 Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4748902)

M113, Ex Grosse Rochade, Germany, 18 Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4748903)

M113s, RCD, Ex Certain Trek, South of Wurzburg, 20 Oct 1975. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4619730, 4619738 and 4619741)

155-mm M109 SP Howitzer, Ex Grosse Rochade, 4 CMBG, 18 Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4822861)

4 CMBG HQ & Sigs 2.5-ton truck cam, Ex Grosse Rochade, Germany, 18 Sep 1975.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4748899)

4 CMBG convoy, Fallex 76, Michelsneukirchen, Germany, 1976.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4631312)

4 CMBG, putting up radio antenna, Fallex 76, Germany, 1976.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4631313)

4 CMBG, R22eR soldier & M113, Fallex 76, Germany, 1976.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4814247)

155-mm M109 SP Howitzer cam, RCHA, Fallex 1976, Germany.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4594347)

155-mm M109 SP Howitzer cam, RCHA, Reforger 76, Sep 1976, Germany.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4631311)

M113 line up, Germany, Reforger 76, Sep 1976, Germany.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4594345)

M113 Dozer on AVLB bridge, 4 CMBG, Fallex 76.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4619747)

M113, R22eR, Eilheim, Ex Reforger 74, view from a medieval castle tower, Germany, Oct 1974.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4816326)

O Gp, 3 Mech Cdo, Fallex 1976, Germany.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4631310)

4 CMBG, 3 Mech Cdo, Carl Gustav, Fallex 76, Germany, 1976.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4814250)

4 CMBG, Carl Gustav team, Germany, 1976.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4814249)

M113 and German Marder passing in fog, Germany, 1976.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4631314)

M113s,1 R22eR, Ex Certain Wacht, North East Germany, 20 Jan 1977. (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN Nos. 4822870 and 4822878)

M113 C & R Lynx behind an American M163 Vulcan AntiAircraft Self-Propelled Gun (AASPG) 20-mm six-barrel gun mounted on a modified M113A1 APC, EX Certain Wacht, Germany, 20 Jan 1977.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4822881)

M113 C & R Lynx, Nabburg, Germany, Ex Nab Jubilee, Sep 1977. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4814264)

Leopard tank, Fall Ex, Sep 1977.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4728086)

Bell CH-136 Kiowa helicopter, 444 Sqn, 4 CMBG, Germany, Sep 1977.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4728075)

4 CMBG, MP MCpl Jim McNamee, children, Leutkirch, Germany, Sep 1977.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4814259)

M113, 3 RCR crossing a pontoon bridge, Fallex Germany, Sep 1978.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4822894)

M113, Ex Certain Sentinel, Germany, Main-Donau Canal S of Bamberg, US Army Engineer floating bridge, Feb 1979.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4849051)

M548 Cargo, 4 CMBG, Ex Certain Sentinel, Germany, Feb 1979.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4886178)

Taurus Armoured Recovery Vehicle (ARV), 4 CMBG, Ex Certain Sentinel, Germany, Feb 1979.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4849068, 4849071, 4886180 and 4886181)

Taurus Armoured Recovery Vehicle (ARV), 4 CMBG,  crossing the Mainz River, Germany, Ex Royal Sword, Oct 1987.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4730775)

M113, Ex Certain Sentinel, Germany, Feb 1979.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4849066)

155-mm M109 SP Howitzer, 4 CMBG, Ex Certain Sentinel, Germany, Feb 1979.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4849077)

155-mm M109 SP Howitzer, 4 CMBG, Ex Certain Sentinel, children visiting, Germany, Feb 1979.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4849078)

Leopard C-1, RCD, Ex Certain Sentinel, Feb 1979.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4728091)

Leopard tanks, Ex Certain Sentinel, Germany, Feb 1979.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4728097)

Leopard, Ex Certain Sentinel, Germany, 28 Jan 1979.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4849063)

Leopard, 13A, Ex Certain Sentinel, Germany, 28 Jan 1979.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4886176)

Leopard line-up, Germany, Feb 1979.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4849061)

Leopard, 4 CMBG, Ex Certain Sentinel, Germany, Feb 1979.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 488174)

Leopard, Ex Certain Sentinel, Germany, Feb 1979.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4849072)

Leopard and M113, Ex Certain Sentinel, Germany, Feb 1979.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4849073)

Leopard engine pack on a trailer in Germany, Feb 1979.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4728143)

Leopard, 4 CMBG, Ex Certain Sentinel, Bavaria, Germany, 28 Jan 1979. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4849060)

Leopard C-1, RCD, Northern Bavaria, Feb 1979.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4728094)

Leopard, 4 CMBG, Ex Certain Sentinel, Bavaria, Germany, Feb 1979. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4849075 and 4849076)

Beaver armoured vehicle-launched bridge (AVLB), Ex Certain Sentinel, Germany, Feb 1979. (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN No. 4849067 and 4886179)

M113 C & R Lynx & M113s, Ex Snakebite, Germany, 5 June 1979.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4886184)

Bell CH-136 Kiowa, 444 Sqn, over 4 CMBG Leopard, Ex Reforger 79, Germany, 5 June 1979.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4886183)

Leopards and M113, 4 CMBG, Ex Reforger 80, Sep 1980.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4922171)

Leopard tank crew, Ex Certain Rampart, Sep 1980, Germany.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4822604)

American M60 Patton tank, Ex Certain Rampart 80, Germany, Sep 1980.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4822597)

Leopards, Fallex 80, Germany, Sep 1980. (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN No. 4922172 and 4922173)

German Marder AFVs, American A-10 Thunderbolt overhead, Ex Certain Rampart 80, Germany, Sep 1980. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4822603)

M113s, 4 CMBG Ex Certain Rampart, Sep 1980.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4822602)

4 CMBG, Fallex 80, R22eR, Germany, Sep 1980.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4922163)

Leopard, 4 CMBG, finding the ground a bit soggy and soft in places, Ex Certain Rampart 80, Germany, Sep 1980. (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN Nos. 482260 and 482261)

Leopard, 22C, slightly stuck, Fallex 85, Hohenfels, Germany, Sep 1980.  (Earnest Pothier Photos)

Leopard, RCD, Grafenwohr, Germany, Canadian Army Trophy shoot, 15 June 1981.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4920720)

Leopard, RCD, Geroldshofen, Germany, Fallex 82, 21 Sep 1982.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4876351)

Leopard, RCD, 23A, Hohenfels, Germany, 30 Aug 1982.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4876326)

Leopard, RCD, Fallex 82, Geroldshofen, Germany, 7 Sep 1982.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4876844)

Leopard dozer, RCD, Fallex 82, Germany, 21 Sep 1982.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4876352)

 

Leopard, RCD, Fallex 82, Ex Valiant Shield, 7 Sep 1982.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4876329)

Leopard tank, RCD, Fallex 82, Ex Valiant Shield, Germany, Oct 1982.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4876333)

Leopard, RCD, Fallex 82, Ex Valiant Shield, Germany, 8 Sep 1982.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4876330)

Leopard, RCD, Schweinfurt, Germany, 7 Sep 1982.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4876332)

Leopard dozer, RCD, Fallex 82, Germany, 21 Sep 1982.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4876352)

M113, Germany, Reforger 82, Sep 1982.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4876349)

M113s, Reforger 82, Germany 14 Sep 1982.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4876348)

M113s, 3 RCR, Geroldshofen, Germany, Fallex, 14 Sep 1982.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4876339)

M548, Scheinfurt, Germany, Fallex, 14 Sep 1982.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4876341)

M577, Geroldshofen, Germany, Fallex, 14 Sep 1982.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4876347)

155-mm M109 SP Howitzer cam, RCHA, Fallex 1982, Germany.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4876327)

M113s, Hohenfels, Germany, 27 Aug 1984.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4920754)

Leopards, C Sqn RCD, Fallex 84, Germany, 4 Sep 1984.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4868481)

Leopard, C Sqn RCD, Fallex, Germany, Sep 1984.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4920775)

Leopard with children visiting, Fallex 84, Germany, Sep 1984.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4920776)

Leopard, RCD, Fallex, Bavaria, Sep 1984.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4868495)

Beaver AVLB and Leopard, Fallex 84, Germany, Sep 1984.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4920777)

Leopard, Fallex 84, Germany, 4 Sep 1984.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4868478)

Leopard, RCD, Hohenfels, Germany, 26 Aug 1984.   (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4920757)

 

M113 Dozer, 4 CER, Fallex 84, Germany, 4 Sep 1984.  (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN Nos. 4868483 and 4868484)

M577 and M113, Fallex 84, Bavaria, Sep 1984.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4920767)

M113 ambulance 89C, river crossing, Bavaria, Germany, 8 Sep 1984. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4868489)

M113, river crossing, Bavaria, Germany, 8 Sep 1984. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4868492)

M113 Dozer, 4 CER, Fallex 84, Germany, Sep 1984. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4920780)

M113, Hohenfels, Germany, Fallex 84, 26 Aug 1984.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4920758)

4 CMBG, PPCLI, FNC1, M113, 4 Sep 1984.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4868488)

Leopard and M113, 4 CMBG, accompanied by a German Gepard SP AA Gun, Bavaria, Fallex 84, Sep 1984. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4920778)

M113, 4 CMBG, accompanied by a German Gepard SP AA Gun, Bavaria, Fallex 84, Sep 1984. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4920769)

 

Beaver armoured vehicle-launched bridge (AVLB), Fallex 84, 4 CER, Germany, 2 Sep 1984. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 468470)

Leopard, Fallex 84, near Hohenfels, Bavaria, Sep 1984.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4920773)

Leopards, Fallex 84, Germany, Sep 1984.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4920771)

Leopard, Hohenfels, Fallex 84, 7 Sep 1984.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4868487)

Leopard, Fallex 84, 4 Sep 1984, Germany.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4868476)

Leopard tank, Reforger 86, Ex Certain Sentinel, Germany, Jan 1986.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4849069).

Beaver armoured vehicle-launched bridge (AVLB), Ex Reforger 86, Ex Certain Sentinel, Germany, Feb 1986. (Library and Archives Canada Photos, MIKAN No. 4849070 and 4849079)

155-mm M109 SP Howitzer, Fallex Oct 1987, Germany.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4730776)

4 CMBG, Ex Royal Sword, Fallex 87, Germany, Oct 1987.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4730787)

M113 line up, Ex Royal Sword, Germay, Fallex 87.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4730782)

Beaver armoured vehicle-launched bridge (AVLB), and M113 C & R Lynx, Langenhard trg area, Lahr, Germany, Sep 1987.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4730764)

Leopard with mine rollers, Langenhard training area, Germany, (possibly 32B, cc'd by Sgt Eugene Stairs), Oct 1987.  (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4730766)

M113 Manoeuvre damage, Fallex, Germany, Oct 1987. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN 4730790)

M113 C & R Lynx, Ex Royal Sword, Germany, Oct 1987. (Library and Archives Canada Photo, MIKAN No. 4730780)

The author with a Soviet T-62 tank in OpFor markings at Hohenfels, Germany, ca 1989.  This equipment was loaned to the 4 CMBG G2 Intelligence Section by the US Army to provide familiarization training on Soviet kit to Canadian troops during annual Fall Exercises (FALLEX) held in September each year.

Ordnance QF 25-pounder gun preserved at CFB Lahr, ca. 1991.  (Author Photos)

Commanders of the Canadian Brigade in NATO

The author had the privilege of serving as a Canadian Forces Intelligence Branch Staff Officer at Headquarters, Canadian Forces Europe from June 1981 to July 1983, and as the G2 Operations Officer for the 4 CMBG Headquarters & Signals Squadron from July 1989 to July 1992.  During the close-out ceremonies for the Brigade in Lahr, the author served as the escort officer for the group of past Commanders of 4 CMBG when this photo was taken on 15 June 1992.

From left to right: Lieutenant-General J. Chouinard, CMM, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Battle Group as a Brigadier, 27 July 1971-13 July 1972.  Major-General J.E.P. Lalonde, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 9 July 1986-15 September 1987.  Lieutenant-General John Elwood Vance, CMM, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 19 July 1976-1 July 1978.  Lieutenant-General William Alexander Beaumont Anderson, OBE, CD, Commanded 27 Canadian Infantry Brigade as a Brigadier, 15 Oct 1953-31 Oct 1955.  Major-General R.G Meating, CMM, CD, MSM, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade as a Colonel, 13 June 1992-1 July 1993.  Brigadier-General P.V.B. Grieve, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Battle Group (1973) and 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group (1974), as a Brigadier, 13 July 1972-1 July 1974.  Major-General W.C. Leonard, MBE, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Battle Group as a Brigadier, 3 July 1970-27 July 1971.  Major-General A.J. Tedlie, DSO, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Infantry Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 10 December 1964-15 September 1966.  Major-General J.M. Robert Gaudreau, CMM, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 3 July 1989-13 April 1991.  Major-General Tom F. de Faye, CMM, CD, SBStJ, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 15 Sep 1987-13 July 1989.  Major-General Clive J. Addy, OMM, OStJ, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 3 April 1991-13 June 1992.

Past commanders missing from the group include:

Lieutenant John K. Dangerfield, CMM, MSC, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 20 July 1984-9 July 1986.  Lieutenant-General Richard J. Evraire, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 1 July-1982-20 July 1984.  General Alfred John Gardyne Drummond de Chastelain, CH, OC, CMM, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 1 July 1980-1 July 1982.  Lieutenant-General James A. Fox, CMM, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 1 July 1978-1 July 1980.  Brigadier-General C.H. Belzile, CM, CMM, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 1 July 1974-19 July 1976.  Major-General J.C. Gardner, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Infantry Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 27 January 1968-3 July 1970.  Brigadier Edward Alfred Charles Amy, DSO, OBE, MC, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Infantry Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 15 September 1966-27 January 1968.  Lieutenant-General Michael Reginald Dare, DSO, OMM, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Infantry Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 15 August 1962-10 December 1964.  Major-General Cameron B. Ware, DSO, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Infantry Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 20 December 1960-25 August 1962.  Brigadier D.C. Cameron, DSO, ED, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Infantry Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 14 November 1957-20 December 1960.  Major-General Roger Rowley, DSO, ED, CD, GCLJ, GOMLJ, Commanded 2 Canadian Infantry Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 31 October 1955-14 November 1957.  Brigadier J.E.C. Pangman, DSO, ED, CD, Commanded 27 Canadian Infantry Brigade as a Brigadier, 5 December 1952-15 October 1953.  Lieutenant-General Brigadier Geoffrey Walsh, CBE, DSO, CD, Commanded 27 Canadian Infantry Brigade as a Brigadier, 5 June 1951-5 December 1952.

Biographies

 

Major-General R.G Meating, CMM, CD, MSM, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade as a Colonel, 13 June 1992-1 July 1993

Major-General Robert (Bob) Meating was born in Saint John, New Brunswick.  He enrolled in the Canadian Army in 1965 as an Armoured Officer. Following officer training, he served as a junior officer and troop leader with the 8th Canadian Hussars (Princess Louise’s), an armoured reconnaissance unit, in Petawawa, Ontario and in Soest, Germany until 1970.

Promoted Captain in 1970, he moved with his new regiment, The Royal Canadian Dragoons (RCD), to Lahr/Schwarzwald in southern Germany.  The RCD was a tank and armoured reconnaissance unit permanently stationed overseas for operational service with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.  He remained with The RCD as a troop leader until 1972 when he was posted as Detachment Commander/Area Cadet Officer (Toronto), Air Transport Groups.  In this position, he lead a staff of 15 and was the regular force officer responsible for 110 Navy, Army and Air Cadet units in southern and western Ontario and two summer camps (at Ipperwash, 1973 and Borden, 1974).

In 1975, he returned overseas to The RCD, and, in the following three years occupied the positions of Battle Captain and Operations Officer at squadron and regimental level respectively.  In 1978, he became an instructor of leadership and Company Commander at the Canadian Forces Officer Candidate School (CFOCS) in Chilliwack, British Columbia.

While at CFOCS (1979), he was promoted Major and posted to command the support unit of the Canadian Contingent with the United Nations in the Middle East (CCUNME), serving in Ismailia, Egypt and the Golan Heights, Israel.  After the Middle East tour of duty, he returned to instructional duties at CFOCS until he was selected to attend the one year senior officers’ course at the Canadian Forces Command and Staff College, Toronto, 1980-81.

For two years from 1981, then-Major Meating commanded the only tank unit in Canada, C Squadron RCD, in Gagetown, NB.  In this command, he and his unit supported all training at the Combat Training Centre Gagetown while also operationally deploying overseas three times.  In 1983, Meating attended the year-long Continuous French Course in Ottawa and St-Jean, PQ.

After the course, in 1984, he was again posted overseas to Lahr - this time to Headquarters, 4th Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as the Brigade G3, a post which he held until his promotion to Lieutenant-Colonel in June 1986.

In 1986 in Lahr, Meating assumed command of The Royal Canadian Dragoons.  In 1987, during his period of command he executed the order to return The RCD to Canada, to Petawawa.  In July 1988, on leaving regimental command, then-Lieutenant-Colonel Meating again went overseas, this time to Headquarters 4th Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as the Senior Staff Officer Operations/Chief of Staff.  He held this position for two years.

Promoted Colonel in July 1990, he assumed the position of Chief of Staff, 1st Canadian Division (Forward) in Lahr. On 12 June 1992, then-Colonel Meating was appointed Commander, 4th Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group during its last year of active service to NATO and to Canada.  On 15 July 1993 with the disbandment of 4 Brigade complete, Colonel Meating was posted to Canadian Forces Base Petawawa as Base Commander.

Two years later in June 1995, Meating was promoted Brigadier-General and selected to command 1st Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group in Calgary, Alberta.

Following two very busy years in command in Calgary (including: the move of the brigade and brigade families from Calgary to Edmonton; four operational unit deployments to Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina; and, fighting the Flood of the Century in Manitoba), then-Brigadier-General Meating was posted to National Defence Headquarters as Director-General Intelligence.

In early 2001, Meating was promoted Major-General and selected as Force Commander of the Multinational Force and Observers (MFO) with headquarters in Sinai desert of the Arab Republic of Egypt.  He lead this multinational, multi-cultural coalition, comprising soldiers and civilians from eleven contributing countries (Australia, Canada, Colombia, Fiji, France, Hungary, Italy, Norway, New Zealand, the United States and Uruguay) for three years, under the mandate and conditions established by the Camp David Accords 1979 and the subsequent Protocol of 1981.

In March 2004, in his 39th year of service, Major-General Meating relinquished command of the MFO and retired from the Canadian Forces in Calgary.

Major-General Meating was invested as an officer in the (Canadian) Order of Military Merit in 1992.  He was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal (MSM) by the US Army for his work with 7th (US) Corps as they prepared for the first Gulf War (1991).  He was awarded the Chief of the Defence Staff Commendation for his personal leadership and service to the citizens of Manitoba during the Flood of the Century in 1997.  In 2002, the Colombian Army invested Meating in the José Maria Cordoba Order of Military Merit for his leadership of Colombia’s only out-of-country, operationally deployed unit.

Internet: http://www.armycadethistory.com/Biographies/biography_MGen_Meating.htm.

Major-General Clive J. Addy, OMM, OStJ, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 3 April 1991-13 June 1992. 

Major-General Addy was born in Ottawa on 23 October 1944.  He served first as a Trooper in the Reserves in the IV Princess Louise Dragoon Guards, was accepted in 1961 at Collège Militaire Royal de St-Jean, Québec, and graduated from the Royal Military College in 1966 with a degree in English.  He was commissioned in The Royal Canadian Armoured Corps and joined his regiment, The Fort Garry Horse, as a troop leader that year in Calgary, Alberta.

From 1966 to 1973 he held many regimental appointments including a United Nations tour in Cyprus and with 12e RBC in Valcartier, Quebec. 

From 1973 to 1975 he attended L'École Supérieure de Guerre in Paris before being posted to West Germany as a squadron commander with The Royal Canadian Dragoons from 1975 to 1977.

He was posted to Mobile Command Headquarters in St-Hubert, Quebec, where he served as Staff Officer Armoured Doctrine and on promotion to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel in 1978, as Senior Staff Officer Armour until he returned to West Germany to command the Royal Canadian Dragoons from 1980 to 1982.

He then served on the directing staff of the Canadian Land Forces Command and Staff College in Kingston, Ontario, before being promoted to the rank of colonel and appointed as Chief of Staff, Central Militia Area in Toronto.  In 1987 he was selected to attend National Defence College.  On completion in 1988, he was appointed Chief of Staff for Canadian Forces Europe.  On promotion to the rank of Brigadier-General in April 1991, he assumed command of 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group and 1st Canadian Division Forward.

In 1992, he was appointed Deputy Chief of Staff Operations for Central Army Group, in Heidelberg, Germany.  One year later, he was appointed Chief of Staff Land Force Command in St. Hubert, Quebec.

In July 1994, he was promoted to the rank of major-general and appointed Commander of Land Force Western Area, Edmonton, Alberta.

He retired in September 1996 after 35 years of service.  He is President of the Canadian Battlefields Foundation, Chair of The National Security Group, Executive Editor of Frontline Security Magazine and member of the Board of the Ottawa Division, Canadian Corps of Commissionaires.  He is former National Secretary of the Canadian Corps of Commissionaires, Past National Vice President of the Conference of Defence Associations, and Past National Chair of the Federation of Military and United Services Institutes of Canada.

Major-General Addy was the Royal Canadian Dragoons' Colonel of the Regiment from 16 November 2002 to 8 April 2006.  He was appointed as the 13th Colonel-Commandant of the Royal Canadian Armoured Corps on 26 January 2008.

Major-General Addy is married to the former Marlene Sabourin of Cornwall, Ontario, and they have a son, Christopher, and a daughter, Danielle.

He resides in Perth, Ontario and, as of 1 April 2004, is the Past Executive Director of The Canadian Corps of Commissionaires. As well, he is the Immediate Past National Chairman of the Federation of Military and United Services Institutes of Canada, National Vice Chairman of the Conference of Defence Associations of Canada and the Colonel of The Regiment of The Royal Canadian Dragoons.  Internet: http://www.zoominfo.com/p/Major-General-Addy/821980438.

Major-General J.M. Robert Gaudreau, CMM, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as a Brigadier-General, 3 July 1989-13 April 1991.

MGen Robert (Bob) Gaudreau, CMM, CD was born in Cowansville, QC and currently resides close to his birthplace in Glen Sutton, Québec.  He started his career as a Signalman in the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals in 1961 and was commissioned shortly thereafter in the 2nd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment (R22eR).  After several years with the R22eR, including service with the United Nations he was promoted to Major in 1974 and Commanding Officer of 1 Commando – Canadian Airborne Regiment.

Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel in 1979, he was posted to Mobile Command (FMC) Headquarters and later commanded the 1st Battalion R22eR in Germany 1981-83.  

In 1983 he was promoted to Colonel and was appointed Deputy Commander – Special Service Force at CFB Petawawa.  He subsequently assumed command of the Canadian Airborne Regiment, serving from 1985 to 1987, including a fourth tour of United Nations duty in Cyprus.

Promoted to Brigadier-General in 1987 he took command of 4 CMBG.  His promotion to Major General in 1989 led to his appointment as the Commander, 1st Canadian Division.  

In 1992 the UN Secretary General appointed him Deputy Commander of the UN Protection Force (UNPROFOR) in the former Yugoslavia.  For his outstanding service in that theatre he was awarded Commander of the Order of Military Merit (CMM).

MGen Gaudreau retired from the Canadian Forces in 1995 as the Deputy Commander, Land Force Command in St-Hubert, QC.  He remains an active member of the R22eR Association, The Canadian Airborne Forces Association, the Airborne Regiment Association of Canada and sits on the Regimental Advisory Committee of the Royal Montreal Regiment.  MGen Gaudreau took up his duties as Colonel Commandant of the Royal Canadian Army Cadets on 1 September 2004.  

Internet: http://www.armycadethistory.com/biography_MGen_Goudreau.htm.

Major-General Tom F. de Faye, CMM, CD, SBStJ, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as a Brigadier-General, 15 Sep 1987-13 July 1989.

MGen. T.F. de Faye was named colonel of the regiment for the Royal Canadian Regiment (RCR) in September 2002.  A career military officer, de Faye was promoted to the rank of major-general in 1991.  He subsequently served as the first commander of Land Forces Western Area, Edmonton, Alberta. 

In August 1994, he became the chief of force development at National Defence Headquarters in Ottawa.  In July 1996, he became commander of the Canadian Defence Liaison Staff in Washington.  On retirement he served a term as the President of the Dominion of Canada Rifle Association.  Internet: http://www.gnb.ca/cnb/Promos/royal/rv%20-%20e.pdf.

Brigadier-General J.E.P. Lalonde, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as a Brigadier-General, 9 July 1986-15 September 1987.

Major-General J.E. Pierre Lalonde was born in Montreal 8 July 1943.  He studied at Ottawa University and Sir George Williams University and, following a year of reserve service, enrolled in the Canadian Army in 1961.  Commissioned in the Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada in 1964, he served in various positions with the Second Battalion and the Regimental Depot until 1968.  This was followed by a tour as Deputy Commanding Officer of Premier Commando, Canadian Airborne Regiment, and attendance at the Land Forces Command and Staff College in 1970.

In 1971, MGen Lalonde was posted to Lahr, Germany as Operations Officer, HQ 4 CMBG.  He was the assigned to the Royal 22e Regt in 1972, and commanded a company in the First Battalion.  Returning to Canada in 1974, he served at the Combat Arms School until his appointment in 1976 as Deputy Commanding Officer of Third Battalion Royal 22e Regt.

Promoted to LCol in 1977, he assumed the position of Senior Staff Officer, Personnel Management, HQ Force Mobile Command in Montreal until returning to Lahr in 1979 as CO First Battalion Royal 22e Regt.  On promotion to Col in 1981, he took command of Canadian Forces Base Montreal.  From 1983-86, he successively held the appointments of Director Personnel Careers, Director Personnel Careers Administration, and Director General Personnel Careers for all non-commissioned members of the CF.

MGen Lalonde took command of 4 CMBG in 1986.  On return to Canada he led two study teams to improve productivity of operational and support activities for DND.  In 1989 he was appointed Chief of Staff Operations at HQ FMC.  He then became Director General Intelligence at NDHQ in 1991.  Promoted to MGen in 1992, he was appointed Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence at Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE), a position he held until his retirement in 1994.

MGen Lalonde completed a Masters Degree (Magna Cum Laude) in International Relations at Université Libre de Bruxelles.  In recognition of his contribution to coalition Intelligence efforts, he was made an Officer of the Legion of Merit by the United States government.

Since retiring, MGen Lalonde made his home in Calgary, then Ottawa, and has served as Vice President, Strategic Planning and Corporate-Marketing, Computing Devices of Canada Ltd., a leading Canadian high technology company.  He is married to the former Maurene Fleming of Calgary.  They have two adult children and two grandchildren.  He is a member of the SHAPE Officer’s Association and the North Atlantic Association.  HLCol Harold A. Skaarup, Out of Darkness – Light, A History of Canadian Military Intelligence, Volume 3, 1998-2005, Annex C.  (iUniverse.com, Lincoln, Nebraska, 2005).

Lieutenant John K. Dangerfield, CMM, MSC, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as a Brigadier-General, 20 July 1984-9 July 1986.

Lieutenant-General (LGen) Jack Dangerfield was born in Regina, Saskatchewan on 21 October 1938.  He completed his schooling in Vancouver, British Columbia.  He married Jean Rayner of Vancouver in 1959 and they have three sons.

LGen Dangerfield began his military career in 1953 when he joined the Royal Canadian Army Cadets and later became the Corps Regimental Sergeant Major of the 2290 British Columbia Regiment Cadet Corps.  In 1955 he joined the British Columbia Regiment of the Canadian Army (Militia) as a Trooper.  In 1957 he enrolled in the Regular Army and shortly after joined the Lord Strathcona’s Horse (Royal Canadians).  Between 1957 and 1967 he served in troop and squadron command positions of reconnaissance and armoured regiments in Canada, with the United Nations Emergency Force in Egypt, and in the Federal Republic of Germany.  In 1967 he attended the Canadian Land Forces Command and Staff College in Kingston, Ontario and upon conclusion was promoted to major.  He completed squadron command in Canada with the 8th Canadian Hussars and later became Commanding Officer of an independent reconnaissance squadron in Germany.  He did a two year exchange with the British Army as General Staff Officer 2 (Operations) in HQ 1st British Division, Verden, Germany.

In July 1973 he was promoted to lieutenant-colonel and served with the United Nations Military Observer Group in India and Pakistan.  From 1974 to 1976 he commanded the Royal Canadian Dragoons in Lahr, Germany.  He then served as an instructor at the Canadian Forces Staff College, Toronto, Ontario.

Upon promotion to colonel in 1977 he became Director of Land Plans and Director of Armour at National Defence Headquarters.  He attended the United States Army War College in 1980, and then took command of Canadian Forces Base Suffield, Alberta in 1981.

Promoted to brigadier-general in 1982 he served as Director General Land Doctrine and Operations.  He commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group in Lahr, Germany from 1984-1986 and served as Deputy Chief of Staff at NATO’s Headquarters Central Army Group, Heidelberg, Germany from 1986 to 1988.

On promotion to major-general in 1988 he was appointed Commander 1st Canadian Division with headquarters based in Kingston, Ontario and Lahr, Germany.

LGen Dangerfield was promoted to that rank in April 1991 and served in the appointment of Director, International Military Staff at NATO Headquarters in Brussels, Belgium.  He retired from the Canadian Forces in April 1995.

Lieutenant-General Dangerfield was selected as Commander of The Order of Military Merit in 1990, and awarded the Meritorious Service Cross in 1994.  The Government of France appointed him into L’Ordre National du Merite in 1989.  The President of the United States selected him for the Legion of Merit in 1996.

After retirement, Lieutenant-General Dangerfield has lived in Kelowna, BC.  Since March 2000 he has served on the British Columbia Dragoons Regimental Council Society.  On 4 March 2006 he commenced his appointment as the Honorary Colonel for the British Columbia Dragoons.  He also serves as a Director of the Okanagan Military Museum Society and of the Kelowna Museum Society.  Internet: http://www.armycadethistory.com/Biographies/biography_Jack_Dangerfield.htm.

Lieutenant-General Richard J. Evraire, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 1 July-1982-20 July 1984.

Born in Ottawa in 1938, Lieutenant-General Richard Evraire joined the Canadian Armed Forces in 1954.  He attended Collège militaire royal de Saint-Jean, the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston, and McGill University in Montréal, where he earned a Bachelor of Civil Engineering in 1960.  He also holds a Master’s in Public Administration from Queen’s University in Kingston (1989), and a Bachelor of Science (1994) and an Honorary Doctorate in Military Sciences (1997) from Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston.  He is presently a doctoral candidate in political studies at Queen's University.

Commissioned as an officer in the Royal 22nd Regiment in 1959, his service included the command of the 1st Battalion of his regiment; 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group; CMR Saint-Jean; Canada's National Defence College; and the NATO Defence College in Rome.  He completed three periods of service at National Defence Headquarters in Ottawa, the last as Chief Land Doctrine and Operations.

Lieutenant-General (Retired) Evraire has participated in two missions for the United Nations – one as a military observer in Kashmir [India and Pakistan (1970-1971)] and the second as commander of the United Nations in the Middle East, Canadian Contingents (1978-1979). Lt.-Gen Evraire served a total of 14 years in NATO, including more than four years as Canada’s military representative on NATO's Military Committee in Permanent Session, in Brussels.  He retired from the CAF in 1997 after 42 years of service.  Lieutenant-General Richard Evraire, now retired, resides in Ottawa.  Internet: http://www.cmrsj-rmcsj.forces.gc.ca/com-com/bio/bre-reb-eng.asp.

General Alfred John Gardyne Drummond de Chastelain, CH, OC, CMM, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 1 July 1980-1July 1982.

Alfred John Gardyne Drummond de Chastelain CH, OC, CMM, CD (born July 30, 1937) is a retired Canadian soldier and diplomat.

General De Chastelain was born in 1937 in Bucharest, Romania, to Alfred Gardyne de Chastelain, a Scottish oil engineer then working in Bucharest for British Petroleum, (later an agent of SOE) and Marion Elizabeth de Chastelain, an American.  He was educated in England and later at Fettes College, Edinburgh. The de Chastelain family emigrated to Canada in 1954, and a year later, after finishing his education at Fettes College, De Chastelain joined his family and attended Mount Royal College (now Mount Royal University) in Calgary.  John de Chastelain is married, and he and his wife MaryAnn (née Laverty) have two children, Duncan and Amanda, and five grandchildren.

De Chastelain started his military career as a Militia private in the Regimental Pipes and Drums of The Calgary Highlanders in which he served from January to September 1956.  He was enrolled in the Royal Military College of Canada in September 1956 and graduated in 1960 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in history and a commission in Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI), two years before he became a naturalized Canadian.  Performing regimental duty in Canada, Germany, and Cyprus, de Chastelain subsequently attended the British Army staff college in Camberley in 1966 and was commanding officer of the Second Battalion PPCLI from 1970 to 1972. During the summer of 1973, as a Lieutenant-Colonel, he commanded Valcartier Army Cadet Summer Training Centre.

As a colonel, he commanded CFB Montreal for a two-year period ending with the 1976 Summer Olympics in that city.  He was also Deputy Chief of Staff of the United Nations Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) and Commander of the Canadian contingent there.  As a brigadier-general, he was successively Commandant of the Royal Military College of Canada, Commander of 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group in Lahr, Germany, and Director General Land Doctrine and Operations at National Defence Headquarters in Ottawa.

As a major-general, de Chastelain was Deputy Commander of the Canadian Army (then called Mobile Command) and Commander of the Mobile Command Division, which was exercised as such in 1985 on Exercise RV '85. As a lieutenant-general, he was Assistant Deputy Minister for Personnel, and then Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff.  In 1989, he was promoted to the rank of general and appointed Chief of the Defence Staff.  In 1993, he transferred to the Reserves and was appointed Ambassador to the United States.  In 1994, he was recalled to Regular Force duty after the departure of Admiral Anderson, and re-appointed Chief of the Defence Staff, from which post he retired in December 1995.

Since November 1995, de Chastelain has been involved in the Northern Ireland peace process and from 1997 to 2011 he was Chairman of the Independent International Commission on Decommissioning, which was responsible for ensuring the decommissioning of arms by paramilitary groups in Northern Ireland.  He has made an impact on the way that Britain has viewed the IRA since the decommissioning has begun.  As part of the Good Friday Agreement an independent neutral adjudicator was selected to look over the disarmament of Republican and Loyalist paramilitary weapons in Northern Ireland.

He is a member of the Board of Directors of the Forum of Federations, the global network on federalism.  He is also a Senior Advisor on the University of Windsor's Jerusalem Old City Initiative.

In 1985, de Chastelain was appointed Commander of the Order of Military Merit and in 1991, Commander of the Order of St John; in 1993, he received the Commendation Medal of Merit and Honour of Greece, and was appointed Officer of the Order of Canada; in 1995, he was appointed Commander of the Legion of Merit (U.S.A.), and in 1999, he was made a Companion of Honour.  Archie Cairns composed a jig for bagpipes in his honour in 1992.

He has an honorary Doctor of Military Science degree from the Royal Military College of Canada, an honorary Doctor of Laws (Conflict Resolution) degree from Royal Roads University in British Columbia, an honorary Doctor of Education degree from Nipissing University, an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Carleton University, an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Queen's University, Kingston, an honorary Doctor of Civil Law degree from Saint Mary's University, Halifax, an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Brock University, and an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Concordia University.  He is also an Honorary Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford. General John de Chastelain was a recipient of the Vimy Award, which recognizes a Canadian who has made a significant and outstanding contribution to the defence and security of our nation and the preservation of our democratic values.  He was also the 2006 recipient of the Royal Military College Club of Canada's Birchall Leadership Award.  In 2010 he was inducted to the Wall of Honour at the Royal Military College of Canada.  

Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_de_Chastelain.

Lieutenant-General James A. Fox, CMM, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 1 July 1978-1 July 1980.

Lieutenant General James A. Fox CMM, CD was the Commander, Force Mobile Command of the Canadian Forces.  Fox joined the Royal Canadian Armoured Corps and went on to be Commanding Officer of Lord Strathcona's Horse taking his Regiment on an operational tour with the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus in 1972.

He was appointed Commander, Force Mobile Command in 1986.  In that role he executed Rendezvous 89, a major exercise involving 15,000 military personnel and more than 5,000 vehicles and aircraft from 40 different units across Canada.  In retirement he became Colonel of Lord Strathcona's Horse.  

Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Fox_(Canadian_Army_officer). 

Lieutenant-General John Elwood Vance, CMM, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 19 July 1976-1 July 1978.

Lieutenant-General John Elwood 'Jack' Vance CMM, CD (28 July 1933 – 10 September 2013) is a retired Canadian Forces officer who became Vice Chief of the Defence Staff in Canada.

Vance joined the Canadian Army in 1952 and graduated from the Royal Military College of Canada in 1956.  He became Commanding Officer of 3rd Mechanized Commando, The Canadian Airborne Regiment, at CFB Baden-Soellingen in 1971, Deputy Chief of Staff Training in 1972 and Director Individual Training at National Defence Headquarters in 1973.  He went on to be Director-General Recruiting, Education and Training in 1975, Commander of 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group in 1976 and Chief of Staff Operations in 1978.  After that he became Chief of Postings, Careers and Senior Appointments in 1980, Chief of Personnel in 1983 and Vice Chief of the Defence Staff in 1985 before retiring in 1988.  He died in September 2013.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Vance_(general).

Brigadier-General C.H. Belzile, CM, CMM, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 1 July 1974-19 July 1976.

Lieutenant-General Charles H. Belzile, CM, CMM, CD (born March 12, 1933) was a Canadian soldier and a former head of the Canadian Army.  He is an honorary member of the Royal Military College of Canada student #H22547.

Born in Trois-Pistoles, Quebec, Belzile graduated from the Université de Montréal in 1953.

Belzile was commissioned in The Queen's Own Rifles of Canada in 1951.  He was then assigned as a platoon commander in Korea.  Upon his return from the Korean theatre, he assumed a number of staff and command positions including that of Adjutant with 2nd Battalion, Queen's Own Rifles of Canada and staff officer at Quebec Command Headquarters in Montreal.

In 1968 he was promoted lieutenant-colonel and appointed Commanding Officer, Royal 22e Régiment in Valcartier.  In 1972, he was appointed Commander, Combat Arms School, at CFB Gagetown, New Brunswick as a colonel.  He was later appointed to several high-profile positions in Canada and abroad.  He commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group in the former Federal Republic of Germany as a Brigadier-General.  As Brigadier General he was Senior Canadian Officer at Headquarters, Central Army Group (CENTAG) in Hammonds Barracks, Seckenheim, Germany.  As Major-General in 1977 he took command of Canadian Forces Europe.   In 1981 he was promoted Lieutenant-General and appointed Commander, Mobile Command, the title under which the army was known at that time.  He retired from active duty in 1986.

 Following his retirement from the military, he held a position of Vice-President with SNC Industrial Technologies of Le Gardeur, Quebec, from 1987 to 1992.  Since 1992 he has been President of CH Belzile Consultants.  In 1994 he became part of a team on a study to improve the efficiency of the Irish Defence Forces.  He served on the Special Commission on the Restructuring of the Canadian Forces Reserves.  He was a member of the Special Advisory Group on Military Justice and Military Police Investigation Services.  He was appointed Colonel Commandant of the Royal Canadian Army Cadets from 1993 to 1998.  In 1998, he was appointed head of the Military Police Services Review Group.  He has served as president of the Canadian Battle of Normandy Foundation (now the Canadian Battlefields Foundation), President of the Conference of Defence Associations and as a member of the Canadian War Museum Advisory Council.

In 2000, he was made a Member of the Order of Canada.  He has also been made a Commander of the Order of Military Merit.  He was a recipient of the Vimy Award, which recognizes a Canadian who has made a significant and outstanding contribution to the defence and security of the nation and the preservation of our democratic values.

On 24 November 2001, he was appointed Honorary Grand President of The Royal Canadian Legion.  He is a recipient of the French Légion d’Honneur.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_H._Belzile.

Brigadier-General P.V.B. Grieve, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Battle Group (1973) and 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group (1974), as a Brigadier, 13 July 1972-1 July 1974.

Lieutenant-Colonel P.V.B. Grieve commanded the Royal Canadian Dragoons in 1964.  From 16 July 1978 - 20 July 1981 he served as the Colonel of the Regiment, RCD.  

Internet: http://www.army.ca/wiki/index.php/RCD_REGIMENTAL_APPOINTMENTS.

Lieutenant-General J. Chouinard, CMM, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Battle Group as a Brigadier, 27 July 1971-13 July 1972.

Lieutenant General Jacques Chouinard CMM CD (1 October 1922 – 28 July 2008) was the Commander, Mobile Command of the Canadian Forces.  Educated at a College in Saint-Anne-de-la-Pocatière, Chouinard was commissioned into Royal 22e Régiment in 1941.  He served in the Second World War with his Regiment in England and Italy.

He was made Commandant of the School of Parachuting during the Korean War and went on to be Commanding Officer of the Royal 22e Régiment in 1962.  He was appointed Commandant of the Royal Military College Saint-Jean in 1968.  He was then made Commander of CFB Valcartier and of the 5 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group in 1970.  He took command of Canadian Forces on the streets of Montreal in October 1970 during the October Crisis when the Front de libération du Québec initiated kidnappings.

In 1971 he took command of the 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group in Lahr in Germany.

In 1972 he returned to Canada and was appointed Commander of the Mobile Command in Saint-Hubert, Quebec.  In 1973 he became Assistant to the Associate Deputy Minister (Policy) at National Defence Headquarters.  In 1975 he was promoted to Lieutenant-General and made Commander, Mobile Command.  He retired in 1977.

In retirement he became International Marketing Manager and then President of Industries Valcartier, a munitions business.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques_Chouinard.

Major-General W.C. Leonard, MBE, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Mechanized Battle Group as a Brigadier, 3 July 1970-27 July 1971.

Capt W.C. Leonard served as a Captain with the Irish Regiment of Canada during the Second World War.  From 1961 to 1965 he was the Colonel Commandant of the Canadian Infantry Association.  He was the first commander of the Battle Group.  Internet: http://legionmagazine.com/en/2002/11/fighting-the-bean-counters/.  He became the commander of Canadian Forces Europe.  He also served as the Chairman of the Military Agency for Standardization.

Major-General J.C. Gardner, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Infantry Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 27 January 1968-3 July 1970.

Lt J.C. Gardner transferred from the British Army to the Canadian Army on 29 March 1944.  He served as an armoured officer and rose to command 4 CIBG in 1978.  Major-General J.C. Gardner served as the Colonel of the Regiment, Lord Strathcona’s Horse (Royal Canadians) from 11 November 1978 to 11 November 1982.   Internet: http://www.strathconas.ca/former-colonels-of-the-regiment.

Brigadier Edward Alfred Charles Amy, DSO, OBE, MC, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Infantry Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 15 September 1966-27 January 1968.

Brigadier-General Edward Alfred Charles "Ned" Amy, DSO, OBE, MC, CD (28 March 1918 – 2 February 2011) was one of Canada's most decorated soldiers.  He died on February 2, 2011, in the Camp Hill hospital, Halifax, aged 92.  Edward Amy graduated from the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston, Ontario in 1939, student # 2510.

Amy served as a tank commander. He commanded A Squadron of the 14th Armoured Regiment (The Calgary Regiment), in Italy, where he won the Military Cross for his "determined and gallant leadership in taking and holding a vital bridgehead over the Moro River" with his Sherman tanks in December, 1943. He was a recipient of the Distinguished Service Order, an Officer of the Order of the British Empire, and recipient of the Military Cross, the Canadian Forces Decoration and the American Bronze Star.

Amy arrived in Normandy, France on 26 July 1944, seven weeks after D-Day as a Major.  He commanded a troop of the 22nd Armoured Regiment (The Canadian Grenadier Guards) in the fight for Grentheville three days later.  During the next five weeks, he participated in all the battles that led to the liberation of Normandy. His regiment was awarded four distinctions for its action in the Battle of Falaise.  He led an attack against Kurt Meyer's 12th SS Panzer Division that resulted in the liberation of Cintheaux and Bretteville.  From 14 to 17 August 1944, his unit was committed to the battle of Rouves, where his tank was destroyed.  He took part in the fights of Falaise against elements of the 3rd SS Panzer Division and the 2nd SS Panzer Grenadier Regiment.  After the Battle of Normandy, his unit went into action on the Seine and Somme Rivers, liberating many towns and villages and taking many German prisoners.  In the closing months of the war, he fought in Belgium and Germany, where he was wounded. After the war, he remained in the Canadian Forces and retired as a Brigadier-General in 1972.

On 18 July 2007, he was awarded the Légion d'honneur, France's highest distinction.  The citation, stated that he "demonstrated outstanding bravery in France during the fiercest battles of the Second World War."  He lived at Indian Point, Lunenburg County then in Halifax, Nova Scotia.  He was an advocate for the reactivation of the Halifax Rifles (RCAC) as a reconnaissance unit, a project which was successfully completed in 2009.  The Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia, Mayann Francis, presented the Royal United Services Institute of Nova Scotia SAC Award to BGen Ned Amy on 7 November 2007.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Amy.

Major-General A.J. Tedlie, DSO, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Infantry Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 10 December 1964-15 September 1966.

General A.J. Tedlie was commissioned as an officer with the Royal Montreal Regiment in 1939.  His unit was broken up and used as reinforcements for the British Columbia Regiment, where he served as a Squadron Commander fighting with Sherman tanks in Normandy in 1944.

In 1948 LCol Tedlie was the Commandant of the experimental station at Fort Churchill on Hudson’s Bay.

In 1968 Brigadier A.J. Tedlie was Deputy Commander of Training Command,

 

Lieutenant-General Michael Reginald Dare, DSO, OMM, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Infantry Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 15 August 1962-10 December 1964.

Lieutenant-General Michael Reginald Dare DSO, OMM, CD (born 1917) is a retired Canadian Forces officer who became Vice Chief of the Defence Staff in Canada.

Dare joined the Canadian Army as second lieutenant in the Dufferin and Haldimand Rifles in the 1930s.  He served in the Second World War as an infantry officer in The Royal Canadian Regiment, then as a staff officer at Headquarters, 4th Canadian (Armoured) Division in Normandy and then, from September 1944, as Brigade Major, 4th Canadian (Armoured) Division, before being appointed, in March 1945, assistant adjutant and quartermaster-general at Headquarters, 4th Canadian (Armoured) Division.  He went on to be Vice Chief of the Defence Staff in Canada in September 1969 before retiring in 1972.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Dare.

Major-General Cameron Bethel Ware, DSO, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Infantry Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 20 December 1960-25 August 1962.

MGen Ware was born 9 August 1913 at London, Ontario.   His father was Lieutenant Colonel F. B. Ware.  He joined the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry Regiment on graduation from RMC in 1935.  On the outbreak of war in 1939, he was serving on attachment to the British Army.  He rejoined Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry in 1940 as a Major and was appointed second in command in 1941.  He led the Battalion in the invasion of Italy and in all operations up to the end of the Battle of Liri Valley in June 1944.  He was Mentioned in Despatches 30 October 1943 and awarded the Distinguished Service Order during the battle of the Moro River 5 December 1943.  He fought with the Patricia’s through The Hitler Line.  On 27 June 1944 LCol Ware relinquished command of the Regiment. 

On leaving the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry he was promoted to Colonel and was given command of the Regiment at Camp MacDonald.  In September, 1947, he proceeded to Staff College and thereafter received a Senior Staff appointment.  On the outbreak of the Korean War he took command of the Canadian Military Mission to the Far East. In 1952, he became Director General of Military training.

In 1952, he was appointed Commandant of the Services College at Royal Roads.  During 1954, he was promoted to Brigadier and proceeded to Japan to take command of the Canadian Military Mission.  In 1955, he became Director General of Military Training. From 31 August, 1958 to 31 October, 1959 he commanded the 1st Canadian Infantry Brigade Group.  An official announcement from Ottawa was made on 2 October, 1959 appointing him Colonel of the Regiment, succeeding the Founder in that appointment.  After a year at the Imperial Defence College, Brigadier Ware took command of the 4th Canadian Infantry Brigade Group in Germany in 1960. 

Upon promotion to Major General in 1962 he was appointed Commandant, National Defence College, Kingston until his retirement in September, 1966. Major-General Ware relinquished the appointment of Colonel of the Regiment on 21 April 1977. Major General Ware passed away 21 January 1999. The Major General Cameron Bethel Ware fonds are in the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry Regimental Museum and Archives.  Internet: http://everitas.rmcclub.ca/?p=5887.

Brigadier D.C. Cameron, DSO, ED, CD, Commanded 4 Canadian Infantry Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 14 November 1957-20 December 1960.

Major-General Roger Rowley, DSO, ED, CD, GCLJ, GOMLJ, Commanded 2 Canadian Infantry Brigade Group as a Brigadier, 31 October 1955-14 November 1957.

General Roger Rowley, (12 June 1914 - 14 February 2007), was a Canadian Army officer who was awarded a Distinguished Service Order for his role in liberating Boulogne during September 1944, and a Bar five weeks later for the capture of Breskens on the Scheldt estuary.

Rowley was born in Ottawa, Canada, on 12 June 1914.  He was educated at Ashbury College Ottawa, Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. After graduation, Rowley became a bond trader. He joined the Canadian militia and was commissioned as an officer in the Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa in 1933.

In the early years of the war, Captain (and later Major) Rowley served with the Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa when they deployed overseas with the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division. This included the regiment's part in the raid on Iceland in 1940. Troops were sent to the northern island country to destroy facilities that might have been of use to German forces if they were to invade the island. The raid was a success.

Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, Rowley commanded the Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders, during the Allied campaign in North West Europe during 1944. The SD&G formed part of 3rd Canadian Infantry Division, whose participation secured the liberation of the Channel ports of Boulogne and Calais. The Canadians launched their attack on Boulogne on 17 September 1944.  The battle raged for six days until the remaining German prisoners surrendered on 22 September.  Rowley's DSO citation praised his speed and daring after the heavy bombing of the château outside the town, as well as his action under heavy artillery and machine-gun fire as the battalion attacked the citadel: "This officer's leadership, dash, bravery and unlimited energy were an inspiration to his officers and men, and his action was one of the principal factors in the capture of Boulogne."

On 22 October 1944, Rowley was ordered to capture the port of Breskens on the Scheldt estuary. The infantry assault was postponed due to heavy losses among the tank support. Less than two hours later a signal, said to have been ordered by Winston Churchill, insisted there could be no delay. Rowley's infantry assaulted along the sea wall and by noon they held the harbour. Rowley's citation for his DSO Bar, signed by Montgomery, declared that despite the shortage of time: "Lt-Col Rowley planned and ordered the new attack with such brilliance and led it with such determination that the garrison was quickly overcome and Breskens was captured."

After the German surrender, Rowley was posted to the Far East to command an infantry training battalion.  After the Japanese surrender, he attended the staff college at Camberley before joining the Canadian Army staff in Washington, DC.  He served in Canada's NATO army until the late 1960s.

After the war, Rowley served at the National Defence Headquarters in Ottawa as Director of Military Training. He commanded the 2nd Canadian Infantry Brigade Group in Germany, then spent a year at the Imperial Defence College in London before becoming commandant at the staff college at Kingston. He was general officer-in-waiting at the Sovereign's Parade during 1976's Royal visit to Canada.  He also served as Colonel, Regiment of the Canadian Guards.  Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Rowley.

Lieutenant-General William Alexander Beaumont Anderson, OBE, CD, Commanded 27 Canadian Infantry Brigade as a Brigadier, 15 Oct 1953-31 Oct 1955.

A member of one of Canada’s most distinguished military families, Lieutenant General William Alexander Beaumont Anderson was born in Montreal.  His father, the late Major-General W.B. Anderson, CMG, DSO of Ottawa, was a former Commander of Military District No. 3; an uncle, Major General T.V. Anderson, DSO, was Chief of the General Staff at the outbreak of the Second World War and a second uncle, Colonel A.A. Anderson, DSO, was second-in-command of the Royal Canadian Signals Training Centre, Kingston during the Second World War.

He received his education at Rothsay Collegiate School, Saint John, New Brunswick where his interest in the military became evident; he joined the Frontenac Regiment at age 13 and entered Royal Military College in 1932.  During his college years, he spent two summers training with the Royal Canadian Navy, the first as a Cadet at HMCS Stadacona and the next afloat aboard HMCS Saguenay.  Graduating in 1936 and commissioned a Lieutenant in the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, he was subsequently placed on leave to attend Queen’s University.  He then served with “A” Battery in Kingston and “C” Battery in Winnipeg.  In 1939 he attended the Artillery Staff Course and was completing the latter portions of this training when the Second World War broke out.

On mobilization, he was appointed Adjutant of 3rd Field Regiment and went overseas in December 1939.  The following May he was appointed Staff Captain, Royal Artillery at the 1st Division Artillery Headquarters and led the advance party on the abortive trip to Brest, France in June 1940.

Several staff appointments at Canadian Military Headquarters, London, followed, as well as attendance at the Camberley Staff College in 1941.  He was given command of 15 Field Regiment in 1943.  Relinquishing command in May 1944, he served as General Staff Officer, Grade One (Operations) at Headquarters First Canadian Army until his return to Canada in February 1945 for assignment to the Pacific Force (6 Canadian Division) as Deputy Commander, Royal Artillery.  The Pacific Force was disbanded before he could take up his appointment.

Promoted Colonel in 1946, he was appointed Director of Military Intelligence, subsequently attending the National Defence College in 1949 and his appointment as Director of the Canadian Army Staff College.  Later, in the rank of Brigadier, he commanded Western Ontario Area and 1 Canadian Infantry Brigade Group in Germany.  In 1956 he attended the Imperial War College and during the years 1957 to 1962 held the successive appointments of Vice Adjutant General, Deputy Chief of the General Staff and Commandant of the Royal Military College.

In January 1962 he was promoted Major General and appointed Adjutant General, a position he held until the army reorganization of 1964.  He then chaired the study group tasked to produce a career management plan for officers and, in October 1965 was appointed Deputy Chief of Reserves.  In July 1966, he was promoted to Lieutenant General and given command of Canada’s army, Mobile Command.

Lieutenant General Anderson was awarded the Order of the British Empire, the Order of Leopold, Order of the Crown with Palm and Croix de Guerre (Belgium) and was Mentioned-in-Dispatches in 1944.

On retirement to pension in 1969 he joined the Ontario Civil Service as a Deputy Minister.  His appointments included Chairman of the Ontario Civil Service Commission and Secretary to the Management Board of the Ontario Cabinet.  He later served as Vice Chairman of the Ontario Inflation Restraint Board.

Active in his community, Lieutenant General Anderson was past President of the Royal Life Saving Society of Canada, served as a member of the Advisory Council of the Niagara Institute and as honorary governor of the National Ballet of Canada.

In September 1986 Lieutenant General Anderson accepted the appointment of Colonel Commandant, The Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery.  He relinquished this appointment in 1992 after six additional years of distinguished service to the Royal Regiment.

With more than forty-five years of service and rising from the ranks to command Canada’s army, Lieutenant General Anderson has made a significant contribution to his country and his Regiment.  Lieutenant General Anderson passed away in Ottawa in 2000.  Internet: http://www.artillery.net/beta/anderson/.

Brigadier J.E.C. Pangman, DSO, ED, CD, Commanded 27 Canadian Infantry Brigade as a Brigadier, 5 December 1952-15 October 1953.

According to the Official History of the Canadian Army, Lieutenant-Colonel J.E.C. Pangman served as the CO of the Essex Scottish Regiment which took part in the Battle of the Rhineland, Operation Veritas, 8-21 Feb 1945.  During a critical phase of the battle, the Germans “effort redoubled as the 47th Panzer Corps sent a fresh formation into the fight.  Most opportunely for General von Lüttwitz, the Panzer Lehr Division had arrived the previous evening at Marienbaum, midway between Calcar and Xanten.  Badly mauled in the Ardennes, its ranks had since been filled with young replacements of little training; nevertheless, as it was about to show, it was still capable of fierce fighting.  It seems to have had only 22 tanks actually ready for action on 19 February.  Higher authority had decreed that it might be used for short counter-attacks, but not for holding a line of defence.  The situation seemed made to order, and about 8:00 p.m. on the 19th it was committed against the Canadians holding the farms along the Goch-Calcar road.   It appears that a battle-group of Lehr attacked on the R.H.L.I. sector, and 116th Panzer Division units launched against the Essex.  Since the Fort Garry tanks had withdrawn at nightfall to re-arm and re-fuel, for the moment our infantry was without armoured support.”

“Throughout the night successive waves of Germans, supported by heavy artillery and mortar fire, drove against the 4th Brigade's positions, inflicting severe losses.  Towards midnight the Essex C.O., Lt.-Col. J. E. C. Pangman, who had previously been out of communication for some time, reported that the situation around his tactical headquarters on the road north of Verkält was "touch and go", with "enemy tanks and infantry all about".  About the same time the R.H.L.I. reported, "Heavy infiltration of enemy infantry and tanks around 'B' and 'C' Companies." At this critical juncture the G.O.C. 2nd Canadian Division, General Matthews, released the 6th Brigade's Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders of Canada to Brigadier Cabeldu, who was thus able to use the Royal Regiment, strengthened by one and later two companies of the Cameroons, to maintain his forward line.  Cabeldu ordered the Royals to reinforce the Essex Scottish.  "D" Company went forward, but returned on finding the Essex headquarters "held by enemy tanks and infantry".  At 1:35 Lt.-Col. Whitaker of the R.H.L.I. sent word that his "C" Company had been overrun and that he was mounting a counter-attack.  All the men "left out of battle" were called forward to bolster the defences; and by morning the battalion's counter-effort had restored its positions.  Aid came with the arrival of a company of the Cameroons, and a troop of Fort Garry tanks moved up in time to help beat off a strong daylight counter-attack.”

“Meanwhile Brigadier Cabeldu had been organizing an attempt by the Royal Regiment (Lt.-Col. R. M. Lendrum) to recover the lost positions of the Essex Scottish and rally "B" and "C" Companies' survivors, who were sheltering in scattered slit trenches.  Preceded by heavy artillery fire, the attack went in at 9:30 a.m.  After an hour's stiff fighting contact was established with Lt.-Col. Pangman, who was holding out with the remnant of his headquarters in a farmhouse cellar.  But so deadly was the enemy fire that it was 2:00 p.m., after a second Royal attack had been mounted, before carriers could reach the spot to evacuate the wounded and the weary headquarters staff.  During the afternoon stragglers from the Essex trickled back; but it was not until next morning that "A" Company, which had been written off as lost, reappeared, having held its ground for 36 hours with only 35 fit men and some wounded.  Altogether the two-day battle cost the Essex Scottish 51 killed, 99 wounded and 54 taken prisoner. The Royal Regiment had had 64 casualties.  Pangman won an immediate D.S.O., as did Major K. W. MacIntyre, commander of the "lost" "A" Company.  Six other members of the Essex Scottish received awards for bravery.  One of them was C.S.M. F. L. Dixon, who got a second bar to his Military Medal from Dieppe.  He was the only Canadian soldier to win the decoration three times in this war.”  Internet: http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/UN/Canada/CA/Victory/Victory-18.html.

Lieutenant-General Brigadier Geoffrey Walsh, CBE, DSO, CD, Commanded 27 Canadian Infantry Brigade as a Brigadier, 5 June 1951-5 December 1952.

General Geoffrey Walsh was born in Brantford, the son of Harris Leamon Walsh and Bertha Jones (Benson), on 19 August 1900.  He was educated at St. Catharines Collegiate, where he was a member of the school cadet corps, the Royal Military College, Nova Scotia Technical College and McGill University.

He had joined The Lincoln Regiment as a Private soldier in 1924 and attended Annual Training in that year and the two following years and then attended RMC.  On graduation in 1930 he was commissioned in the Royal Canadian Engineers.

General Walsh transferred from the Permanent Force to the Canadian Army Service Force in September 1939 and sailed for England as a Major one year later.  He was posted to Force III and took part in the Spitzbergen raid in August 1941.  After serving in a number of Engineer units and holding the appointment of Brigade Major, he was promoted Lieutenant Colonel in April 1942.  He attended a number of professional courses in the UK, including Combined Operations training.

In 1942 he was posted to the 1st Canadian Division and served in Sicily and Italy.  In September 1943 he was awarded the Distinguished Service Order for "Gallant and Distinguished Services in Sicily."  On returning to the UK in January 1944 he was appointed Commander Royal Engineers 4th Canadian Armoured Division.  One month later he was promoted Brigadier and Chief Engineer 2nd Canadian Corps.

General Walsh was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire and Commander of the Order of Orange Nassau (Netherlands) in 1945.

After the war he commanded the Northwest Highway System which took over control of the Alaska Highway from the Americans, for which the United States appointed him an Officer of the Legion of Merit.  He was then appointed Commander of Eastern Ontario Area at Kingston, Ontario, and commanded the Area for three years.  He took command of 27 Brigade on its formation and commanded it in Germany for one year.  On return to Canada he became Director General of Military Training and in September 1955 was promoted Major General and appointed Quartermaster General of the Canadian Army.  He relinquished that appointment in July 1959 and was appointed General Officer Commanding, Western Command.  In October 1961 he was promoted Lieutenant General and appointed Chief of the General Staff.  On unification of the Forces in 1964 he was appointed Vice Chief of the Defence Staff, an appointment he held until October 1965 when he began processing for release, which took place in July 1966.

During retirement he served as Colonel Commandant of the Royal Canadian Army Cadets, 1970-1974, and as such organized the Army Cadet League of Canada.

General Walsh married Gwynn Abigail Currie of St. Catharines in 1935 and they had one son, Robert Geoffrey Walsh.

General Walsh lived in retirement in Ottawa and died there in 1999.

WALSH, Geoffrey, Lieutenant-Colonel - Distinguished Service Order - Engineers - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 25 September 1943 and CARO/3791 dated 6 November 1943.  Educated at Royal Military College; served in Canadian Army until 1964. His postings included command of the Northwest Highway System in 1946, command of 27th Infantry Brigade in Europe (1951) and last Chief of the General Staff with rank of Lieutenant-General.  Died in Ottawa, 3 April 1999, aged 90.  Recommended for immediate award by Major-General G.G. Simonds, General Officer Commanding, 1 Canadian Infantry Division, on or about 24 July 1943; document with Headquarters, 30 Corps, 30 July to 1 August 1943 (supported by Lieutenant-General O.W.H. Leese); with Headquarters, Eighth Army, 3-6 August 1943 (supported by General B.L. Montgomery); with Headquarters, 15 Army Group, 7 August to 9 September 1943 (approved by General Harold R. Alexander).

During the assault of 2 Canadian Infantry Brigade on Leonforte, 21/22 July 1943, it was essential that an enemy demolition be bridged in order that supporting arms for the brigade could be moved forward.  The bridging site at the time was under heavy enemy machine gun and mortar fire.  The operation was done in the dark by 3 Canadian Field Company, but owing to the vital importance of this bridge, Lieutenant-Colonel Walsh as Commander Royal Engineers personally supervised the effort.  Some 40 Germans and three German tanks were within 50 yards of the bridging site rendering it almost impossible for infantry to secure covering positions.  Lieutenant-Colonel Walsh ignored the incessant small arms fire which ricocheted off the bridge members, rushed through the construction, and as a result the bridge was open for traffic at 0210 hours, well in advance of schedule, enabling the necessary supporting arms to cross and conclude the successful drive on Leonforte.

WALSH, Geoffrey, Brigadier, DSO - Commander, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 23 December 1944 and CARO/5235 dated 3 January 1945.

In training prior to operations in France, in the planning stage and in the execution of the engineer work within 2 Canadian Corps, Brigadier Walsh has shown exceptional ability and assiduous application to his duties.  The successful bridging of the River Orne in front of Caen and the opening of roads through the town was very largely attributable to the organizational ability and personal supervision of Brigadier Walsh.  His work has been very much above the average of what might have been expected of his post.

WALSH, Geoffrey, Brigadier, DSO - Mention in Dispatches - awarded as per Canada Gazette and CARO/5801, both dated 23 June 1945.

WALSH, Geoffrey, Brigadier, CBE, DSO - Mention in Dispatches - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 9 March 1946 and CARO/6431 dated 8 March 1946.

WALSH, Geoffrey, Brigadier, DSO - Legion of Merit, Degree of Commander (United States) - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 30 March 1946 and CARO/6478 dated 1 April 1946.  Recommended by Brigadier J.F.A. Lister (Chief of Staff, Deputy Adjutant and Quartermaster-General, First Canadian Army); document at Headquarters, First Canadian Army, 15-21 July 1945 when signed off by General H.D.G. Crerar.

Brigadier Walsh served as Chief Engineer, 2 Canadian Corps from July [1944] when it was first committed in the Northwest European theatre of operations until early in September when he was appointed Chief Engineer, First Canadian Army.  He has served in the latter capacity through the balance of the campaign.

The role of the Engineers during these operations was one of great importance.  Due in large part to this officer's unusual organizing and executive ability, however, this arm of the service successfully met all the varied demands which were made upon it.  Under his leadership and example, moreover, its personnel displayed in the execution of their tasks the greatest gallantry, initiative and resource.  This officer has throughout the campaign distinguished himself by exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services.

WALSH, Geoffrey, Brigadier, CBE, DSO - Commander, Order of Orange-Nassau with Swords (Netherlands) - awarded as per Canada Gazette dated 22 March 1947 and Canadian Army Order 12/47 dated 31 March 1947.  

Internet: http://www.armycadethistory.com/biography_LGen_Walsh.htm.